Daughter of Winter
As the ground of her past shifts, a girl finds her way to an unexpected future in this compelling historical novel about survival and strength.It’s 1849, and twelve-year-old Addie lives in the shipbuilding town of Essex, Massachusetts. Her father has left the family to seek gold on the West Coast, and now the flux has taken the lives of her mother and baby brother, leaving Addie all alone. Her fear of living as a servant in some other home drives her into the snowy woods, where she survives on her own for several weeks before a nomadic, silver-haired Wampanoag woman takes her in. Slowly, the startling truth of Addie’s past unfolds. Through an intense ancient ceremony, and by force of her own wits and will, Addie unravels the mystery of her identity — and finds the courage to build a future unlike any she could ever have imagined.

Daughter of Winter Details

TitleDaughter of Winter
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseOct 12th, 2010
PublisherCandlewick
ISBN-139780763645007
Rating
GenreHistorical, Historical Fiction, Young Adult, Childrens, Middle Grade, North American Hi..., American History, Teen, American, American Fiction, Juvenile, Literature, 19th Century

Daughter of Winter Review

  • Glenda
    January 1, 1970
    It is 1849, and things are bad for 12-year-old Addie. Her father has left the family’s Massachusetts home to look for gold in California, and her mother and brother have just died from the much-feared flux.Worried that the town's busybodies will send her to live with strangers and force her to work as a caregiver and servant, Addie told no one that her mama and brother had passed away and flees to the nearby woods (in spite of the snow) to try and survive on her own.But it’s harder than she thou It is 1849, and things are bad for 12-year-old Addie. Her father has left the family’s Massachusetts home to look for gold in California, and her mother and brother have just died from the much-feared flux.Worried that the town's busybodies will send her to live with strangers and force her to work as a caregiver and servant, Addie told no one that her mama and brother had passed away and flees to the nearby woods (in spite of the snow) to try and survive on her own.But it’s harder than she thought to use the limited skills her father taught her, and so she is grateful for the help offered by Nokummus, an elderly Wampanoag woman, at least until Nokummus claims to be Addie’s grandmother. This is an engaging survival story intertwined with a search for identity and I enjoyed reading it. Though listed as young adult, I think it is better suited for younger children, maybe ages 10-14.I won this book on a Goodreads giveaway.
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  • Kathy
    January 1, 1970
    In 1849, Addie Hayden is left alone by her father who had left to make his riches in the California Goldrush, and taking care of her Mother and baby brother. Tragedy occurs when both her brother and the woman who she thought was her mother have passed away. Addie was taken in by her Wampanoag grandmother who had told her the truth about her real mother. She had taught Addie about many Wampanoag stories of her heritage as well as the vision ceremony when children become of age. Will Addie return In 1849, Addie Hayden is left alone by her father who had left to make his riches in the California Goldrush, and taking care of her Mother and baby brother. Tragedy occurs when both her brother and the woman who she thought was her mother have passed away. Addie was taken in by her Wampanoag grandmother who had told her the truth about her real mother. She had taught Addie about many Wampanoag stories of her heritage as well as the vision ceremony when children become of age. Will Addie return to her cabin to wait for her father's return or will she leave with her grandmother to go back to her native people?
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  • Margo Tanenbaum
    January 1, 1970
    Pat Lowery Collins' new release tells the story of 12-year old Addie, a resilient young girl in Massachusetts in 1849. When the novel opens, things couldn't be much worse for our heroine--her father took off to make his fortune in the California Gold Rush, leaving Addie with Mama and her little brother Jack. But now Mama and Jack have died of the flux, and Addie is trying to manage on her own with only her cat Matilda and the farm animals for company. When the townspeople ask, she pretends that Pat Lowery Collins' new release tells the story of 12-year old Addie, a resilient young girl in Massachusetts in 1849. When the novel opens, things couldn't be much worse for our heroine--her father took off to make his fortune in the California Gold Rush, leaving Addie with Mama and her little brother Jack. But now Mama and Jack have died of the flux, and Addie is trying to manage on her own with only her cat Matilda and the farm animals for company. When the townspeople ask, she pretends that everything's OK and that she's still taking care of her sick family. The only adult who seems to know what's really going on is a mysterious ancient Wampanoag Indian woman, Nokummus, who appears to be watching over Addie.Addie's great fear of being discovered and sent away to live with strangers as a servant girl leads her to run away from her cozy home into the dead of the Massachusetts winter. As foolish as this might seem, we learn that Addie has camped with her father in all seasons, and knows what to do to survive in the wilderness. Along with Addie, we feel the biting cold as she struggles to build a fire and feed herself, finding shelter in an abandoned shipyard. And always, she's waiting for Nokummus to come and rescue her. Sure enough, the old Indian woman shows up, taking Addie to her home or wetu on a nearby island, where she cares for her and shares the stories of the Wampanoag people. Addie's always felt a little different from the people in town, but she was never sure exactly why. Soon, under Nokummus' guidance, Addie discovers her real heritage--and truths about her family that she had never imagined.This novel encompasses a number of themes; it is a coming-of-age novel, about a young girl attempting to figure out where she fits into the universe in which she lives, as well as an adventure/survival story. In addition, it's a multicultural novel, in which the author includes many details of Wampanoag life in the 19th century, from their diet to their dwellings, legends, and rites. These are the same Indians familiar to us from the story of the Pilgrims and the first Thanksgiving. The only member of the tribe we meet is the elderly Nokummus. Yet the author keeps Nokummus at arm's length from Addie, who desperately longs for an affectionate word or touch.While this is a well-written novel, particularly deft in its evocative descriptions of the Massachusetts winter, I never really warmed up to the story, partly because I had difficulty believing in a 12-year old girl being so reluctant to ask for help from adults when tragedy strikes her family, and also because I found the character of Nokummus too remote for me to feel emotionally involved in her story. Nonetheless, I can imagine this book appealing to some tween and teen readers, particularly those with an interest in Native American cultures, and would consider it a worthy purchase for school and public libraries.
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  • Zoe Chen
    January 1, 1970
    The book, Daughter of Winter, takes place in Massachusetts in 1849, where a twelve-year-old girl named Addie lives. Addie is left alone at home with only the silence to comfort her since her mother and baby brother were killed as they obtained a deadly disease also known as the “flux” to Addie and her father journeyed along with his other friends on an adventure to find gold. Throughout the book, Addie constantly lies to her friends and adults to escape being forced into serving another family b The book, Daughter of Winter, takes place in Massachusetts in 1849, where a twelve-year-old girl named Addie lives. Addie is left alone at home with only the silence to comfort her since her mother and baby brother were killed as they obtained a deadly disease also known as the “flux” to Addie and her father journeyed along with his other friends on an adventure to find gold. Throughout the book, Addie constantly lies to her friends and adults to escape being forced into serving another family by the law. As an excuse to when people ask Addie about how her mother and baby brother are doing, she responds by saying that her mother and brother are alive and well, even though her mother and baby brother are already dead and Addie has buried them in a coffin nearby her house. However, Addie is unable to keep people believing this lie, so Addie runs away into the forest where she meets a woman who she calls Nokkumus, an Indian from the Wampanoag tribe. As Addie continues to stay with Nokkumus, Addie discovers a secret that Nokkumus and Addie’s mother had been hiding from Addie all along, Addie’s mother was an Indian for the Wampanoag tribe and Nokkumus is Addie’s grandmother. If you enjoy reading about how a lone girl finds her destiny, children who have to rely on their own strength to get through serious tragedies in their life, and following a character through events that lead up to opening doors to their family’s past, you should try to read this book. This is moderate material to any aged reader however there is some reference to how a girl’s body changes during their adolescence years which might be inappropriate to some readers.
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  • Patricia O'Sullivan
    January 1, 1970
    Twelve-year-old Addie is alone. Her father has gone off to California with the Forty-niners and her mother and brother have just died of the flux. And while the silence of the house disturbs Addie, she can’t bear the thought of being sent to live with another family in town, possibly to be treated like a servant. But then an old native woman keeps appearing in the yard, and Addie is scared. Fleeing to the woods, Addie does her best to survive the New England winter, but she is always cold, alway Twelve-year-old Addie is alone. Her father has gone off to California with the Forty-niners and her mother and brother have just died of the flux. And while the silence of the house disturbs Addie, she can’t bear the thought of being sent to live with another family in town, possibly to be treated like a servant. But then an old native woman keeps appearing in the yard, and Addie is scared. Fleeing to the woods, Addie does her best to survive the New England winter, but she is always cold, always hungry. In the end, it is the old native woman who helps Addie to survive while helping the young girl to understand who she truly is.While there are some strong moments in this novel, particularly the poetic bookends, overall I found it lacked the direction and tension to keep me interested. The opening is very strong, but then very little happens even though there is often the potential for interesting plot twists that the author dose not pursue such as a bully’s pursuit of Addie, the bigotry to Addie’s best friend, and the return of Addie’s father.
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  • Embrc
    January 1, 1970
    Recommended. Grades 5-8In 1849 Essex, Massachusetts, 12-year-old Addie is living alone after her father leaves for the CA gold rush and her mother and baby brother die from "the flux". Worried that she will be found out and sent to live with strangers, Addie tells no one of her predicament. When suspicions arise, she takes off into the wintry woods and attempts to survive on her own until her father's return. She is saved from exposure and starvation by an old Wampanoag woman who takes her in an Recommended. Grades 5-8In 1849 Essex, Massachusetts, 12-year-old Addie is living alone after her father leaves for the CA gold rush and her mother and baby brother die from "the flux". Worried that she will be found out and sent to live with strangers, Addie tells no one of her predicament. When suspicions arise, she takes off into the wintry woods and attempts to survive on her own until her father's return. She is saved from exposure and starvation by an old Wampanoag woman who takes her in and cares for her--and teaches her Indian customs and traditions and reveals the secret of Addie's heritage.This is a nice survival/coming-of-age story. There's a well developed sense of time and place. The "wise Indian woman" seems a bit of a stereotype to me--I wish I knew more in order to judge how accurate a portrayal of Wampanoag customs this book depicts.Jane FlandersLincoln Public Library
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  • Kris Irvin
    January 1, 1970
    Had I read this when I was 10, I think I would have loved it. But reading it as an adult, some things fell short for me. The whole Nokummus relationship, actually, fell very short. The beginning of the book is very engaging, but as it goes on it just becomes kind of tedious and random. The ending was pretty bad, and nothing really gets resolved.It's not the worst book I've ever read, but it's far from being the best.
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  • Michele
    January 1, 1970
    This book is set in my hometown, so I enjoy recognizing the different locations the author mentions. It is a very easy read although a little predictable at times. However, I am enjoying it quite a bit!
  • Erin
    January 1, 1970
    Kind of disappointing.
  • Clare
    January 1, 1970
    A strong female character is the heart of this tale. Addie, a teen, finds herself in an unthinkable situation. Her father has recently gone off to find gold in California and her mother and brother have died from illness. Left alone she tries to fend for herself, all the while hoping the townspeople will not notice and take her away from her home. An elderly Wampanoag woman tells Addie that she will help her but also has kept a secret that will change the teen's life forever. Although the book h A strong female character is the heart of this tale. Addie, a teen, finds herself in an unthinkable situation. Her father has recently gone off to find gold in California and her mother and brother have died from illness. Left alone she tries to fend for herself, all the while hoping the townspeople will not notice and take her away from her home. An elderly Wampanoag woman tells Addie that she will help her but also has kept a secret that will change the teen's life forever. Although the book had an ending of sorts it left much unresolved and had the feeling of the first book of a series.
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  • Aubrey
    January 1, 1970
    This book was a good, coming of age story but I felt it was kind of lacking in some way. I felt it could have been so much more, but overall a good read. Especially recommend it for the 10-12 year old girl group.
  • InezL_D1
    January 1, 1970
    All of Addie's family members are gone, leaving her alone. Addie survived on her own for a few weeks until she met a Wampanoag. You would like this book if you enjoy reading about how early humans survive.
  • Laurie Sacrey
    January 1, 1970
    An Coming of age and finding out you are not who you were told to be.A very easy and fast read , very good
  • Fabienne
    January 1, 1970
    I enjoyed this story of Addie and Nokummus.Descriptive and educating. Hardships and sweet revelations kept my emotions all over the place.
  • Iris Ellsberry
    January 1, 1970
    It was very boring once you got to like the 10th chapter and the ending didn't really solve anything. Hopefully they make a 2nd book so I can understand.
  • QNPoohBear
    January 1, 1970
    Twelve-year-old Addie and her family live in the shipping town of Essex, Massachusetts in 1849. Her father headed off to the gold fields of California just before an epidemic of the flux hit Essex. Addie's mother and little brother were both ill, but not Addie, who was determined to care for them all alone, without the interference of strangers. Addie is devastated when her mother and brother die of the flux and must gather her strength to take care of the bodies and do what it takes to survive Twelve-year-old Addie and her family live in the shipping town of Essex, Massachusetts in 1849. Her father headed off to the gold fields of California just before an epidemic of the flux hit Essex. Addie's mother and little brother were both ill, but not Addie, who was determined to care for them all alone, without the interference of strangers. Addie is devastated when her mother and brother die of the flux and must gather her strength to take care of the bodies and do what it takes to survive until her father returns. Addie, like her mother, doesn't like strangers. Her mother always called them "interfering busybodies." Addie makes plans to disappear before the townspeople discover her secret and make her work as an unpaid servant. She's reluctant to give up school, which she enjoys, and the friendship of her only true friend John, but she is determined to take care of herself. Addie meets a mysterious old Indian woman, Nokummus, who takes in Addie and teaches the girl things she never learned in school. Nokummus also holds the key to a secret about Addie's past and she is convinced that Addie is the one she has been looking for to become a great leader of her people. At first Addie isn't convinced, but as she grows to love Nokummus, she is torn between her life in Essex and her life with Nokummus. She has to make a momentous decision about who she is and what she will do with her future. This beautifully written novel opens and closes with poems that frame the story. Addie is a plucky heroine that most girls can relate to. She's not perfect, she's not too noble and she's not too much of a hoyden to be unrealistic. She's been shaped by certain factors in her life that have made her stronger. I like her a lot because she seems realistic. There's a budding romance that's very sweet and unfolds nicely. Nokummus is also an interesting character, though perhaps a bit stereotypical : the proud, wise, old Indian woman. The story is rich in detail and well-researched historical facts. I can easily see the story unfold in my head. This is a great coming-of-age/identity story and I highly recommend it for ages 11/12 +.
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  • Victoria Dixon
    January 1, 1970
    It’s 1849, and twelve-year-old Addie lives in the shipbuilding town of Essex, Massachusetts. Her father has left the family to seek gold on the West Coast, and tragically the flux has ended the lives of her mother and baby brother, leaving Addie all alone. Fearful of being taken in as a servant, Addie flees from her house into the snowy woods, where she endures hunger and bitter cold until Nokummus, an elderly Wampanoag woman, coaxes Addie to her dwelling.Now living under the care of the mercuri It’s 1849, and twelve-year-old Addie lives in the shipbuilding town of Essex, Massachusetts. Her father has left the family to seek gold on the West Coast, and tragically the flux has ended the lives of her mother and baby brother, leaving Addie all alone. Fearful of being taken in as a servant, Addie flees from her house into the snowy woods, where she endures hunger and bitter cold until Nokummus, an elderly Wampanoag woman, coaxes Addie to her dwelling.Now living under the care of the mercurial old woman, Addie slowly recognizes the truth of her past. Through an intense ancient ceremony and by force of her own wits and will, Addie must come to grips with the facts of her newfound identity – and find the courage to build a future unlike any she could ever have imagined.Daughter of Winter was a heart rending read at times. The book begins:Yesterday I washed their bodiesas I’ve seen the women dodressed them in their best,and laid them in a crypt of snow…If that doesn’t catch your attention, for better or worse, you must be the one in the crypt. I was riveted after those first four lines, but I have to admit, Daughter of Winter was a hard read for me because of Addie’s agonizing search for her own identity and “real” mother. You see, I’m an adoptive mother. My daughter is from China and though she’s still a little young for these questions, she will someday have them. Just like Addie, my child will want to know who her “real” mother is and I will have to contain my tears at the question. Tears for her loss; tears that she has to ask such a terrible thing because I am her real mother. I am just not the person who gave her life. This book managed to touch me in a deeply personal place, for which I’m grateful. I hope it will help me to be a better mother when these questions arise.The novel’s conclusion is moving and fulfilling, but I hate spoilers and refuse to give away anything else. What I will do is whole heartedly recommend this novel to the general populace, but most especially to those people touched by adoption or foster situations.
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  • Leslie Preddy
    January 1, 1970
    Lowery Collins’ novel starts and ends with a story poem. The poem leads the reader through what happens before and after the narrative. Set in Massachusetts in 1849, the opening is powerful with the knowledge that our heroine, Addie, is alone as she deals with the sudden death of her younger brother and Mamma. Her father is unreachable and off hoping to make his fortune in the gold rush. With her father not expected back for more than a year, Addie was left alone to deal with the death of her mo Lowery Collins’ novel starts and ends with a story poem. The poem leads the reader through what happens before and after the narrative. Set in Massachusetts in 1849, the opening is powerful with the knowledge that our heroine, Addie, is alone as she deals with the sudden death of her younger brother and Mamma. Her father is unreachable and off hoping to make his fortune in the gold rush. With her father not expected back for more than a year, Addie was left alone to deal with the death of her mother and brother, including the all too real task of preparing the dead for burial. With a sense of self-preservation, she tried to keep the deaths a secret from the townfolk because she fears being passed into somebody else’s care and forced into work instead of going to school. The fear of the inevitable moment when the community finds her living alone was the impetus necessary for her to venture off alone. After weeks of hiding and surviving in the cold, a woman appears and says she is Addie’s grandmother. Here Addie, who thought she was white, first learns of her multi-cultural heritage and of her Native American mother who died in childbirth and her grandmother who cared for her when she was an infant. Grandmother takes her away to live on an island where Addie lives and learns from her and of the way of her birth mother’s people. Through many trials and a pervading sense of loneliness, Addie grows up as the story slowly unfolds. This is a quiet, compassionate tale of secrets, heritage, self-discovery, personal strength, and unconditional love.
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  • Libby Ames
    January 1, 1970
    When twelve-year-old Addie’s mother and little brother die of the flux, Addie is left on her own. Her father has left home to follow the call of the gold rush and Addie is afraid of being sent to another family as a servant. At first, Addie hides her mother’s death, but she knows she can’t fool her fellow townspeople for long.Addie makes a desperate attempt to survive on her own in the snowy woods until she finally accepts help from Nokummus, an elderly Wampanoag woman. Life with Nokummus opens When twelve-year-old Addie’s mother and little brother die of the flux, Addie is left on her own. Her father has left home to follow the call of the gold rush and Addie is afraid of being sent to another family as a servant. At first, Addie hides her mother’s death, but she knows she can’t fool her fellow townspeople for long.Addie makes a desperate attempt to survive on her own in the snowy woods until she finally accepts help from Nokummus, an elderly Wampanoag woman. Life with Nokummus opens Addie’s eyes to the truth of her past that even her father kept hidden. Addie must accept who she really is before she will have the courage to create her future. Daughter of Winter is well-written historical fiction as well as an interesting coming of age and wilderness survival story. Addie is a strong character with an interesting story that will appeal to tweens as well as elementary readers.Recommended ages—10 and up
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  • Jennifer Wardrip
    January 1, 1970
    Reviewed by Jennifer Rummel for TeensReadToo.comAddie's mother and brother die in the middle of winter. Addie's father has left to find gold on the West Coast. All alone, she struggles to maintain normalcy. She's so afraid that the townspeople will force someone to take her in and she will become a servant.Finally, when all hope is lost, she flees out into the night. She survives on her own with her cat for company. Addie's not sure how long she will be able to last. She grows weak and then sick Reviewed by Jennifer Rummel for TeensReadToo.comAddie's mother and brother die in the middle of winter. Addie's father has left to find gold on the West Coast. All alone, she struggles to maintain normalcy. She's so afraid that the townspeople will force someone to take her in and she will become a servant.Finally, when all hope is lost, she flees out into the night. She survives on her own with her cat for company. Addie's not sure how long she will be able to last. She grows weak and then sick. Eventually, Nokummus finds her.Nokummus, an elderly Wampanoag woman, takes Addie under her wing. Addie regains her health and her strength, and under the watchful eye of Nokummus, she learns the truth about her past.DAUGHTER OF WINTER is a one part survival story and one part coming-of-age tale. Addie struggles against the town, against nature, and against herself to find her true destiny.
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  • Sarah
    January 1, 1970
    Addie is a twelve-year-old who has to learn how to be by herself. Her dad left weeks ago for the gold fields, leaving her behind with her mother and little brother. But soon after he leaves, her family becomes sick and Addie has to take care of them herself. She does the best that she can, but they don't make it. Addie is terrified. It's 1849 and she isn't sure how long she can fool the neighbors into thinking her ma is still alive. She doesn't want to be shipped away somewhere else though--what Addie is a twelve-year-old who has to learn how to be by herself. Her dad left weeks ago for the gold fields, leaving her behind with her mother and little brother. But soon after he leaves, her family becomes sick and Addie has to take care of them herself. She does the best that she can, but they don't make it. Addie is terrified. It's 1849 and she isn't sure how long she can fool the neighbors into thinking her ma is still alive. She doesn't want to be shipped away somewhere else though--what will happen if her pa returns and she isn't there? And so Addie is determined to make it on her own. An old Wampanoag woman helps her, and Addie soon realizes that there is much more to her heritage than she realizes. Nokummus isn't just an old lady--she's an elderly lady who has the answers to questions that Addie doesn't even know she has.I had to listen to this because the main character's name is Addie! It's a sweet historical read, even if parts are a bit unbelievable.
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  • Lynn
    January 1, 1970
    This book was recommended by an adult patron who reads a lot of children's literature. Addie lives in Essex, Massachusetts in 1849. Her father has gone West to the gold fields and has left Addie with her mother and baby brother. Her mother, who was never very strong, died with the flux as did her brother. Addie had sole care for her mother and brother for her mother refused any help from neighbors. Addie is afraid of being taken in by another family and forced to be a servant. So she runs away a This book was recommended by an adult patron who reads a lot of children's literature. Addie lives in Essex, Massachusetts in 1849. Her father has gone West to the gold fields and has left Addie with her mother and baby brother. Her mother, who was never very strong, died with the flux as did her brother. Addie had sole care for her mother and brother for her mother refused any help from neighbors. Addie is afraid of being taken in by another family and forced to be a servant. So she runs away and lives in the wilderness.Eventually she is joined by an old Wampanoag woman who teaches her how to survive in the woods. This woman Addie has seen around and knows that her father has purchased shell fish from so Addie trusts her. Slowly Addie learns that this woman knows a great deal more about her and her family than she ever dreamed. This is really an amazing story and I highly recommend it to anyone looking for a youth coming of age story and historical fiction.
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  • Laura
    January 1, 1970
    In the mid-19th century shipbuilding town of Essex, Massachusetts, 12-year-old Addie learns a startling and unexpected secret about her identity. When we first meet Addie, her father has sailed to California to find gold. Her mother and brother have died of a sudden illness. Addie is alone, except for her best friend, John, and a mysterious Wampanoag Indian woman. Addie struggles to find her place in this new and treacherous life, while she waits for her father to return. Daughter of Winter has In the mid-19th century shipbuilding town of Essex, Massachusetts, 12-year-old Addie learns a startling and unexpected secret about her identity. When we first meet Addie, her father has sailed to California to find gold. Her mother and brother have died of a sudden illness. Addie is alone, except for her best friend, John, and a mysterious Wampanoag Indian woman. Addie struggles to find her place in this new and treacherous life, while she waits for her father to return. Daughter of Winter has a subtle effect on you, building your concern for Addie's welfare while simultaneously increasing your wonder about who Addie really is. An unexpected page turner that you will hope has a sequel.
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  • Christopher Obert
    January 1, 1970
    Daughter of Winter is a coming of age story told in 1849 Massachusetts. Addie is a 12 year old girl living in Essex when both her mother and brother die of sickness. Addie’s father is on the West Coast and does not know what has happened back at home. It is up to Addie to keep her wits and overcome her childhood fears while waiting for her father’s return, if he returns at all! But Addie’s story is more complicated because of her secret hidden past. Her life’s history is not what she thought it Daughter of Winter is a coming of age story told in 1849 Massachusetts. Addie is a 12 year old girl living in Essex when both her mother and brother die of sickness. Addie’s father is on the West Coast and does not know what has happened back at home. It is up to Addie to keep her wits and overcome her childhood fears while waiting for her father’s return, if he returns at all! But Addie’s story is more complicated because of her secret hidden past. Her life’s history is not what she thought it was and it has now begun to re-enter her life. Can Addie cope with these events happening all at once or will they prove to be her undoing?
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  • Star
    January 1, 1970
    We find Addie all alone, her father gone to find gold out West and her mother and baby brother dead of the flux (dysentery). She's trying to keep it a secret so she doesn't have to become some family's servant. She runs off on her own and meets up with Nokummus, a Native American woman, who knows Addie better than she knows herself.This is good historical-esque fiction about a girl's coming of age. Addie's got to go within and discover her own truth. Not what others think she should be or what s We find Addie all alone, her father gone to find gold out West and her mother and baby brother dead of the flux (dysentery). She's trying to keep it a secret so she doesn't have to become some family's servant. She runs off on her own and meets up with Nokummus, a Native American woman, who knows Addie better than she knows herself.This is good historical-esque fiction about a girl's coming of age. Addie's got to go within and discover her own truth. Not what others think she should be or what society says a girl should be, but her innermost self. This was a very interesting, enjoyable, and thought-provoking book.
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  • Leah Markum
    January 1, 1970
    Simple and sweet. I love historical fiction that has a touch of strong-heroine-breaking-gender-roles thing and Native American culture. In some ways the drama is as serious as winter in 1850s Massachusetts can be and yet as gentle of family love can be. I had flashbacks to the American Girl series, partly because of the protagonist's age since I usually read books with older characters. Unfortunately there's no epilogue, because in this case I would love to know what happened a few months after Simple and sweet. I love historical fiction that has a touch of strong-heroine-breaking-gender-roles thing and Native American culture. In some ways the drama is as serious as winter in 1850s Massachusetts can be and yet as gentle of family love can be. I had flashbacks to the American Girl series, partly because of the protagonist's age since I usually read books with older characters. Unfortunately there's no epilogue, because in this case I would love to know what happened a few months after the story ended (specific reasons would be spoilers).
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  • Kiirsi Hellewell
    January 1, 1970
    This book is a sort of historical fiction, taking place during the winter of 1850-ish in Massachusetts. It reminds me a lot of books I read scores of as a kid, and I'm pleasantly surprised they're still publishing books like this. Mostly I enjoyed the story, though it really dragged in parts. I felt the ending was way too rushed. But I did like the "who am I?" aspect and how the main character went about exploring her personal and cultural identity.
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  • Cecilia Rodriguez
    January 1, 1970
    The story is set in 1849, Essex, Massachusetts.Twelve year old Addie is left alone after both her mother and younger brother die from illness.Fearful that she will be taken in as a servant, Addie runs away.Close to starvation, Addie is rescued by Nokummus, an elderly Wampanog woman.Collins' plot has the themes of hidden family heritage and self discovery.The story is detailed and Addie is a believable heroine.
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  • Ms. Heres
    January 1, 1970
    Addie is left completely alone after her father leaves to follow the Gold Rush and her mother and brother die from the flux. Not sure she will be able to survive until her father returns, and not even sure her father WILL return from his adventure, Addie must find a way to provide for herself. Her chances of survival seem to improve after meeting a strange Indian woman.
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  • Delena
    January 1, 1970
    I couldn't wait to see how this story turned out. A young girl had to be strong despite many hardships. Such a neat story of family and strength.
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