The Money Book for Freelancers, Part-Timers, and the Self-Employed
This is a book for people like us, and we all know who we are.  We make our own hours, keep our own profits, chart our own way. We have things like gigs, contracts, clients, and assignments.  All of us are working toward our dreams: doing our own work, on our own time, on our own terms. We have no real boss, no corporate nameplate, no cubicle of our very own. Unfortunately, we also have no 401(k)s and no one matching them, no benefits package, and no one collecting our taxes until April 15th. It’s time to take stock of where you are and where you want to be. Ask yourself: Who is planning for your retirement? Who covers your expenses when clients flake out and checks are late? Who is setting money aside for your taxes? Who is responsible for your health insurance? Take a good look in the mirror: You are. The Money Book for Freelancers, Part-Timers, and the Self-Employed describes a completely new, comprehensive system for earning, spending, saving, and surviving as an independent worker. From interviews with financial experts to anecdotes from real-life freelancers, plus handy charts and graphs to help you visualize key concepts, you’ll learn about topics including:  • Managing Cash Flow When the Cash Isn’t Flowing Your Way • Getting Real About What You’re Really Earning • Tools for Getting Out of Debt and Into Financial Security • Saving Consistently When You Earn Irregularly • What To Do When a Client’s Check Doesn’t Come In • Health Savings Accounts and How To Use Them • Planning for Retirement, Taxes and Dreams—All On Your Own

The Money Book for Freelancers, Part-Timers, and the Self-Employed Details

TitleThe Money Book for Freelancers, Part-Timers, and the Self-Employed
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseMar 2nd, 2010
PublisherThree Rivers Press
ISBN-139780307453662
Rating
GenreNonfiction, Business, Economics, Finance, Currency, Money, Personal Finance

The Money Book for Freelancers, Part-Timers, and the Self-Employed Review

  • Cara
    January 1, 1970
    Just got this book last night, and I'm already halfway through. I've been freaking out about wrecking my finances when I become self-employed; this book reminds me that there's no magic to it. Figure out how much money you need for the stuff you need, and put that much aside when you have money so you can get that stuff. Even self-employed people can have health insurance, an emergency fund, a retirement, sick days, etc., if they do the math and follow through.There is nothing in this book that Just got this book last night, and I'm already halfway through. I've been freaking out about wrecking my finances when I become self-employed; this book reminds me that there's no magic to it. Figure out how much money you need for the stuff you need, and put that much aside when you have money so you can get that stuff. Even self-employed people can have health insurance, an emergency fund, a retirement, sick days, etc., if they do the math and follow through.There is nothing in this book that I didn't know, but I'm still finding it helpful and very reassuring. The advice is concrete, specific, and clearly correct. Yay math! ...The whole book was excellent. Highly recommended....Notes:Ch1: treat yourself like a good employer would treat you. That means retirement, benefits, sick days, tax withholding.Ch2: figure out what happened last year. What did you earn, what did you spend it on? Figure out fixed expenses, 3 top areas to watch/goals, when to recheck (weekly? next month?). Ch3: Debt. Go through records, find out: how much you spent on interest and fees last year, what kinds of things you borrow money for, what you're still paying on. Rank debts in order of priority to pay off. (small balance first, highest rate first, most hated first?) Don't put any more on credit, pay the minimum on everything but #1, pay it off, then do the same for each debt down the line.Ch4: Make a big list of the specific things you want. Categorize them into 5-6ish categories. Rank them. Find out how much each one costs--spell out costs and dates in your goals. Focus on a few to make happen first. CHh5: Save by percentages because freelance income is inconsistent. Have dedicated account for each goal, and siphon off the percentage for each as soon as you get paid. Ch6; holy trinity of savings: retirement, emergency, taxes. Make account for each, put in a percentage every time you get paid. If you use the emergency fund, pay it back as soon as you can--consider it a short-term loan to yourself. For retirement account, use it to hold funds on their way to your SEP-IRA, Roth, whatever. SEP-IRA recommended: save up to 20% of net self-employment income (income after deductions), up to $49k. Tax deductible; have until April 15 for previous year. But bad if you plan to have employees--must put same amount in theirs. Another good option: Solo 401(k)--can save $16,500+20% of net or 25% of salary, tax-deductible--this offers the most money sheltered but slightly more complicated to set up, may have $250/year maintenance fees. Employees are also problematic with this one.If hiring a financial planner, get one who works for fees only, not commissions. Choose a fiduciary--required to put your needs first. Get that in writing.Ch7: Have a spending account at a brick-and-mortar bank you can deposit checks immediately. Link to the other accounts. When a check comes in, transfer percentages from here to other goal accounts. If big, transfer all but one month's expenses to local savings. Move back to spending acct as needed in next month(s).Ch8: Do it. Start with 3/4/3 emergency/tax/retirement if have never saved before (??? not nearly enough ???) or 5/15/10 (better). Once you get 6-12 months' income in emergency, you can stop putting money in there and throw it at other goals.Ch9: Debt vs. saving for retirement, emergency, taxes? Save first. Otherwise, you'll probably just put the other shit on credit cards and make the debt worse. Or set up percentages like this: 3/15/5/7 emergency/taxes/retirement/debt. Ch10: As more money comes in, the fixed percentages automatically mean you're saving more. You could also up the percentages so you're still spending the same amount and saving the rest. Consider setting up a health account to save for health insurance (quarterly or annual) premiums, or to be sent to HSA (if you have a high-deductible health plan).Stuff you need: life insurance, disability, estate plan (revocable living trust with an incapacity clause, will, living will). Get a real lawyer to do them.Set up dedicated dream accounts to save for other things you want: new camera, big trip, etc. Add them to percentage system.Where to save? <3 years: savings account or CD. 3-5 years: low-risk portfolio (20/60/20 stocks/bonds/cash). 5-10 years: moderate-risk portfolio (40/60 stocks/bonds). 10+: high-risk (65-90/35-10 stocks/bonds)Ch11: Get more income: marketing, expand skill set, make more offerings, etc. Invoice promptly, follow up promptly, work promptly. Be open to offering new things. Envision where you want to be in 1, 5, and 10 years. Location? Employees? Customers? Income? Be detailed and descriptive as possible.Ch12: Celebrate what's awesome about working for yourself! (or go back to a regular job if you don't like it--that's ok, too.)Other books to read: Getting Things Done, Just give me the Answer$: Expert Advisors Address your most pressing financial questions, The complete tightwad gazette, The millionaire next door, The richest man in Babylon, Think and Grow RichFreelancers' advocacy:Freelancers Union freelancersunion.orgNational Assoc for the self-employed nase.orgHealth insurance:ehealthInsurance ehealthinsurance.orgfreelancers union freelancersunion.orgnase nase.orgtrade associationfee-paid financial plannersGarrett planning network garrettplanningnetwork.comNational Assoc of Personal Financial Advisors napfa.org
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  • Jennifer
    January 1, 1970
    This book is a veritable godsend for those of us who have non-traditional jobs with erratic and unpredictable income. Had this book existed three years ago it would have saved me two years of toil and struggle as I experimented with methods of achieving financial security as a self-employed individual. It seems that 99% of financial guides make the assumption that the reader has a regular and dependable paycheck, and this book is for those who experience a "feast or famine" cycle. The authors ar This book is a veritable godsend for those of us who have non-traditional jobs with erratic and unpredictable income. Had this book existed three years ago it would have saved me two years of toil and struggle as I experimented with methods of achieving financial security as a self-employed individual. It seems that 99% of financial guides make the assumption that the reader has a regular and dependable paycheck, and this book is for those who experience a "feast or famine" cycle. The authors are insightful and witty, and their recommendations simple and realistic. I found this book to be quite refreshing, as it provides answers for all of the "what ifs" that have been generated for me in reading the standard books by suze orman/jean chatzky/david bach/etc. This book takes into account that the self-employed bear the extra burden of saving their own taxes each quarter, shopping for their own health insurance, administrating their own retirement vehicles, and doing all of it with no steady paycheck. This book was a great comfort to me, if for no other reason that the authors finally acknowledged the difficulties and anxieties that are an inevitable facet of non-traditional employment. Their philosophy in a nutshell? Create a "holy trinity" of non-negotiable accounts consisting of 1) taxes 2) retirement 3) emergency fund, that you pay a percentage of each dollar earned FIRST.....BEFORE paying for your own bills....NO MATTER WHAT. Luckily, I had already implemented a system like this in the last couple of years. However, for readers who have not finessed such a system, this book would be invaluable. They also go into Health Insurance and Health Savings Accounts, which I believe are financially savvy moves for the self-employed. An accessible, successful, thoughtful book!
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  • Chad Warner
    January 1, 1970
    A decent primer on personal finances for the self-employed, aimed at freelancers and microbusiness owners. The advice is sound but quite basic. I'm already doing almost everything they advocate.It covers saving (for emergencies, taxes, and retirement), spending, and debt. It also briefly covers insurance and estate planning.NotesHow long to keep financial records• If you owe additional tax, keep for three years.• If you claim credit or refund, keep later of three years or two years after tax was A decent primer on personal finances for the self-employed, aimed at freelancers and microbusiness owners. The advice is sound but quite basic. I'm already doing almost everything they advocate.It covers saving (for emergencies, taxes, and retirement), spending, and debt. It also briefly covers insurance and estate planning.NotesHow long to keep financial records• If you owe additional tax, keep for three years.• If you claim credit or refund, keep later of three years or two years after tax was paid.Instead of telling people, "I can't afford that" to excuse yourself from spending, say, "I'm saving for X.”Choose a financial planner who:• Works for fees paid by client, not by commissions. There's a conflict of interest with commissions.• Is a fiduciary .• Is affiliated with NAPFA or Garrett Planning Network.Saving• Save at least 30% of income; 50% emergency fund (until maxed), 15% taxes, 10% retirement.• Saving 40 to 50% is better; 15% emergency fund (until maxed), 20% taxes, 15% retirement, 5% health savings.
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  • Kat
    January 1, 1970
    This was such a great book! It was very helpful in giving me direction and motivation. If you are just looking for a self-help type book that just throws out theories and tips, this is NOT the book for you. This book really makes you get hands on with your finances. Each chapter has different objectives. At the end of the chapters it gives a little list of all the things you are to do next or to have done in that chapter. Part 1 seemed like fluff to me but I realized the authors were just trying This was such a great book! It was very helpful in giving me direction and motivation. If you are just looking for a self-help type book that just throws out theories and tips, this is NOT the book for you. This book really makes you get hands on with your finances. Each chapter has different objectives. At the end of the chapters it gives a little list of all the things you are to do next or to have done in that chapter. Part 1 seemed like fluff to me but I realized the authors were just trying to set you up for the real stuff and probably trying not to scare readers away with the wealth of information they laid on in part 2. Part 3 was mostly geared toward the self employed and freelancers but it still motivated me to look forward to my future. I will have to read this book again in the future. Since I checked it out from the library I am definitely going to have to copy the appendix. The authors list websites for everything you could need from financial software to online banks to health insurance to investment firms. A must read!
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  • Adam
    January 1, 1970
    A good introduction to personal finance for freelancers and the self-employed. However, it focused a little more on strategies for those with a lot credit card debt or overspending issues than I expected. Neither problem is an issue for me right now (and hopefully, not in the future).I was also surprised that they didn't address the topic of keeping personal and business accounts separate a little bit more. I've heard from multiple individuals (entrepreneurs & accountants alike) that this is A good introduction to personal finance for freelancers and the self-employed. However, it focused a little more on strategies for those with a lot credit card debt or overspending issues than I expected. Neither problem is an issue for me right now (and hopefully, not in the future).I was also surprised that they didn't address the topic of keeping personal and business accounts separate a little bit more. I've heard from multiple individuals (entrepreneurs & accountants alike) that this is a good idea, but it may not be for everybody. It also seemed to focus on reactive techniques (i.e. what to do with money once it comes in), but didn't address proactive techniques such as cash-flow projections, but I believe that this was probably a more advanced topic than the authors wanted to address.It was a little more basic than I expected but there were a few tips and resources that they mentioned that I was not aware of that I will implement after reading this book. Very well written (both of the authors are freelance writers).
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  • Ali Bolourian
    January 1, 1970
    This is a good book for entrepreneurs who have problem organizing their finances with no money management experience and some debt. If you are a type of person who is organized and looking for more insightful and in depth information about finance and money management, this book will bore you.
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  • Tinea
    January 1, 1970
    Totally useful, though quite longwinded to get across a simple message. It's a how-to guide for managing your finances (especially how to save money longterm) if your income is variable and unpredictable, like freelancers and people employed part-time or who work for tips.The book had a few things that differentiate it from a traditional, holistic personal finance book (like The Financial Peace Planner, which I definitely recommend-- finance geared towards low-income folks). These included organ Totally useful, though quite longwinded to get across a simple message. It's a how-to guide for managing your finances (especially how to save money longterm) if your income is variable and unpredictable, like freelancers and people employed part-time or who work for tips.The book had a few things that differentiate it from a traditional, holistic personal finance book (like The Financial Peace Planner, which I definitely recommend-- finance geared towards low-income folks). These included organizational tips and how to handle stuff specific to the self- or under-employed: you have to pay your own taxes (no withholding), health insurance, vacation & sick days, and retirement.The book's main purpose is its savings system for people who can't make regular payments into a savings account. Instead the authors recommend:(1) Save in percentages of all income you receive, instead of fixed dollar amounts. So instead of saving $50 every month, you would save 10% of every check, which might mean $15 one week and $35 another week. This way you still save even when you're not really earning much money, but it never bankrupts you, and when you're flush, you save more.(2) Actually open many different savings account so you keep your money separated by purpose, instead of all in one lump. The authors figure that when you have no good feel for how much money you will have in the future, you tend to go through crazy spend and thrift cycles, getting super frugal between checks and then making extra purchases as soon as one comes in. Because of that, they feel that keeping all your money lumped together in one savings account makes it too hard for most people to sort out what they can spend now and what they should save for later. This is purely psychological-- you could easily just keep track of things on paper. But the authors feel that since it's easy to make many free online savings accounts nowadays, it's more effective to actually create separate accounts for each thing you are saving for.They suggest you keep your checking account at your regular bank, with a debit card and all that. Then you create several savings accounts at an online high-interest savings bank. These do not come with debit cards, so to access the money you have to wait 2-4 days for it to transfer to your checking account, making them still liquid but not available for impulse purchases. These also get slightly more interest than regular banks, but are equally secure (they're FDIC insured).They suggest 3 separate savings accounts to start:- emergency fund (5-10%): 3-6 months worth of expenses saved up so that if you lose your job or something really expensive breaks (like a car), you can pull from this instead of a credit card. You set a limit to how big this will be and save a % of your income until you hit that limit. Once it's full, you don't need to add more money here, until you withdraw from it for an emergency. Then you save a % again until it's back to its full size. It's crucial to decide ahead of time what counts as an emergency: the authors recommend only pulling from this account to pay your fixed expenses like rent.- retirement/long-term fund (10-15%): Choose a low enough % for this that it won't be a burden, but actually go ahead and start saving for longterm stuff like a house or retirement now since even small amounts become a lot of money over time. They recommend you have an online savings account for this, but regularly transfer that money into a higher interest investment like an IRA retirement account (which they explain in detail). As an aside (not in this book), I think a cool option might be to invest this in "socially responsible investments." That term has definitely been co-opted, so I'm not suggesting you throw money at any random organization that uses those words. But with research, it's possible to find things like revolving loan funds or other financial institutions that support good causes; your investment gives them some more capital to give out bigger loans, and you earn slightly more interest than you would in a savings account. For example, the Cooperative Fund of New England gives low-interest loans to housing and worker's co-ops, and they accept really small investments. I tried to do some research on mutual funds that have strict guidelines in what companies they invest, but I didn't find anything worth recommending.- taxes fund (20-30%): If you earn enough to pay taxes, and they don't get taken out of your paychecks, it's important to prepare yourself for that enormous bill by actually putting like 20-30% of you income in a separate account that you don't touch. After these three big ones, the book suggests creating more accounts based on your needs and goals. For example:- [savings goal] accounts (5-15%) - accounts named by the thing you are saving for. Use the money that would have gone to the emergency fund, once that account is full. They suggest having separate accounts for small or regular stuff and large dreams, so you don't end up never reaching the big dream cuz you constantly empty your savings for smaller ones.- health fund - to pay for things that aren't covered by insurance, if you have it, and to pay for everything if you don't.- donations (5-15%) - Separate out some money to give to good causes, campaigns, and charities; actually choosing a % to spend on this leads to donating more money overall in a way that doesn't make you feel hard up.I'm gonna repeat that a lot of this system is mental, and could be just as easily accomplished if you are meticulous about your financial records, keeping track of how much money you can allot to any specific part of your budget. That said, I'm probably going to try some of their recommendations: namely, separating out an emergency fund into a high-interest online savings account (I think I'll use this for dream&goal savings as well, just keeping careful track that the bottom X number of dollars don't count for fun stuff) and starting a retirement/long-term savings account; by starting a retirement account really early, I'm hoping to give myself less pressure later on to either get an amoral-ish high-paying job in my 30s and 40s, and/or struggle with needing to work forever. I also started a running Donations Budget, with a starting balance that I will continuously add to as a % of my income, and subtract from as I make donations; I'm hoping this will allow me the ability to send money out to emergency legal funds and stuff while having the peace of mind that it's actually money that's budgeted towards donations and not, you know, rent.
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  • Michael Starghill
    January 1, 1970
    Excellent! I highly recommend this book to all the self employed folks out there. It really helps with getting a grasp on the ebbs and flows of income that come with the self employed life. It also helps with structural ideas about planning for your financial future. Very informative and extremely helpful.
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  • Joel B Pryde
    January 1, 1970
    Fantastic and essential book for anyone who works for themselves.
  • Sarah
    January 1, 1970
    i think this would be a really good book for anyone who has never read anything about personal finance or who is just starting out freelancing. since i've been freelancing for 6(!) years now, i'd figured a few things out by trial and error. but it would have been nice to have this book at the get-go to clue me in on a few things!one thing the book didn't seem to mention at all though is the federal self-employment tax. it's 15.3% of your income off the top if you're self employed. so, saving jus i think this would be a really good book for anyone who has never read anything about personal finance or who is just starting out freelancing. since i've been freelancing for 6(!) years now, i'd figured a few things out by trial and error. but it would have been nice to have this book at the get-go to clue me in on a few things!one thing the book didn't seem to mention at all though is the federal self-employment tax. it's 15.3% of your income off the top if you're self employed. so, saving just 15% of your income for taxes isn't going to do much, as you'll already be behind! you need to save enough for your federal (15.3% plus your tax bracket), state, and city/municipality (if applicable). if you're a personal finance junkie, you probably won't find anything new in this book. but, like i said, if you don't know your ira from your 401(k), or you're just starting out on your own, this would be a good book to read. it spurred me to create an "emergency fund" account in addition to my "tax account" (well, that and a crown that fell out the same day i was going to write my 2010 tax checks!). next to come, a "retirement account".---i won this book in a good reads give away. i was so excited! i never win anything! it arrived earlier this week and i started it today (3/31/11). hopefully there will be some GREAT advice in it that i can use to get our shit together.---
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  • Michele
    January 1, 1970
    A great resource for people with irregular income, whether that means you're part-time, freelancing or self-employed. Authors teach a simple, scalable finance system that shows you how to make your money work for you so you can avoid the "feast or famine" lifestyle. Of course, the book can only provide so much information, so you'll still need to hire a CPA and/or business attorney to make sure you're making the best financial decisions for yourself/your biz, but the book is definitely a great s A great resource for people with irregular income, whether that means you're part-time, freelancing or self-employed. Authors teach a simple, scalable finance system that shows you how to make your money work for you so you can avoid the "feast or famine" lifestyle. Of course, the book can only provide so much information, so you'll still need to hire a CPA and/or business attorney to make sure you're making the best financial decisions for yourself/your biz, but the book is definitely a great starting point!
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  • Tami
    January 1, 1970
    Some of the content in this book is stuff people should probably already know - but overall, this book is filled with useful information. Anyone with a not-so-regular job should probably at least skim through this because you're guaranteed to find some helpful tips.
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  • Amanda
    January 1, 1970
    This is a very direct read, with plenty of exercises in it to reevaluate one's personal finances. Doing the exercises helps one to get the most out of this book. Even if you don't, and you aren't a freelancer (yet), this is still helpful to read. It is geared towards freelancers, so anyone else in a different situation would have to reconfigure it to better match their lifestyle. However, the main lesson in the book can apply to everyone: save your money!It is helpful that this book does not get This is a very direct read, with plenty of exercises in it to reevaluate one's personal finances. Doing the exercises helps one to get the most out of this book. Even if you don't, and you aren't a freelancer (yet), this is still helpful to read. It is geared towards freelancers, so anyone else in a different situation would have to reconfigure it to better match their lifestyle. However, the main lesson in the book can apply to everyone: save your money!It is helpful that this book does not get bogged down with big financial terms one might expect in a book about personal finance. It is clear to anyone, especially those who are the opposite of math geniuses (and the math they do talk about is so simple). The narration is enjoyable, and sometimes it is like having a financial coach talking to you, steering you away from bad habits. I would recommend this to anyone who wants to learn how to save money.
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  • Lisa Mccoy
    January 1, 1970
    I wish I had known about this book years ago! Completely indispensable for freelancers and the self employed. I went through the entire book first and now will go back and complete the exercises. This book is a game changer.
  • Joel Snyder
    January 1, 1970
    Very practical and helpful book for those of us in the gig economy!
  • Brenda
    January 1, 1970
    Very practical and useful guidance for independent contractors and the self-employed. The book is nicely peppered with humor too: "credit cards are the handmaidens of Satan."
  • Zach
    January 1, 1970
    A "must" for freelancers.
  • Christine
    January 1, 1970
    Good financial guidance for the not regularly employed, but also solid advice for all.
  • Sfdreams
    January 1, 1970
    I really liked this book, although I am not self-employed (yet!) though I plan to be in the (hopefully) not-too-distant future. I got this book at the library, but plan on buying it when I actually do become self-employed to have on hand. Actually, I just now noticed that it being given away--perhaps I could win it!! This is very well-written book with a dash of humor. And it is very understandable to someone whose mind goes numb when confronted with legalese and financial mathematics. Plus, I r I really liked this book, although I am not self-employed (yet!) though I plan to be in the (hopefully) not-too-distant future. I got this book at the library, but plan on buying it when I actually do become self-employed to have on hand. Actually, I just now noticed that it being given away--perhaps I could win it!! This is very well-written book with a dash of humor. And it is very understandable to someone whose mind goes numb when confronted with legalese and financial mathematics. Plus, I really like that they confront emotional issues of practicing asking for what you deserve and talk about building prosperity.The last chapter (Chapter 12) is entitled: The Final Word on Financial Empowerement. Don't you just love that title? Financial Empowerment!! I'll have some of that!! Actually, the third part of the book is entitled: Growing the Plan and Living the Dream. Love that too!Reading this book, while helping me sort out my current financial woes, also makes me long for the day when I have the freedom and creativity of working for myself!If you have a not-so-regular job, this is the book for you! If you have a regular, convential job, this book's concepts can be applied to you as well. (Except that you don't have to worry about making quarterly tax payments!)
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  • Jeannie
    January 1, 1970
    I won this book in a Goodreads firstreads Giveaway. I have recieved the book last week, but no chance to read it yet. It is on the list to read soon. I am looking forward to learning something from it. OK - I am working my way through the book. I was looking forward to it, then I was hesitant. Really, who wouldn't want to improve their fincancial savy, but the actual effort part was a bit of a scary prospect. I also didn't know the best way to approach this at first. I love the way this book is I won this book in a Goodreads firstreads Giveaway. I have recieved the book last week, but no chance to read it yet. It is on the list to read soon. I am looking forward to learning something from it. OK - I am working my way through the book. I was looking forward to it, then I was hesitant. Really, who wouldn't want to improve their fincancial savy, but the actual effort part was a bit of a scary prospect. I also didn't know the best way to approach this at first. I love the way this book is written, it puts some things into perspective, and is written to the people, for the people! It isn't just information, this is a system - so it does take some effort. I found it slow going becuase I would read, and then wait until I could complete tasks before reading more. That could take forever, so I have decided to finish reading, then go back and start over to actually follow the system. I will definately post an update again.
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  • Connie Kuntz
    January 1, 1970
    The authors of this book respect the freelancer's journey. They don't judge it. There is lots of good advice in this book about saving money, especially pertaining to online savings accounts and percentages. There is also good advice about understanding money. Money is not something to feel guilty about. Neither is freelancing. Money is something to save. Freelancing is a way to save money. The authors never once ask the freelancer to be anything except who he or she is. Instead of requesting th The authors of this book respect the freelancer's journey. They don't judge it. There is lots of good advice in this book about saving money, especially pertaining to online savings accounts and percentages. There is also good advice about understanding money. Money is not something to feel guilty about. Neither is freelancing. Money is something to save. Freelancing is a way to save money. The authors never once ask the freelancer to be anything except who he or she is. Instead of requesting the freelancer to alter his or her entire personality, the authors show how to make his or her work ethic entirely profitable. Read the book if you need solid advice about starting online savings accounts. I loved the advice about "naming" the savings accounts. I was content to just memorize the account numbers, but giving each account a name helps make saving that much more fun. This book should have "For Connie" written on the dedication page.
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  • PopcornReads
    January 1, 1970
    The Money Book for Freelancers, Part-Timers, and the Self-Employed by Joseph D'Agnese and Diane Kiernan is an excellent resource for everyone who chooses to work outside of the regular corporate world. The subtitle says it all: "The Only Personal Finance System for People with Not-So-Regular Jobs."Working as a freelancer or self-employed person comes with all kinds of money issues that never arise for someone who chooses to work within the "system." This resource can save you a lot of headaches The Money Book for Freelancers, Part-Timers, and the Self-Employed by Joseph D'Agnese and Diane Kiernan is an excellent resource for everyone who chooses to work outside of the regular corporate world. The subtitle says it all: "The Only Personal Finance System for People with Not-So-Regular Jobs."Working as a freelancer or self-employed person comes with all kinds of money issues that never arise for someone who chooses to work within the "system." This resource can save you a lot of headaches because I can tell you from experience that this is not something you want to learn by trial and error. There can be serious personal and consequences if you don't know what you're doing. I recommend it for your business operations bookshelf.
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  • Miriam
    January 1, 1970
    The Money Book for Freelancers, Part-Timers, and the Self-Employed is a straight-forward, accessible guide to managing an inconsistent income. The authors offer financial advice alongside personal anecdotes, which helps to make the book readable as well as informative. There is also an appendix that lists financial software options, web resources, and top investment firms to supplement the suggestions provided by the text. While not all of the information was specifically relevant to me, I found The Money Book for Freelancers, Part-Timers, and the Self-Employed is a straight-forward, accessible guide to managing an inconsistent income. The authors offer financial advice alongside personal anecdotes, which helps to make the book readable as well as informative. There is also an appendix that lists financial software options, web resources, and top investment firms to supplement the suggestions provided by the text. While not all of the information was specifically relevant to me, I found the book engaging and instructive. I anticipate I'll find myself referring back to The Money Book and its candid approach to personal finances. I received my copy as part of a First Reads giveaway.
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  • Ruth
    January 1, 1970
    I got this book through the give-a-away from here. Even though this was written for the self-employed it had a lot of practical advise the people with regular jobs could apply also. I found this a very easy to read in every day language with step by step guidelines to help manage your finance system. There are so many areas that the self-employed MUST take care of that those that are employed by others have automatically done by our bosses. It is so important that one covers all the financial ba I got this book through the give-a-away from here. Even though this was written for the self-employed it had a lot of practical advise the people with regular jobs could apply also. I found this a very easy to read in every day language with step by step guidelines to help manage your finance system. There are so many areas that the self-employed MUST take care of that those that are employed by others have automatically done by our bosses. It is so important that one covers all the financial bases before a crises hits. I definately feel that if you are self-employed or thinking about becoming self-employed you must read this book. It is very easy to follow and has lots of web-sites listed that can be great tools for you.
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  • Lindsey
    January 1, 1970
    I can not recommend this book enough. When I first bought this book years ago, not everything applied to me. I took from it what I needed and put it away. Every few years, or when something changes in a big way, I pick up The Money Book and re-evaluate. Each time I read through it, I gain new insight based on my experiences and the changes in my life. Though much of the book references freelancers, anyone can gain help from this book. I've always worked some form of retail and currently also hav I can not recommend this book enough. When I first bought this book years ago, not everything applied to me. I took from it what I needed and put it away. Every few years, or when something changes in a big way, I pick up The Money Book and re-evaluate. Each time I read through it, I gain new insight based on my experiences and the changes in my life. Though much of the book references freelancers, anyone can gain help from this book. I've always worked some form of retail and currently also have a side business with my husband (who also works retail). This book is incredibly helpful in making sure we stay on track when our pay isn't always the same each month.
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  • Stephanie
    January 1, 1970
    I won this book from a goodreads.com giveaway. I really liked it. I have read over 25 books on personal finance and money and I feel like this book has encompassed much of what several other books have discussed. It is an "all in one handbook" and well written. I feel it is easy to follow. Good for someone struggling to learn how to get their finances under control and good for someone like me who knows and understands the methods but could always use a refresher or reminder to stay on track. I I won this book from a goodreads.com giveaway. I really liked it. I have read over 25 books on personal finance and money and I feel like this book has encompassed much of what several other books have discussed. It is an "all in one handbook" and well written. I feel it is easy to follow. Good for someone struggling to learn how to get their finances under control and good for someone like me who knows and understands the methods but could always use a refresher or reminder to stay on track. I would recommend this to anyone who can read whether or not they are self employed or employed by a company. A great system to follow!
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  • earthy
    January 1, 1970
    Solid, funny, approachable info on personal finance for the self-employed. I wish there had been a bit more focus on just starting out as a freelancer (it's hard to determine average expenses and income when you don't have 3 years of back taxes to draw from!), but what's here is good and, most importantly, do-able. I like the way the described system is simple and scalable whether you're making a lot or just a tiny bit. It also forces you to get SPECIFIC about financial goals, which is terrifyin Solid, funny, approachable info on personal finance for the self-employed. I wish there had been a bit more focus on just starting out as a freelancer (it's hard to determine average expenses and income when you don't have 3 years of back taxes to draw from!), but what's here is good and, most importantly, do-able. I like the way the described system is simple and scalable whether you're making a lot or just a tiny bit. It also forces you to get SPECIFIC about financial goals, which is terrifying, liberating, and extremely necessary.I'll definitely be looking into buying a copy to use as a guide on my own financial journey--so long as it fits into my expenditure budget, that is!
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  • Tally
    January 1, 1970
    Finally! A text useful for the (poor schmucks?) among us who don't have that steady paycheck every week or two (or month). I've read too many books regarding budgeting and such, but they assume everybody gets paid the same times and roughly the same rates each time. I'm so glad I found this book, it's already helping and I haven't done any of the steps it lays out yet (but I'm about to start). Great read with some humor and very useful knowledge. If you're up to your ears in part time/sporadic/f Finally! A text useful for the (poor schmucks?) among us who don't have that steady paycheck every week or two (or month). I've read too many books regarding budgeting and such, but they assume everybody gets paid the same times and roughly the same rates each time. I'm so glad I found this book, it's already helping and I haven't done any of the steps it lays out yet (but I'm about to start). Great read with some humor and very useful knowledge. If you're up to your ears in part time/sporadic/freelance work (or aren't, and isn't that the trouble?) then this book is VITAL to your sanity and overall health.
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  • Teresa
    January 1, 1970
    I won this book and am so glad I did. The book was sent quickly and signed with a personal note by the authors. Even though this was written for the self-employed it had a lot of practical advise that people with regular jobs could use also. It was written in everyday language with step by step guidelines that were easy to understand. The book was interesting with a touch of humor that made you want to keep reading. I've already recommended this book to several family members - self-employed and I won this book and am so glad I did. The book was sent quickly and signed with a personal note by the authors. Even though this was written for the self-employed it had a lot of practical advise that people with regular jobs could use also. It was written in everyday language with step by step guidelines that were easy to understand. The book was interesting with a touch of humor that made you want to keep reading. I've already recommended this book to several family members - self-employed and not. If you're starting a business or trying to keep one going, this book is a must read.
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  • Belea Keeney
    January 1, 1970
    A stellar contribution to help freelancers, part-timers, and all those other weird designations for the non-traditionally employed. Their basic strategy is to desginate un-touchable accounts where income is *immediately* funneled away from a spending account. Then only spend from the spending account. The other suggestion they have, which will be helpful and do-able, is start somewhere. No, you may not be able to start saving 20% off the top right away, but you can probably start with 3% or 5%. A stellar contribution to help freelancers, part-timers, and all those other weird designations for the non-traditionally employed. Their basic strategy is to desginate un-touchable accounts where income is *immediately* funneled away from a spending account. Then only spend from the spending account. The other suggestion they have, which will be helpful and do-able, is start somewhere. No, you may not be able to start saving 20% off the top right away, but you can probably start with 3% or 5%. Then save that, and scale up as your income increases.Highly recommended.
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