Everyone Communicates, Few Connect
World-renowned leadership expert and bestselling author John C. Maxwell says if you want to be an effective leader, you must learn how to connect with people. While it may seem like some folks are just born with a commanding presence that draws people in, the fact is anyone can learn to communicate in ways that consistently build powerful connections. Everyone Communicates, Few Connect, helps you succeed by revealing Maxwell’s Five Principles and Five Practices to develop this crucial skill of connecting, including: finding common ground, keeping your communication simple, capturing people's interest, inspiring people, and staying authentic in all your relationships. Your ability to achieve results in any organization--be it a company, church, nonprofit, or even in your family--is directly tied to the leadership skills in your toolbox. Connecting is an easy-to-learn skill you can apply today in your personal, professional, and family relationships to start living your best life.

Everyone Communicates, Few Connect Details

TitleEveryone Communicates, Few Connect
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseMar 28th, 2010
PublisherHarperCollins Leadership
ISBN-139780785214250
Rating
GenreLeadership, Business, Language, Communication, Nonfiction, Self Help, Personal Development

Everyone Communicates, Few Connect Review

  • Al
    January 1, 1970
    Everyone Communicates, Few Connect (John Maxwell)Central Truths1. If you want to succeed, you must learn how to connect with others.2. High achievers care about people, view subordinates optimistically, seek advice from subordinates, and listens well to everyone.3. Maturity is the ability to see and act on behalf of others.4. We remember 85% to 90% of what we see; less than 15% of what we hear.5. Connecting always requires energy; must intentionally and willingly connect with others. This Everyone Communicates, Few Connect (John Maxwell)Central Truths1. If you want to succeed, you must learn how to connect with others.2. High achievers care about people, view subordinates optimistically, seek advice from subordinates, and listens well to everyone.3. Maturity is the ability to see and act on behalf of others.4. We remember 85% to 90% of what we see; less than 15% of what we hear.5. Connecting always requires energy; must intentionally and willingly connect with others. This requires initiative (go first); clarity (prepared); patience (slow down); selflessness (give); and stamina (recharge).6. If you are responsible for leading people or communicating with others, it is especially vital for you to find ways to recharge.7. A bad beginning makes a bad ending (Euripides)8. People connect with stories, not statistics.9. It is the job of a leader to bring clarity to a subject, not complexity.10. Three words are essential to connect with others: brevity, levity, and repetition.11. Leadership is about inspiring people to do things they never thought they could (Steve Jobs)12. The mediocre teacher tells, the good teacher explains, and the great teacher demonstrates.13. Vision without passion is a picture without possibilities.14. People ask three questions about their leaders: Do they care for me? Can they help me? Can I trust them?15. Preparation yields confidence and passion yields conviction.Application1. When communicating, find common ground, make communication simple, capture people’s interest, inspire others, and be real.2. When you communicate, you must include: thought (something I know); emotion (something I feel); and action (something I do).3. When communicating, attempt to connect on four levels: visually, intellectually, emotionally, and verbally.4. Connect Visually: eliminate personal distractions (do not allow dress or habit distract from message); expand range of expressions; move with sense of purpose, pay attention to surroundings, and remove obstacles and reduce distance from audience.5. Connect Intellectually: must know your subject and yourself.6. Connect Emotionally: the words used are far less important than the energy, intensity, and conviction with which you use them.7. Connect Verbally: what we say and how we say things make quite an impact.8. Bring intentional energy to conversations. Gear up mentally and emotionally for communication opportunities.9. Think of ways that you can increase your energy when speaking to an audience.10. Read voraciously and constantly file quotes and illustrations. Have a lot of material ready to include in any message.11. Become a student of communication, study effective speakers.12. The larger the audience, the more energy you will need to bring to your communication.13. Build upon agreement, not disagreement. Don’t make assumptions about people, take into consideration other people’s views, avoid indifference, and don’t isolate yourself.14. Availability requires intentionality, spend time with others.15. Keep talks to three ideas. Get to the point.16. Deliver results before delivering the message; communicate from experience. You must live what you communicate.17. Do not commit one or more of the four unpardonable sins of a communicator: being unprepared, uncommitted, uninteresting, and uncomfortable.18. If you want to get your message across, you have to learn how to communicate in someone else’s world.
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  • Monica Kim: Reader in Emerald City
    January 1, 1970
    Although this book came out almost 10 years ago, it is as relevant and timely today. I highly recommend this book on connecting, especially in this hyper-active, socially connected society. It contains invaluable wisdom & actional steps you can apply anywhere.
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  • Danny
    January 1, 1970
    Enjoyed this look at connecting. It communicates 5 principles and 5 practices for connecting. Part 1: Connecting Principles1. Connecting Increases Your Influence in Every Situation2. Connecting Is All About Others3. Connecting Goes Beyond Words4. Connecting Always Requires Energy5. Connecting Is More Skill Than Natural TalentPart 2: Connecting Practices1. Connectors Connect on Common Ground2. Connectors Do the Difficult Work of Keeping It Simple3. Connectors Create an Experience Everyone Enjoys Enjoyed this look at connecting. It communicates 5 principles and 5 practices for connecting. Part 1: Connecting Principles1. Connecting Increases Your Influence in Every Situation2. Connecting Is All About Others3. Connecting Goes Beyond Words4. Connecting Always Requires Energy5. Connecting Is More Skill Than Natural TalentPart 2: Connecting Practices1. Connectors Connect on Common Ground2. Connectors Do the Difficult Work of Keeping It Simple3. Connectors Create an Experience Everyone Enjoys4. Connectors Inspire People5. Connectors Live What They CommunicateSome of my favorite quotes include:”Maturity is the ability to see and act on behalf of others. Immature people don’t see things from someone else’s point of view. They rarely concern themselves with what’s best for others. In many ways, they act like small children.”“I've come to the conclusion that there are two kinds of people in the world of communication: there are speakers who write and writers who speak. have yet to meet someone who does both at the highest level.”“We the uninformed, working for the inaccessible, are doing the impossible for the ungrateful!” The Subordinate’s Lament by Jim Lundy “Good leaders and communicators don't isolate themselves, and they don't deliberately keep people in the dark. They inform people, make them a part of what's going on, and include them in decision making whenever possible. You cannot establish common ground if you refuse to let anyone know who you are or what you believe.”“I had a rule on Sundays for myself and my staff: while the people were on-site, there were to be no closed-door meetings.”“Rick Warren … advises that humility comes from:• Admitting your weaknesses• Being patient with others' weaknesses• Being open to correction• Pointing the spotlight at others”Four pointers to help you become a better connector.1. “Do I feel what you feel?” before asking “Do you feel what I feel”2. “Do I see what you see?” before asking “Do you see what I see?”3. “Do I know what you know?” before asking “Do you know what I know?”4. “Do i know what you want?” before asking “Do you know what I want?”“One spring I shared with the congregation that during the summer I was going to speak on a series entitled, “You Asked for It.” I encouraged every attendee to request the subject they would most like me to talk about, and I would pick the ten most requested topics. Thousands of people participated, we picked the top ten, and those became the sermon topics throughout the summer. The result was that attendance actually increased instead of decreasing. Why? Because I knew what people wanted to learn about.”“When I want to really get to know someone, I ask three questions. People's answers to these give me great insight into someone's heart. The questions are: • What do you dream about? • What do you sing about? • What do you cry about?”“as leaders and communicators, our job is to bring clarity to a subject, not complexity.” “If you can't explain it simply, you don't understand it well enough.” Albert Einstein“For my needs, a quote or illustration had to fit in one or more of these four categories: • Humor—something that will make people laugh • Heart—something that will captivate people's emotions, • Hope—something that will inspire people• Help—something that will assist people in a tangible way”
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  • Melissa Krabbe
    January 1, 1970
    I love this book! There are so many great ideas in it that it’s hard to know where to start commenting on them. So I’ve picked my top ten, which I’ve described in reverse order. I’ve also included a couple of concerns.Number 10: Maxwell demonstrates connecting by using blog comments in this book. He talks about the need to “be the message” (210) in order to most effectively inspire people, so I thought it was appropriate that Maxwell himself demonstrates how he is connecting with people by the I love this book! There are so many great ideas in it that it’s hard to know where to start commenting on them. So I’ve picked my top ten, which I’ve described in reverse order. I’ve also included a couple of concerns.Number 10: Maxwell demonstrates connecting by using blog comments in this book. He talks about the need to “be the message” (210) in order to most effectively inspire people, so I thought it was appropriate that Maxwell himself demonstrates how he is connecting with people by the way he has written this book. Each chapter is full of quotes from people who have commented on his blog, and he even has his writer Charlie Wetzel write a section in his own voice (104-114). He didn’t have to do that, but in a book about connecting with people it makes a tremendous amount of sense to let those people with whom he’s connected help tell the story.Number 9: “Connection always begins with a commitment to someone else” (88). This is the Maxwell version of Rick Warren’s opening statement from The Purpose Driven Life, “It’s not about you.” It’s a good Christian perspective that works in every area of life, and I was glad to see that it had a place in this book.Number 8: Maxwell still writes like a pastor. In the middle of chapter 6 about finding common ground he makes the typical if-you-don’t-get-anything-else-from-this-sermon-get-this statement when he says “If you were to do only this and nothing else…” (142). Consequently, I read the pages following that statement even more carefully than I had read the earlier pages. As cliché as it is for him to say this, it’s effective.Number 7: Writing and speaking require different kinds of communication skills (113-4). To illustrate this, Maxwell describes why he’s an effective speaker, but needs Charlie Wetzel to translate that into writing that connects with people. I’d never thought about this before and had always assumed that if you could write well, then you would be able to speak well, and vice versa. Now I know to pay more attention to the different skills that are required for each.Number 6: Feelings matter. Maxwell’s first “how to” about finding common ground is to try to identify with the person or group’s feelings, and dealing with emotions is a recurring theme throughout this book. This makes sense, but it was nice to see it in writing because I think we get the idea in both business and church that we are to turn off our feelings and deal with everything logically. It’s impossible to ignore feelings, however, and Maxwell emphasizes that if you do, you’re missing out an important part of connecting. He says that “to really understand people, you must…go beyond the head and consider the heart” (146). He also says that more than anything else, people will remember how you made them feel (211). Maxwell doesn’t stop with how other people feel; he also talks about the importance of what the speaker feels, because passion for the topic is another important part of connecting. Number 5: Talking about your failures can be effective (139). This just seems counterintuitive to me, and yet Maxwell describes why it’s not. I think the key, though, is talking about what happened next. I think this is why testimonials can be such an effective Christian witness. God does great things through our failures.Number 4: Maxwell includes a quote from Aquinas about converting people (140), just one of the many ways in which this book is good for learning about evangelism. The most important reason for connecting with people is to tell them about Christ, so even though the idea of evangelism only got a small mention, I thought it was huge that it made it into a basically secular book.Number 3: Maxwell spends a whole chapter (8) on how not to be boring, and includes the exhortation to “be unpredictable” (185). I can do that! (At least, I think I can.) I think there is the potential to let the desire to be interesting overpower the message, but as Maxwell illustrates, there are far too many speakers (and preachers) who don’t seem to even be trying to be interesting. I definitely don’t want to be one of those!Number 2: Maxwell challenges speakers to call people to action and have high expectations (205, 221-2). I think too many pastors are afraid to do this. Maxwell very clearly shows the fallacy in this, particularly in his example of Lincoln saying that a sermon was “brilliantly conceived, biblical, relevant, and well presented” but a failure because the speaker didn’t ask his listeners to “do something great” (205). As Christians, we are called to do great things, and difficult things, and we need to challenge people to do them.Number 1: Connecting can be learned (Chapter 5). I was very glad to know this because I want to learn! I’ve spent too much of my life afraid of people and avoiding contact with them. Now that I want to connect I’m anxious to learn how to do it better, and this is the primary reason why I enjoyed reading this book so much.Connecting is great, and I love that Maxwell can break it down into steps for us, but I wonder if connecting without God at the center has the potential for pointing people in the wrong direction? He talks in several places about not being self-centered, but if you aren’t pointing them to God or yourself, then the only other option is themselves. Maxwell’s story on page 73 about the church anniversary sounds like a great celebration of memories and people, but I wondered if God came into the picture there. Maybe Maxwell left that part out because this isn’t really a Christian book, but I think it’s important to consider how easily God could be left out of connecting altogether unless steps are taken to counteract that.Another concern is about the chapter on integrity. I certainly think it’s an important chapter. Maxwell says to be effective, you need to be genuine, and if you expect others to do what you say, you have to live what you teach (237). Both of these are true, but I wondered whether they would be just as true even if your motivation were more mundane. For example, if you’re passionate about making money, you might be driven to follow all of Maxwell’s recommendations, but for all the wrong reasons. This also made me wonder why Maxwell decided to stop being a pastor. Certainly he’s reaching more people now, but to what end?There’s no doubt this is a great book. There are many more than ten reasons, so the good far outweighs the bad, but, to be balanced, I also included two concerns. To secular readers, the first concern might be irrelevant, but the second concern about one’s motivation for connecting will unfortunately always be a potential problem. I had initially thought it was odd to be reading what appears to be a secular book for a Christian class, but within a few chapters it became obvious that Maxwell is working within a Christian worldview. Hopefully for most readers that underlying worldview shines through. Maxwell’s insights are helpful for all sorts of people, but this book should be especially important to Christians, because God cares about reaching people and obviously so does Maxwell.
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  • Thomas Holbrook
    January 1, 1970
    John C. Maxwell is a well-respected, widely known, much awarded leadership expert. In case the reader was unaware of this fact, he/she well is reminded – frequently – in the first fifty pages of this book. I can only assume this is Mr. Maxwell’s way of establishing credibility quickly, but I found it very distracting to be told how qualified the author is every other page. This self-aggrandizement proved to be unneeded, as the content of the book was good, the writing clear & engaging with John C. Maxwell is a well-respected, widely known, much awarded leadership expert. In case the reader was unaware of this fact, he/she well is reminded – frequently – in the first fifty pages of this book. I can only assume this is Mr. Maxwell’s way of establishing credibility quickly, but I found it very distracting to be told how qualified the author is every other page. This self-aggrandizement proved to be unneeded, as the content of the book was good, the writing clear & engaging with easily understood applications for the points made. Perhaps this is a new attempt by Mr. Maxwell to better “connect” with his audience, as I do not recall the previous book I read by him (The 21 Irrefutable Laws of Leadership, Thomas Nelson Publishers, Nashville, Tennessee) to be as egocentric. This self-validation notwithstanding, this book is worth reading. I did not want to risk missing any of the well supported material he presented, so I carefully read each page. This discipline was well rewarded by the information gained. There are insets throughout the book that emphasize important points and there is much more that “spoke” to me beyond those found “in the boxes.” There is little new material to be found in this book. It is loaded with quotes (the author collects them) that illuminate the presented point(s), those issues of focus are familiar and are addressed with commonsense. This is the power of this book – it speaks to the obvious, reveals how “connecting” can be done if one is willing to do the tasks required and it does so without being condescending or simplistic. I would recommend this book to: anyone who is struggling with how to be less shy, those interested in public speaking and people “managers.” For “The World’s Most Respected Leadership Expert” (according to the front cover – was there a vote for this title of which I was unaware?) this book has little “leadership” material included. If one wishes, she/he can read one (or all) of Mr. Maxwell’s 30+ books he has written.
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  • Daniel Butcher
    January 1, 1970
    John C. Maxwell in Everyone Communicates Few Connect provides guidance to help leaders move from talking and sharing information to connecting to audiences, ranging from one on one to large audiences. Maxwell breaks his work into two parts; principles the theory of connection, and practices, how to connect. At the end of each chapter, Maxwell provides an overview of the major points of each chapter and tips on applying each chapter’s content for different audiences. The author reminds us that in John C. Maxwell in Everyone Communicates Few Connect provides guidance to help leaders move from talking and sharing information to connecting to audiences, ranging from one on one to large audiences. Maxwell breaks his work into two parts; principles the theory of connection, and practices, how to connect. At the end of each chapter, Maxwell provides an overview of the major points of each chapter and tips on applying each chapter’s content for different audiences. The author reminds us that in order to be effective we must connect. Overall this book provides tools to improving oneself as a communicator and more importantly as a leader by connecting messages with audiences.To be honest, many of the principles and practices in this book are not new material. We all know, or should know, that in order to be a successful communicator one needs to energetic, you need to care about your audience and you need to be credible. Despite this, we all need reminders of these “facts” and Maxwell does an excellent job of collecting common sense and practical principles and tips for successful communication. Personally, this book has lead me to self assess how I communicate to a large group in my own workplace. I find myself asking, is it about me or them, and I credible, do I give them credit, do I make them insiders and many many more. This book is a great resource for anyone who needs to communicate, which is pretty much everyone!
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  • Paul C. Stalder
    January 1, 1970
    A fine example of a book whose endnotes are worth more than the actual content. This is not a terrible book; it is easy to read, understandable, and fairly applicable to differing situations. And yet, I found reading it almost unbearable. For a book that stresses focusing on others in order to connect, Maxwell uses the word "I" insufferably. It felt at points as if he simply wanted to expound on his success. And there is no doubting his success, but he need not be such a blowhard about it. When A fine example of a book whose endnotes are worth more than the actual content. This is not a terrible book; it is easy to read, understandable, and fairly applicable to differing situations. And yet, I found reading it almost unbearable. For a book that stresses focusing on others in order to connect, Maxwell uses the word "I" insufferably. It felt at points as if he simply wanted to expound on his success. And there is no doubting his success, but he need not be such a blowhard about it. When he stops telling stories about himself, and gets down to real content, Maxwell does provide some nuggets of wisdom for connecting with people. While not groundbreaking, they are certainly helpful. After pushing through the horrendous conclusion, which serves to undermine most of what was said in the book, one stumbles upon the most useful part of this book. This work was well-researched and provides an extensive list of far more beneficial works on communication, connection, and the like. My advice? Unless you can grab this book for free, simply skip to the end and read through the endnotes.
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  • Kimberly [Come Hither Books]
    January 1, 1970
    More substance, less testimonials please. I'm sure there are others who will soak up the info here, but for me, the style fell flat. It's breezy and conversational, packed full of stories and real life examples. So many, in fact, that the actual argument is lost among the chatter. Though I read it by rec and was looking forward to it, I found myself skimming by the second chapter and abandoned it halfway. If endorsements and fuzzy stories help you absorb information, by all means give this book More substance, less testimonials please. I'm sure there are others who will soak up the info here, but for me, the style fell flat. It's breezy and conversational, packed full of stories and real life examples. So many, in fact, that the actual argument is lost among the chatter. Though I read it by rec and was looking forward to it, I found myself skimming by the second chapter and abandoned it halfway. If endorsements and fuzzy stories help you absorb information, by all means give this book a try. Maxwell's methods are effective, but each actionable step was buried in examples, making them hard to pick out and, for me, irritating to read.
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  • David Pugh
    January 1, 1970
    Not necessarily anything earth shattering or new in the book, but excellently put together. There were definitely some nuggets of truth that jumped out at me. The book did more to motivate than instruct, which was kind of the point of the book. If you hope to communicate effectively this is a great read, and recommended.
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  • Jeff
    January 1, 1970
    Connecting is the ability to identify with people and relate to them in a way that increases your influence with them. "If I went back to college again, I'd concentrate on two areas: learning to write and speak before an audience. Nothing in life is more important than the ability to communicate effectively." Gerald FordThree questions the crowd is asking: 1. Do you care for me?2. Can you help me? 3. Can I trust you? "The most influential person who will talk to you all day, is you. So, you Connecting is the ability to identify with people and relate to them in a way that increases your influence with them. "If I went back to college again, I'd concentrate on two areas: learning to write and speak before an audience. Nothing in life is more important than the ability to communicate effectively." Gerald FordThree questions the crowd is asking: 1. Do you care for me?2. Can you help me? 3. Can I trust you? "The most influential person who will talk to you all day, is you. So, you should be very careful what you say to you." Zig Ziglar
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  • Stephen
    January 1, 1970
    This book helped me understand that dealing with people is not all about me. Listening to the person speak and giving myself time to respond helps with a connection. This connection crosses all parts of my life from business to family and friends.
  • Jesse Bray
    January 1, 1970
    Excellent read! Practical, and accessible!
  • Razvan Rogoz
    January 1, 1970
    I used to hate these kinds of books.Why?It is your simplistic, feel good type of “manual”. It is not thought provoking. It is not something that will make you say “wow, I wish I thought of this before”.However, I am using the wrong system of values.This book taught me or reminded me many common sense approaches to communication. Nothing is special or complex and yet, all work. It made me say again and again “yeah, right, why haven’t I done that?”.Communication, effective communication is simple. I used to hate these kinds of books. Why?It is your simplistic, feel good type of “manual”. It is not thought provoking. It is not something that will make you say “wow, I wish I thought of this before”.However, I am using the wrong system of values.This book taught me or reminded me many common sense approaches to communication. Nothing is special or complex and yet, all work. It made me say again and again “yeah, right, why haven’t I done that?”.Communication, effective communication is simple. Listen. Show enthusiasm. Talk the language of your audience. Connect with them. Build trust. Push them towards action.You don’t need an MBA to know this.You need not travel the world and see yogis and masters to find out what works. And this is what this book contains, a lot of common sense advice we all know but we are not using.This is all I have to say about it.It can’t teach you something you don’t know. It can just remind you you’re probably doing a LOT of things wrong.And since the purpose of education is a behavioral change, this book succeeds.4 / 5
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  • Srikantadatta Tagadur
    January 1, 1970
    As a public speaking enthusiast I highly recommend this book to anyone who wants to learn the art of connecting with people. The author is truly an expert in this field and conveys the message in the most lucid and simplest way possible. The anecdotes and examples used to reinforce the concepts are perfect and genuinely appeals to everyone who reads the book. The read was a great learning experience and I can’t wait to see all my learning in action.
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  • Tiffany
    January 1, 1970
    This is written by a supposed expert in communication with the help of a professional writer, and it has been a slog to get through. I'm reading it for work, and my boss and I agree that it's way too long and boring. If you're interested in the subject, get this from the library (don't pay for it), and just read the chapter summaries. There are a few good points, but he uses ten examples when a couple would suffice. And there are way too many stories and quotes. He's not following his own advice This is written by a supposed expert in communication with the help of a professional writer, and it has been a slog to get through. I'm reading it for work, and my boss and I agree that it's way too long and boring. If you're interested in the subject, get this from the library (don't pay for it), and just read the chapter summaries. There are a few good points, but he uses ten examples when a couple would suffice. And there are way too many stories and quotes. He's not following his own advice to get to the point. (Although one of his other suggestions is to say things over and over, which contradicts the first point.) Also, he quotes Roger Ailes more than once.
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  • Carrie Daws
    January 1, 1970
    John Maxwell has definitely learned over his career how to communicate well with others. The tips and counsel he offers within these pages almost seem too simple, yet as I've put some of them into practice over my few years of leadership, I've seen the results. If you want to communicate more effectively--through leadership, through speaking or writing--this is a great place to start.
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  • Alberto Cuellar
    January 1, 1970
    Great piece of reading. Easy to digest. Great piece of reading. Easy to digest. Great anecdotes and quotes.Very practical. Every leader should read it. Thank you.
  • Jason
    January 1, 1970
    If you have ever read a book by John Maxwell before then you can appreciate both the simple truths and straight forward actions that he gives and suggests in his books. This book is no different. However, if you have read Maxwell's stuff before, then you probably also know how long it can take to work through the book if you are truly taking it in and contemplating what he is suggesting you do to change your life rather than just reading it straight through. Maxwell believes that it is our If you have ever read a book by John Maxwell before then you can appreciate both the simple truths and straight forward actions that he gives and suggests in his books. This book is no different. However, if you have read Maxwell's stuff before, then you probably also know how long it can take to work through the book if you are truly taking it in and contemplating what he is suggesting you do to change your life rather than just reading it straight through. Maxwell believes that it is our ability to connect, not just communicate, that determines if we reach our full potential and that connecting is a skill that can be learned. By taking us on a journey through several parts of his own life, he demonstrates that he himself had to learn these skills and then hone them over time. He is a leader, a connector now and while most of these skills are second nature to him at this point, he still shows throughout this book the effort and intentionality that is required by a person if they truly want to connect with other people. I have read many other leadership books and communications books and I don't think that there are huge revelations in this book. If you are looking for a new way to do things, I don't think that is what Maxwell was shooting for. He packages up things that people know and do sporadically and simply says..."This works, but you have to work for it.". There are not any quick outs to becoming a connector.So for me, a person who desires and aspires to be a leader, a connector, a person that can help influence people, this book was a great read and will be a great reference to go back to on occasion to make sure I am employing these tested skills towards those people I am around. I would suggest that anyone read it because all the connecting skills that are addressed can be applied to personal, professional or family relationships...and who amongst us couldn't improve in one of those areas?
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  • Matthew Turner
    January 1, 1970
    I don’t know why I keep making the same mistake, but hopefully this will be my last one. These self-help books just aren’t for me. I was lured by the snappy title, and my naïve optimism that this author would have something profound to say on the topic.Almost all the advice in this book is OK and --- if I’m really honest --- I did actually learn a couple of new things (although I’m struggling to think of them now).But the overall experience was a little unpleasant for me. For example, the author I don’t know why I keep making the same mistake, but hopefully this will be my last one. These self-help books just aren’t for me. I was lured by the snappy title, and my naïve optimism that this author would have something profound to say on the topic.Almost all the advice in this book is OK and --- if I’m really honest --- I did actually learn a couple of new things (although I’m struggling to think of them now).But the overall experience was a little unpleasant for me. For example, the author tries to describe the importance of body-language by giving an example of thieves who study their victims and avoid people who seem confident and alert. I would really need to see the reference data or scientific evidence to support claims like that, because that is so close to victim-blaming it made me squirm. If it’s true, support it with evidence. If it’s just an anecdote? Erghhhh… those are the kind of anecdotes we could live without.Speaking of anecdotes… this book is full of ‘em. Parts of it are just Mr. Maxwell telling stories about people he knows, with a tenuous link to his theme of “connecting” tacked onto the end.And it’s also a little rah-rah-yay-America for my taste. Not super bad… but there were hints of it. But my biggest problem is that all the advice was just incredibly obvious. I thought I was purchasing a book about how to connect with people, but this is really a book about why connections are important, with some cute little stories and platitudes to support that. If you have any doubts about the importance of human connections, buy this book and you may learn something new. But if you already think human connections are important, and you’re already doing an OK-to-average job cultivating them, my advice is to put your wallet away and keep walking.
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  • Jo Linsdell
    January 1, 1970
    In Everyone Communicates Few Connect, Internationally respected leadership expert and speaker, John C. Maxwell discusses how to communicate and connect with others in order to reach your potential. In this book Maxwell offers his method of Five Principles and Five Practices, you can learn to connect one-on-one, in a group or with an audience. Although Maxwell highlights the importance of concentrating on others and not just promoting or talking about yourself as being one of the major aspects of In Everyone Communicates Few Connect, Internationally respected leadership expert and speaker, John C. Maxwell discusses how to communicate and connect with others in order to reach your potential. In this book Maxwell offers his method of Five Principles and Five Practices, you can learn to connect one-on-one, in a group or with an audience. Although Maxwell highlights the importance of concentrating on others and not just promoting or talking about yourself as being one of the major aspects of good communicating, the author almost constantly talks about his personal achievements through out the book and although in some cases these personal tales add to his argument, for the most part it just left me thinking how much he loves himself. Even to the extent that when he writes about his failures, it seemed that he was instead giving some kind of sales pitch to get more speaking engagements.I also felt that the points raised in the book could each have been covered in much less pages. The quotes and examples given to back up each point were too many and quickly bored me.That being said, the book did offer a few insights into more effective communicating that I hadn’t previously considered. The tips for preparing for talking to groups were particularly useful.This book may be of interest of people studying communication or for those looking to improve their presenting skills.
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  • CarolynKost
    January 1, 1970
    Author, speaker and leadership expert Maxwell seeks to catalyze readers' latent potential to become highly effective and influential leaders and expert communicators who deftly establish connections with their listeners. Maxwell refutes the idea that identifying with others is an innate ability, but rather a skill that one can develop by directing one's attention toward others and connecting enthusiastically with what others see, hear, feel, and understand. He identifies various practices of Author, speaker and leadership expert Maxwell seeks to catalyze readers' latent potential to become highly effective and influential leaders and expert communicators who deftly establish connections with their listeners. Maxwell refutes the idea that identifying with others is an innate ability, but rather a skill that one can develop by directing one's attention toward others and connecting enthusiastically with what others see, hear, feel, and understand. He identifies various practices of those who are adept at socializing and public speaking, from self-deprecating humor to projecting confidence. This is a pithy practical manual with grounded examples, and folksy anecdotes and quotations. Each chapter ends with bullet point advice about how to employ each principle in three contexts: one to one, a group, and an auditorium. While much of this material is basic ("Find common ground;""Speak more about the other than yourself") and has been covered more extensively elsewhere (i.e. Sonya Hamlin's essential How to Talk So People Listen), Maxwell is adept at drawing the reader in and maintaining attention. This is an excellent starting point for public speaking neophytes, but would be a disappointing review for the more seasoned. Recommended for bookstores and public libraries where motivational books are popular.
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  • John Semchenko
    January 1, 1970
    key understanding...Communciation is all about connecting with others. Information transferred is less important than the relationship that is built. key quotes...People don’t care how much you know, until they know how much you care.You can not educate or motivate until you initiate a relationship.Communication is less KNOWLEDGE and more relationship.To accomplish anything of value, you must learn to manage and marshal your energy.Connecting with others begins with thinking about those people. key understanding...Communciation is all about connecting with others. Information transferred is less important than the relationship that is built. key quotes...People don’t care how much you know, until they know how much you care.You can not educate or motivate until you initiate a relationship.Communication is less KNOWLEDGE and more relationship.To accomplish anything of value, you must learn to manage and marshal your energy.Connecting with others begins with thinking about those people.When you see people as valuable you will understand that they can add more value to the team if they are a part of it.If you don’t feel you are connecting it may be due to the fact that you don’t care.key questions...Am I trying to CORRECT or CONNECT with others?How can I add value to people?What feelings do I want to create in others?What messages do I want to send with my physical appearance?How do I visually connect with people?
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  • Aaron Beddes
    January 1, 1970
    I wasn't expecting much since I wasn't familiar with the book - just stumbled across it in OverDrive. But, I was very pleasantly surprised. I appreciate self-help books that emphasize the importance of being a better person first, and then how that leads to success.I just listened to a copy borrowed from the library, but this is probably a book worth owning. I'll probably buy it.
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  • Tony Jr.
    January 1, 1970
    WOW!! What a great book.. Very well written, excellent stories to back up the points (one made me laugh out loud) along with practical applicable strategies and tips. I found myself shaking my head in agreement with many of the key points the author made. I purchased the audio & hardback book for review and closer study. This is simply a must-have for anyone that cares about connecting with people.
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  • Isaai Lance Sihlangu
    January 1, 1970
    Just started reading this book a few a days ago,like all other Maxwell's previous books,this one is none other than the best yet of Maxwell's classic,How many times do we communicate yet failing in connecting with each other,well alot of times if you ask me!!,well those are over, John C Maxwell with this book gives us the in-depth break drown of how we can not only enhance our communication but ways in making that happen,Maxwell's great thoughts and view.
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  • Travis Dahle
    January 1, 1970
    This was an excellent book and would highly recommend it to people who want to improve how they communicate with people in meetings, face to face, and in large presentations.A more in-depth review can be found here.
  • Elias Thomase
    January 1, 1970
    I will have to say John C. Maxwell will be one of my new and forever favorite Authors. I really took my time the where so many great opportunities to take note for the great information to be shared, I will recommend this book to anyone, this book can benefit anyone who searching to self-develop.
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  • Sasha
    January 1, 1970
    This book might be of value to a 16 year old, say. Someone who could benefit by reviewing the most absolutely basic principles of good communication. "Care about the person you are communicating with." "Speak so that you can be understood."There are far more insightful books out there.
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  • Kathrynn
    January 1, 1970
    Excellent book and I highly recommend it anyone looking to learn how to communicate more effectively.
  • Jennifer
    January 1, 1970
    This is a must-read for all. Imagine how much better our lives would all be if we did more than communicated, we connected.
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