Seed Seeker (Seed, #3)
An adventure in colonization and conflict from acclaimed SF writer Pamela SargentSeveral hundred years ago, Ship, a sentient starship, settled humans on the planet Home before leaving to colonize other worlds, promising to return one day. Over time, the colony on Home divided into those who live in the original domed buildings of the colony, who maintain the library and technology of Ship, and those who live by the river, farming and hunting to survive. The Dome Dwellers consider themselves the protectors of "true humanity" and the River People "contaminated," and the two sides interact solely through ritualized trade: food and goods from the River People in exchange for repairs and recharges by the Dome Dwellers.Then a new light appears in the night sky. The River People believe it might be Ship, keeping its promise to return, but the Dome Dwellers, who have a radio to communicate with Ship, are silent. So Bian, a seventeen-year-old girl from a small village, travels upriver to learn what they know. As she travels through the colony of Home, gaining companions and gathering news, Bian ponders why the Dome Dwellers have said nothing. Has Ship commanded them to be silent, in preparation for some judgment on the River People? Or are the Dome Dwellers lying to Ship, turning Ship against their rivals?Whatever the answer, life is about to change radically on both sides of the divide.

Seed Seeker (Seed, #3) Details

TitleSeed Seeker (Seed, #3)
Author
FormatHardcover
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseNov 9th, 2010
PublisherTor Books
ISBN0765314282
ISBN-139780765314284
Number of pages288 pages
Rating
GenreScience Fiction, Young Adult, Adventure, Science Fiction Fantasy, Fiction

Seed Seeker (Seed, #3) Review

  • Kristin
    June 10, 2012
    I completed the Earthseed trilogy and found all three books quite intriguing. I was really impressed with the author's creativity and imagination, and I'm not just saying that because the author is my Aunt Pam! These books address a really interesting question: if humans were to leave Earth, would the worlds we create be any better, or would we still fight wars and find ourselves in endless power struggles? I'm not sure I agree with the answer these books suggest, but how the story ends seems pl I completed the Earthseed trilogy and found all three books quite intriguing. I was really impressed with the author's creativity and imagination, and I'm not just saying that because the author is my Aunt Pam! These books address a really interesting question: if humans were to leave Earth, would the worlds we create be any better, or would we still fight wars and find ourselves in endless power struggles? I'm not sure I agree with the answer these books suggest, but how the story ends seems plausible. Whereas most trilogies I've read track the same set of characters, this trilogy tracks 3 generations. Though I felt like I didn't get to know the characters as well, it's interesting how different the values of the characters in Earthseed are from those in Farseed and especially Seed Seeker. Farseed was my favorite of the 3 books because of Nuy, one of the coolest female characters I've read about in a long time. I recommend these books to anyone who's interested in reading a more cerebral science fiction trilogy than Hunger Games. These books make you think a bit more!
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  • Vanessa
    June 28, 2011
    A few generations ago, the sentient Ship found the planet Home, and seeded a human colony there. Ship promised to return one day to check up on their progress after it finds more planets to colonize.Now Ship has returned to Home, and the people there aren't sure they want it to come back.There are two different groups of people living on Home, as represented by their PoV narrators. There are the 'dome dwellers' who remain at the initial settlement and live off the technology and supplies that Sh A few generations ago, the sentient Ship found the planet Home, and seeded a human colony there. Ship promised to return one day to check up on their progress after it finds more planets to colonize.Now Ship has returned to Home, and the people there aren't sure they want it to come back.There are two different groups of people living on Home, as represented by their PoV narrators. There are the 'dome dwellers' who remain at the initial settlement and live off the technology and supplies that Ship provided when they first arrived. Safrah is one of the four young adults who still live there, helping to raise the children grown from the mechanical wombs; all older adults have died. They consider themselves 'true humans' because they haven't integrated with the alien biology of the planet. However, the majority of the population moved away from the first settlement, and now live along the river, including the young woman Bian. Unlike the dome dwellers who live among deteriorating technology, the agrarian river people are thriving and growing.The characters, particularly the main PoV characters are an interesting assortment of people, with their problems, wants, and fears. The switches between PoV was smooth and easy to follow. The cultures of the dome dwellers and the outsiders was sparsely drawn, but was well enough done to not overwhelm a YA audience with too much information.On first glimpse the concept of SEED SEEKER is really interesting. And the first quarter of the book sets up the story nicely. But then niggling problems became apparent, and by three-quarters of the way through they became full-blown annoyances.A good portion of important information that affects character choices and behavior isn't given sufficient foreshadowing; it's not explained until we're in-the-moment, which makes the resolutions feel contrived. For example, the dome dwelling children are too afraid ever go outside. However, near the end of the novel we learn that one of them has been sneaking out on increasing forays for the past several months...which conveniently helps the river people gain entrance to the domes they would otherwise be lost in.The prose could have been more fluid, and as a result it slowed the pace, making the book almost tedious to read. The dialogue was particularly awkward, mostly because the characters provide information that was hard for me to believe real people would share. The creative naming convention, especially when referring to people who don't have a direct bearing on the plot, cluttered the narrative unnecessarily.The most important of these problems is the eventual realization of the contrived plot. Bian and Safrah spend the entire novel afraid. Afraid of their own lives. Afraid of the other community's culture. Afraid of Ship's potential 'judgement' on the colony. Afraid of what's going to happen. Fortunately they stumble forward in their lives despite this fear—even if it's not clear why they're afraid of everything around them. It got overbearing at times, because their fear and fear-based actions were important to the plot's forward momentum...which meant the momentum was slow and stilted.Despite the interesting premise, the execution lacked any real strength. YA readers who really enjoy science fiction may likely enjoy this book for the themes of colonization, quasi-religious judgement, technology vs pastoral, opposing cultures, and a sort of "first contact" with Ship. However, others with a passing interest in Sci Fi may find it dull.Recommended Age: 12+Language: NoneViolence: Brief scene near the end, and not particularly graphic.Sex: Several of the characters have romantic intentions which lead to marriage, including one same-sex couple who must overcome cultural obstacles.SEED SEEKER is the final installment of the Seed Trilogy, after EARTHSEED (1983) and FARSEED (2007). However, it's easily readable as a standalone.
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  • Erika
    October 29, 2010
    I am reviewing a copy provided by the publisher.Bian has never been beyond the fields of her village. The River People have had little need to travel north to visit the Dome Dwellers. They do not want for food or clothing, only the strange technology of their ancestors brings them upriver to trade with the people they became separated from so long ago. Fuel cells can’t replenish themselves, after all. Neither can the colonists, the Dome Dwellers—the survivors who maintain their righteous link to I am reviewing a copy provided by the publisher.Bian has never been beyond the fields of her village. The River People have had little need to travel north to visit the Dome Dwellers. They do not want for food or clothing, only the strange technology of their ancestors brings them upriver to trade with the people they became separated from so long ago. Fuel cells can’t replenish themselves, after all. Neither can the colonists, the Dome Dwellers—the survivors who maintain their righteous link to the first colonists of Home and refuse to leave the long-standing habitats and claim the world as their own.They have not done well sustaining the animals and crops left for them. Even the children run wild and unbridled around the compound, driven by an unnamed fear of the River People and of the wide unknown beyond the fabricated structures surrounding them. But a strange light on the horizon is about the change how these two groups view each other, how they feel about their failures and accomplishments, and how they choose to go forward with their lives. Like a legend or fairy tale, everyone is familiar with the story of Ship, the large flying machine that brought the first settlers to Home, and its promise to return one day and show its children they have not been forgotten. Ship, as Bian as surmised, has come back.Seed Seeker is the final installment in a trilogy Pamela Sargent began with Earthseed in 1983. Before I go further, and since it was a concern of my own, this is a book that can be read alone, without the previous two (Earthseed and Farseed). It does not have to be read in chronological order. I was assured of this because like anyone stepping blind into a new series, knowing where to start is often a difficult decision. After finishing the book, I think I agree, with one hesitation. There were some moments that beg for further exploration, but have little bearing on knowledge of the previous two books—as far as I can tell, at least. Simply put: the book was too short and certain characters just did not get enough attention.But before I go into that, there were any number of things to enjoy about this book. The writing, for one, was incredibly engaging. Not having read Sargent before, I did not have any expectations and this, I think, was good. It means I was that much more impressed with how quietly driven this book is. The POV switches between Bian and Safrah so both sides are equally represented. I especially love how the journey takes them out of their comfort zones, much like Frodo Baggins or Luke Skywalker finally stepping beyond home for the first time in a grand adventure.There may be an abundance of technology on Home—whether it functions correctly, if at all, is a different story—but the technology by itself isn’t important. How the River People and Dome Dwellers react to it (and in return, to each other) is the undercurrent moving this novel to its ultimate conclusion. This is a book about fear. About fear and change and how those two go hand in hand, but also why one can be the catalyst for the other.Like other “first contact” stories, Seed Seeker organized the friend versus foe mentality that often motivates strangers to realize the only way out of any situation is Death To The Invaders. We don’t ever want to be friendly; we can’t ever be sure the Other Side means well, nor can we convince them we do, and so we take the most brutal route (the easiest to convey): violence. In this case, the division between the River People (pastoral and agrarian) and the Dome Dwellers (tech-dependent) happened long ago, in another book perhaps. Is it really important to know why they are separated? No, but the names they give each other speak for themselves. Half of the original colony wanted to explore and expand the unknown of their new home. The other half felt compelled to listen to their bigoted leaders and stay where they could control everything, where their machines could regulate food, temperature, and maintain a digital library of the past. These were the folks who just couldn’t let things go.The marvelous thing about Ship is how it eventually changes this dynamic of what began as a slowly brewing war of resentment and suspicion. The River People think the Dome Dwellers, with their radio, have made contact with Ship but refuse to share that information; the Dome Dwellers think Ship has abandoned them for their failures and chosen to speak only to the River People. Neither of these two sides ever just communicate with each other.The moment Ship as a Possibility changes into Ship as a Reality, people can and do act, but in surprisingly heroic ways. In addition to how fluidly Sargent executes this chain of events, she also considers issues of progression and tradition, turning expectations completely around to examine which half of the colony lies on either side of that divide.Thematically, I was very impressed with Seed Seeker.There are, of course, a few nasty characters, several sweet ones, and a variety of others to stir things up . Suspicion, love, jealousy, bitterness—these young adults are human to the core and experience the emotions to prove it. While I could see where Sargent may excel at creating the perfect environment for relatable characters to grow vividly around and against each other, I found myself unable to really develop a strong connection to any one of them. Their individuals troubles felt too distant, especially Arnagh (who, let’s face it: was not given the best of names) and Lusa (the victim of unrequited love). We find them both in mourning. Their rejections have already happened. What readers get are the after effects which, while sad, are difficult to fully appreciate. I can’t fathom what Lusa finds so attractive about Enli, other than him being a musician; he’s distant and grumpy, not to mention flighty. Lusa could do much better. I wish my heart went out to them, and to a certain extent it does. But only on the surface, as a sympathetic ear rather than out of any real investment in their heartbreak.This is where I feel a divergence between Seed Seeker as a stand alone versus as the third in a trilogy. Even though it appears none of these characters were featured in Farseed (the second of the trilogy), and that a significant amount of time has passed in world between the two, something still felt off. Something still felt missing. The conflict between Morwen and Terris felt especially hollow. These children deal with the repercussions of something unseen and harbor deep resentments, but are already seething and villainous. Maybe Safrah didn’t raise them well. Maybe they had other poisonous influences. Maybe the story will feel more well-rounded after reading the first two, maybe it won’t. I do intend to find out.
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  • J.L. Dobias
    April 30, 2012
    Seed Seeker by Pamela SargentSeed Seeker is Pamela Sargent's third book in the Seed Series.The first two set the tone for the series and this one follows through with the same tone capping off the series that is more character driven than innovative. In the first book the Ship which is both a generation ship and sentient AI, has raised generations of humans with the goal to deliver them to their new home where she would seed the new world. She was doing so in the belief that she was completing t Seed Seeker by Pamela SargentSeed Seeker is Pamela Sargent's third book in the Seed Series.The first two set the tone for the series and this one follows through with the same tone capping off the series that is more character driven than innovative. In the first book the Ship which is both a generation ship and sentient AI, has raised generations of humans with the goal to deliver them to their new home where she would seed the new world. She was doing so in the belief that she was completing the work of some of the finest minds Earth had to offer. Saving mankind by preparing the generations to survive on a potential new and wild world.[The sentience of the ship seems to be minimized throughout the series though the main thread of the moral dilemma is tied to its sentience.]The story starts with a generation that has some conflicts amongst its members and as they come close to reaching their destination they discover that the ship has had a previous generation in suspension because the first world she stopped at was not suitable. The waking of that generation causes more conflict and sets the stage for strife in the near future when they are all dropped upon the new world. At the same time Ship discovers that the original group that set her on her mission may have been the missfits of Earth rather than the great minds she'd been programed to believe.In the second book the colony of three disparate groups attempt to survive while ship goes on with her mission to create more generations and continue to seed the universe. The story begins with a few of the original colonist still arround, but centers on the next generation. A generation that might contain some who have some dramatic adaptations to the new world. This sets the stage for the division of those who are affected and those that are not. And the isolation of the ones who believe they are the future of pure man on the new world.This third book takes up from there in the next generation and also at a time when the generation Ship has been having some doubts about her purpose and some regrets about leaving the first generations on the new planet. As the story opens there is a new light in the sky above the new world and this sets off a pilgrimage to the original settlement to find out if the light might be Ship. There are mixed feelings about the potential arrival of ship because those who have been changed by something on this new planet are fearful that the Ship may reject them as being less than adequate[less than human].Once again Pamela Sargent creates some interesting and credible characters that come to life in a world of strife, conflict, and misunderstanding. And the leading question in the readers mind might be; how will ship react to this world of savages and how could they possibly fit into her programmed plan.This is a great Generation Ship series that is both for Young Adults and SFF fans. J.L. Dobias
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  • Ove
    December 1, 2010
    We are back at Home, the planet Ship seeded. A moving light in the sky remind everyone about Ship’s promise to return. The River People lives simple agrarian lives close to the alien nature that changed them forever. The Dome Dwellers, the ‘true humans’ are dwindling and only a few mature kids and an unruly group of kids remains. They all share the legends about Ship.But they also share mistrust for the other. The light sets off a series of events that fuels their mistrust and violence threatens We are back at Home, the planet Ship seeded. A moving light in the sky remind everyone about Ship’s promise to return. The River People lives simple agrarian lives close to the alien nature that changed them forever. The Dome Dwellers, the ‘true humans’ are dwindling and only a few mature kids and an unruly group of kids remains. They all share the legends about Ship.But they also share mistrust for the other. The light sets off a series of events that fuels their mistrust and violence threatens.The Seventeen-year-old Bian provides the POV of the River People while Safrah provides the same for the Dome Dwellers. The story is more about the travel than the objective though.It is interesting to learn the world as the characters do. None of the main characters have ever been outside their home town. The characters they meet are in general interesting and there is a progress of love affairs, quarrels, misunderstandings and new experiences.The characters are easy to relate to but I would have liked to see a bit more character development and background. Especially the unruly kids of the Dome Dwellers are a bit sketchy. This lowered my enjoyment some.Seed Seeker is a good conclusion to the Seed Trilogy and can be read alone and Pamela Sargent leaves the door open for another book in the end.
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  • Dena Landon
    February 4, 2011
    Good YA scifi is hard to find, and having heard good buzz about Seed Seeker I was pleased when a friend gave me a copy. I wasn't disappointed. The story is told from the points of view of two main characters, Safrah and Bian. They both live on a planet called Home, but Safrah lives with a group who claim to be 'true humanity' in domes and surrounded by technology left by the Ship that brought them to the planet, and Bian lives with the River People out on the planet.When a light appears in the s Good YA scifi is hard to find, and having heard good buzz about Seed Seeker I was pleased when a friend gave me a copy. I wasn't disappointed. The story is told from the points of view of two main characters, Safrah and Bian. They both live on a planet called Home, but Safrah lives with a group who claim to be 'true humanity' in domes and surrounded by technology left by the Ship that brought them to the planet, and Bian lives with the River People out on the planet.When a light appears in the sky, and people start talking about an old promise that Ship would return, both girls worlds start to change. Bian, who is shy and has never strayed far from home, volunteers to travel to see if the Dome Dwellers have had contact with Ship. Safrah is confronted with sabotage within the Dome and the fear that they will be judged for disappointing Ship. The arrival of Ship will leave both girls forever changed. It was particularly fascinating to read the two girls fears of the other group of people. I thought Sargent did a great job illustrating how they each had misconceptions of the other, and how it could lead to conflict and misunderstandings. Based on the title, and the titles of her other works, this could be a sequel or part of a series, but I read it as a stand alone and enjoyed it.
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  • Steven Brandt (Audiobook-Heaven)
    August 6, 2012
    A long time ago, in a galaxy far, far away the inhabitants of a planet called Earth built a sentient starship to carry their progeny to the stars. Ship’s purpose was to find inhabitable planets and seed them with humans in order to ensure the survival of the species. Ship did indeed find a suitable planet. It deposited a colony of humans on a planet they named Home and carried on with its mission, promising to return one day to check on the colony’s progress. And so several hundred years, and ma A long time ago, in a galaxy far, far away the inhabitants of a planet called Earth built a sentient starship to carry their progeny to the stars. Ship’s purpose was to find inhabitable planets and seed them with humans in order to ensure the survival of the species. Ship did indeed find a suitable planet. It deposited a colony of humans on a planet they named Home and carried on with its mission, promising to return one day to check on the colony’s progress. And so several hundred years, and many generations, passed.On the planet Home, the humans soon split into two groups. The first group stayed inside the habitat dome, remaining cut off from all outside influences, so that humanity would remain in its original “pure” condition. The second group moved out of the dome, breathing the native air, eating the native food, drinking the native water, becoming one with their new home. Over the years, the two groups butted heads on more than one occasion and even came to the brink of all out war at least once. It seems that people just can’t get along, no matter what planet they live on.Read the full review at Audiobook-Heaven
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  • David Ketelsen
    June 14, 2012
    I received this book free via a Goodread's contest.Seed Seeker, the third volume in the Seed Trilogy, compares poorly with the first volume, Earthseed.My main complaint about this book is that the story is told from two points of view and both of these are from girls that are always scared. That gives the book a monotonic feel as well as an underlying sense of passivity. I also found the strong underlying religious tone of the book cloying.Since I'm definitely not in the demographic focus for th I received this book free via a Goodread's contest.Seed Seeker, the third volume in the Seed Trilogy, compares poorly with the first volume, Earthseed.My main complaint about this book is that the story is told from two points of view and both of these are from girls that are always scared. That gives the book a monotonic feel as well as an underlying sense of passivity. I also found the strong underlying religious tone of the book cloying.Since I'm definitely not in the demographic focus for this book ---I'd guess that's it is oriented towards readers in the 8-14 range and more towards girls than boys--- my objections might be more because the book is not directed towards me.It was interesting to see how the end of this book curved back to the first book. The circularity did give a nice sense of completion to the 3-volume series.
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  • John
    January 17, 2011
    Descendants of colonists left to settle another world discover that their seeding AI starship has returned to check them out.I was definitely the wrong reader for this, since I don't have much tolerance for being told rather than shown back story and significant developments, for low-key characters who all sound the same when they talk, and for a slow moving and entirely predictable plot. Sargent does something else that killed this for me: she divides her narrative into chapters and numerous su Descendants of colonists left to settle another world discover that their seeding AI starship has returned to check them out.I was definitely the wrong reader for this, since I don't have much tolerance for being told rather than shown back story and significant developments, for low-key characters who all sound the same when they talk, and for a slow moving and entirely predictable plot. Sargent does something else that killed this for me: she divides her narrative into chapters and numerous subsections that nearly all end with inaction or the end of an incident or a completed thought. The effect is to set up a monotonous rhythm to the storytelling, leaving me uninvolved in the characters or events, and uninterested in finding out what happens next.
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  • Fleece
    February 5, 2014
    too repetitive and simplistic but besides that it was REALLY SWEET. As in endearing and homey (despite the whole dire OH GOD THE SENTIENT AI THAT PUT US ON THIS WORLD IS **JUDGING** US. also WHAT IF WE FIGHT AND KILL EACH OTHER?). Would rec! cute relationships (women in love! pining boys in love! het pairings!), am choosing to interpret all of the characters as POC also <3 cos i can. all of them are just trying SO HARD to do what is right ;3;
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  • Hyzenthlay
    August 3, 2014
    I'm so happy that the book I loved and read a hundred times when I was young went on to become a series. More specifically, that it became THIS series. We need more books like this for young readers. That are honest but hopeful, not focused on romance, but true relationships. Gonna hand Earthseed to my 14y/o tomorrow.
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  • Geri D
    July 5, 2012
    I really enjoyed this book. The characters were believable and the contrast between the two groups of people in the book was very realistic. I liked how both groups were portrayed and it felt like this was almost a real life story. Both groups distrusted but how the one tried to hide from the other was very much like real life. I am looking forward to reading more by this author.
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  • Sarah
    November 4, 2010
    3.5 stars - This book is sure to please fans of this series. The plot is promising, but the characterization is, on the whole, lacking something. Read my full review here: http://bookwormblues.blogspot.com/201...
  • jgyweniverel
    July 5, 2012
    I have not had the privilege of reading the first two books in this series, but believe me when I say that I am certainly going to try to find them. This sounds like a great thrill ride of a book.
  • Sam Hacker
    January 19, 2016
    It was so boring. I could never get into it. I skipped through the almost entire novel. That's how bad it was.
  • Deva Fagan
    February 22, 2012
    I think Earthseed is still my favorite of the series, but it's been really neat to see the entire span of the overarching story of Ship and its children!
  • David
    September 17, 2012
    Average. Nice story with good potential, but you never really get that feeling of being pulled into the story along with the characters. Feels a bit flat.
  • Foggygirl
    October 7, 2012
    An excellent series!
  • Kevin
    January 27, 2013
    The last piece of the Earthseed trilogy. Just like the sequel, I say meh. Even more so. The new characters were interesting, but there was no compelling motive or driving interest.
  • Peggy Lo
    September 3, 2011
    I liked this one best out of the three
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