The Complete Persepolis
Here, in one volume: Marjane Satrapi's best-selling, internationally acclaimed graphic memoir.Persepolis is the story of Satrapi's unforgettable childhood and coming of age within a large and loving family in Tehran during the Islamic Revolution; of the contradictions between private life and public life in a country plagued by political upheaval; of her high school years in Vienna facing the trials of adolescence far from her family; of her homecoming--both sweet and terrible; and, finally, of her self-imposed exile from her beloved homeland. It is the chronicle of a girlhood and adolescence at once outrageous and familiar, a young life entwined with the history of her country yet filled with the universal trials and joys of growing up.Edgy, searingly observant, and candid, often heartbreaking but threaded throughout with raw humor and hard-earned wisdom--Persepolis is a stunning work from one of the most highly regarded, singularly talented graphic artists at work today.

The Complete Persepolis Details

TitleThe Complete Persepolis
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseOct 30th, 2007
PublisherPantheon Books
ISBN-139780375714832
Rating
GenreSequential Art, Graphic Novels, Comics, Nonfiction, Autobiography, Memoir, Biography

The Complete Persepolis Review

  • Patrick
    January 1, 1970
    I sat down to read a little of this during lunch, and ended up sitting in the restaurant for an hour after I was done eating. Eventually I felt guilty and left, but my plans were shot for the afternoon, as all I could think about was finishing this book. I wish there were some mechanism on Goodreads to occasionally give a book more than five stars. Something to indicate when you think a book is more than merely excellent. Like for every 100 books you review, you earn the right to give one six-st I sat down to read a little of this during lunch, and ended up sitting in the restaurant for an hour after I was done eating. Eventually I felt guilty and left, but my plans were shot for the afternoon, as all I could think about was finishing this book. I wish there were some mechanism on Goodreads to occasionally give a book more than five stars. Something to indicate when you think a book is more than merely excellent. Like for every 100 books you review, you earn the right to give one six-star review. If such a mechanism were in place, I'd use my six-star review on this graphic novel. It was lovely and clear. It had a strong emotional impact, without being sugary or uncomfortable. It was eye-opening without being preachy or didactic. I read the whole thing in less than three hours, and I can honestly say I am better for the experience.
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  • Alejandro
    January 1, 1970
    A masterpiece of graphic novels This edition as the name indicates, collects the complete run of “Persepolis”.Creative Team:Creator, Writer & Illustrator: Marjane Satrapi REVOLUTIONARY WORK I remember the days when we traveled around Europe, it was enough to carry an Iranian passport. They rolled out the red carpet. We were rich before. Now as soon as they learn our nationality, they go through everything, as though we were all terrorists. They treat us as though we have the plague. Persep A masterpiece of graphic novels This edition as the name indicates, collects the complete run of “Persepolis”.Creative Team:Creator, Writer & Illustrator: Marjane Satrapi REVOLUTIONARY WORK I remember the days when we traveled around Europe, it was enough to carry an Iranian passport. They rolled out the red carpet. We were rich before. Now as soon as they learn our nationality, they go through everything, as though we were all terrorists. They treat us as though we have the plague. Persepolis is the masterpiece by Marjane Satrapi, a pseudo-biographical work, illustrating her life since 10 years old (1980) until 24 years old (1994), where she experienced her coming-to-life, in her native Iran, during the Islamic Revolution and the war with Iraq, along with four years in Europe, and her return to Iran again.In this graphic novel you will witness many of the convoluted events happening during the decade of the 80s in the Middle East, from the point of view of a brave girl that was living at the heart of the incidents.Marjane is able to present each topic that she wants to expose in titled parts where you learn about relevant facts of Iranian’s society, its past, its present and its future.However, what makes unique Persepolis is the brilliant approach by Marjane Satrapi of those events, since while she is fearless to show the brutal side, she is also honest in showing her failures and doubts during growing up, and even she goes to the funny side of life.Since it’s impossible for any human being to live in constant stressed status, people need to breath, to liberate the weight of their risky existence in many different ways.People needs to smile, not matter where they live. They need to live.And Marjane knows that.Therefore, she masterfully is able to tell her lifestory, full of political episodes and social chapters, but always adding humoristic elements with taste and without ridiculing the seriousness and gravity of the situations.Anybody can tell a tragedy but……a dramedy requires talent, tact and wit.Brace yourself and meet Persepolis.
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  • Mohammed Arabey
    January 1, 1970
    ألا يسقط يسقط الانقلابات العسكرية التي تنقلب لفاشية ديكتاتورية؟ألا يسقط يسقط الأنقلابات الملزقة بالأسلام "الأديان" التي تنقلب لفاشية ديكتاتورية؟ألا تسقط تسقط الفاشية الديكتاتورية؟هذا كان حال مرجان سترابي، فتاة صغيرة من أيران في 1979 وقصة عائلتهاوهي تتعلم تاريخ انقلاب الخمسينات..صعود الشاه..ثم ثورة الحرية العدالة الاجتماعية التي تحولت الي ثورة"إسلامية" ثم حكم فاشي ديكتاتوري"الثـورة الإيرانيـة"لماذا كل هذا يبدو متشابها؟ لماذا اشعر بكل هذا الديجا فو؟التاريخ فعلا له وسائله المعقدة ليعيد نفسه...في اي ألا يسقط يسقط الانقلابات العسكرية التي تنقلب لفاشية ديكتاتورية؟ألا يسقط يسقط الأنقلابات الملزقة بالأسلام "الأديان" التي تنقلب لفاشية ديكتاتورية؟ألا تسقط تسقط الفاشية الديكتاتورية؟هذا كان حال مرجان سترابي، فتاة صغيرة من أيران في 1979 وقصة عائلتهاوهي تتعلم تاريخ انقلاب الخمسينات..صعود الشاه..ثم ثورة الحرية العدالة الاجتماعية التي تحولت الي ثورة"إسلامية" ثم حكم فاشي ديكتاتوري"الثـورة الإيرانيـة"لماذا كل هذا يبدو متشابها؟ لماذا اشعر بكل هذا الديجا فو؟التاريخ فعلا له وسائله المعقدة ليعيد نفسه...في اي مكانهو كتاب جبته صدفة رمضان الماضي..شدني غلافه واعلم انه شهيرا..لأكتشف انه كوميكس بعد ان اشتريتهولأكتشف انه كوميكس بسيط للغاية..ايراني الاصل ..ايراني القصة..ايراني الطابع والتاريخلا ترفع توقعاتك عاليا..فهي أبسط أشكال الكوميكس، ومع ذلك الحكاية كأقوي اشكال الروايات الميلودراميةهل تعلم لماذا؟لأنه قصة حياة حقيقيةذكرتني كثيرا بمسلسل "ذات" -المسلسل نفسه اكثر من الرواية المبني عليها- والذي يحكي حكاية بنت من مصر من ميلادها بثورة يوليو 1952 وحتي ثورة 25 يناير2011 -والتي لم يعلم أحد وقتها إلي ما ستؤول عليهريفيو رواية ومسلسل ذاتوالكتاب علي جزئينقصة طفولة، حكاية مورجان سترابي، فتاة إيرانية من عائلة كبيرة لم تتم العاشرة عندما اشتعلت الثورة الإيرانية الشهيرة في 1979 وحتي 1984.. تشهد ثورة بلادها ضد الظلم والحكم الاستبدادي الذي بدأ بانقلاب في الخمسينات، ليتم سرقتها و إلصاق إسم الدين عليها ليبدأ عهد جديد اكثر استبدادا،تطرفا وقسوةوقصة عودة، من الثمانيانت وحتي أوائل التسعينات إبان حرب العراق والكويت.. حيث نتابع تحول الفتاة اثناء دراستها بالخارج إلى مراهقة ثم شابة في رحلة ذهاب للبحث عن النفس...وعودة مرة أخري الي ايران في التسعينات..وقت حرب الخليجبالرغم من قوة الجزء الأول رغم إنتقال احداثه من الماضي"قبل الثورة" للحاضر"بعد الثورة" في أوله، إلا أن انخفض تقييمي بنقطة لتداعيات الجزء الثاني، فجزء العودة كان متخبطا الي حد كبير-سواء الحبكة او الحياة عاما ولكن لنر كل جزء علي حدة----------الجزء الأول: قصة طفولة مورجان سترابي من عائلة متحررة الي حد كبير، ليس الأمر شاذا هنا… ففي إيران الستينات والسبعينات رغم القمع العسكري من شاه إيران إلا ان التشدد لم يبلغ ماحدث بعد الثورة ال-استغفر الله العظيم-الاسلاميةفتاة بأحلام الطفولة البريئة ظنت انها عندما تكبر يمكنها ان تكون "رسولة" تنشر رسالة الخير والمساواة والعدالة الإجتماعية لمن حولها، مبنية علي ثقافات بلدها وفلسفة رازدشتكونها من عائلة مثقفة وواعية وميسورة الحال جعلها تعرف الكثير عن تاريخ إيران وحروبها مع العرب والمغول، انقلاب الخمسينات وطغيان الشاه...ظنت عندما وجدت ثورة 79 إنه قد يتحقق فعلا المساواة والعدالة الإجتماعية لتكتشف مدي خداع احلامها الطفوليةمن خلال حوالي 20 فصلا ستري قصص أسرية، ثورية، أجزاء كبيرة من شكل الحياة الايرانية قبل وبعد الثورة.. إقحام الدين في الاستبداد والحروب وقتل القاصرين في الصفوف الأمامية في الحروب...لمحات من تاريخ إيران ونقاط التحول السياسية بهاوكيف تم تشويه الدين عن طريق السياسة والأطماعستري أيضا الانبهار المعتاد بالثقافة الغربية والأغاني الأجنبية، مايكل جاكسون وفرقة آبا بطريقة أعتقد شبيهة جدا لفترة السبعينات في مصر..فمن من اهلنا لا يعرف خوليو اجلاسياس أو ديميس روسوس او حتي فيلم جون ترافولتا الراقص وبروس لي ملك الترسو الاجنبي؟ولكنك ستجد كيف صار الحصول علي أشياء كهذه في ايران جريمة عقابها الجلداعجبني جدا البراءة، لم يعجبني بعض التصرفات -كبدء التدخين مثلا- ولكنها كانت واقعية بالطبعهناك جزء شعرت إنه مقحم عن عائلة يهودية بمجرد ظهورهما وانت تدرك انه لغرض -التنوع- فحسب...وأن الجميع يعاني في حالة الحكم الاستبدادي وويلات الحروبلكني لم أمانع وجوده كثيرا بعكس تنوع ما بالجزء الثانيالجميل في الأمر هو اسماء الفصول التي احيانا ما تكون شيئا عابرا في الفصل ولكن له رمز ما..أعجبني جدا استخدام الاسماء وبالطبع لا تنس ان اهمه الفصل الاول "الخمار" والذي سيتكرر في الجزء الثانيولعل أكثر ما جعلني أمنح هذا الجزء 5 نجوم كاملة هو جمال علاقة الوالدين مع مورجان، وحكاياتها مع جدتهاولحظة سفرها للنمسا وتوديعها لوالديها أكثر ما أثر بي بشدة----------الجزء الثاني : قصة عودة عند نشر الكتاب لاول مرة تم نشره علي 4 اجزاء، قصة عودة مكونة من جزئين ايضا ولنرالنصف الأول مورجان وتحولها من فتاة في الرابعة عشر الي السادسة عشر...عامان في الخارج تحاول تحقيق نفسها،استكمال تعليمها في بلد يتيح لها التنفس ورغم طبيعتها المتمردة إلا انها ستحاول رغم صعوبات أخري قد تكون مختلفة شكلا ولكنها تكاد تكون متشابهة مضمونااجمل ما بهذا "النصف" هو محاولاتها التأقلم وطبيعة مورجان التي ستصير محببة بسبب معايشتك لها بالجزء الاولزيارة الأم هي اجمل ما بالجزء الثاني بأكمله، شعور -مرور الزمن، التحول من الطفولة لعالم البالغين وإن كنت هنا ستجد ان إصرار المؤلفة علي تقديم شخصيات متنوعة بالرواية تحول الي اقحام حقيقي ، فقد استفحل لدرجة تقديم شخصيات مثلية الجنس بلا اي مبرر وان تتقبلهم الام ايضا بسهولةأصعب ما بهذا الجزء هو ما بعد السادسة عشر، المراهقة والتخبط وانعدام الهوية...وإن كان مؤلما في متابعته إلا انني اري انه مازال واقعيا جدافعلاأن أكتشافك لذاتك هو ماقد يحررك...ان تفهم نفسك وتتقبلها هو ما سيساعدك علي النجاحوقد استغرقت تلك المعرفة وقتا طويلا لمورجان لمعرفتهااما النصف الثاني فهو أواخر شهور مورجان في الخارج إنتهاءا بفصل مسمي بعبقرية "الخمار"، متبوعا بفصول عودتها الي إيران في سن الشباب لتشهد التغيرات -للاصعب- ببلدهالتكمل دراستها الأكاديمية بالفن...والبحث عن الذات والهوية...في ظل هرمونات الارتباط في مجتمع متشدد لا يخلو من الحياة الماجنة السريةهذا النصف كان الأسوأ بالنسبة لي، وأعتقد انه يتطلب شجاعة بحق للاعتراف به من جانب المؤلفةهل تذكر وصفي لعائلة مورجان بالمتحررة، لم أقصد إساءة قدر ما اري ان وصف مورجان بالمنفلتة المتخبطة هو الأصلح لكل هذا النصف والذي بدأ بمنتصف هذا الجزءقد يكون وصفي هذا بسبب انني قاريء من دولة شرقية ولكن فعلا التحرر فاق الحد بالربع الاخير من الكتاب ثم بدأ التخبط والزواج و و وقلل هذا كثيرا من تعاطفي مع مورجان وإن زاد من تعاطفي مع الوالدين وتقديرهما رغم تساهلهما الشديد ولكن لا تنكر ان ظروف البلد قادرة فعلا علي تحويل التقي الي فاجر بسبب كل هذا التشدد ---------- النهايةهي قصة مورجان ساترابيوالتي بنجاح الرواية وتحويلها لفيلم سينمائي ونجاحها كمؤلفة ومخرجة بالتأكيد تعتبر نهاية جميلة للروايةفهي قصة حياتهاهي نفسهارسالة الرواية ربما إنك قد تكون ضحية مجتمع فاشي متناقض مستبدولكن أيضاً انت مسؤول عن إختياراتك...فأحسن الأختيارسعدت بالنهاية وان كنت مازلت مشفقا علي حال الوالدين...أشفقت عليهم وعلي الكثير من اهل ايران من نيران التعنت والفاشية والقمعولكنه الوطننهاية بها أمل بالتغيير الذي قد يبدأ بالنفسبالأخص عندما تعرف -من بعد أن تغلق الرواية- أنها نجحت..بدليل ان الرواية بين يديك..والفيلم نجح في حصد الجوائز من 2007شجاعة حقيقية بالتأكيد لتكتب كل هذابكل هذه الصراحة والوضوح وعدم التكلف..والاعتراف بالعيوب..والتغيير الحقيقي الذي يبدأ كما قلت بالنفسقد يكون الحرية لها عامل ولكن سوء استخدامها مدمرا بحقولكن يصعب عليك ان المجتمعات المستبد حاكمها، المتطرفة فعلا لا تصلح للإبداع، تحقيق الذاتلا تصلح للرخاءلا تصلح للعيشلا تصلح للكرامة لا تصلح للعدالة الإجتماعيةألا يسقط يسقط….؟أبدأ بنفسكمحمد العربيمن 20 يوليو 2016الي 22 يوليو 2016
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  • Alienor ✘ French Frowner ✘
    January 1, 1970
    ~Full review ~ 4.5 starsThings I didn't know before : The Complete Persepolis was originally written in French. Way to feel dumb as shit in the (French) bookstore, I assure you. Things I know now : Marjane Satrapi, as a French-Iranian, can't enter the US now. But hey, it's for your "security", all that shit.****** I just learned that French-Iranian had been authorized to go to the US with a Visa.Favorite quote from the whole collection : "As time passed, I grew increasingly aware of the contras ~Full review ~ 4.5 starsThings I didn't know before : The Complete Persepolis was originally written in French. Way to feel dumb as shit in the (French) bookstore, I assure you. Things I know now : Marjane Satrapi, as a French-Iranian, can't enter the US now. But hey, it's for your "security", all that shit.****** I just learned that French-Iranian had been authorized to go to the US with a Visa.Favorite quote from the whole collection : "As time passed, I grew increasingly aware of the contrast between the official representation of my country and people's real lives, what happened behind doors" (approximate translation by me, I don't own the English version to check)... because we're at the core of what makes The Complete Persepolis so interesting and, I'll say it, indispensable. For me, the strength of Marjane Satrapi's graphic-novel relies on the insight it offers the reader : where more classic nonfiction books can easily end up as mere juxtapositions of historical events (which is often boring, okay?), The Complete Persepolis successfully breaks the codes by combining Iran's History with Marjane Satrapi's experience. I, for one, believe that we need this kind of insight just as much as history books, because as I said in my review of Rooftops of Tehran, it's way too easy to dehumanize people we know nothing about, to forget the much real people living in the countries that our leaders target. This is what I mean when I say that there's nothing political anymore in strongly disagreeing with Trump's decisions, especially when it comes to Muslims. At this point, it's not about agreeing on reducing taxes for the rich in order to avoid flight of capital, it's about acknowledging that everything in Western culture participates in feeding our prejudices. Really it's about acknowledging that these prejudices are real and that it's an everyday, conscious work to fight against them. What fighting prejudices does not mean : It doesn't mean agreeing with everything. It doesn't mean, oh my god, erasing western culture** - and that concept, loved and spread by so many of far right voters is so fucking ridiculous given the fact that we have controlled the narrative for so long, it's not even funny. The "great replacement" so dearly loved by FN voters is merely another way for them to express their islamophobia and show their lack of basic education. Forget me with this shit. ** I'm using "western culture" as a generalization here - I don't believe that all western countries share the *same* culture, far from it. What fighting prejudices means : it means accepting that different experiences are just as much valid. It means educating yourself, reading about and from people from different cultures. It means rejecting any attempt of categorizing cultures as being good or evil as a whole. It means a lot of listening and maybe less talking. Trust me, I very much include myself when I say that we have to educate ourselves. The truth is, I have a shit tons of biases. I'm desperately secular, hopelessly Cartesian and very much on the Left spectrum. I've beneficed from my white privilege my whole life. I'm a straight, abled woman from Europe. I will never understand religion - I am interested in religions, but it's not the same thing and it never will. As far as I'm concerned, though, people can believe what they want as long as they don't try to convince me that I should believe and live my life according to thus beliefs. And just to be clear, right now the intolerant people who are being vocals about condemning abortion or LGBTQIA rights in my country are very much Christians. Nobody asks you to change what you are, but to accept that others aren't the same.Am I going to screw up and fail to notice hurtful contents in the books I read? Probably, unfortunately. Yet I think that in the end, what baffles me and makes me so sad and so angry is the fact that so many people genuinely do not want to listen, learn and do better. Everything starts with education, and I'm not saying this because I'm a teacher. Nobody should ever forget that "[we] know one thing; that [we] know nothing".For more of my reviews, please visit:
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  • Manny
    January 1, 1970
    Visiting Spain for a conference earlier this month, I impulsively decided to do something about my almost non-existent Spanish. I began by reading the Spanish edition of Le petit prince, which got me started nicely. Now I wanted to try something harder. I had in fact read Persepolis in French not long after it came out, but I remembered very little of it; this would be a proper test of whether I had actually learned anything. I was pleased to find that I could read it! I'm still having to guess Visiting Spain for a conference earlier this month, I impulsively decided to do something about my almost non-existent Spanish. I began by reading the Spanish edition of Le petit prince, which got me started nicely. Now I wanted to try something harder. I had in fact read Persepolis in French not long after it came out, but I remembered very little of it; this would be a proper test of whether I had actually learned anything. I was pleased to find that I could read it! I'm still having to guess a lot of words, and every now and then I found a sentence that made no sense at all, but I could follow the story without difficulties. The thing which surprised me most was that I found I liked the book better in Spanish than I had in French. After a while, I figured out why: my very uncertain language skills forced me to look carefully at all the pictures, and I realized that I hadn't properly appreciated them first time round. I'd read the book pretty much in one sitting, which didn't do it justice. This time, I gave the graphical aspects the attention they deserved.But dammit, forget the Spanish and the artwork: it's still the story that wins. Her horror and indignation over the dreadful Iranian republic are so powerfully expressed. There's one episode in particular that I can't get out of my head. She's been characteristically loudmouthed at school. The teachers call her parents, and they tell her very seriously that she must be more careful. Does she know what had happened to the teenage daughter of the man they knew who made false passports?Marji looks at them.Well, say her parents, they arrested her. And they sentenced her to death. But, according to Iranian law, one may not put a virgin to death. So she was forcibly married to one of the revolutionary guards, and he deflowered her. And then they could shoot her. But, again according to Iranian law, the groom must give the bride a dowry, and if she is dead he must give it to her parents. So the next day, a representative of the revolutionary guard called on them. And he gave them fifty tumanes - about five dollars. That was the price for her virginity and her life.I'm sorry, says Marji, stunned. I didn't know.The truly terrifying thing is that the tone, throughout most of the book, is one of amused irony. As she says in another very powerful passage, when she meets a friend who's been horribly mutilated after serving in the war with Iraq, you can only complain up to a certain point, when the pain is still bearable. After that it makes no sense any more. All you can do is laugh.
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  • Rowena
    January 1, 1970
    This was brilliant: a graphic novel depicting the coming-of-age of a young Iranian girl living in Iran during the Islamic Revolution, who is eventually sent to live in Austria for 4 years for her safety. It shows the horrors of living in a war-torn nation, as well as how terrifying it must be to live in a country run by religious fundamentalists/fanatics. The Muslim leaders recruited 14 year old boys in the war effort, closed down schools, targeted intelligent people and women wearing jeans and This was brilliant: a graphic novel depicting the coming-of-age of a young Iranian girl living in Iran during the Islamic Revolution, who is eventually sent to live in Austria for 4 years for her safety. It shows the horrors of living in a war-torn nation, as well as how terrifying it must be to live in a country run by religious fundamentalists/fanatics. The Muslim leaders recruited 14 year old boys in the war effort, closed down schools, targeted intelligent people and women wearing jeans and nail polish...As a woman, the sexist views of the Islamists made me angry. One panel shows an Islamist on television saying "Women's hair emanates rays that excite men. That's why women should cover their hair." If that isn't the most ridiculous thing I have ever heard :/This was a very raw and candid portrayal of life. Satrapi didn't really try to sugarcoat anything. I liked the precocious child, Marji, who was trying to understand the world that was going on around her and wasn't scared of questioning the hypocrisies she witnessed. And her self-realization as she tried to determine her identity in Austria and when she went back to Iran and was perceived as an outsider and a worldly woman also held my attention.It made me think of people,especially children, living in other war-torn places such as Syria, what must they be going through everyday? What must they be witnessing? Torture, death etc? How can someone get over that? Definitely a must-read for everyone.Disclaimer: This book isn't anti-Islam, it's anti-fundamentalist. Satrapi mentioned how fundamentalists in every religion are dangerous, and I wholeheartedly agree.
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  • Mia Nauca
    January 1, 1970
    Hace poco leí el cuento de la criada y me pareció un libro de distopía inconcebible en la actualidad. Sin embargo, leer Persépolis me ha abierto muchísimo la mente, para una mujer occidental es fácil olvidar la realidad que se vive en los países como Irán e Iraq que están sometidos a regímenes religiosos extremistas donde las mujeres no tienen ningún derecho. Ni siquiera pueden correr en público, maquillarse, enseñar los tobillos o las muñecas... es que es tan surreal para mi pensar que eso pasa Hace poco leí el cuento de la criada y me pareció un libro de distopía inconcebible en la actualidad. Sin embargo, leer Persépolis me ha abierto muchísimo la mente, para una mujer occidental es fácil olvidar la realidad que se vive en los países como Irán e Iraq que están sometidos a regímenes religiosos extremistas donde las mujeres no tienen ningún derecho. Ni siquiera pueden correr en público, maquillarse, enseñar los tobillos o las muñecas... es que es tan surreal para mi pensar que eso pasa en el 2017. Pero hay muchas personas que se rebelan contra el sistema, mucha gente que no esta de acuerdo y que hace una diferencia. Que importante es leer este libro amigos que en forma de novela gráfica se pasa volando.
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  • Marpapad
    January 1, 1970
    Persepolis is a truly amazing graphic novel....
  • Emily May
    January 1, 1970
    I keep promising to write a full review for this but never get around to it. Basically, I read Persepolis for my Gendered Communities course and I think it's one of those rare reads that actually gets better when you study it for the historical, cultural and political context. There are depressingly few Middle Eastern women whose books are read on a large scale so the insight which Persepolis offers into this part of Iran's history is very important. It offers a perspective we don't get to see t I keep promising to write a full review for this but never get around to it. Basically, I read Persepolis for my Gendered Communities course and I think it's one of those rare reads that actually gets better when you study it for the historical, cultural and political context. There are depressingly few Middle Eastern women whose books are read on a large scale so the insight which Persepolis offers into this part of Iran's history is very important. It offers a perspective we don't get to see too often.
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  • Casey
    January 1, 1970
    Ugh. I am deeply ambivalent. First, I found the political side fascinating. If you're interested in Iran's history, the graphic novel format is really accessible. However, I really disliked Marjane. I feel a little guilty about this, as she's a real person. While she and her family were proud that she was outspoken, I found her rude and obnoxious. They believed she was raised to be "free." I certainly appreciate their hugely liberal views in such a repressive environment, but their version of "f Ugh. I am deeply ambivalent. First, I found the political side fascinating. If you're interested in Iran's history, the graphic novel format is really accessible. However, I really disliked Marjane. I feel a little guilty about this, as she's a real person. While she and her family were proud that she was outspoken, I found her rude and obnoxious. They believed she was raised to be "free." I certainly appreciate their hugely liberal views in such a repressive environment, but their version of "free" felt more like "offensive" and "disrespectful" and "tactless." There are so many instances in this book where Marjane faces conflict, and instead of sticking up for herself in a decent manner, she resorts to calling people prostitutes or bitches or whatever. I never thought I'd be one to criticize profanity or being up-front, but I found that they made Marjane very unsavory.
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  • Aubrey
    January 1, 1970
    4.5/5My first memories of Iraq and Iran consist of mixing the names up, having nothing more than the vague knowledge from television talkers that someone was fighting someone and we, the United States, were fighting everyone. Persia was where my best friend in first grade was from, a place she once told me didn't exist anymore before she changed schools in third grade and we completely lost contact with each other. The intervening years between then and now filled up with reports of war and terr 4.5/5My first memories of Iraq and Iran consist of mixing the names up, having nothing more than the vague knowledge from television talkers that someone was fighting someone and we, the United States, were fighting everyone. Persia was where my best friend in first grade was from, a place she once told me didn't exist anymore before she changed schools in third grade and we completely lost contact with each other. The intervening years between then and now filled up with reports of war and terrorism and an overwhelming fear mongering, leaving me with the feeling I was being force fed bullshit at such an insidious level that I couldn't even trust myself to seek out the least poisoned method of discovering the other side of the story. Since upgrading the status of literature in my life from hobby to livelihood, I've had more time to get down to the bottom of Introduction to Iran 101 - Autodidact Style entry on the neverending Lit bucket list, and I have to say, I can't imagine a better way than this book.Graphic novel, really, but with Watchmen on the 1001 Books to Read Before You Die list and The Complete Maus regularly touted as a modern classic, the faster the academic niches of capital L Literature come to terms with the more than capable qualities of the Graphic Novel in terms of Meaning and Importance and yadda yadda yadda, the better. Three hundred years ago it was the novel in Europe, two millenia ago it was the writing things down in general in Greece,, and really, if you can find a memoir that is erudite as it is hilarious as it is heartbreaking as it is politically conscious in a social justice manner as it is life affirming as it is of a country that has for decades been horrendously misconstrued six ways to Sunday by the United States as this one, please, let me know. Member of the Guardians of the Revolution (MGR): Madam, why were you running?Marjane: I'm very late! I was running to catch my bus.MGR: Yes..but...when you run, your behind makes movements that are...how do you say...obscene!Marjane: WELL THEN DON'T LOOK AT MY ASS!I yelled so loudly that they didn't even arrest me. One of the first popular conceptions that comes to my mind when I think on Iran is how bad the women in that country have it. Now, the Wikipedia page for Rape culture states: According to Michael Parenti, rape culture manifests through the acceptance of rapes as an everyday occurrence, and even a male prerogative. It can be exacerbated by police apathy in handling rape cases, as well as victim blaming, reluctance by the authorities to go against patriarchial cultural norms, as well as fears of stigmatization from rape victims and their families. That description is the United States, complete with dress codes, lack of sexual education regarding consent, incidents such as Steubenville and statistics such as 1 in 5 women in universities have been raped at some point during their enrollment. This commentary has nothing to do xenophobia of the civilized countries of the so called West, or with Iran consisting of all kinds of people worn down by death and fear and love of their homeland and culture being controlled by Persian fundamentalists, or the CIA's involvement in taking down countries so as to slake the US's lust for oil, or the fundamental differences between Iran and Iraq and Kuwait and all those other countries media crews love to lump together and poke at, but it does have to do with my basis for relating with Marjane and her growth from child to adult. In comparison to the big picture of her story, it's not much, but it is enough to get me off my commonly accepted high horse of US superiority and start listening. Marjane: 'I don't want to leave the country right away.'Reza: 'It's because you are still nostalgic. You'll see, a year from now people will disgust you. Always interfering in things that don't concern them.'Marjane: 'Maybe so, but in the West you can collapse in the street and no one will give you a hand.' It's a crying shame that it took me this long to read a work that wonderfully cuts to the heart of that vague sensationalism that is the US's treatment of the Middle East. It's an even greater shame that this sort of work is a rare breed in the field of public perception. However, while it may have taken me the length of my own path from childhood to adulthood to experience a good introduction to the reality of things, a start in the right direction is a start.
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  • Nandakishore Varma
    January 1, 1970
    Books such as this and The Complete Maus remind us how powerful the medium of "comics" is. It is not all Walt Disney and Tom and Jerry, folks.
  • Sara
    January 1, 1970
    One of the things I loved about this book was Marjane's very individual voice and how it transformed from the start of the book when she is 10 to the end, when she is 22. Ten-year-old Marjane, by the way, is about the most awesome kid I have encountered in print. She reminded me of Harper Lee's Scout, except Marjane was cuter and more hilarious. Also, more political.Most readers are unlikely to be really conversant in 20th Iranian political history and it is absolutely fascinating to be introduc One of the things I loved about this book was Marjane's very individual voice and how it transformed from the start of the book when she is 10 to the end, when she is 22. Ten-year-old Marjane, by the way, is about the most awesome kid I have encountered in print. She reminded me of Harper Lee's Scout, except Marjane was cuter and more hilarious. Also, more political.Most readers are unlikely to be really conversant in 20th Iranian political history and it is absolutely fascinating to be introduced to the topic through the eyes of an impressionable child, an emotional teenager and a jaded young adult. Marjane tells her story in an intense, honest, funny and heartbreaking fashion.The style of art is beautiful and everything is drawn in a kind of a kooky way. I though that the style reinforced that this whole story comes from one young person's distinct point of view. As in all graphic novels, the images are just as potent, if not more, than the plot itself and this is no exception."Persepolis" is the best book I can think of to introduce the uninitiated to the world of graphic novels. The subject matter is the polar opposite of the superhero comic stereotype and the intense, skillful storytelling will captivate even the mots doubting reader.I adored it.
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  • Sercan Vatansever
    January 1, 1970
    İdeolojik yapının nasıl değiştirilebileceğini, bir ülkede yönetimi halkın hiçbir şeye karışmasına fırsat vermeden sadece devlete bırakmanın ne demek olduğunu, erkek egemen toplumun insan hayatına karışmasının sonucunda nelerin kısıtlanacağını, bu kısıtlamalar doğrultusunda sanatın nasıl yok olacağını, din diye tutturup dini en çok suistimal edenlerin pisliklerini ve din ile toplumun nasıl uyutulabileceğini, başkalarının düşüncelerine, yaşam biçimine ve tercihlerine saygının ne kadar önemli olduğ İdeolojik yapının nasıl değiştirilebileceğini, bir ülkede yönetimi halkın hiçbir şeye karışmasına fırsat vermeden sadece devlete bırakmanın ne demek olduğunu, erkek egemen toplumun insan hayatına karışmasının sonucunda nelerin kısıtlanacağını, bu kısıtlamalar doğrultusunda sanatın nasıl yok olacağını, din diye tutturup dini en çok suistimal edenlerin pisliklerini ve din ile toplumun nasıl uyutulabileceğini, başkalarının düşüncelerine, yaşam biçimine ve tercihlerine saygının ne kadar önemli olduğunu iyi bilen İran halkının, İranlı Marjene'nin romanı... Ne yazık ki çoğu açıdan Türkiye'nin romanı. Tüm bunların yanı sıra batının o ahlak yozlaşmasına da mükemmel değinir. Hele bunu son derece geleneksel bir toplumdan gelen Marji'den seyretmek, 'bizi' görmemi sağladı. Yazar bununla amacının kendi ülkesini veya dinini kötülemek olmadığını net bir şekilde gösteriyor. Zaten kendisinin de dediği gibi, Marjane İran'ı seviyor. Bu noktada kendime geliyorum; Çoğu kez söylenirim 'Türkiye'den nefret ediyorum!' diye. Sonrasında da hep aynı şeyler dolaşır zihnimde 'Kendini kandırma! Sen Türkiye'den değil, baştakilerin zihniyetinden ve bu zihniyet doğrultusunda değişen fikirlerden nefret ediyorsun.' diye. Öyledir de... O yüzden, şu an bu raddede değiliz belki de ama, çok şey buldum kendimden bu kitapta.Değindiği konular vs. her şey bir yana olaylara verilen tepkiler, düşünceler çok bizden. Savaşın etkileri... savaşta din, dil, renk gözetilemeyeceğine de değiniyor. Ve tüm bunları yaparken o esprili dilinden de bir şey kaybetmiyor.Bazı kesimlere ağır gelecek, Tunus'ta filminin televizyonlarda yayımlanmasından ötürü radikal İslamcı kesimin günlerce ayaklanmasına, içlerindeki nefreti şiddetle (her zamanki gibi) kusmalarına sebebiyet verecek kadar gerçek, İran'da baskısı yapılamayacak kadar sert, bazı resimlerini paylaşsam bana dinsiz yaftası yapıştırılarak hakaretler edilecek kadar da doğru bir kitap.Mutlaka hayatınızdan geçsin.
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  • Carlos De Eguiluz
    January 1, 1970
    Marjane Satrapi nos cuenta su historia en "Persepolis", una poderosa autobiografía que transmite diversas y profundas emociones; nos introduce a un escenario caótico y dramático pero aún pudiendo tornar su obra depresiva y desolada, evita la victimización por medio del humor y algunas veces, el sarcasmo. Nos narra su perspectiva, y también su ideología que evoluciona constante y progresivamente conforme se avanza en la lectura.La historia se divide en cuatro partes; la primera nos narra sus años Marjane Satrapi nos cuenta su historia en "Persepolis", una poderosa autobiografía que transmite diversas y profundas emociones; nos introduce a un escenario caótico y dramático pero aún pudiendo tornar su obra depresiva y desolada, evita la victimización por medio del humor y algunas veces, el sarcasmo. Nos narra su perspectiva, y también su ideología que evoluciona constante y progresivamente conforme se avanza en la lectura.La historia se divide en cuatro partes; la primera nos narra sus años ingenuos e infantes, en los que sus pensamientos son los de una niña dividida entre dos mundos: el que le exponen sus padres liberales y el que le presenta su escuela y su religión. La segunda, nos introduce en su pensamiento influenciado por algunas lecturas, el paso del tiempo y la complejidad que su ambiente representaba. La tercera, su vida fuera de su entorno conocido y su constante necesidad de encajar dada su falta de identidad; que se ve influenciada por el movimiento punk. Finalmente llegamos a la cuarta y una de las dos mejores partes, donde nos encontramos a una mujer completa en busca de la emancipación y la libertad."Persepolis" es perfecta, pues llega a enseñarnos mucho en muy poco. Expone la censura, el machismo y la opresión en la Irán durante el tiempo de los Guardianes de la Revolución.Sin duda alguna, un libro esencial para aquellos que pretenden expandir su mente y aprender sobre temas realmente importantes.Personalmente, de lo mejor de mi año. Y eso que he leído cosas demasiado buenas.1)"Quería ser la justicia, el amor y la cólera de Dios.""La revolución es cómo una bicicleta; cuando las ruedas dejan de moverse, se cae.""Para despertarme, me compraron libros.""Para que una revolución triunfe, todo el pueblo debe estar implicado.""Me repugna que la gente esté condenada a un destino oscuro sólo por su clase social.""Ha salido la gente cargando el cuerpo de un hombre joven al que había matado el ejército. Lo aclamaban como a un mártir.""Entonces me di cuenta de que no sabía nada. Leí todos los libros que pude.""El motivo de mi verguenza y la revolución es el mismo: la diferencia de clase social.""La poítica no se mezcla con los sentimientos.""¡La libertad tiene un precio!""Hacer justicia no es cosa tuya ni mía, diría, incluso, que hay que saber perdonar.""A veces es duro aceptar la verdad.Nadie acepta la verdad.""Al llegar la noche tenía un diabólico sentimiento de poder... Pero no duró mucho. Resultaba agobiante.""La gente mala es peligrosa, pero también lo es perdonarles.""La justicia es la base de la democracia. Los hombres deben de ser iguales ante los ojos de la ley.""La memoria de la familia no debe perderse. Aunque no sea fácil para ti, aunque no lo entiendas todo."2)"Rápidamente la manera de vestir se convirtió en una cuestión ideológica.""No sólo había cambiado el gobierno. La gente también cambiaba.""¡Como mujer, es ahora cuando debe aprender a defender sus derechos!""¡Bombas, cohetes y cañones no cambiarán nuestras opiniones!""La guerra siempre te coge desprevenido.""—¿No tienes juguetes?—No, ya soy mayor. Tengo libros.""Cualquier pretexto era bueno para reírse.""—Si los pelos son tan excitantes como dice, ¡¿Por qué no se depila el bigote?!""Después de las bombas y del miedo instintivo a la muerte, recuperas la razón. Piensas en las víctimas y te invade otro tipo de angustia.""A pesar de todo, los jóvenes seguían la moda a riesgo de ser arrestados.""Morir como mártir es inyectar sangre en las venas de la sociedad.""No existe grito en el mundo que hubiera podido aliviar el sufrimiento y la cólera que sentía.""—En la vida encontrarás a muchos imbéciles. Si te hieren, piensa que es su estupidez la que les empuja a hacerte daño. Así evitaras responder a su maldad. Porque no hay nada peor en el mundo que el rencor y la venganza... mantén siempre tu dignidad, tu integridad y la fidelidad a ti misma.""No hay nada más triste que las despedidas. Son un poco como la muerte."3)"Para educarme, era preciso que entendiera todo. Empezado por mí: yo, Marji, como mujer.""Antes de orinar como un hombre tenía que convertirme en una mujer liberada y emancipada.""Todas las religiones tienen sus extremistas.""Leer no era suficiente. Aún me faltaba mucho para integrarme.""—La vida es sufrimiento. Todo es la nada, por lo tanto, la vida es la nada. Cuando un hombre toma conciencia de este vacío, sólo puede vivir como los gusanos, inventando juegos de dirigentes dirigidos para olvidar su fragilidad.""Cuanto más esfuerzos hacía para integrarme, más tenía la impresión de estar alejándome de mi cultura, de estar traicionando a mis padres y a mis raíces, de entrar en un juego que no era el mío.""Quería olvidarlo todo, hacer desaparecer mi pasado, pero mi subconsciente me tenía atrapada.""En tiempo de guerra no sirve de nada construir.""Ahora hace falta que hagas un esfuerzo, que llegues a ser alguien. Me da igual lo que acabes haciendo, sólo procura ser la mejor. Aunque seas bailarina en un cabaret, siempre es mejor bailar en el lido que en un tugurio.""Le di mi palabra pero era demasiado joven para mantenerla. Este amor casto me frustró más de lo que me ayudó. Quería amar y ser amada de verdad.""Las cosas llegan siempre cuando menos las esperas. Aquello era la felicidad.""Ese lado decadente que tanto le había gustado, acabó irritándolo profundamente.""La noche trae el consuelo.""Creo que prefería ponerme en grave peligro que afrontar mi vergüenza. La vergüenza de no haberme convertido en nada, la vergüenza por no haber conseguido que mis padres estuvieran orgullosos después de tanto sacrificio. La vergüenza de haberme convertido en una mediocre nihilista.""Cogí mis cosas...Volví a ponerme el pañuelo...Y se fueron a tomar el viento mis libertades individuales y sociales..."4)"Cuando te prohiben algo, adquiere una importancia desproporcionada. Más adelante, me dí cuenta de que el hecho de maquillarse y querer vivir como occidentales era un acto de resistencia por su parte.""Uno sólo puede sentir autocompasión cuando las penas son soportables. Una vez superado ese límite, la única forma de soportar lo insoportable es reírse de ello.""En cuanto desaparecía el efecto de los comprimidos, volvía a ser consciente de mi angustia. Mi desgracia se resumía en una frase: yo no era nada. Era una occidental en Irán y una iraní en occidente. No tenía identidad alguna. Ni siquiera sabía por qué vivía.""Es muy difícil matarse con un cuchillo de fruta. Las armas blancas no eran lo mío.""Cuanto más se mostraba una mujer, más progresista y moderna era.""¿La religión defiende nuestra integridad física o simplemente se opone a la moda?""El miedo es lo que nos hace perder nuestra conciencia, también es lo que nos convierte en cobardes.""Cuando se tiene miedo, se pierde la capacidad de análisis y de reflexión. Nuestro pavor nos paraliza, por eso el miedo ha sido siempre el motor de represión de todas las dictaduras.""—¡Un artista debe desafiar la ley!""—La libertad de expresión se paga cara hoy en día.""—¡No sólo nos aplasta el gobierno, sino también el peso de nuestras tradiciones!""La libertad tenía un precio..."
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  • Doğan
    January 1, 1970
    Satrapi'nin ülkesinin geçmişini (ve bugününü) okudum. Umarım ülkemin geleceğini okumamışımdır.
  • F
    January 1, 1970
    loved this
  • Carlos.
    January 1, 1970
    Una de las mejores novelas gráficas que he leído. Pronto os hablaré más de ella en el canal, pero en resumen: me ha encantado, me he reído muchísimo y he aprendido un montón. 100% recomendada. ♥
  • Piya
    January 1, 1970
    "Nothing's worse than saying goodbye. It's a little like dying." My very first graphic memoir and wow… what a read ! Clever, funny and very informative .:). Marjane gives us a glimpse into the day to day life of someone living in an extremely oppressive regime, but she does it with so much humour and satire. I have so much love for her Grandma.I wish she had written a memoir too. "I have always thought that if women's hair posed so many problems, God would certainly have made us bald." Full RTC "Nothing's worse than saying goodbye. It's a little like dying." My very first graphic memoir and wow… what a read ! Clever, funny and very informative .:). Marjane gives us a glimpse into the day to day life of someone living in an extremely oppressive regime, but she does it with so much humour and satire. I have so much love for her Grandma.I wish she had written a memoir too. "I have always thought that if women's hair posed so many problems, God would certainly have made us bald." Full RTC :)
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  • Cata
    January 1, 1970
    Sem dúvida uma experiência diferente da primeira leitura. Vou ter que pensar melhor na classificação e escrever uma nova opinião. Ou revisão da opinião 1ª Opinião. *a ser revista*http://p-encadernadas.blogspot.pt/201...
  • April (Aprilius Maximus)
    January 1, 1970
    I learnt so much reading this!Around the Year in 52 Books Challenge Notes:- 41. A book about a major world event (The Islamic Revolution)
  • Matthew
    January 1, 1970
    Graphic novel was the perfect medium for this story. I am not saying I would not have enjoyed it if it had been prose, but Satrapi's words and images together drew me in right away and I flew through the story. This is another important story from a region with lots of important stories to tell. The theme is that we are all people even though we are often defined by our government, media, religion, etc. We cannot truly know who someone is without meeting them in person. It is also interesting to Graphic novel was the perfect medium for this story. I am not saying I would not have enjoyed it if it had been prose, but Satrapi's words and images together drew me in right away and I flew through the story. This is another important story from a region with lots of important stories to tell. The theme is that we are all people even though we are often defined by our government, media, religion, etc. We cannot truly know who someone is without meeting them in person. It is also interesting to see that people who we think are completely different may have more in common with us than we think. While this may not be your typical super hero, monster fighting, graphic novel - I think a wide variety of people will enjoy the story. And, you will definitely learn something new!
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  • Helen
    January 1, 1970
    Persepolis is the memoir of Marjane Satrapi, who grew up in Iran during and after the years of the Iranian Revolution in an affluent middle class family. Given the setting you would expect this graphic novel to cover some seriously heavy subject matter, which it does, but it’s also surprisingly humorous and sprinkled with many light-hearted moments. For a book that deals with such dark themes and refers to so many character deaths, there is a surprising amount of joy to be had from it. I enjoyed Persepolis is the memoir of Marjane Satrapi, who grew up in Iran during and after the years of the Iranian Revolution in an affluent middle class family. Given the setting you would expect this graphic novel to cover some seriously heavy subject matter, which it does, but it’s also surprisingly humorous and sprinkled with many light-hearted moments. For a book that deals with such dark themes and refers to so many character deaths, there is a surprising amount of joy to be had from it. I enjoyed the first part the most, as we read about the events surrounding this tumultuous time in global history from the perspective of a very young Marjane. Little Marjane is pretty much the cutest kid ever, and I love the way adult Marjane pokes fun at her child self, with her naivety, constant attention seeking and unshakeable belief that she knows best. This is the first graphic novel I’ve ever read, and now that I’ve finished I’m wondering why on Earth it took me so long to discover how awesome these are. The artwork in Persepolis is very simple with its black and white format, but the way the characters are drawn conveyed the emotion of the scene just as clearly as any page of prose. I initially assumed that reading a novel in this format would mean I missed out on a lot of the detail or ultimately felt less attached to the characters because we only get snippets of their conversations, but that wasn’t the case at all. I loved all the characters, especially Marjan’s parents and grandmother who were so supportive and inspiring, making their eventual separation all the more heart-breaking. This book was moving without resorting to overused tropes or emotional manipulation, and proves that you don't need reams of flowery prose to create honest and relateable characters.I knew very little about Iran before reading this book, and now I know a little bit more. When hearing about countries with limited freedom of speech on the news it's tempting to picture the whole population as one homogeneous mass and miss the fact that this population must have as diverse a range of opinions and attitudes as any other, the only difference being that many other countries are better able to express these range of views. It seems obvious but this book really brought it home for me by depicting such an interesting range of characters who, whilst outwardly conforming to the regime, were participating in small acts of rebellion, from hosting parties to drinking alcohol to listening to banned music. I know this will be one of those books that I keep returning to again and again and I can’t wait to lend this to everyone I know so that I can spread the joy that is Marjane Satrapi's writing. Also, this interview between Marjane Satrapi and Emma Watson might be one of the most inspiring things I’ve ever read.
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  • Adrianne Mathiowetz
    January 1, 1970
    A question I heard a lot while I was reading this book was "how does it compare with Maus?" -- and if I were to answer that question, I would say, I suppose, that I thought that Maus was more compelling, with more classically heroic characters, detailed, careful artwork (and-I-mean-come-ON it was about the holocaust, haven't we all agreed that's the official trump card?) -- but I'm not sure that it actually makes much sense to compare this book with Maus. Sure, they're both graphic novels whose A question I heard a lot while I was reading this book was "how does it compare with Maus?" -- and if I were to answer that question, I would say, I suppose, that I thought that Maus was more compelling, with more classically heroic characters, detailed, careful artwork (and-I-mean-come-ON it was about the holocaust, haven't we all agreed that's the official trump card?) -- but I'm not sure that it actually makes much sense to compare this book with Maus. Sure, they're both graphic novels whose subject is generally similar. They're at once historical, tragic, and personal. But other than that, they're just two very different books, written by two very different authors regarding two different conflicts. It would be as if you were reading Red Badge of Courage, and people kept asking "so, how does it compare with War and Peace?"Aaaaaannyway. So! About Persepolis.I went into this novel knowing essentially nothing about the war(s) in Iran, and to my surprise I left this book knowing essentially nothing about the war(s) in Iran. Just when the narrator reaches an age when she could really perceive what is happening in her country and act out against it or submit and meld into it, her parents wisely ship her off to Austria, and once there she specifically avoids watching the news and connecting with political developments back at home. Thus, for a large portion of the story we're led through her various musical tastes, hair styles and relationship developments (can you beliiieeeve that first boyfriend and the croissants?). There are no post scripts, tangents, or musical bridges conveying basic information to the reader, no "meanwhile, back at the ranch, lots of people went to jail for silly things, and also there were deaths or something". The narrator was divorced from these concerns at the time, and so are we the readers.Primarily, this novel is an autobiography: the details of her homeland function mostly to describe the main character, not the country or turmoil therein. Egotistical? It seemed that way, sometimes, but maybe it depends what you expected from the book.That said, Marjane Satrapi's character is a well-developed one: never the perfect angel, not always striving to even just be good, but continually just trying to figure things out and attain the same, elusive happiness everyone else seems to have. She's likable, interesting, self-deprecating and ever-changing, and for what it's worth I found it really difficult to put the book down. (To me, actually, that's worth quite a lot. I weep for a lost childhood in which I could never, ever seem to put a book down: I finished one and then desperately started another, consuming them like cocaine. Why aren't books like cocaine anymore? Maybe I should just give up on literature and try harder drugs. Or more graphical novels by Marjane Satrapi.)Thoroughly enjoyable, with artwork that really grew on me with time, and definitely recommended. Just don't expect to want to start a revolution afterwards.
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  • foteini_dl
    January 1, 1970
    Η Satrapi,ένα κορίτσι της "γενιάς του '79" στο Ιράν,μ' αυτό το λιτό,ασπρόμαυρο comic μας θυμίζει ότι αυτές οι "μικρές" ιστορίες,οι άγραφες,είναι περισσότερο αληθινές από τα βιβλία στείρας,ακαδημαϊκής ιστορίας.Και,τελικά,αυτές οι ιστορίες μόνο "μικρές"δεν είναι.Μας υπενθυμίζει,επίσης,ότι η θρησκεία είναι ο μεγαλύτερος μηχανισμός καταπίεσης ενός κράτους.Σ' αυτό βοηθάνε πολύ και τα μαύρα χρώματα που χρησιμοποιεί.Συγκινεί η γλυκόπικρη ζωή της Marji,σε κάνει να γελάς κόλας.Σου θυμίζει να είσαι αληθιν Η Satrapi,ένα κορίτσι της "γενιάς του '79" στο Ιράν,μ' αυτό το λιτό,ασπρόμαυρο comic μας θυμίζει ότι αυτές οι "μικρές" ιστορίες,οι άγραφες,είναι περισσότερο αληθινές από τα βιβλία στείρας,ακαδημαϊκής ιστορίας.Και,τελικά,αυτές οι ιστορίες μόνο "μικρές"δεν είναι.Μας υπενθυμίζει,επίσης,ότι η θρησκεία είναι ο μεγαλύτερος μηχανισμός καταπίεσης ενός κράτους.Σ' αυτό βοηθάνε πολύ και τα μαύρα χρώματα που χρησιμοποιεί.Συγκινεί η γλυκόπικρη ζωή της Marji,σε κάνει να γελάς κόλας.Σου θυμίζει να είσαι αληθινός στον εαυτό σου και τα πιστεύω σου.Αυτό είναι το πιο πολύτιμο μάθημα απ'όλα,που δε το διδάσκει κανένα σχολείο ή πανεπιστήμιο.(Αφιερώστε του λίγο από το χρόνο σας και δείτε και την-εξίσου-υπέροχη ταινία.)
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  • Mayra
    January 1, 1970
    Special and enlightening.It was delightful to learn about Iran and the Islamic Revolution, something so far away from me, through the eyes of a character to whom I could so easily relate.
  • peiman-mir5 rezakhani
    January 1, 1970
    دوستانِ گرانقدر، موضوع اصلی این کتاب، واژهٔ بی مفهوم و توهین آمیز و احمقانهٔ «حجاب» است... و سختی ها و مشکلاتِ دختران و زنانِ ایرانی در این سرزمین را بخصوص از بعد از سال ۵۷ در قالبِ خاطراتِ «مرجان ساتراپی» و به صورت نقاشیِ سیاه و سفید بیان نموده استدختر بچه ای که از کودکی در مدرسه و جامعه به دلیل اینکه جنس زن است، از بسیاری از حقوقِ انسانیش محروم شده است و مجبور است از کودکی کفنِ سیاه به سر داشته باشد.... و پدر و مادرش تصمیم میگیرند در سن نوجوانی او را به خارج از کشور بفرستند تا بلکه بتواند مانن ‎دوستانِ گرانقدر، موضوع اصلی این کتاب، واژهٔ بی مفهوم و توهین آمیز و احمقانهٔ «حجاب» است... و سختی ها و مشکلاتِ دختران و زنانِ ایرانی در این سرزمین را بخصوص از بعد از سال ۵۷ در قالبِ خاطراتِ «مرجان ساتراپی» و به صورت نقاشیِ سیاه و سفید بیان نموده است‎دختر بچه ای که از کودکی در مدرسه و جامعه به دلیل اینکه جنس زن است، از بسیاری از حقوقِ انسانیش محروم شده است و مجبور است از کودکی کفنِ سیاه به سر داشته باشد.... و پدر و مادرش تصمیم میگیرند در سن نوجوانی او را به خارج از کشور بفرستند تا بلکه بتواند مانندِ یک انسان زندگی کند و درک کند که همه جا مثلِ عرب و عرب پرستانِ کثیف با جنسِ لطیفِ زن، همچون یک کنیز و یک ماشین بی ارزشِ تولیدِ بچه، رفتار نمیکنند‎امیدوارم این توضیحات مفید بوده باشه«پیروز باشید و ایرانی»
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  • Simra S
    January 1, 1970
    "Life is too short to be lived badly"I finished this book in one sitting. I normally don't write reviews but this book is amazingly good and is worth all the hype. It has a lot of humour, compassion and heartbreaks. I absolutely loved Marjane as the little rebellious girl who spoke her mind, as the girl who lost her way and couldn't hold her dignity, as the girl who came back and proved herself, and also as the writer who has written this book so beautifully. To have lived in such oppression th "Life is too short to be lived badly"I finished this book in one sitting. I normally don't write reviews but this book is amazingly good and is worth all the hype. It has a lot of humour, compassion and heartbreaks. I absolutely loved Marjane as the little rebellious girl who spoke her mind, as the girl who lost her way and couldn't hold her dignity, as the girl who came back and proved herself, and also as the writer who has written this book so beautifully. To have lived in such oppression then living with freedom for four years, then coming back again to such oppression and carrying on just shows how much strong a woman can be. Marjane's family are like icing on the cake in this book. Every character in this book is very well written.It is lighthearted yet intense and as a person who doesn't know a lot about Iran, I confess I got to know a lot about Iran through this book.
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  • Parthiban Sekar
    January 1, 1970
    I am afraid that I might not be able to tell anything good or great from my limited knowledge of what-went-wrong or what-kept-her-going. Is it the oil which once was a natural resource? Is it her-smoking-cigarette? Is it her hooded-veil? Is it the never-ending war? Is it her make-up? Is it her defiance?Here it is, I think that it is more appropriate that you hear from someone who knows more:Elham's review of The Complete Persepolis
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  • Ferdy
    January 1, 1970
    4.5 stars - Spoilers-Brilliant, this was so much more than what I expected. I knew I'd enjoy Persepolis but I had no idea that I'd find a story about a girl (Marji) growing up in Iran at the time of the Islamic Revolution so immersive, gripping, relatable and moving. It was simple yet powerful.-Marji's struggles in Iran were portrayed so well, I believed everything I was reading. One of the main issues I have with fact based or autobiographical novels is that I always feel things are exaggerated 4.5 stars - Spoilers-Brilliant, this was so much more than what I expected. I knew I'd enjoy Persepolis but I had no idea that I'd find a story about a girl (Marji) growing up in Iran at the time of the Islamic Revolution so immersive, gripping, relatable and moving. It was simple yet powerful.-Marji's struggles in Iran were portrayed so well, I believed everything I was reading. One of the main issues I have with fact based or autobiographical novels is that I always feel things are exaggerated, hidden or changed so that the story can seem more glamorous or thought provoking or profound. In Persepolis I never felt that way once, I was swept away in the story, and it felt like I was there watching and experiencing all the good and bad in Marji's life — it was brutal and honest storytelling.-Marji was mostly a horrid character. She was self centered, angry, jealous and self pitying, yet she still made for an engaging and interesting character. I was really put off with her getting an innocent man in trouble (probably getting whipped or beaten) just so she could protect herself. I wouldn't have minded her doing that if 1. It was certain she'd even get in trouble in the first place or 2. If the guy had been guilty for some other crime. It was unforgivable what she did, and it actually made for uncomfortable reading… Especially when she laughed about it and felt no remorse.I have to say that there were parts where I loved Marji, like when she was being rebellious towards unreasonable authority figures. There were a lot of times where her strict teachers or elders would tell her off or threaten her for wearing certain clothes/make up, listening to music, talking to guys, etc. And I loved that Marji stuck up for herself… I cheered when some Guardians of the Revolution told Marji not to run for the bus because the movements were obscene (and would tempt some poor guy into wanting sex), and she basically told them to fuck off, and to not stare at her arse if it turned them on so much.-What I thought was done really well was Marji's depression and loneliness in the years she spent alone in a foreign country. Her parents sent her to school in Vienna so she'd be away from the war between Iraq/Iran, they wanted her to be safe and happy but she ended up being lonely, misunderstood, used and abused. I really felt for her, she had loving parents but because she was on her own, she felt unloved and unimportant.-I was a bit confused about whether Marji was a muslim or not. She drank, dated, had sex and did drugs… She never prayed or read the Koran… Although she did have conversations with God. I just never got the sense that she was a muslim — maybe it was because her parents weren't religious?-I liked the illustrations, they were clear and easy to follow… But they didn't blow me away… That's one of the main reason that I gave this 4.5 stars instead of 5.I was really impressed with Persepolis — especially how it showed the human and forward thinking side of Iran, and also the repressive and fanatical side. I feel that western media doesn't show nearly enough coverage of the majority non-extremist and very much human side of muslim countries — there should be more of it shown, it'd be one way to help relations between everyone.
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