The Math Book
Math’s infinite mysteries and beauty unfold in this follow-up to the best-selling The Science Book. Beginning millions of years ago with ancient “ant odometers” and moving through time to our modern-day quest for new dimensions, it covers 250 milestones in mathematical history. Among the numerous delights readers will learn about as they dip into this inviting anthology: cicada-generated prime numbers, magic squares from centuries ago, the discovery of pi and calculus, and the butterfly effect. Each topic gets a lavishly illustrated spread with stunning color art, along with formulas and concepts, fascinating facts about scientists’ lives, and real-world applications of the theorems.

The Math Book Details

TitleThe Math Book
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseSep 1st, 2009
PublisherSterling
ISBN-139781402757969
Rating
GenreScience, Mathematics, Nonfiction, History, Reference, Physics, Philosophy, Academic, Popular Science, Education

Readers also enjoyed


The Math Book Review

  • Sean
    January 1, 1970
    The first thing I did when I picked up this book was look up Kovalevskaya in the index. As in Sofia Kovalevksaya, mathematical genius and pioneering female mathematician and academician of the 19th century. And there she was, a full page on one of my heroes. Weierstrass's unsung research partner. The first woman in Europe to obtain a doctorate in mathematics and only the third female full professor. This article and the article on Emmy Noether (a female mathematical genius of even higher stature The first thing I did when I picked up this book was look up Kovalevskaya in the index. As in Sofia Kovalevksaya, mathematical genius and pioneering female mathematician and academician of the 19th century. And there she was, a full page on one of my heroes. Weierstrass's unsung research partner. The first woman in Europe to obtain a doctorate in mathematics and only the third female full professor. This article and the article on Emmy Noether (a female mathematical genius of even higher stature than Kovalevskaya) almost made me cry at my desk at the library. So inspiring.This book is gorgeous. The 250 articles, ranging from the pre-mathematics of several thousand years ago to cutting-edge mathematical research, are uniformly light and short and are written at a level that most laypersons would understand. Each is illustrated with a full-page mathematical drawing or rendering, a reproduction of a historical document, or a portrait of the subject.I find that most people don't understand what mathematics is. They get caught up in the notation and the symbols and the algorithms and the nerdiness and they miss out on the beauty and the wonder of the subject. This book will not actually teach anyone mathematics, but maybe it'll light a spark!
    more
  • Grant
    January 1, 1970
    I found the book too much of a tease, where it would explain the most intuitive concepts that didn't need to be explained and then skip over the more interesting complex things. Introducing the most notable mathematical contributions is a great idea, but two hundred is far too many to remember or appreciate given the limited text.
    more
  • Jim Leckband
    January 1, 1970
    The target audiences for these books must be very selective, but I think they have a strategy that enables them to sell more of them than they would by the subject and writing itself. If this was a book of the author writing on the greatest hits of mathematics with a page devoted to each and where the reader needs to be almost 90% of the way there in terms of being able to understand the subject matter at any level - then very few copies would be sold. The mathematics described in this book are The target audiences for these books must be very selective, but I think they have a strategy that enables them to sell more of them than they would by the subject and writing itself. If this was a book of the author writing on the greatest hits of mathematics with a page devoted to each and where the reader needs to be almost 90% of the way there in terms of being able to understand the subject matter at any level - then very few copies would be sold. The mathematics described in this book are of the highest levels. Pickover does a very good job for the most part of the general gist of each milestone, but sometimes he just misses it - because the point in question is so arcane and indescribable in words.So back to the strategy. The publishers have each milestone paired with a high quality (almost schmaltzy) illustration of the milestone facing the words. The illustrations are sometimes fascinating to gaze at on their own, but sometimes they are just graphic design placeholders (like 3D type of greek letters - big whoop!). In any case, this strategy puts an arcane math text into a coffee table book - and broadens the audience from solely math geeks, to those who want to show off their intelligence and interests via book bling. It seems the publishers read up on their Venn diagrams among other things!
    more
  • Robert
    January 1, 1970
    There were a few quirks in the presentation of this book that annoyed me but might not be noticed by anyone else. The structure of the book is to have 3 or 4 paragraphs that explain discuss introduce mention a favorite topic of the author on the left page and an illustrative picture on the right. Each picture has an explanatory blurb at the bottom of the left page. Here is the annoyance: Most of the time the blurb simply repeated a few sentences from the 3 or 4 paragraphs of text above. I There were a few quirks in the presentation of this book that annoyed me but might not be noticed by anyone else. The structure of the book is to have 3 or 4 paragraphs that explain discuss introduce mention a favorite topic of the author on the left page and an illustrative picture on the right. Each picture has an explanatory blurb at the bottom of the left page. Here is the annoyance: Most of the time the blurb simply repeated a few sentences from the 3 or 4 paragraphs of text above. I thought that was lazy. I have a background in engineering and finance so I have taken lots and lots of math and statistics courses. This book was interesting because so many of the topics dealt with number theory and topology, two topics that are not covered in engineering or finance. Problems in number theory are often easy to state, since they normally only involve positive integers, but difficult to solve. I would guess that 90% or so of these topics involved prime numbers. Here is the thing that bugged me: Every single time he mentioned prime numbers, he explained what prime numbers are using the exact same sentences. Every time. I thought that was lazy too. If there was one thing you could actually learn from this book, it is how to recognize a prime number. On the other hand, even problem statement in topology involves a lot of opaque language about abstruse concepts. Annoyance #3: When he introduced topology problems, he breezily threw around "invariant," "Hilbert space," and "n-dimensional symmetry" like they were every day topics at lunch. Maybe they are, but I don't hang out with that crowd. I'm only annoyed because I did not feel like going to another source to try to understand what he was talking about. Brian Greene would have found a way to explain it. Annoyance #4: The author had a tendency to involve religion more than I would have thought to be strictly necessary. For example, if a mathematician under discussion was Jewish, he mentioned it. He did not comment on any other religions unless it was because a mathematician was Jewish and then converted. He also used angels as the actors in his examples instead of, for instance, "person A" or "John." There are lots of glossy pictures and it is a nice jumping off point for a lot of topics that you've never heard of before 3/5 stars.
    more
  • Lthmath
    January 1, 1970
    The author has set a big goal for this book: discussing different mathematical breakthroughs from B.C up to 2007. It is hard to briefly describe them and make it interesting for the general public, but the book is delivering it. It is very interesting how the author decided to attach an image to every aspect. You will find everything from paintings, graphs, photos, drawings. I consider that the images for each topic are so good and they just give so much more to the text-description. With this b The author has set a big goal for this book: discussing different mathematical breakthroughs from B.C up to 2007. It is hard to briefly describe them and make it interesting for the general public, but the book is delivering it. It is very interesting how the author decided to attach an image to every aspect. You will find everything from paintings, graphs, photos, drawings. I consider that the images for each topic are so good and they just give so much more to the text-description. With this book, it just shows how much an image does to understanding mathematics and its applications. Moreover, this book does such a good job at talking about the applications of different mathematical concepts into other fields. Even if there are just a short mention at the end of a page or something, I observed that the author didn't stop at the basic examples and gave full on details about some aspects. On the other hand, the book might seem boring from time to time if you are not completely griped by the topic described. Short descriptions are important for getting the general idea, but they might seem a little dry from time to time. I recommend you give yourself some time in between seatings for this book. Read a couple of pages at a time and them do some research on your own for the most interesting aspect you discovered (check the "Notes and Further Reading" at the end) and so on. You might bet more from the book if you do it this way.
    more
  • Liezie
    January 1, 1970
    After 1 year, 1 week and a lot of toilet visits it is finally finished. :)I'm very glad I bought it. I found it very interesting. The writer doesn't always succeed to explain the complex matter into terms I understood, but most of the time he does. And it doesn't always stick to the theories, often it just tells about the scientists behind the science, the times they lived in, what practical fields it is used in, why it is important, ... You do not have to have a scientific background to like th After 1 year, 1 week and a lot of toilet visits it is finally finished. :)I'm very glad I bought it. I found it very interesting. The writer doesn't always succeed to explain the complex matter into terms I understood, but most of the time he does. And it doesn't always stick to the theories, often it just tells about the scientists behind the science, the times they lived in, what practical fields it is used in, why it is important, ... You do not have to have a scientific background to like this book, you only have to be interested in science.
    more
  • Eric Hamilton
    January 1, 1970
    More of a history book than a useful dive into actual math topics. Would have been more interesting if each topic was a few pages long (and less topics overall) - with each topic making an attempt to describe and/or teach the reader about the topic. Instead every page is a brief overview of the topic and how it helped our lives - which is interesting, but not interesting enough for a book of this size.
    more
  • Jessica
    January 1, 1970
    Fantastic collection of topics and beautiful illustrations. Warning: If you are looking for a book that gives in-depth explanations of mathematical concepts, this isn't for you: each topic is only given a page of rather large text, so the explanations are often shallow.
    more
  • Noah
    January 1, 1970
    The Math book is quite interesting although Im not sure whether this is more of a Math or History book, but it was still very fun to read and I learned a lot more about Euler and other famous mathematicians. The book flows very nicely and the pictures really help to grasp strange concepts that would otherwise be very confusing. It is fun to read for anyone who has an interest in math, history or the sciences. The book covers thousands of years of the history of math and goes back past the babylo The Math book is quite interesting although Im not sure whether this is more of a Math or History book, but it was still very fun to read and I learned a lot more about Euler and other famous mathematicians. The book flows very nicely and the pictures really help to grasp strange concepts that would otherwise be very confusing. It is fun to read for anyone who has an interest in math, history or the sciences. The book covers thousands of years of the history of math and goes back past the babylonian times, but The babylonian times part of the book is not as interesting as the modern math (the last couple of centuries). Sometimes I wish that the book would go into a little more detail about some of the modern math because it is very interesting and I would like to learn more, but the briefness of it is sometime nice in that it keeps you interested and is not at all boring.
    more
  • S.H
    January 1, 1970
    As previously stated, introducing the most notable mathematical theories and contributions in this format is a great and fun idea, however, I did find quite a few factual errors in the texts, which weren't exactly hard for anybody to look up, giving the impression that it was written without much care, unprofessional. Still it's a nice and comprehensive overview of the important mathematical discoveries in chronological order, and you can use it to find something new that interests you and go in As previously stated, introducing the most notable mathematical theories and contributions in this format is a great and fun idea, however, I did find quite a few factual errors in the texts, which weren't exactly hard for anybody to look up, giving the impression that it was written without much care, unprofessional. Still it's a nice and comprehensive overview of the important mathematical discoveries in chronological order, and you can use it to find something new that interests you and go into further reading from there.
    more
  • Joshua Zhou
    January 1, 1970
    I bought the book in hope that it may stimulate my math nerses. The book turned out to be a collection of mathematical anecdotes with little actual food of thought. Perhaps it can made you "know a lot" in terms of making a conversation. But I think it is of little help if someone wants to become an active thinker.
    more
  • Anthony Faber
    January 1, 1970
    One page essays on 232 mathematical things arranged chronologically. Sometimes interesting, but I don't think a person without a good math background will get much out of it and there wasn't enough detail in the things that I didn't know.
  • Jacob
    January 1, 1970
    Overall a very well written and interesting book.It is especially interesting in the middle however I think that too many of the articles are about maths textbooks for the first few hundred pages, and there are too many fractals from 1900 onwards.Still very easy to read though.
    more
  • Jen Cihon
    January 1, 1970
    This book blew my mind. A history of all the important people and discoveries in math. I was a math major so I like math. Some of the discoveries are just so interesting and amazing. It's 516 pages but half of it is pictures of the people etc so a quick read.
    more
  • Mengda Liu
    January 1, 1970
    Interesting introduction to math history. A couple of topics really interests me. Doesn’t help you build an understand of math knowledge structure, but a good teaser that drives me to learn more.
  • David Tagliaferri
    January 1, 1970
    Perfect book for next to the toilet.
  • Moloy De
    January 1, 1970
    Ok
  • Eco Imp
    January 1, 1970
    A beautiful walk through mathematical history. The plates are stunning. I see myself using this book as a hook to capture student interest in math class.
  • Liam Cronan
    January 1, 1970
    Ideal book for anyone interested in the history of mathematics, statistics, or economics. Pickover gives each of the 250 "Milestones" a concise yet detailed overview. He gives the reader not just the facts but also the significance that each plays in our world today, and uses each one to build on the last. His sections on Fermat and Gauss were some most intriguing, but the entire book makes for a fast-paced read despite being a seemingly dry topic. My one complaint would be that sections felt a Ideal book for anyone interested in the history of mathematics, statistics, or economics. Pickover gives each of the 250 "Milestones" a concise yet detailed overview. He gives the reader not just the facts but also the significance that each plays in our world today, and uses each one to build on the last. His sections on Fermat and Gauss were some most intriguing, but the entire book makes for a fast-paced read despite being a seemingly dry topic. My one complaint would be that sections felt a bit disjoined overall, but that was to be expected with the style of the book itself. I would highly recommend this book to those interested in math or history alike.
    more
  • Adam
    January 1, 1970
    I thought this was simply a wonderful book. This is the first book I've ready by Clifford Pickover and seeing that he has written many others I think I will go track some of those down. This book basically covers the history of Mathematics in a very concise, but thoughtful way. Although the book is not a complete history, then again 500 pages would be barely enough to cover a complete history, but "The Math Book" covers some essential points. Pickover tried to do a couple of things when he wrote I thought this was simply a wonderful book. This is the first book I've ready by Clifford Pickover and seeing that he has written many others I think I will go track some of those down. This book basically covers the history of Mathematics in a very concise, but thoughtful way. Although the book is not a complete history, then again 500 pages would be barely enough to cover a complete history, but "The Math Book" covers some essential points. Pickover tried to do a couple of things when he wrote this book. Give the readers a good overview of Mathematics history and he also wanted to include Mathematical problems that interested him. In that regard the book can touch upon some little known historical elements in the field of Mathematics, which I think many will appreciate. Everyone hears the stories of Archimedes and his discovery of displacement, but there are lesser known problems and people as well and that's where I think this book manages to get a little interesting. In the past one hundred years the field of mathematics has completely exploded and a great portion of this book deals with properties found in more modern times, which I think is great because most history books I've read don't put it into the perspective of what's going on in the field now. If you're not totally math savvy, don't worry. Pickover has written this book for the layman, so even the least experienced can gain an appreciation for the world and history of mathematics. One aspect of the book that really drew me to purchase this was each entry has one page of text describing the historical nature and the page opposite is a picture. Sometimes this is a picture of the person who discovered the property, but a lot of times it is an illustration of a mathematical object, which I think people will appreciate rather than just reading a mathematical narrative trying to describe an abstract object. Working with programs like Mathematica have surely enabled Pickover to bring some of these more complex geometries to life for everyone to see. I think this is one of the aspects that sets it apart from other books. I would highly recommend this to any math enthusiast regardless of background. However, if you are looking for a very detailed history of mathematics I would recommend you seek out other books. "The Math Book" is much lighter and designed to engage readers quickly, rather than get into the real details of the history.
    more
  • Cosmic Jae
    January 1, 1970
    If you want to know some fascinating concepts about math without knowing too much of the details, then this book is for you. For example, magic squares where horizontally, vertically, and diagonally all the numbers added up will be the same. Also the fascinating thing about amiable numbers such as 220 and 284. There is also a short chapter on the mathematical game puzzle on the Tower of Hanoi. After I read the book, I had so many lively conversations with my family! I couldn’t stop thinking abou If you want to know some fascinating concepts about math without knowing too much of the details, then this book is for you. For example, magic squares where horizontally, vertically, and diagonally all the numbers added up will be the same. Also the fascinating thing about amiable numbers such as 220 and 284. There is also a short chapter on the mathematical game puzzle on the Tower of Hanoi. After I read the book, I had so many lively conversations with my family! I couldn’t stop thinking about some of these amazing numerical patterns for days!
    more
  • David
    January 1, 1970
    Following a sort of chronological ordering from the very ancient to the present, each two page spread involves some curious aspect of mathematical significance, with a decidedly curious bent toward a particular philosophical stance on the matter of whether mathematics is created or discovered. Pickover seems to lean toward the discovery side of this argument, which in no way lessens the way he goes from a desert ant that has some method of "counting" its steps (which begs the question of how an Following a sort of chronological ordering from the very ancient to the present, each two page spread involves some curious aspect of mathematical significance, with a decidedly curious bent toward a particular philosophical stance on the matter of whether mathematics is created or discovered. Pickover seems to lean toward the discovery side of this argument, which in no way lessens the way he goes from a desert ant that has some method of "counting" its steps (which begs the question of how an ant could possibly keep track of thousands of steps), to Tegmarks Mathematical Universe Hypothesis, that the universe is not just a structure described by mathematics, it is mathematics. Between these two articles, Pickover displays two-hundred-forty-eight other articles in just enough detail to give this reader pause to do a bit of thinking. I was gratified that he chose to introduce readers to some of the influential women in the history of mathematics, and he elaborates some of the examples that demonstrate the whole of Euclidian geometry has not yet been explored (there are still discoveries being made in this ancient branch). I was also a bit nonplussed that the Fundamental Theorem of Arithmetic was not showcased the same way the Fundamental Theorems of Algebra and Calculus were, despite the fact that he devoted several articles to prime number studies. I know a few people who may find a bit of inspiration to pick up their interest in math by recommending this book to them.
    more
  • Mikko Karvonen
    January 1, 1970
    The Math Book is basically a sweeping history of mathematics told through 250 key milestones. It does not even try to be detailed or all-encompassing, but aims to track the way and rate mathematics has developed over the millenia.Each subject has been devoted one page of text and one more or less related full-colour image on the opposite page. The result is a visually attractive encyclopedia that is easy to follow. Pickover's enthusiastic, and for the most part layman-friendly writing completes The Math Book is basically a sweeping history of mathematics told through 250 key milestones. It does not even try to be detailed or all-encompassing, but aims to track the way and rate mathematics has developed over the millenia.Each subject has been devoted one page of text and one more or less related full-colour image on the opposite page. The result is a visually attractive encyclopedia that is easy to follow. Pickover's enthusiastic, and for the most part layman-friendly writing completes the compelling presentation.For a math geek like myself, who loves the subject, but has not really studied it to be aware of everything that has happened or happening on the field, the book was an excellent read. The subjects were selected with good eye, providing a mixture of great breakthroughs, intriguing results and conjenctures, and interesting persons. The writing did on most cases good work presenting the subjects and their meaning for mathematics without getting too technical about it. At times I was left wanting for bit more detail, though.All in all, The Math Book is a good way of getting a glimpse of everything the world of mathematics involves and how it has helped to form our society, science and understanding of the universe.
    more
  • Charles
    January 1, 1970
    This book is the perfect one to reside on the coffee table of math department lounges, as it is possible to open it to any page and use the contents to begin a mathematical conversation. All the subject matter is presented at a level that all professional mathematicians will understand and people with a high school education that included mathematics can easily understand the majority of the topics. For each of the subjects, one page is devoted to a brief explanation and the next contains a colo This book is the perfect one to reside on the coffee table of math department lounges, as it is possible to open it to any page and use the contents to begin a mathematical conversation. All the subject matter is presented at a level that all professional mathematicians will understand and people with a high school education that included mathematics can easily understand the majority of the topics. For each of the subjects, one page is devoted to a brief explanation and the next contains a color picture related to the subject. The images are so colorful and bright that they would even catch and retain the eyes of young children.Another use of this book would be in high school or college math classes where the subject is the history of mathematics. The descriptions of each of the milestones could serve as the starting point for a paper or a presentation. Finally, it is a book that is just fun to read, the math is not deep, but it is lively and entertaining.Published in Journal of Mathematics, reprinted with permission
    more
  • Deluge
    January 1, 1970
    Interesting tidbits with no depth. It's more encyclopedic, if anything.Use as a quick reference, if you must read it.
  • Brian Ryer
    January 1, 1970
    This is not so much the kind of book that you read cover to cover but more the sort of book you want to have lying around wherever you work (or relax if you're a math geek) as picking it up and flipping it open presents you with a short article on one little bit of the landscape of the magnificent multi-peaked mountain of knowledge called mathematics. You want to dip into it frequently.For me this short figurative jaunt on the math highlands works as a general purpose inspirational nudge. Prime This is not so much the kind of book that you read cover to cover but more the sort of book you want to have lying around wherever you work (or relax if you're a math geek) as picking it up and flipping it open presents you with a short article on one little bit of the landscape of the magnificent multi-peaked mountain of knowledge called mathematics. You want to dip into it frequently.For me this short figurative jaunt on the math highlands works as a general purpose inspirational nudge. Prime factoring just has that sort of effect on me. Of course the book can also be a great way to help someone less fortunate–less in love with the unending awesomeness of mathematics–to get an idea of what you're smiling about when they say they like the design of a public space and you know it's the golden ratio everywhere that makes them like it so much.
    more
  • Steve
    January 1, 1970
    Do you like Math? Do you like History? Do you like Math History?If the answer to any of the above was "no", then this is a book with a serious chance of changing your mind.This book is essentially a highlight reel of math history. With a quick page-long summary (coupled with some interesting art), the author briefly explains some mathematical development, how it happened, who did it, and occasionally an amusing little side note to the history as well.The topics covered range from the fairly well Do you like Math? Do you like History? Do you like Math History?If the answer to any of the above was "no", then this is a book with a serious chance of changing your mind.This book is essentially a highlight reel of math history. With a quick page-long summary (coupled with some interesting art), the author briefly explains some mathematical development, how it happened, who did it, and occasionally an amusing little side note to the history as well.The topics covered range from the fairly well known (Pythagorean Theorem, Euclidian Geometry, Invention of the Abacus...) to things that sound made up (Hairy Ball Theorem, for one). Generally explained in a straightforward, easily comprehensible manner, most readers should gain at least a modicum of understanding, aside from perhaps the most obtuse topics in the book. Highly recommended.
    more
  • Richard
    January 1, 1970
    On first impression, this book is a beautifully illustrated, hard colder math book with acute glimpses into discoveries in mathematics. I've always wanted to write a similar such book! Upon reading it, I found myself looking it a lot less than I wanted to. Too often were illustrations lazily chosen and resembled clipart. A significant number of entries were references to math texts, which were important, but nowhere nearly as interesting as other findings or quandaries in math.There was a heavy On first impression, this book is a beautifully illustrated, hard colder math book with acute glimpses into discoveries in mathematics. I've always wanted to write a similar such book! Upon reading it, I found myself looking it a lot less than I wanted to. Too often were illustrations lazily chosen and resembled clipart. A significant number of entries were references to math texts, which were important, but nowhere nearly as interesting as other findings or quandaries in math.There was a heavy emphasis on describing the mathematician and too light emphasis on the math. The word Jew appeared an uncomfortable number of times in inappropriate places.I would love to see a similar book up-to-date (ABC Conjecture now proven!) with perhaps less milestones and more relevant details and better/more creative images.
    more
  • Jeff
    January 1, 1970
    The subtitle of this book is; "From Pythagoras to the 57th Dimension, 250 Milestones in the History of Mathematics". That about says sit all. This is a really cool encyclopedia-like book with great images and one-page anecdote about math, from across time. They range from cicada's calculating prime numbers, to the Infinite Monkey Theorem to how they solved Checkers. I used it like a nightly devotional, reading one or two stories every night. (probably why it took me 2 years to finish).One intere The subtitle of this book is; "From Pythagoras to the 57th Dimension, 250 Milestones in the History of Mathematics". That about says sit all. This is a really cool encyclopedia-like book with great images and one-page anecdote about math, from across time. They range from cicada's calculating prime numbers, to the Infinite Monkey Theorem to how they solved Checkers. I used it like a nightly devotional, reading one or two stories every night. (probably why it took me 2 years to finish).One interesting story is about Benford's Law, where the probability of the first digit of a set of numbers is known. In any set of numbers there is a 30% chance that a number will begin with 1. This idea is used by accounting auditors sometimes to look for fraud. Cooked books are unlikely to follow the law, natural ones would.Very interesting reading.10/10S: 2/19/14 - F: 5/26/16 ( 838 Days)
    more
  • Daniel Wright
    January 1, 1970
    The now-ubiquitous word "awesome" is, sadly, the only word I can use to describe this book. I can't speak loud enough over the noise of Pickover shouting, "LOOK HOW F***ING AWESOME I AM! LOOK, MATHS! IT'S THE F***ING S***, RIGHT?!"Well, maybe not exactly that, but you get the general idea. Honestly, I will keep this book near me for quite a long time to come, just opening it at a random entry to see what piece of incredible general awesomeness I can find. I mean first there's some ants, and then The now-ubiquitous word "awesome" is, sadly, the only word I can use to describe this book. I can't speak loud enough over the noise of Pickover shouting, "LOOK HOW F***ING AWESOME I AM! LOOK, MATHS! IT'S THE F***ING S***, RIGHT?!"Well, maybe not exactly that, but you get the general idea. Honestly, I will keep this book near me for quite a long time to come, just opening it at a random entry to see what piece of incredible general awesomeness I can find. I mean first there's some ants, and then there's a triangle and then some knots and then a bigass Universe and then 1+1=2 and then oh I give up, just read it, and if you don't get it give up and read a different bit. Awesome. Just awesome.
    more
Write a review