God Wants You to Be Rich
In God Wants You to Be Rich, bestselling author Paul Zane Pilzer provides an original, provocative view of how to accumulate wealth and why it is beneficial to all of humankind. A theology of economics, this book explores why God wants each of us to be rich in every way -- physically, emotionally, and financially -- and shows the way to prosperity, well-being, and peace of mind. Pilzer explains that the foundation of our economic system is based on our Judeo-Christian heritage and includes chapters on a variety of financial issues from outsourcing and unemployment to the rise of technology and real estate.  Table of Contents1. God Wants You to Be Rich2. The Covenant3. The Search for Camelot4. Economic Alchemy5. What's Happening to Our Jobs6. The Workplace of the 21st Century7. Money8. Government9. LeadershipAppendix: The Principles and Six Laws of Economic Alchemy

God Wants You to Be Rich Details

TitleGod Wants You to Be Rich
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseDec 4th, 2007
PublisherTouchstone
ISBN-139781416549277
Rating
GenreBusiness, Economics, Finance, Currency, Money, Nonfiction, Self Help

God Wants You to Be Rich Review

  • Books Ring Mah Bell
    January 1, 1970
    This guy CAN NOT be for real.
  • Chinedu Okonkwo
    January 1, 1970
    The author took a deep dive into economics, psychology and a little sprinkle of Christianity. It is good to learn what have happen in the US economy since the 1900s and the false economic predictions. Although the book was written in the late 1990s, some of the predictions has came into existence and its still relevant today as it was 20 years ago.
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  • Ryan
    January 1, 1970
    My notes and quotes:Pilzer primarily describes his theory of economic alchemy. Describes how Abraham developed first property laws and customs. Argues that God wants all people to be fulfilled and prosperous. Also argues that technology has and will continue to answer all problems that people predict will lead to economic ruin. Explains that overall economic growth has increased for most of the century and will continue to increase as long as more productive methods are developed. Most economic My notes and quotes:Pilzer primarily describes his theory of economic alchemy. Describes how Abraham developed first property laws and customs. Argues that God wants all people to be fulfilled and prosperous. Also argues that technology has and will continue to answer all problems that people predict will lead to economic ruin. Explains that overall economic growth has increased for most of the century and will continue to increase as long as more productive methods are developed. Most economic problems come from political problems rather than lack of resources. Explains how Keynes incorrectly assumed that people would cease to want more products once they had been satiated (this is where graduated income tax comes from). Goes into detail about economic progression throughout the 1980's and 90's. Describes in general how it is better to freely share new technology and methods in order to allow increased efficiency across industries instead of dying out because one company has a monopoly on it. The principles of economic alchemy are: technology determines wealth because it determines the amount of physical resources; advancement of technology is determined by the ability to process information; and the backlog of discovered technology that has not been put into use is the true predictor of economic growth for society and the individual. The principles of alchemy are: 1. technology determines what is considered a physical resource (e.g. used to be whales, now is petroleum); 2. technology determines the supply of existing physical resources (e.g. the supply increases as we use it more efficiently, etc.); 3. the rate of technology development is determined by the ability to process information (e.g. more minds working together on same problem solve it quicker); 4. technology determines what products are available and therefore dictates consumer demand; 5. technology also determines the level of consumer demand for these new products by fixing the price at which goods can be sold (here differentiates between quantity demand and quality demand, only want so much of one product, then you want a better quality model); 6. immediate economic potential can be explained by looking at tech. gap, optimum practices based on what's available vs. actual economic practices. Explains why immigrants often make the best workers because they are willing to adapt to new methods quickly. Also explains how jobs that used to take a lifetime to become obsolete now take only a few years; therefore it is important to control one's employment destiny instead of planning on spending a lifetime with the same company. One of the most important attributes of capitalism is the division of labor it allows, thereby increasing productivity tremendously. So based on this emerging "temporary" labor market it is often better to "quit before you are fired." In other words, become more of an independent contractor (and continue to work for the same company for your first client) so that you will not be tied to one company's changing needs. Also describes how money is disappearing as a store of wealth, instead it is stored in investments, credit cards, and other non-money sources. Ends book with going into how to solve societal problems through economics (e.g. crime by eliminating the ease of circulation of money from stolen items, education with no ability-based rewards). Stresses that unemployment is usually the result of technological change and is a sign of economic improvement.
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  • Jay
    January 1, 1970
    First of all, I've recently come to notice that in the Bible there's not very much direct application to our 21st century issues of technological development, or what to make of the time given back from the distribution of labor in urban areas. This lack of knowledge prompted me to pick up this book, hoping to find some new commentaries on passages from the gospels or even recovering intent from Old Testament principles.The main thrust of Pilzer does address the phenomenon we're currently experi First of all, I've recently come to notice that in the Bible there's not very much direct application to our 21st century issues of technological development, or what to make of the time given back from the distribution of labor in urban areas. This lack of knowledge prompted me to pick up this book, hoping to find some new commentaries on passages from the gospels or even recovering intent from Old Testament principles.The main thrust of Pilzer does address the phenomenon we're currently experiencing, which is an exponentially-accelerating economy and technological environment. The primary effect is increased efficiency, which improves the standard of living for everyone because of more value with the same resources or less. The residual effect is displacement of employees whose skills, by competitive-yet-well-intentioned capitalistic fundamentals, become obsolete and put them in a position requiring them to adapt. Academically, Pilzer made great arguments of why this creative destruction is economically productive, as well as healthy for the growth of humans in our endeavor to improve the world.However, theologically, there was much less support than I could've hoped for. There were merely a handful of obscure passages (mainly from the Abrahamic laws) that were mentioned, and used as a springboard for further elaboration with modern economics. So there was nothing terribly innovative here, just several good ideas.Considering my opening statement, I was satisfied with the limited biblical insights Pilzer delivered. Overall, this book was a great collection of modern 20th century examples of "economic alchemy," with plenty of short vignettes to demonstrate his conceptual ideas. If not from the perspective of a Christian, then as a businessperson I feel much more empowered with a model of how to create thriving, sustainable organizations with humanitarian insights.
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  • Ajeya
    January 1, 1970
    Learned.The Book Gives Principles and Six Laws of alchemy.Principles of Economic Alchemy:-1. Wealth is proportional to Technological Advancement2. Technological progress depends on ability to grasp info3. Economic growth is predicted by technologies-yet to be implemented.and six laws which are rephrasing of above 3.Alchemic = Excess (Unlimited!)Modern retailing = distribution + education.Retailers specializing in consumer education can seriously challenge those experts in distribution. Teach con Learned.The Book Gives Principles and Six Laws of alchemy.Principles of Economic Alchemy:-1. Wealth is proportional to Technological Advancement2. Technological progress depends on ability to grasp info3. Economic growth is predicted by technologies-yet to be implemented.and six laws which are rephrasing of above 3.Alchemic = Excess (Unlimited!)Modern retailing = distribution + education.Retailers specializing in consumer education can seriously challenge those experts in distribution. Teach consumers on what they need and how to go about it ( like Installing home goods - Home Depot , Amway)On Hiring and Firing - Individual - Take responsibility of economy as people work for themselves. Increased Outsourcing makes people free from giant companies, let them stand on what they are good at with increased self-belief, responsibility and freedom.Keynes General Theory 1936 - " Consumption is the sole end of economic activity"
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  • David Feinstein
    January 1, 1970
    The book basically takes you through the history of the US economy and economic thinking at various stages through our history. Mr. Pilzer points out that consumers never become satisfied as was predicted in the 30's and 40's. Advancing technology always stays one step ahead of man and provides him with new and improved products which may be considered a luxury at first but will quickly become a necessity in our ever changing society.
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  • Seth
    January 1, 1970
    Not at all what you would think from the title of the book. It was a very interesting book with an optimistic view of economics. When he went into theology, he was definitely out of his expertise. He had a lot of interesting takes on things that were different than the common held belief on why things happen.
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  • Cassio Moreno
    January 1, 1970
    Excelente história. Uma visão positiva e que parte da própria moção e força de vontade, cita vários atentados à economia e várias coisas que deram certo.Nos dá pequenos ensinamentos sobre fazer-nos ricos, mas não somente de dinheiro.
  • Hk
    January 1, 1970
    Fantastic writer, make economics so easy to understand
  • Surya Winata
    January 1, 1970
    bahwa dunia ini adalah dunia yang makin hari makin bertambah kaya, dan bukan makin lama makin miskin sehingga mesti berebut segala hal.
  • Liz
    January 1, 1970
    Excellent book on economics and the history of our free enterprise economic system.
  • Epee
    January 1, 1970
    Hilarious. Some people could justify anything.
  • Philip S
    January 1, 1970
    Some interesting ideas about how technology increases wealth over time, wealth that government statistics do not recognize or account for. There is very little "theology" in this book.
  • Jennifer
    January 1, 1970
    Very interesting. I found myself believing most of what he says. I got a little bored though and didn't finish it. Sometime I will.
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