Cartooning
The best cartooning is efficient visual storytelling—it is as much a matter of writing as it is of drawing. In this book, noted cartoonist and illustrator Ivan Brunetti presents fifteen distinct lessons on the art of cartooning, guiding his readers through wittily written passages on cartooning terminology, techniques, tools, and theory. Supplemented by Brunetti's own illustrations, prepared specially for this book, these lessons move the reader from spontaneous drawings to single-panel strips and complicated multipage stories.Through simple, creative exercises and assignments, Brunetti offers an unintimidating approach to a complex art form. He looks at the rhythms of storytelling, the challenges of character design, and the formal elements of comics while composing pages in his own iconic style and experimenting with a variety of tools, media, and approaches. By following the author's sophisticated and engaging perspective on the art of cartooning, aspiring cartoonists of all ages will hone their craft, create their personal style, and discover their own visual language.

Cartooning Details

TitleCartooning
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseMar 29th, 2011
PublisherYale University Press
ISBN-139780300170993
Rating
GenreSequential Art, Comics, Art, Nonfiction, Drawing, Graphic Novels

Cartooning Review

  • Anca
    January 1, 1970
    This is a gorgeous book. Beautiful cover, beautiful typesetting, good binding, wonderful content. Though I didn't get what I was expecting (something more along the lines of Scott McCloud's books) the book was really interesting and, well... short. I would have loved to keep on reading. Thankfully, the book references an abundance of works for further study. Last but not least, Ivan Brunetti comes across as the nicest person ever.
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  • Erika
    January 1, 1970
    Thanks to Lynda Barry's wonderful books What It Is and Syllabus: Notes from an Accidental Professor, I have started drawing again after a hiatus of about 10 years. I am not a very accomplished artist but I love to draw. It has been great getting back to it. Barry recommends Brunetti's book in her book, Syllabus. (And Brunetti recommends What It Is in Cartooning.)Both Barry and Brunetti have made me ponder how one approaches the creation of a story. For me, the process of thinking in pictures hel Thanks to Lynda Barry's wonderful books What It Is and Syllabus: Notes from an Accidental Professor, I have started drawing again after a hiatus of about 10 years. I am not a very accomplished artist but I love to draw. It has been great getting back to it. Barry recommends Brunetti's book in her book, Syllabus. (And Brunetti recommends What It Is in Cartooning.)Both Barry and Brunetti have made me ponder how one approaches the creation of a story. For me, the process of thinking in pictures helps me get out of my own head and observe the world more slowly and carefully. Using cartoons as a medium frees me from the heavy burden of telling a "big" story, which often, in my case, results in writer's block. This way, I can think in vignettes or scenes or even in a single-panel format which is a great way to try to get down to an essential element or feeling. As I attempted the exercises, I was delighted to find that as I was trying to draw my subject I occasionally stumbled (usually due to my lack of skill) on some nuance I hadn't consciously considered previously. I recommend Cartooning and the exercises therein to anyone generally interested in the art and process of storytelling.
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  • S
    January 1, 1970
    Pretty good for developing storytelling skills, even if cartoons aren't your forte. It makes you think about visual images as well as textual ones, and how they work together, which is a great skill now where storytelling has become more and more cinematic. If your focus is writing screenplays, all the better.
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  • Greg Allan Holcomb
    January 1, 1970
    This is an activity book on cartooning. Use it to build your skills or just to keep 'em sharp. Well worth picking up if you want to comic. This shouldn't be the first book you pick up on doing comics, but it's one of the ones to pick up when you want to get serious.Just so you know- there's a lot of shitty books on cartooning, this is not one of those.
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  • David Miller
    January 1, 1970
    An interesting discourse on how stories come together, filtered through the weirdness of the individual comics artist. It's straightforward, stressing the fundamentals over pretentiousness. But there's still room enough for ambition and for wonder at what an artist can achieve with limited tools.As a textbook, it's highly effective as well. A reader interested in learning the craft of comics would do well to gollow its course.
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  • Nicholas Ball
    January 1, 1970
    Developed as a text for a course the author delivered, it's a little dry and feels like it relies on their coursework and feedback. The exercises are well written and progress naturally, but the book is more a condensed zeitgeist of the theory of cartooning than a "Make Cartoons!" style how-to book.
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  • Redi Bortoluzzi
    January 1, 1970
    4.5/5 Um curso de quatorze semanas para você pensar a sua arte. Ainda que tenha lições muito básicas, mesmo quadrinhistas cascudos podem conseguir extrair um material valioso ao longo dos exercícios.O autor levanta algumas teses meio polêmicas, mas que merecem alguma reflexão, especialmente a discussão sobre charge política.Orgânico e analógico, é um livro pra se sujar de nanquim!
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  • JTRyan
    January 1, 1970
    Lynda Barry brought me here. This one is from the library and I am sure we're going to get one for the summer when we can devote time to doing each week's exercise. I enjoyed the references to Catcher in the Rye.
  • Kate
    January 1, 1970
    What a perfect, short, and profound encouragement to pick up a pencil and create your own cartoons. This is a lovely, tiny book on cartooning. Lynda Barry recommended it, and I do, too.
  • Haya Alkhalifa
    January 1, 1970
    Good book to get you started.I enjoyed the authors anecdotes and personal input in each chapter. The book was an easy read and a good starting point for budding cartoonists.
  • Melanie Page
    January 1, 1970
    "Write for yourself, do not concern yourself with pleasing your audience (it is impossible, anyway)" (73)."It is all right not to know what it is you are tying to communicate, exactly, ahead of time. Part of the creative process is exploring our thoughts, letting our guard down, and laying ourselves on the line, as we try to work through these things" (73).According to Chris Ware and Seth (pen name of Gregory Gallant), "when you sit down to draw, you should 'dress for work.' Have respect for you "Write for yourself, do not concern yourself with pleasing your audience (it is impossible, anyway)" (73)."It is all right not to know what it is you are tying to communicate, exactly, ahead of time. Part of the creative process is exploring our thoughts, letting our guard down, and laying ourselves on the line, as we try to work through these things" (73).According to Chris Ware and Seth (pen name of Gregory Gallant), "when you sit down to draw, you should 'dress for work.' Have respect for your craft. Put on a pair of pants" (71)."Admittedly, art is like spit. It does not repulse or even worry us while it is still inside of us. But once it exits our body, it becomes disgusting" (73).This book is like a syllabus that has passages that read as if spoken by the teacher to add in explanation. Brunetti writes with the confidence of a person who is a master of his skill. I found this book to be helpful with my fiction writing and that it does not simply apply to cartooning.
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  • High Plains Library District
    January 1, 1970
    This slim book is a full 15-week class on cartooning. The best part? No drawing talent is required. Okay, for those of us who can't draw, who forget basic physiology and draw reversed hands and have no idea about facial proportion, the exercise notebook is a little embarrassing to keep around. There are some cat drawings in mine that would make an outside observer question whether I've ever actually seen a cat outside of a Master And Margarita fever dream. But hey, I don't need practice in somet This slim book is a full 15-week class on cartooning. The best part? No drawing talent is required. Okay, for those of us who can't draw, who forget basic physiology and draw reversed hands and have no idea about facial proportion, the exercise notebook is a little embarrassing to keep around. There are some cat drawings in mine that would make an outside observer question whether I've ever actually seen a cat outside of a Master And Margarita fever dream. But hey, I don't need practice in something I'm already good at. A book on eating donuts? Not necessary. I'm great at that already. A book on DRAWING donuts in cartoon style? Okay, that I could use.~Peter
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  • Edward O'Neill
    January 1, 1970
    I was let down by this.Brunetti tacitly assumes that the drawing part itself cannot nor need not be taught.He gives problems for students to solve, but the problems themselves are so challenging, it's difficult to see how the student is helped in any way.Perhaps this works with Brunetti's tutelage, but this book is very far from giving anyone not already adept the wherewithal to think about problems of pictorial representation and storytelling.Basically, this is the graphic novel equivalent of t I was let down by this.Brunetti tacitly assumes that the drawing part itself cannot nor need not be taught.He gives problems for students to solve, but the problems themselves are so challenging, it's difficult to see how the student is helped in any way.Perhaps this works with Brunetti's tutelage, but this book is very far from giving anyone not already adept the wherewithal to think about problems of pictorial representation and storytelling.Basically, this is the graphic novel equivalent of the Strunk-and-White approach: be clear and get to it.Not enough.
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  • Heather
    January 1, 1970
    This thoughtful take on comic art by Ivan Brunetti, whose work has appeared in McSweeney’s and The New Yorker , is the condensed version of a course the author teaches on the art of cartooning. He presents a series of assignments designed to help readers express themselves eloquently in words and pictures. One especially clever exercise walks readers through the process of distilling a complete story into a one-panel comic strip using J.D. Salinger’s classic The Catcher in the Rye as an example. This thoughtful take on comic art by Ivan Brunetti, whose work has appeared in McSweeney’s and The New Yorker , is the condensed version of a course the author teaches on the art of cartooning. He presents a series of assignments designed to help readers express themselves eloquently in words and pictures. One especially clever exercise walks readers through the process of distilling a complete story into a one-panel comic strip using J.D. Salinger’s classic The Catcher in the Rye as an example. Don’t be fooled by the whimsical cover; this book is decidedly aimed at adults.
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  • Morgane
    January 1, 1970
    Once I had a painting teacher, this old Woody Allen type of guy (from New York and everything), who was insanely neurotic - he told me he HAD to eat a PB&J sandwich for lunch every day, to maintain some stability in his life - and who also worked harder than anyone I know, focusing on content and technique rather than letting us muck around with "style", knowing that style without substance is crap at best. Reading this was like being in his class again, if it had been about cartooning and n Once I had a painting teacher, this old Woody Allen type of guy (from New York and everything), who was insanely neurotic - he told me he HAD to eat a PB&J sandwich for lunch every day, to maintain some stability in his life - and who also worked harder than anyone I know, focusing on content and technique rather than letting us muck around with "style", knowing that style without substance is crap at best. Reading this was like being in his class again, if it had been about cartooning and not about painting. I miss that class.
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  • Maia
    January 1, 1970
    Cartooning: Philosophy and Practice by Ivan Brunetti was one of the two books I read for a Comics Pedagogy class in my MFA program over the summer. It took me a while to get into Brunetti's sometimes unnecessarily familiar tone but it's a very good outline for a 15 week comics class and by the conclusion it's downright inspirational. Probably one of the best books on teaching and making comics available. Also very short! I'd highly recommend it.
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  • Somya
    January 1, 1970
    “Art is somewhat like spit. It does not repulse or even worry us while it is still inside of us, but once it exits our body, it becomes disgusting.” - Ivan BrunettiThis book is really good for anyone interested in cartooning. Brunetti is so precise with his wit, it's cutting. As an aside, the size, typography, graphic design and tactile experience of the book is perfect and very enjoyable to revel in.
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  • Rachel
    January 1, 1970
    Clear, concise, elegant. A really great text about art and creation beyond just cartoons. I read this on the suggestion of Lynda Barry in "Syllabus" for my Humanities 101 course, focusing mostly on the philosophy side, but I'm looking forward to actually taking the course as Brunetti outlines it and working on my own fledgling doodles.
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  • Esther
    January 1, 1970
    I find the author-instructor deeply frustrating, and now feel relieved I wasn't selected to take his class in college. That said, his exercises in progressive cartooning interest me, and I may give them a shot/post them on M&W.
  • Tena Edlin
    January 1, 1970
    This book was mentioned in Lynda Barry's Syllabus, and I wanted to read it to add to my background knowledge for my comics, cartoons, and graphic novels unit. I like the basic quality of the drawings. I think they will put some of my students who think they "can't draw" more at ease.
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  • susie
    January 1, 1970
    Ivan Brunetti has the rare ability to articulate the art making experience, its challenges and triumphs, and a series of absolutely fun exercises to get the beginner and the expert both reoriented. Strongly recommended to anyone interested in combining words and images.
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  • Lysbeth
    January 1, 1970
    A fifteen-week tutorial in drawing cartoon, Brunetti based this book on the classes he has taught both at the undergraduate and graduate level. Along with pragmatic exercises for the sketch book, Brunetti discusses the basics of good visual storytelling.
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  • Moss Drake
    January 1, 1970
    This is a book about honing the craft of cartooning. It is roughly Brunetti's 15-week class on cartooning, so it is enlightening to do the exercises proposed in the book. But, it can also be read cover-to-cover (70 pages) or used as a reference or inspiration. Worth owning
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  • Jim
    January 1, 1970
    a how to book w/illos by chris ware. excellent
  • Mycala
    January 1, 1970
    This book is excellent! If you follow the exercises in this book, your skills will definitely improve. A valuable resource in my collection.
  • Ivy
    January 1, 1970
    Ivan Brunetti is the best!
  • Aileen
    January 1, 1970
    This was a library browse through book for me but it was fun and would be worth revisiting if I ever get my cartooning on. It was inspirational for my sketchbook.
  • Lise Petrauskas
    January 1, 1970
    Gah! I can't find my copy anywhere!
  • Kate Pittman
    January 1, 1970
    This book is amazing. A tiny gem filled with wisdom. I plan to follow the lessons at some point in the near future, but just reading it through ignited a few new thoughts in my art brain.
  • Shannon Wheeler
    January 1, 1970
    great little book on cartooning.
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