Fried
 This Is an Invitation to Take Your Power Back!       What happened to the spark you had as a child that powered curiosity, engagement with life, and creativity? Has it burned out? Are you feeling emotionally and physically exhausted and cynical, wondering if you’ve got what it takes to make it in this rapidly changing world? Burnout looks a lot like depression, but it’s not a biological bogeyman that medication or simple stress management can cure. It’s a disorder of hope and will that sucks the life out of competent, idealistic, hardworking people like you; and it will be an ongoing challenge for you to take your power back!            In this breakthrough work, Joan Borysenko, Ph.D.—a Harvard-trained medical scientist, psychologist, and renowned pioneer in stress and health—straddles psychology, biology, and soul in a completely fresh approach to burnout. Joan’s deeply human (and often amusing) personal accounts of burnout and recovery; the science of helplessness, hopelessness, and empowerment; and the rich wisdom of people who have gone from fried to revived—including many of Joan’s vibrant community of 5,000 Facebook Friends—make this powerful and practical book a must-read for our times.

Fried Details

TitleFried
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseJan 1st, 2011
PublisherHay House
ISBN-139781401925505
Rating
GenreSelf Help, Nonfiction, Health, Psychology

Fried Review

  • Amy L. Campbell
    January 1, 1970
    Note: Free copy received via NetGalley.I feel like not only did I have to sit through a half hour lecture by my physician about my daily habits, but when I told her I was having pain in my kidneys to "take two of these and call me in the morning." I sincerely don't feel like this book addressed the topic, and much of it was rehashing of personality types ala Myers-Briggs, there was quite a bit of psychotherapy/alternate spirituality buzzword-throwing, and far too many personal anecdotes that did Note: Free copy received via NetGalley.I feel like not only did I have to sit through a half hour lecture by my physician about my daily habits, but when I told her I was having pain in my kidneys to "take two of these and call me in the morning." I sincerely don't feel like this book addressed the topic, and much of it was rehashing of personality types ala Myers-Briggs, there was quite a bit of psychotherapy/alternate spirituality buzzword-throwing, and far too many personal anecdotes that didn't really fit. It seems to me that Borysenko really wanted to write a memoir about being burned out and just didn't know how to do it. So instead we have a somewhat ineffectual self-book all about Borysenko helping herself. I didn't see anything new in this, and if you're like me and out of work it will not help you at all.I think Borysenko really missed out on a good opportunity to help out a lot of people who are in very dire situations right now. These are the people who actually have the time to read a book like this and might benefit most from it. Instead we get advice like, "make sure you take time for vacation!" Her advice can pretty much be summed up in this passage from the second to last chapter:"To prevent burnout, listen to yourself, rest when you need to, and love your body in the way you eat and what your senses take in...spend time in silence, meditate, take walks in nature. Talk or write, but don't let anything fester." Page 144 (quote verified using Google Books).I also found the writing style to be a bit abrasive. It sounds as if she is writing directly to her friends who all come from the same or very similar backgrounds. I found the use of relying solely on her personal experience and those of her Facebook friends to be a little questionable and it just felt like she was trying to prove herself to her audience about her credentials and how good of a person she is now. I'm just not convinced that this helps anyone but the author.
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  • pri
    January 1, 1970
    i've read a lot of books about burn out and getting out of burn out. this is the best so far. right book, right time. right way of approach. no corporate classroom powerpoint slide feel. very honest and holistic. highly recommended if you're even considering the title. :)quotes: "when you tell your body that you're not particularly interested in living, and you let your life force run perilously low, it's not surprising that the physical plant obliges by shutting down""You can study personality i've read a lot of books about burn out and getting out of burn out. this is the best so far. right book, right time. right way of approach. no corporate classroom powerpoint slide feel. very honest and holistic. highly recommended if you're even considering the title. :)quotes: "when you tell your body that you're not particularly interested in living, and you let your life force run perilously low, it's not surprising that the physical plant obliges by shutting down""You can study personality with a variety of systems that are fascinating windows on what shapes your unique personality, temperament, and worldview. But the bottom line is this: If you know who you are and accept it, then you're less likely to waste energy trying to be something you're not. It's the struggle that will burn you out. And it's the acceptance of who you are that lets you relax and soften your edges. The result is the natural joy of living comfortably in your own skin"while i don't think her method was a "it solved everything and did my wash too," i appreciated it much more than the very many "you can have it all if you just organize/work out/eat enough/do this enough" self help that tends to be offered for burnout. it was much more focused on burnout as a natural progression of the self. a cycle. time to take notice, stop, withdraw in. give focus back to yourself, remember who you are and what you are capable of. and then get back out there.
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  • Charles Legg Jr.
    January 1, 1970
    Dr. Borysenko does an excellent job of describing what burnout is and how it effects your life and health, but falls way short, in my opinion, of offering real help in the recovery from being fried. The last few chapters of the book are little more than comments left by her Facebook friends, most containing way too much "being one with the universe" babel. I was hoping that the book, which had a good factual beginning, would have offered a more structured guidance towards recovering from burnout Dr. Borysenko does an excellent job of describing what burnout is and how it effects your life and health, but falls way short, in my opinion, of offering real help in the recovery from being fried. The last few chapters of the book are little more than comments left by her Facebook friends, most containing way too much "being one with the universe" babel. I was hoping that the book, which had a good factual beginning, would have offered a more structured guidance towards recovering from burnout. I kept reading, but with each new page, the drudgery of reading yet another Facebook comment grew tiring. If you would remove all the quoted comments, there is little left of her own writing, and a lot of that is anecdotal writing about herself. Looking at the author's other books, it seems she is in the business of writing short "feel good books" rather than books of substance. Was disappointed and had hoped for more.
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  • Laura Peterson
    January 1, 1970
    I'm not sure how to review this. The distinction drawn between being stressed out versus burned out was very valuable to me. I enjoyed the book, though found myself skimming in a variety of areas. I also didn't feel connected to the "help" areas, the ways to move through burnout on to revitalization. I'm willing to admit it may have been my own lack while reading rather than a flaw with the book. I did get some valuable info out of it.
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  • Beth Levant
    January 1, 1970
    Exceedingly superficial. Just a bunch of personal annecdotes and some re-hash of basic psychological concepts that don't go anywhere. No useful take home information.
  • Greta
    January 1, 1970
    This book is really mostly an autobiography and a shout out to Joan's Facebook Friends (FBFs) who helped her through a rough patch (and gave her fodder for this book). She's been there, done that before, though, and given it some thought and this book has some useful information about "burnout" (or stress or depression or dysfunction or whatever you want to call whatever isn't working for you...maybe we should just refer to it as "the downside of life"). The author brings in all sorts of explana This book is really mostly an autobiography and a shout out to Joan's Facebook Friends (FBFs) who helped her through a rough patch (and gave her fodder for this book). She's been there, done that before, though, and given it some thought and this book has some useful information about "burnout" (or stress or depression or dysfunction or whatever you want to call whatever isn't working for you...maybe we should just refer to it as "the downside of life"). The author brings in all sorts of explanations for why bad things happen, who is most susceptible to malfunctioning, how to get beyond these challenges and, hopefully, get your groove back on. Nothing new here, really, just a new buzzword and lots of alternative viewpoints of dysfunction and its cures, and maybe a different way of approaching the biology vs ecology question (nature vs nurture) and the possiblity of change and/or damage control. (There's a spotlight here on the downside of pharmaceuticals as well, but she clearly doesn't want to step on anyone's toes by saying "Just Say No" outright). Life is inherently disastrous, but whether you get fried, apparently, is up to you. I'd like to think that's true, in my glass half-full sort of way.
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  • Jacinta
    January 1, 1970
    This was pretty annoying with the constant suggestions to “try reading my other book x!” and references to the irony of all her self help books on stress etc and how she was still stressed, but I gave up when I hit an entire chapter about how anti depressants are mostly just marketing, most people who get them aren’t depressed they’re just burned out, and Big Pharma is bribing doctors to prescribe them when nobody needs them (with a couple weak attempts at saying she wasn’t saying that). There a This was pretty annoying with the constant suggestions to “try reading my other book x!” and references to the irony of all her self help books on stress etc and how she was still stressed, but I gave up when I hit an entire chapter about how anti depressants are mostly just marketing, most people who get them aren’t depressed they’re just burned out, and Big Pharma is bribing doctors to prescribe them when nobody needs them (with a couple weak attempts at saying she wasn’t saying that). There are plenty of issues with diagnoses and prescriptions in mental health but “actually everyone has the condition *I’m* writing a book about instead!” is nonsense.
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  • Crissy
    January 1, 1970
    I thought it started strong. Insightful knowledge that I was excited to keep reading. Just past the halfway point it started to fall apart and never recovered. Second half I thought she was just trying to fill the pages up and I struggled to stay interested/attentive.
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  • Madhur Ahuja
    January 1, 1970
    Ok. Book. First couple of chapters are good and practical. Rest of them I could not relate much. Should be a quick read for someone suffering from burnout.
  • Heidi The Reader
    January 1, 1970
    Fried: Why You Burn Out and How to Revive was eye opening for me. First of all, I have heard people describing themselves as feeling "burned out" but I had no idea that this was an actual state of being that could be categorized and treated. Secondly, I have experienced this myself and, perhaps because of learned helplessness (described in detail in the book), I didn't know that this could be addressed and healed. Now, I know.Dr. Borysenko calls this a disease of the spirit that has physical sym Fried: Why You Burn Out and How to Revive was eye opening for me. First of all, I have heard people describing themselves as feeling "burned out" but I had no idea that this was an actual state of being that could be categorized and treated. Secondly, I have experienced this myself and, perhaps because of learned helplessness (described in detail in the book), I didn't know that this could be addressed and healed. Now, I know.Dr. Borysenko calls this a disease of the spirit that has physical symptoms in the body. The answer is self knowledge and self care. Through personality tests, you can determine which jobs, situations, friends, ect are best for you and give you the greatest chance of success with your natural talents and inclinations. Also, by determining what motivates you, you can figure out what you need for "happiness." Everybody is different so each person burns out or feels successful for very different reasons. Know what you need and spend your energy working towards that- rather than what society or those around you say that you need or should want.Another interesting attribute of this book is that Dr. Borysenko wrote it with input from her circle of Facebook friends. She would post questions about burn out on her page (causes, symptoms, treatments) and then used those answers to develop Fried. The book isn't just based on her personal opinions or small, hand picked research groups. She had everyday people working together and contributing answers towards a disease that is hard to define and let alone treat. I think that in the future that more authors will be using this method for information collection and theory development. The World Wide Web is bringing together people with common interests who would have never had the chance to meet each other or brainstorm together. It's an interesting and innovative way to utilize technology and social media for the greater good.Fans of Deepak Chopra and Denise Linn might like this book. Anybody who has a job, family obligations, or stress of any kind should enjoy this. It's empowering, educational, and life changing.
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  • Mary Miller
    January 1, 1970
    I hate writing bad reviews, honestly! However, this book needs to be better edited or an additional add to the title:" my memoirs and how I survived burn out." My concern is that this is more of a personal story of how Joan survived her burn outs, versus a true book outlining and giving tips and exercises that can help someone get out of their burn out. Why? Because one exercise written in one or two sentences as a 'way out of the hole' (one per level of hole you're in), is all she is offering h I hate writing bad reviews, honestly! However, this book needs to be better edited or an additional add to the title:" my memoirs and how I survived burn out." My concern is that this is more of a personal story of how Joan survived her burn outs, versus a true book outlining and giving tips and exercises that can help someone get out of their burn out. Why? Because one exercise written in one or two sentences as a 'way out of the hole' (one per level of hole you're in), is all she is offering here. There are some great spots in this book; the first couple of chapters are 'dead spot on' talking about mapping your burn out (and perhaps we need to map our own levels of decent into hell, as mentioned by Dante), but sadly the predominant theme is; me, me and more me. Which is fine, we get that folks in the "self help industry" working to create mentor systems, doing group dynamics, going from seminar to workshops IS a very stressful job. However, this book is so mixed in terms of its intent (for the public, for her, for?????) it reads more like a diary and a cursory attempt to involve Facebook as a test modality (using folks from her Facebook page to talk about stress and burn out, as well as folks talking rather candidly with her regarding their SSRI use, which is a bit scary considering that Facebook like all computerdom, means that what they are sharing become public access).She mentions several assessment tools, the burn out decent is based on one of these systems, but the order of decent is based the tool levels and not on her experience or even others (the homicidal tendency would before the complete hollow shell, for example), which is sad, because as i said, the first 2 chapters are stellar then it going into antidotal stories about herself for the most part: interesting but not necessarily a shovel that can get you out of this burn out mentioned!
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  • Summer
    January 1, 1970
    Be yourself. Rest when you're tired. Not exactly ground breaking advice. Also, I think she really wanted to target women but instead of just writing to women, she made these odd perfectory mentions for men. One sentence was "If it hasn't changed, you may have to visit Mama Gena's School for the Womanly Arts or whatever the masculine equivalent may be." She couldn't google something before writing such a sentence? Why invite men to the party just to dismiss them? I appreciated her careful walking Be yourself. Rest when you're tired. Not exactly ground breaking advice. Also, I think she really wanted to target women but instead of just writing to women, she made these odd perfectory mentions for men. One sentence was "If it hasn't changed, you may have to visit Mama Gena's School for the Womanly Arts or whatever the masculine equivalent may be." She couldn't google something before writing such a sentence? Why invite men to the party just to dismiss them? I appreciated her careful walking of the line where antidepressants are concerned. It must be difficult trying to tell people not to get medicated too quickly or unnecessarily, but DO get medicated if that's really what needs to be done. Over all, it was an OK read. A nice little break for your brain. A reminder to meditate and take care of yourself. If you aren't a big self-help reader already, this would be a good place to start. If you read this sort of thing already, it's mostly old hat.
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  • Experience Life
    January 1, 1970
    You probably know the feeling: You’re tired — and not just physically. You’ve got no pep, no creativity, and little interest in the things you used to enjoy.You’re experiencing what’s known as “burnout,” explains Joan Borysenko, PhD, in her latest book. Burnout occurs when good people give their best — then wind up with nothing left for themselves. Although the experience has several dimensions, it is primarily characterized by learned helplessness, she explains — a sense that even if you try, t You probably know the feeling: You’re tired — and not just physically. You’ve got no pep, no creativity, and little interest in the things you used to enjoy.You’re experiencing what’s known as “burnout,” explains Joan Borysenko, PhD, in her latest book. Burnout occurs when good people give their best — then wind up with nothing left for themselves. Although the experience has several dimensions, it is primarily characterized by learned helplessness, she explains — a sense that even if you try, there’s nothing you can do to transform your situation. In Fried, Borysenko carefully details the progressive stages of burnout — from the frustration of unmet needs to the chasm of inner emptiness — and she suggests practical ways to emerge from the burnout abyss. Along the way, she includes engaging personal stories about her own encounters with burnout and how she got through them. A great mix of authentic empathy and practical advice.
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  • Kristen Holland Shear
    January 1, 1970
    It was given to me as an intervention of sorts, and as much as I hate to admit this, I needed it. There were sections that I don't agree with, but by and large, the book is a great wake-up call for anyone who thinks they might be burnt out. By providing concrete answers as well as step-by-step solutions to address the issues, Borynsenko provides a great resource for people who are constantly exhausted, stressed out, etc. I'm planning to share this book with several friends and relatives who migh It was given to me as an intervention of sorts, and as much as I hate to admit this, I needed it. There were sections that I don't agree with, but by and large, the book is a great wake-up call for anyone who thinks they might be burnt out. By providing concrete answers as well as step-by-step solutions to address the issues, Borynsenko provides a great resource for people who are constantly exhausted, stressed out, etc. I'm planning to share this book with several friends and relatives who might also benefit from a mini-intervention.
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  • Barbara Wright-avlitis
    January 1, 1970
    This author wrote this book with the help of her Facebook friends. It's about burning out and finding your way back. It's written in a way that flows so easily with examples and stories. Today, the business world has seriously changed, demanding more and more of workers. Burnout is on the rise and it carries a strong stigma but there really isn't much relief available. This book helps to understand how people burnout and what to do to recover and prevent burnout. Great book!
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  • Vickie
    January 1, 1970
    Fried is a wonderful guide to navigating the effects so commonly experienced by many Americans; Burnout. Joan Borysenko not only provides a road map to relief but also recruited the help of Facebook fans to participate by sharing their personal experiences as well. This is a great addition to your personal book shelf or a great gift to someone you care about that is at the end of their rope.
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  • Sabkymom
    January 1, 1970
    A very fast read that covers the 12 stages of burnout and then, how to recover utilizing Dante's inferno and Divine Comedy as literary metaphor. Particularly relevant given the ever-increasing stress of American life and work. A worthwhile read.
  • Melanie
    January 1, 1970
    Quick read about what burnout and depression feel and look like. Contains suggestions about how to avoid burnout in the future.
  • Kathy
    January 1, 1970
    Another good one by Joan Borysenko. Her insights on the subject and what to do about it are useful and practical.
  • Ron J Roy
    January 1, 1970
    Great "how-to" book on working through Burn Out. Very clear on the differences of depression and burn-out. Easy read!
  • Erin
    January 1, 1970
    One of the best books I have read this year...
  • Ellen
    January 1, 1970
    Turns out we aren't machines.
  • Laquetta
    January 1, 1970
    when you over cooked your brain boils at first and then over heats. which in turn describes fried. Now time to learn how to undo this mess.
  • Andrea
    January 1, 1970
    rec by Katie
  • Kim
    January 1, 1970
    A little preachy but it got the job done; I am no longer worried about my increasingly hectic work.
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