Summerkin (Winterling, #2)
"Down through the Way she fell, feeling the wind and the pressing darkness, the dizzy thump when she landed on the bank. She was through. The air felt softer here, the shadows deeper—and the pull of her connection to the land settled into her bones."In the Summerlands, time moves slowly, roots grow deeply, and change is not welcomed. But change is needed.After defeating the wicked Mor and freeing her kin from deadly oaths made to this false ruler, Fer is now the rightful Lady of the land. Yet her people don't know what to make of their new Lady's strange ways, and neither do the High Ones, the rulers of the magical realm, for Fer is an outsider—half human.To prove herself worthy of the Summerlands crown, Fer is summoned to compete in an epic contest where her strengths and skills will be tested and her loyalties challenged. Can she trust Rook, the puck she calls friend? Can she trust herself? If Fer fails, she will lose her land and the Way will be closed to her forever.

Summerkin (Winterling, #2) Details

TitleSummerkin (Winterling, #2)
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseApr 23rd, 2013
PublisherHarperCollins
ISBN-139780061921063
Rating
GenreFantasy, Childrens, Middle Grade, Magic, Young Adult

Summerkin (Winterling, #2) Review

  • Maud
    January 1, 1970
    4.5 stars.I really enjoyed the plot of this one, there was a competition and intrigue and weird new creatures and lands for us to discover. I found the characters, old and new, all very enjoyable and the part with the Hunt had my heart in my throat! I gave the first book in this series 4 stars, this one is even better!The reason why I can't give this 5 stars is because I feel a bit uncomfortable with how Fer is forcing her view upon the other Lords and Ladies. Is she right? Yes, Fer is definitel 4.5 stars.I really enjoyed the plot of this one, there was a competition and intrigue and weird new creatures and lands for us to discover. I found the characters, old and new, all very enjoyable and the part with the Hunt had my heart in my throat! I gave the first book in this series 4 stars, this one is even better!The reason why I can't give this 5 stars is because I feel a bit uncomfortable with how Fer is forcing her view upon the other Lords and Ladies. Is she right? Yes, Fer is definitely right. But it feels forced and I think that it is better to let people see and come to their own conclusions than forcing them like this. I also feel like it's not like Fer to force the others to do things the way she wants them to do it. So I took off half a star for that.
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  • Intisar Khanani
    January 1, 1970
    This is a little younger than I usually read, so I'm rounding up a smidgen to correct for that. Overall, a fun read.
  • Ahmed Ejaz
    January 1, 1970
    Full stars
  • colleen the convivial curmudgeon
    January 1, 1970
    My review of the first book in the series was a bit middling - 2.5 bumped to 3 - and for the first part of this book I feared the second would be the same.But at some point it started to click for me, and I didn't want to put the book down - so this is more a solid 3, maybe a 3.5.The biggest plus is the characters. I had mentioned that the characters were a bit of a weakness and rather thin in the first book, but they felt more flushed out in this one - at least Fer and Rook did. And I was glad My review of the first book in the series was a bit middling - 2.5 bumped to 3 - and for the first part of this book I feared the second would be the same.But at some point it started to click for me, and I didn't want to put the book down - so this is more a solid 3, maybe a 3.5.The biggest plus is the characters. I had mentioned that the characters were a bit of a weakness and rather thin in the first book, but they felt more flushed out in this one - at least Fer and Rook did. And I was glad that some of the other competitors - Gnar and Lich - also ended up having a bit more depth to them that I suspected they would at first blush.The story, itself, is a bit predictable, but I think it would be a lot less so for kids. And, even so, not everything went quite the way I expected it would, though most of the main parts did.Overall, though, I liked the world and the story and characters more for this second installment, and I'm keen to read the last book and see how it all pans out.
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  • Jasmine
    January 1, 1970
    A really interesting arc for this fae series. The first book was about non-violence, with medicine as resistance, and this one is about non-hierarchical servant leadership. I'm really interested to see where book three goes. I mean it's technically about a competition to see who gets to be the Lady of the Summerlands, with archery contests and a magical fashion show. And trickster babies who are sometimes puppies. And government-led extermination campaigns against said tricksters. MIDDLE GRADE I A really interesting arc for this fae series. The first book was about non-violence, with medicine as resistance, and this one is about non-hierarchical servant leadership. I'm really interested to see where book three goes. I mean it's technically about a competition to see who gets to be the Lady of the Summerlands, with archery contests and a magical fashion show. And trickster babies who are sometimes puppies. And government-led extermination campaigns against said tricksters. MIDDLE GRADE IS FOR KIDS THEY SAID. KIDS READ EASY BOOKS I THOUGHT. SOMETHING LIGHT AND FLUFFY.
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  • Kathryn
    January 1, 1970
    4.5 STARSThe sequel to Winterling is not only worthy, I actually enjoyed it more! The story feels more original here, the characters develop even greater depth. I love that Fer (view spoiler)[takes her role as Lady with such grace and intelligence, while also still needing to learn a thing or two. (hide spoiler)] Prineas creates a wonderful sense of place with the Summerlands and the other lands Fer and Co travel to, and the new characters felt very fresh and interesting. Though I had a few quib 4.5 STARSThe sequel to Winterling is not only worthy, I actually enjoyed it more! The story feels more original here, the characters develop even greater depth. I love that Fer (view spoiler)[takes her role as Lady with such grace and intelligence, while also still needing to learn a thing or two. (hide spoiler)] Prineas creates a wonderful sense of place with the Summerlands and the other lands Fer and Co travel to, and the new characters felt very fresh and interesting. Though I had a few quibbles and unanswered questions about a few aspects of the book (view spoiler)[namely, the use (or lack of use) of oaths as well as the questionable-at-times "wisdom" of the High Ones (hide spoiler)], overall I thoroughly enjoyed it and really loved Fer's epiphany (view spoiler)[swearing the oath to her people (hide spoiler)] It was also great fun, and captivating, to learn more about the pucks. I look forward to the third book!
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  • Mel (Daily Prophecy)
    January 1, 1970
    3.5 stars too.I liked the first book better, although I loved the character development in this book better. Fer and Rook are more fleshed out. There is also a lot of adventure in this book; with the quests Fer must complete in order to prove she is the rightful Lady of the Lands. Children will devour this (and yet, it is still highly enjoyable for the older audience)
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  • K
    January 1, 1970
    I love the self-loathing antihero as much as the next person, but it's refreshing sometimes to read books about characters who are good and heroic and, yes, fallible, but ultimately strong and kind. Fer is a wonderful character in that regard; she can be childish and naive (which is totally fair because she's, what, like thirteen?) and she can be stubborn and foolish, but she's ultimately driven by empathy, fairness, and a drive to be kind to everyone.Summerkin is a good book. It's better than W I love the self-loathing antihero as much as the next person, but it's refreshing sometimes to read books about characters who are good and heroic and, yes, fallible, but ultimately strong and kind. Fer is a wonderful character in that regard; she can be childish and naive (which is totally fair because she's, what, like thirteen?) and she can be stubborn and foolish, but she's ultimately driven by empathy, fairness, and a drive to be kind to everyone.Summerkin is a good book. It's better than Winterling in that the action flows more evenly, and Fer is given more room to shine. I generally dislike books that involve a contest of sorts, mostly because it causes the action to drag and the plot to become predictable -- contests usually only go two ways: they win (less often) or they fail (usually due to circumstances outside their control) only to triumph later through some deux ex machina loophole (more often). That said, the contests in Summerkin work, and the plot threaded between the contests keeps the action moving.That said, and I have no idea if this is the case, it feels like Winterling was a stand alone with Summerkin and Moonkind appended on. Some of the information we're granted in Summerkin seems almost directly contradictory to what we found out in Winterling. In Winterling it sounded like the glamorie was something kind of specific to the Lady of the Summerlands? Because we meet the Huldre and she is described as having a sort-of glamorie that works entirely unlike any other glamorie seen in the series. It feels like, especially because I am most of the way through Moonkind now, that Prineas had one idea of the glamorie in Winterling and then had to tweak it to make it a plot in Summerkin and Moonkind.Also Arenthiel??? Was talking about defeating the Mor to claim the Summerlands but like ... when was he going to get around to doing that????? Because, again, in Winterling it seemed like the Mor had been doing her thing for at least a while (judging from how long Fer's parent's didn't return for her; like time obviously passes differently in the human world but that'd still be at least a couple years). Was Arenthiel just too busy primping or something? He couldn't have wanted the Summerlands that badly.Also, and I'm not really sure this is any flaw of the book's or just my preference, but I always find Rook's POVs much more boring than Fer's. I mean, I like Rook, but I think he's (a) a better supporting character and (b) far less irritating when we can't see into his mind. I would have liked to see more interaction with Fer and Twig, and Fer and Gnar. I love the driving relationships of the books, but I wish there was more female friendship.I'm not going to talk much about Rook's puck-brothers other than to say they're fucking dicks. Also Rook seems to be the most un-mischievous mischief-maker ever. "Yes, I suppose I'll do this tricky thing I guess if I have to" *long sigh*. Still, I do enjoy Rook; I just enjoy laughing at him more.I feel like I've talked about all the negative in this book, but I really liked it! It was fun to read and hard to put down and Fer is just a fantastic protagonist. I felt good after reading her story in Summerkin. The plot was quick-moving and engaging, and Prineas is a fantastic writer who uses humor deftly -- both to build relationships and to lighten the mood when the book becomes a touch dark. I'm loving Moonkind right now too, and I'm very happy I bought this series.
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  • Brandy Painter
    January 1, 1970
    Originally posted here at Random Musings of a Bibliophile.Last year I completely fell for a surly, mischievous, puck named Rook and a strong, kind-hearted, girl named Fer when I read Winterling by Sarah Prineas (my thoughts). When my copy of Summerkin, the sequel, arrived it was no surprise that I lost interest in everything else in my TBR pile and had to read it right away. I am happy to say that I adored it and am more in love with the characters than ever.Fer, who defeated the evil usurper wh Originally posted here at Random Musings of a Bibliophile.Last year I completely fell for a surly, mischievous, puck named Rook and a strong, kind-hearted, girl named Fer when I read Winterling by Sarah Prineas (my thoughts). When my copy of Summerkin, the sequel, arrived it was no surprise that I lost interest in everything else in my TBR pile and had to read it right away. I am happy to say that I adored it and am more in love with the characters than ever.Fer, who defeated the evil usurper who had murdered her parents and taken over the Summerland, now must come to terms with what it means to be the ruler. She is fiercely determined not to take oaths from her people knowing how they were abused when they did that before. Her refusal to do this has put her right to rule in question. The High Ones have requested that she come to compete in a competition. The winner will win the right to rule the Summerlands. Rook, now freed from his oaths to the evil Mor, has returned to his Puck brothers. They are determined to create mischief and what better place to create mischief than at a competition the High Ones have organized at the nave? And what better puck to send than Rook, who the Lady Gwynnefar foolishly trusts and calls friend? But there is a sinister presence at the nave ready to challenge Geynnefar and Rook finds himself torn between his duty as a puck and the strange bond that keeps forming between him and Fer.Fer's journey to learn what sort of leader she wants to be and how to implement that proves how perfect she is for the job. Her strength under pressure, her compassion for all, and her ability to empathize make her a great leader. She wants to see the good in every one, but isn't afraid of standing up to those she sees as threatening her people. Yet she is so lonely because she is seen as the Lady by her people and as a half-human usurper by most of her peers. It is heart wrenching the ways she wants to trust Rook, but can't help doubting. Particularly when he keeps telling her not to trust him. At the same time it is heart wrenching to see Rook wanting to be what she needs but fighting it at the same time. He doesn't know how, it's against his nature. As much as I want to smack him sometimes I can't help but love him. He is obnoxious but endearing, because he is also noble and upstanding in his own way. I really love how the books in this trilogy are focusing on both of their character arcs and their relationship. It was lovely to see Fer's relationship with Fray and Twig growing as well.There are some great new characters added to the story this time too. Two of Fer's competitors, Gnar and Lich, are fascinating and I would love to see more of them. Arenthiel makes the perfect villain, smarmy and insidious in all the right ways. All the other pucks in the story are a marvelous additon as well.The competition aspect of the story kept the pacing moving quickly and makes for a riveting read. There is always something going on, something to discover, something to think about. All this builds up to intense moments. I continue to appreciate what Prineas is doing with faerie-lore in these books.I'm ecstatic that we only have months to wait for Moonkind, which will release in January.
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  • Leah Thomas
    January 1, 1970
    Fer. Actually Lady Fer, ever since she defeated the Mór, the powerful, corrupt ruler of the lands on the other side of the Way. For the longest time, Fer felt like she didn't belong in the normal, human world. All her life she was lonely, that is, ever since she came to the Summerlands. The land lies across the human world, through a series of portals, and now, Fer has been crowned the Queen of the ever-changing land.One fine day, Fer's assistant and best friend, Rook, delivers a letter to Fer. Fer. Actually Lady Fer, ever since she defeated the Mór, the powerful, corrupt ruler of the lands on the other side of the Way. For the longest time, Fer felt like she didn't belong in the normal, human world. All her life she was lonely, that is, ever since she came to the Summerlands. The land lies across the human world, through a series of portals, and now, Fer has been crowned the Queen of the ever-changing land.One fine day, Fer's assistant and best friend, Rook, delivers a letter to Fer. It is from the High Ones, and it states that she must prove herself worthy of the Summerlands through a competition. When Fer travels to the nathe palace, she must find out her true heart, make new friends, compete with tricksters, and retrieve old friends in order to keep control of the new home she is meant to love and her peoples' fate.
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  • Charlie
    January 1, 1970
    I might've enjoyed it more if I'd read the first one first. But I didn't know it was a sequel when I started to read.It was rather boring at the start (most likely because i couldn't understand stuff they would've mentioned in the first book), but I made myself finish it, hoping it would get better. And did it? Certainly. I enjoyed the last half. And so you might ask why I have it only 3 stars? Well, 3 and a half, actually. I did enjoy it, yes, but I have enjoyed books a lot better before, so I I might've enjoyed it more if I'd read the first one first. But I didn't know it was a sequel when I started to read.It was rather boring at the start (most likely because i couldn't understand stuff they would've mentioned in the first book), but I made myself finish it, hoping it would get better. And did it? Certainly. I enjoyed the last half. And so you might ask why I have it only 3 stars? Well, 3 and a half, actually. I did enjoy it, yes, but I have enjoyed books a lot better before, so I think 3 and a half stars is a fair call.
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  • Yvette
    January 1, 1970
    Not bad but it didn't quite match up to book one.Fer, now Lady of the Land since she beat the raven queen must prove her worth to the people in charge because in fact she is the magical equivalent of middle management and most everyone else is going "ewwww she's part human gross". She also struggles to deal with the corporate culture of the magical world while not compromising her values but through being a decent human being (heh) she proves that she is worthy of her job. Also there's like this Not bad but it didn't quite match up to book one.Fer, now Lady of the Land since she beat the raven queen must prove her worth to the people in charge because in fact she is the magical equivalent of middle management and most everyone else is going "ewwww she's part human gross". She also struggles to deal with the corporate culture of the magical world while not compromising her values but through being a decent human being (heh) she proves that she is worthy of her job. Also there's like this almost romantic subplot with Rook where he has to choose whether to throw in with his puck brothers or this ~girl~ and despite me wanting to hate it, it actually was decently done and added to the story. Honestly what really chafed me was Fer seemed determined to not grow (view spoiler)[ as she refused to take the oaths of her people right to the end, like I get the idea that she didn't want them magically bound to her but like also part of being bound to your people is them being bound to you. Maybe that gets addressed in book 3 but it really ruined the end for me. (hide spoiler)]For the middle of a series this is actually a good book but it just didn't have the same impact as book 1. If you liked book 1 and want to check in with the characters and see Fer waffle between growing and not then def pick it up. If you are wanting actual growth on Fer's part or a story more like book 1... Eh, not a waste of time but this isn't what you're looking for.
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  • riverri
    January 1, 1970
    What a nice light middle-grade read. I may have enjoyed Winterling more, but this was still a good book. Perhaps I am just used to reading books that take place on a grander scale, more plot development and characters, so when I was finished with Summerkin, I was a bit underwhelmed by how quickly the plot came to a climax.Having finished this book, let me share some opinions on it:-The Competition—a pretty typical thing I see often in middle-grade fantasy books. It was not the most original thin What a nice light middle-grade read. I may have enjoyed Winterling more, but this was still a good book. Perhaps I am just used to reading books that take place on a grander scale, more plot development and characters, so when I was finished with Summerkin, I was a bit underwhelmed by how quickly the plot came to a climax.Having finished this book, let me share some opinions on it:-The Competition—a pretty typical thing I see often in middle-grade fantasy books. It was not the most original thing, but I have nothing against these recycled fantasy ideas. I kinda like them. So, Fer enters the competition to prove her competency as a Lady, but I would’ve liked to see more story about the other competitors. The High Ones, of course being ancient and all that, didn’t really strike me as ‘intelligent’; perhaps it’s only me.-The Pucks—Rook is a pre cool character, although he needs to stop with this trust issue thing. I like how we get to explore his family in this book and how he cares for them. I’m just wanting to see Rook grow out of his ‘untrusting shell’ and just become a badass Puck, lol.
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  • Marissa
    January 1, 1970
    Another book by Sarah Prineas that has an intriguing plot that kept me reading. A bit predictable at times (spoiler: it was easy to see Fer would save Gnar and Lich at least once over the course of the book) but the plot did deviate from what I thought would happen regarding Rook, the summer crown, and Arenthial. The puck characters are a delight and the plot was original enough and intriguing enough that I would recommend this book to anyone looking for a good read. For older readers, it may be Another book by Sarah Prineas that has an intriguing plot that kept me reading. A bit predictable at times (spoiler: it was easy to see Fer would save Gnar and Lich at least once over the course of the book) but the plot did deviate from what I thought would happen regarding Rook, the summer crown, and Arenthial. The puck characters are a delight and the plot was original enough and intriguing enough that I would recommend this book to anyone looking for a good read. For older readers, it may be a bit of a quick, light read but again Fer is a beautiful heroine and the plot is good enough to keep you entertained regardless of it being written for a younger audience. I love what Fer represents.
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  • Silly Sadly
    January 1, 1970
    Most people Fers age have the everyday dealings with trying to feel like they fit in and are accepted by their peers and viewed as equals by all. Fer takes it to another level as she goes to an area in the world she was from and has to fight for acceptance and respect from a group of peers who definitely have different ideas as to how their world should be run. I finished this book in a matter of days.
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  • Hannah Belyea
    January 1, 1970
    Fer has not been Lady of the land long when her place is challenged due to her half-human blood, forcing her to compete for the title; meanwhile, Rook must decide whether a pack with his puck brothers means more than his friendship with Fer...Prineas continues this engaging series with more heart and fantastic characters and plenty of lore to please fans. When the time to face her opponents comes, will Fer make the right decisions?
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  • Emily
    January 1, 1970
    I liked the first book better it was more exciting but it was nice to see the story followed through a bit. I know there’s another book so I guess that’ll tell us about the new lady’s time as the lady and beyond that I think it would become redundant and boring so I’ll read the next book and gladly stop it there.
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  • Mia
    January 1, 1970
    This was such a good, fun read. It was really original. I loved all the characters, twists, and turns. Fer really grew on me in this second book- I grew to like her. In book one she kind of drove me nuts but this book I loved how much she grew as a character. It was great. If you're a fan of books like Narnia or wildwood this is one you'd like too.
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  • Karoline
    January 1, 1970
    really enjoyed the first book in this series, but this one was kind of boring to me. I struggled so much getting through it. The only character I really like is the main character. Rook and the rest of the pucks annoy me to no end. The story was ok, but kind of forgettable.
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  • Lara
    January 1, 1970
    this book was amazing!
  • Bethany
    January 1, 1970
    My nine year old son got the series as a birthday present and he enjoyed them, as did I.
  • Natalie
    January 1, 1970
    just finished it today! Can't wait to read the next!:)
  • Rachel Boling
    January 1, 1970
    Another great book from Sarah Prineas. In this one, Fer must find her place in the fairy realm, and prove herself both to those around her and to herself.
  • Heather Feinauer
    January 1, 1970
    It was a good follow up to the first, I enjoy the premise of this series. It’s interesting, you meet a lot of unique characters and you get to know the heroine more and more. Good read.
  • Karissa
    January 1, 1970
    This book is the second in the Winterling series. The series will continue in Moonkind which is scheduled for a Jan 2014 release date. I enjoyed this book just as much as the first one, it was a wonderful middle grade fantasy involving fey. I would definitely recommend reading Winterling before reading this book.In the last book Fer defeated the evil Mor making her the Lady of the Summerlands. Now Fer is back in the human lands and longs to return to the Summerlands. When she returns her people This book is the second in the Winterling series. The series will continue in Moonkind which is scheduled for a Jan 2014 release date. I enjoyed this book just as much as the first one, it was a wonderful middle grade fantasy involving fey. I would definitely recommend reading Winterling before reading this book.In the last book Fer defeated the evil Mor making her the Lady of the Summerlands. Now Fer is back in the human lands and longs to return to the Summerlands. When she returns her people don’t know what to make of her and her unique way of doing things. This includes the High Ones who request that Fer journey to their lands to compete in a contest that will prove whether or not she is the true Lady of Summerlands. This is a magical story full of adventure and intrigue with enough twists and turns to keep the reader engaged and entertained. It’s appropriate for all ages as well, although one of Fer’s competitors is very cruel to those around him.I love Fer as a character. She has times when she is uncertain of her actions but always decides to stay true to what she thinks is right. Everyone is telling her she is ruling the Summerland in the wrong way, but she sticks with what she believes to be right. I also loved her kindness and her loyalty to those she considered friends.Rook plays a large part in the story as well. As a pouka his loyalty to Fer is constantly called into question. He himself struggles with the call to be true to his family of poukas and his yearning to help out Fer as a friend.A good portion of the novel is spent with Fer in competition with some other competitors. They were all interesting characters and these scenes were action-packed and engaging. Going on along with this storyline there is the mystery of a missing crown. My favorite part of this book is the world. The descriptions are incredibly well done and create excellent imagery for the reader. There are new creative and magical things around every corner so you never know what to expect. The book is well written and a fairly easy read. The plot isn’t incredibly complex (it’s written for young readers) but it is complex enough to keep an adult interested and engaged. Overall I enjoyed this book a lot. I love the magical world and the wonderful creative descriptions throughout. Fer is an excellent example of a growing girl who is trying to do what she believes in, even if doing what everyone else thinks is right would be the easier path. This is an absolutely wonderfully creative and engaging fantasy, I highly recommend it to all ages of readers who love fantasy. I can’t wait to read Moonkind when it releases.
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  • Pamela
    January 1, 1970
    I've been waiting for this sequel to Winterling in a quiet, happy way--not the rabid GIVE IT TO ME NOW that I hear from many people regarding books in a series. So, I don't feel completely saddened that this didn't live up to what I wanted it to be, but it's still a bit hard to swallow.I had been hoping for a more thorough exploration of Fer (short for Jennifer)'s past, her new role as Lady (ruler) of the Summerlands, and more character development of her friends. Instead, we are treated to a so I've been waiting for this sequel to Winterling in a quiet, happy way--not the rabid GIVE IT TO ME NOW that I hear from many people regarding books in a series. So, I don't feel completely saddened that this didn't live up to what I wanted it to be, but it's still a bit hard to swallow.I had been hoping for a more thorough exploration of Fer (short for Jennifer)'s past, her new role as Lady (ruler) of the Summerlands, and more character development of her friends. Instead, we are treated to a sort of Hunger-Games-Lite competition, and one of those Ancient Evil baddies who just wants it all (he just wants it all! and he wants it now!). Fer wants to be friends with Rook, who is a puck. Pucks can shapeshift into dogs, horses, or goats, and they have no allegiance but to themselves. It's a given that they are tricky and love messing with people. Fer has this sort of deluded belief that her will can make Rook her friend, and I guess he's kind of her friend, but he's also a puck. What with all the themes of finding yourself and self-acceptance here, I would have preferred it if Rook had said something like, "Fer, thanks for saving my life. But I'm a puck, and I can't be your friend. It's not in my nature." and run off into the sunset at the beginning of the book, instead of this weird back-and-forth is-he-or-isn't-he-her-friend thing that goes on the whole time. His puck-brothers didn't feel very dimensional, and the threat that Fer faces--that of being declared unfit to rule because she is half-human--doesn't really seem that, well, threatening. It's just an excuse to do a competition scene (with archery, no less--sigh) and have Fer show the fae how awesome being human is, because you actually care about other people. Actually, that quality of humanity is in question for me right now, but hey, let's be optimistic here. I did like the lesson that Fer learned, and then taught, about being a leader versus being a ruler, and it was rather eloquently put. I do think Sarah Prineas is a very good writer--you can tell, especially, that she loves to write about nature and about a person's connection to nature. However, Summerking felt rather rushed. I wished we had more time to get to know the characters and the lay of the fae-land. I also wish that there was more interaction with Phouka, Fer's formerly puck-formed horse (he's a perma-horse now). I love horse characters!
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  • Aelvana
    January 1, 1970
    Fer is restless back home with Grand-Jane. She can't forget the Way she crossed or the people she saved or the land that is so much more to her than the place where she's grown up. With Grand-Jane's reluctant blessing, she heads back to take her place as the Lady of the Summerlands. Only to find the High Lords have issued her a challenge, contesting her right to rule, and have opened a competition with the prize as her beloved Summerlands. She can't refuse---but she's nothing like them, nor does Fer is restless back home with Grand-Jane. She can't forget the Way she crossed or the people she saved or the land that is so much more to her than the place where she's grown up. With Grand-Jane's reluctant blessing, she heads back to take her place as the Lady of the Summerlands. Only to find the High Lords have issued her a challenge, contesting her right to rule, and have opened a competition with the prize as her beloved Summerlands. She can't refuse---but she's nothing like them, nor does she know what the testing might involve.It doesn't take long for Fer to plunge right back into the world she left, and despite her dual heritage it's obvious which side of the Way she belongs. But, frustratingly, she makes little effort to figure out the rules of the particular world she's entered, and when she refuses her subject's oaths (for fear of being too like her predecessor) she sets off a chain of events that could tear the Summerlands from her forever.Fer's determination to play by her own rules finds its match again in Rook. The puck is no longer bound to be near her, but he can't seem to tear himself away. Rook struggles to figure out what she is to him, even as he feels he must prove himself again to his brother pucks. And if that sounds terribly romantic, it really isn't---Rook has never had a friend, apart from other pucks. He doesn't trust Fer actually means friendship and not some tricky form of servitude, and especially now that she's more or less a Lady he's careful to stay away from anything that could be considered binding. Rook wants freedom more than anything.Once again, the relationship between Rook and Fer is the heart of the story. Trust is a tricky thing, as Rook, no longer bound to obey anything, is free to make as much trouble as he desires. Pucks do love trouble . . .I liked how Fer's kindness continues to be one of her defining traits. She's willing to be good, not just look good, even when it costs her dearly. And I like how the contest is as "tricksy" as it is, because as Fer is finding out, being straightforward can be itself a deception when dealing with the natives. It's probably one reason why they're so big on oaths, as an oath is sure in a way most things aren't.Overall this is a good adventure. I liked it better than the previous because it was harder to tell exactly where things were going. I rate this book Recommended.
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  • Sophia
    January 1, 1970
    I really, really love this series. It's got the characters of a children's novel (young, not involved in romance, and preferring adventure over teenage wangsting) and the worldbuilding of an accomplished YA fantasy. The world is enchanting, the creatures are wonderful. (The pucks. THE PUCKS. Shapeshifting men who have a pack-of-wolves mentality, and are direct decedents of Loki - or if they aren't, they should be seeing as their entire reason for existing is causing Mischief.) And the characters I really, really love this series. It's got the characters of a children's novel (young, not involved in romance, and preferring adventure over teenage wangsting) and the worldbuilding of an accomplished YA fantasy. The world is enchanting, the creatures are wonderful. (The pucks. THE PUCKS. Shapeshifting men who have a pack-of-wolves mentality, and are direct decedents of Loki - or if they aren't, they should be seeing as their entire reason for existing is causing Mischief.) And the characters are charming (Fer is an agreeable YA heroine who sometimes makes really stupid decisions but can also be a bit of a badass, Rook is this fabulous ball of angst and rage and I love him to pieces and I'm do glad the book is told in dual perspectives because it wouldn't be half as enjoyable without my favorite mischief making puck having a say) Even the side characters in this one were great, the dragon girl and the swamp boy - I want to know more about them and their stories. I really, really cannot wait for the next one. This series reminds me how great fantasy can be when you're not caught up in an awful teenage romance (and how nice it is to wish for two characters to be together, instead of getting it right off the bat.) Four stars.
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  • Mothwing
    January 1, 1970
    Fer goes and takes part in the Triwizard Tournament to prove that she's indeed the Faerie Queene, meets several contestants from different parts of fairyland who might use trickery to get their own way. Rook reconnects with his puck brothers and is on a quest of his own. Will Fer come out on top, will Rook have to decide between being a puck and the friendship he so clearly feels uncomfortable with? Fer's grandmother still wants to get rid of her or at least doesn't kick up much of a fuss when F Fer goes and takes part in the Triwizard Tournament to prove that she's indeed the Faerie Queene, meets several contestants from different parts of fairyland who might use trickery to get their own way. Rook reconnects with his puck brothers and is on a quest of his own. Will Fer come out on top, will Rook have to decide between being a puck and the friendship he so clearly feels uncomfortable with? Fer's grandmother still wants to get rid of her or at least doesn't kick up much of a fuss when Fer jaunts off to fairyland. Half the problems that Fer gets into with Rook would have been resolved by sitting down and talking to each other. I'm also confused at Fer's poor respect for what Rook has repeatedly told her - that he'd prefer not to be tied to her. He acknowledges that she considers him her friend and does act like a decent person, but he also makes it abundantly clear where his boundaries are and that he does not want the responsibility of her trust. And she constantly ignores him. As someone who on several occasions had people think they were friends with me whom I've never really connected to on any level I am not sympathetic to her doing this. I remain grateful for the lack of love plot and rapiness.
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  • Christina
    January 1, 1970
    There is more beautiful imagery and adventure in this 2nd story of the Winterling series. The land here had once been wild, and not even that long ago. Just over a hundred years before, it had been prairies full of wildflowers and grasses and buzzing insects, with patches of oak woodlands, and streams winding their way to the river. Lightning-lit wildfires would race through the dry prairie, leaving it blackened, and in the spring new green would sprout up.We spend time with some characters from There is more beautiful imagery and adventure in this 2nd story of the Winterling series. The land here had once been wild, and not even that long ago. Just over a hundred years before, it had been prairies full of wildflowers and grasses and buzzing insects, with patches of oak woodlands, and streams winding their way to the river. Lightning-lit wildfires would race through the dry prairie, leaving it blackened, and in the spring new green would sprout up.We spend time with some characters from the first book, and get to know them better. I still think this series will keep kids turning the pages, even if adults like me find flaws. Fer is a character children can look up to. She has a heart of gold and is willing to fight for what's right.I had an issue (since book 1) with Fer insisting that Rook is her friend, when he's mostly been grumpy and snarky and saying he's NOT her friend. Yes, Fer sees the gold under the dust of his persona, but kids should be careful to distinguish believing the best of others and insisting someone who's mean to you is your friend. Actions do speak louder than words, in the end.Don't worry, Rook does pretty much come through for her. But if you want to know how or when you'll have to read!
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