The Library Gingerbread Man
The Gingerbread Man ran into a crowd at 920, the biography section. Abraham Lincoln, Harriet Tubman, and Amelia Earhart tried to stop him. "Stop! Stop, Gingerbread Man! You're a long way from home."The Gingerbread Man sped around them. "Run, run, as fast as you can. You can't catch me, I'm the Gingerbread Man! I ran away from the librarian, a Word Wizard, a giraffe, a robot, a paper bird, and a jokester, and I can run away from you, too."Even Jesse Owens, a record-breaking Olympic runner, couldn't keep up.

The Library Gingerbread Man Details

TitleThe Library Gingerbread Man
Author
FormatHardcover
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseJan 1st, 2010
PublisherUpstart Books
ISBN1602130485
ISBN-139781602130487
Number of pages32 pages
Rating
GenreChildrens, Picture Books, Storytime, Fantasy, Fairy Tales, Writing, Books About Books, Fractured Fairy Tales, Holiday, Christmas, Adventure, Food and Drink, Food, Humor

The Library Gingerbread Man Review

  • Jennifer
    December 27, 2015
    The gingerbread man lives at 398.2. He escapes his book and races along the shelves past many other book characters. But what will happen when he reaches the last shelf?I saw this book on my Goodreads feed – and I thank whoever it was that read it and put it on my radar! What a wonderful introduction to the Dewey Decimal Classifications. This is quite a fun story and would be a great read-aloud. After all, “It is particularly hard to outsmart a librarian.”
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  • Caryn
    February 17, 2010
    I especially liked the part where the gingerbread man is captured by the librarian - "It is particularly hard to outsmart a librarian." :)
  • Mary
    December 31, 2011
    The idea of the book is good--to use a story to teach children about the different sections of the library. But, the text and the pictures had some qualities that did not ring true with the public library I use. In this book, titles of books written on the spines of the books are written from bottom to top on most of the books, whereas in my library, they are written from top to bottom, including on the spine of The Library Gingerbread Man . Many of the titles that are on the shelves in the pic The idea of the book is good--to use a story to teach children about the different sections of the library. But, the text and the pictures had some qualities that did not ring true with the public library I use. In this book, titles of books written on the spines of the books are written from bottom to top on most of the books, whereas in my library, they are written from top to bottom, including on the spine of The Library Gingerbread Man . Many of the titles that are on the shelves in the pictures do not seem to belong to the section they are placed in, such as My Big Book of Monkeys in 397.1-389.2. Biographies about Abraham Lincoln, Harriet Tubman, and Amelia Earhart are listed as 920 but belong in 973, 305, and 629 in my library. Again, I like the idea of the book, but the execution is lacking.
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  • Krista the Krazy Kataloguer
    February 17, 2010
    Dotti Enderle has taken the traditional story of the Gingerbread Man and set it in the library. The naughty Gingerbread Man escapes from his book and is chased around the library by a number of characters who pop out of their books. This is a clever story to introduce kids to the idea that the library has an organization, and that the numbers stand for different subjects. The one thing that would have made this book perfect would have been a page at the end outlining the Dewey Decimal System. As Dotti Enderle has taken the traditional story of the Gingerbread Man and set it in the library. The naughty Gingerbread Man escapes from his book and is chased around the library by a number of characters who pop out of their books. This is a clever story to introduce kids to the idea that the library has an organization, and that the numbers stand for different subjects. The one thing that would have made this book perfect would have been a page at the end outlining the Dewey Decimal System. Aside from that, very entertaining--and I totally agree with the statement "It is particularly hard to outsmart a librarian."! Recommended.
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  • Laurie
    December 4, 2012
    Booklist (May 15, 2010 (Online))Preschool-Grade 2. In this version of the oft-told tale, a plump, chocolaty-looking Gingerbread Man with frosting highlights, a gumdrop nose, and peppermint buttons escapes from his usual locale, in a book at number 398.2 at the library. He eludes the librarian, a word wizard (from 423.1), a giraffe (from 599.638), a robot (from 629.892), and so forth, and is pursued by a crowd of characters from each section of the Dewey decimal system, eventually meeting up with Booklist (May 15, 2010 (Online))Preschool-Grade 2. In this version of the oft-told tale, a plump, chocolaty-looking Gingerbread Man with frosting highlights, a gumdrop nose, and peppermint buttons escapes from his usual locale, in a book at number 398.2 at the library. He eludes the librarian, a word wizard (from 423.1), a giraffe (from 599.638), a robot (from 629.892), and so forth, and is pursued by a crowd of characters from each section of the Dewey decimal system, eventually meeting up with an Arctic fox (998), who offers to help him escape. Luckily, before the fox gets him, the clever librarian quickly closes the Gingerbread Man back into the book for the next eager reader. This is a clever, humorous, and basic guide to the library filled with attractive characters in a nicely appointed ambience of shelves chock-full of appealingly titled books. Pair with one of the many gingerbread renderings, such as The Gingerbread Girl, by Lisa Campbell Ernst (2006), or another library story, such as Library Lil, by Suzanne Williams (1997).Library Media Connection (October 2010)While being shelved in the library, the Gingerbread Man jumps out of his book and races away. As he dashes down the shelves, other characters at various locations in the Dewey Decimal system call out and run after him. He outpaces a giraffe from 599.638, a robot from 629.892, and many others. The list increases along with the trail of pursuers in this cumulative tale. Finally, he meets his nemesis, an Arctic fox, at 998. Just in time, the librarian saves the day. Engaging illustrations in warm tones feature a traditional Gingerbread Man decorated with icing squiggles and candies. Noting how books have an ?address? in the library is a strength of this special-use version of the classic tale. Additional Selection. Brenda Dales, Department of Teacher Education, Miami University, Oxford, OhioSchool Library Journal (June 1, 2010)Gr 1-4-"At the library.. The Gingerbread Man lives at number 398.2." And so begins this Dewey decimal twist on an old favorite. When the naughty cookie escapes from the librarian, his pursuers include a thesaurus from 423.1 that cries, "Stop! Cease! Halt! Freeze! Stay!" and a robot from 629.892 that drones, "Stop. Stop. You. Are. Misplaced." As the impish runaway meets each new character, he echoes the familiar refrain, "Run, run, as fast as you can./You can't catch me, I'm the Gingerbread Man!" When he reaches the 920s, Abraham Lincoln, Harriet Tubman, and Amelia Earhart all try in vain to catch him. "Even Jesse Owens, a record-breaking Olympic runner, couldn't keep up." Finally, an Arctic fox emerges from the 998s: "Looks like you're trapped.. I'm quick and light on my feet. Get up on my back." We all know what usually happens next, but the "clever librarian" saves the day and the cookie is safely reshelved where he belongs. The young woman sports cat's-eye glasses and a '70s striped and flowered frock; the pudgy brown protagonist is classically iced and has a pink candy nose; and the book spines feature humorous titles such as If You Give a Fox a Gingersnap. Children will delight in the picture of the wily fox waiting expectantly to swallow the little man. Pair this fun introduction to library organization with Jackie Mims Hopkins's Goldie Socks and the Three Librarians (Upstart, 2007) to welcome students back to school in September.-Barbara Auerbach, PS 217, Brooklyn, NY Copyright 2010 Reed Business Information.
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  • Megan Cureton
    March 5, 2015
    The Gingerbread Man, always had his place on the shelf in the library. But one day, he decided to leap from the book and that is when the famous line was made. "Run, run, as fast as you can. You can't catch me, I'm the Gingerbread Man!" Which you could incorporate music here by singing this part and making up dance movements or hand movements. The Gingerbread Man goes on to run past many shelves, including a Word Wizard, a giraffe, a robot, a paper bird, and plenty more. After passing all of the The Gingerbread Man, always had his place on the shelf in the library. But one day, he decided to leap from the book and that is when the famous line was made. "Run, run, as fast as you can. You can't catch me, I'm the Gingerbread Man!" Which you could incorporate music here by singing this part and making up dance movements or hand movements. The Gingerbread Man goes on to run past many shelves, including a Word Wizard, a giraffe, a robot, a paper bird, and plenty more. After passing all of these objects, the Gingerbread Man found himself in a corner of a library with no where to go. He climbed up and asked a fox for help, but to his surprise, the fox tried to eat him. The clever librarian was there to save the day and closed the Gingerbread Man back in his book and took him to his correct shelf and spot. I like the library version of the Gingerbread Man. I think a librarian could read this book aloud to his or her students at the beginning of the year to show the importance of putting the books in the same spot on the shelves where they got them from. I think the illustrations in this book were very bold and I like how the text was kind of just placed anywhere on the page. The page where the fox was about to eat the Gingerbread Man, the text is smack in the middle of the picture and everything. I like that because the illustrator and author wanted to use the whole page for the illustration and not have to worry about saving a specific spot for the text. I would have this book in a first or second grade classroom and let them read this book during reading time. I think they will like the humor and see that it is a fun read.
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  • Samantha DuPree
    October 2, 2012
    One day the librarian was putting a book away on the shelf, when out leapt the Gingerbread Man. The librarian yells at him to stop but he runs away, shouting, “you can’t catch me, I’m the Gingerbread Man!” The Gingerbread Man passes by the thesaurus at 423.1, the giraffe at 599.638, and even the robot at 629.892. All along the way they yell at him to stop and he taunts them with his catchphrase. He also passes an origami bird, the joke books, the biography section, and more. Finally a fox jumps One day the librarian was putting a book away on the shelf, when out leapt the Gingerbread Man. The librarian yells at him to stop but he runs away, shouting, “you can’t catch me, I’m the Gingerbread Man!” The Gingerbread Man passes by the thesaurus at 423.1, the giraffe at 599.638, and even the robot at 629.892. All along the way they yell at him to stop and he taunts them with his catchphrase. He also passes an origami bird, the joke books, the biography section, and more. Finally a fox jumps out of a book and says it will help the Gingerbread Man escape if he jumps onto his back. The Gingerbread Man is scared but does so and when the fox tricks him and is about to eat him, the librarian catches him onto his book. She places him back onto the shelf for eager readers to check out. This book is perfect for elementary age kids who are learning a little bit about what the call numbers on books are for. It appeals to kids in that it teaches them in a simple, kid-friendly way that book are placed in the library in a certain way. I would implement this book into the display because they can learn about the categories at the library and where they can find their favorite books. Maybe then they can teach themselves the call numbers at the library and learn a little more about the Dewey Decimal system.Enderle, D. (2010). The library gingerbread man. Janesville, Wisconsin: UpstartBooks.
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  • Michelle McBeth
    October 12, 2014
    This story is about the Gingerbread Man who lives at 398.2 in the library. But he decides one day to run away. He runs through the aisles of the library encountering different characters in different sections of the library.This book would be perfect for reading with a child while sitting at the library. It is a fast paced and interesting story that includes characters from different parts of the library such as a robot from 629.892. I think every school librarian should own a copy of this book. This story is about the Gingerbread Man who lives at 398.2 in the library. But he decides one day to run away. He runs through the aisles of the library encountering different characters in different sections of the library.This book would be perfect for reading with a child while sitting at the library. It is a fast paced and interesting story that includes characters from different parts of the library such as a robot from 629.892. I think every school librarian should own a copy of this book. The illustrations are beautiful, colorful and fun. As good as this book is, I don't think, however, that it would hold up well out of context for smaller children who do not already understand how to use the library's Dewey Decimal system.
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  • Beth
    March 29, 2012
    I overheard two teenage girls in the library today talking about not having a clue on how to find several books they needed for a children's project they were doing in English class...As an English/Secondary Ed. major and the mother of three little kids I am APPALLED that there are teenagers walking around in the USA who do not know how to navigate through a library. The Library Gingerbread Man will be on my classroom shelves for sure, just as a crash course on where to start for those kids unfo I overheard two teenage girls in the library today talking about not having a clue on how to find several books they needed for a children's project they were doing in English class...As an English/Secondary Ed. major and the mother of three little kids I am APPALLED that there are teenagers walking around in the USA who do not know how to navigate through a library. The Library Gingerbread Man will be on my classroom shelves for sure, just as a crash course on where to start for those kids unfortunate enough to never had been read to. My five year old adores all things gingerbread related in books and this story just became her new favorite!
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  • Jamie
    August 17, 2016
    At the library every book character has an address. The gingerbread man lives at number 398.2. The gingerbread man runs out of his book. The librarian tells the gingerbread to get back into his book. The gingerbread man tells the librarian run run as fast as you can. you can't catch me I'm the gingerbread man. The gingerbread man runs past several other books. The characters of the books chase after the gingerbread man telling him to go back into his book. The gingerbread man tells them run run At the library every book character has an address. The gingerbread man lives at number 398.2. The gingerbread man runs out of his book. The librarian tells the gingerbread to get back into his book. The gingerbread man tells the librarian run run as fast as you can. you can't catch me I'm the gingerbread man. The gingerbread man runs past several other books. The characters of the books chase after the gingerbread man telling him to go back into his book. The gingerbread man tells them run run as fast as you can. The gingerbread man runs across the fox. The fox almost eats the gingerbread man until the librarian snatched him up in the book.
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  • Jenny
    February 19, 2012
    Great story and illustrations. The gingerbread man lives at 398.2 on the library shelf. One day he hops out of his book and begins to run away, shouting the famous lines, "Run, run as fast as you can..." Characters from other books at other locations (such as the thesaurus at 423.1...my favorite since he shouts, "Stop! Cease! Halt! Freeze! Stay!) try to stop him, but it looks as if the gingerbread may escape...until he reaches the end of the shelf and gets help from the arctic fox at 998...Will Great story and illustrations. The gingerbread man lives at 398.2 on the library shelf. One day he hops out of his book and begins to run away, shouting the famous lines, "Run, run as fast as you can..." Characters from other books at other locations (such as the thesaurus at 423.1...my favorite since he shouts, "Stop! Cease! Halt! Freeze! Stay!) try to stop him, but it looks as if the gingerbread may escape...until he reaches the end of the shelf and gets help from the arctic fox at 998...Will he survive the fox's help? I love the fun introduction to the Dewey decimal system and the clever twist to the original story.
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  • Stefanie Burns
    January 15, 2017
    Obviously a spin off of The Gingrbread Man. Here, the gingerbread man escapes, not from an oven, but his book. As he runs across the nonfiction section characters from other books try to stop him. He chants his typical phrase: run run as fast as you can you cant catch me in the gingerbread man! And runs away. At the end he comes across a fox, an arctic fox. As he's about to eat him the librarian saves the day. Sort of.As he runs he passes characters from books in other DDC sections. Fun introduc Obviously a spin off of The Gingrbread Man. Here, the gingerbread man escapes, not from an oven, but his book. As he runs across the nonfiction section characters from other books try to stop him. He chants his typical phrase: run run as fast as you can you cant catch me in the gingerbread man! And runs away. At the end he comes across a fox, an arctic fox. As he's about to eat him the librarian saves the day. Sort of.As he runs he passes characters from books in other DDC sections. Fun introduction to the DDC.
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  • Stefani
    April 16, 2011
    I am one of those librarians that can't pass by a fun library-themed book! This is a fun retelling of the Gingerbread Man, who escapes his book (in the 398s) to run around the library. I loved the different animals and people at the different numbers, as this would make a good introduction to Dewey. And the librarian is the hero; gotta love that.Audience will be limited to library storytimes and avid library-loving kids, but a good addition nonetheless.
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  • Traci Bold
    May 17, 2016
    A clever take on the old story 'THE GINGERBREAD MAN' to have him run amuck in the library and going through the non-fiction sections to get away. This book should send out the 'what-ifs' about what books await in each section pointed out in the story.Written by Dotti Enderle, illustrated by Colleen M. Madden and published by Upstart Books, Janesville, WI. #PB #fairytale #imagination #library
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  • Luanne Hatcher
    March 7, 2012
    As the librarian was shelving "The Gingerbread Man," book back into its 398.2 location, the Gingerbread Man jumped out of the book. He ran to different Dewey Decimal areas in the library until he is outsmarted. This would be a fun book to read with students learning about the Dewey Decimal Classification system.
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  • Angie
    February 22, 2011
    My seven-year loves gingerbread man stories. I've volunteered at the elementary school library a lot lately. This was the perfect book for us! I really like the basic introduction to the dewey decimal system. I like how it stayed true to the gingerbread man story with a quirkly twist at the end for a happy ending. Perfect read-aloud book, particularly for librarians.
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  • Amy
    July 21, 2012
    Yet another fabulous gingerbread man tale! This one offers readers a glimpse into the Dewey Decimal classification system as the gingerbread boy runs through the library shelves. He encounters different characters, such as a word wizard, robot, and well-known historical figures in the biography section.
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  • Laura
    December 10, 2014
    This was the perfect book to help my 3rd and 4th graders "get" the Dewey decimal system. I had a book ready from each call number mentioned and held it up as it appeared in the story. The students were amazed that our books matched the books from the story. It was very effective in helping them understand that this system truly is used in other libraries around the world.
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  • Susan
    December 10, 2010
    Oh my - this is perfect for librarians and their friends! I'm kicking myself I didn't get to read it at last night's family storytime, but I may try to squeeze it in somewhere. Would be lots of fun for class visits to introduce the idea of the dewey decimal system. Heart!
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  • Erin
    December 2, 2015
    The Gingerbread Man story is told with the setting of a library. Instead of a baker, the Gingerbread Man runs away from a librarian. Characters from the different books he passes by chase him. Good for older kid storytimes, okay for preschool storytimes.
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  • Andria
    March 1, 2014
    I use this book every year to open my second grade unit on how to use the library. It always is a big hit with the kids as they can help me read part of the story. I always let them predict whether he gets eaten or not at the end.
  • Robin
    August 28, 2012
    Guess which book is going to be featured in my first story time of the season where I talk about the library and books? If you guessed this one, you are correct! Fantastic intro to Dewey Decimal system as well. Now we'll see if the kids like it!
  • Beth
    August 13, 2016
    A somewhat halfhearted introduction to the Dewey Decimal System. You don't really learn anything about the system from reading this book. It's just a conversation starter to begin a lesson on what the system is.
  • Mandy
    September 12, 2011
    The Gingerbread Man jumped out of his book on shelf 398.2 and ran and ran. Pretty soon he was chased around by the library characters from other books found in different addresses from the nonfiction section.This is a good book that without a doubt should be paired with a library Dewey lesson!
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  • Kaitlin Moriarty
    December 10, 2014
    This book was so fun! This book would be considered a modern fable/fantasy book.It is a twist on a classic tale. The illustrations are modern as well and seem to be done in watercolor. It is witty and funny as well. It also goes over the elements of a library which is a great thing to see!
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  • Sheryl
    January 11, 2013
    A clever twist on the Gingerbread Man; when the Gingerbread Man escapes from his 398.2 home and runs amuck through the Dewey Decimal system, chaos ensues. This is a clever addition to instruction on the Dewey Decimal system. It is also one of those books I must own as soon as possible!
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  • Kendall
    December 18, 2011
    A must-have for librarians; especially around the holidays! I read this in the non-fiction area to my fourth graders, who were amazed and decided that it was magic...all the books in our collection coincided with the numbers in the book! Wow...Dewey as a magical thing...it was such a fun lesson!
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  • Catherine Johnson
    October 21, 2010
    A fresh take on an old classic, The Library Gingerbread Man has the librarian in a flutter. Before you know it, lots of characters are trying to help the librarian catch the gingerbread man. It's like a book version of a scene from Night at the Museum. A super ending too.
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  • Brandi
    October 29, 2013
    The classic tale of the gingerbread man is tweaked by Enderle in this imaginative book. Teachers can use this book to compare/contrast it with the original story. This book could also be used in a mini lesson to teach students about creating their own versions of beloved stories.
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  • Jackie
    October 29, 2011
    A sneaky way to introduce kids to the dewey decimal system. The crafty gingerbread man escapes from his book and travels down the shelves and meets various subjects. The Library Gingerbread Man would be a great book for library visits from schools.
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