The Pioneer Woman Cooks
#1 New York Times BestsellerPaula Deen meets Erma Bombeck in The Pioneer Woman Cooks, Ree Drummond’s spirited, homespun cookbook. Drummond colorfully traces her transition from city life to ranch wife through recipes, photos, and pithy commentary based on her popular, award-winning blog, Confessions of a Pioneer Woman, and whips up delicious, satisfying meals for cowboys and cowgirls alike made from simple, widely available ingredients. The Pioneer Woman Cooks—and with these “Recipes from an Accidental Country Girl,” she pleases the palate and tickles the funny bone at the same time.

The Pioneer Woman Cooks Details

TitleThe Pioneer Woman Cooks
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseOct 27th, 2009
PublisherWilliam Morrow Cookbooks
ISBN-139780061658198
Rating
GenreFood and Drink, Cookbooks, Cooking, Nonfiction, Food

The Pioneer Woman Cooks Review

  • Nikki
    January 1, 1970
    (WARNING: incoming rant)I wanted to give this book three stars but since I found out the TRUTH about what a fake and phony Ree Drummond is, I cannot.Through several websites I read the truth about Ree, her life of privilege in an upper-middle-class family and then marrying into one of the top land-owner ranching families in the US. The "pioneer" appellation that Ree gave herself must be an inside joke because she and her husband are so rich (without even counting her $1.5M+ blog, TV show, cookbo (WARNING: incoming rant)I wanted to give this book three stars but since I found out the TRUTH about what a fake and phony Ree Drummond is, I cannot.Through several websites I read the truth about Ree, her life of privilege in an upper-middle-class family and then marrying into one of the top land-owner ranching families in the US. The "pioneer" appellation that Ree gave herself must be an inside joke because she and her husband are so rich (without even counting her $1.5M+ blog, TV show, cookbooks dynasty) that they get paid for land they don't work and to keep wild mustangs on their property (subsidized in the millions by the US government). In fact the little ranch operation that Marlboro Man (Ladd Drummond) runs with his brother Tim makes a paltry few hundred thousand a year in comparison to where the big bucks are (Ree's empire and the family land, some of which sold back in 2001 for over $20M - purchased by the US government).Ree and her perfect little cowboy clan ARE NOT LIKE you and me, though she thinks if she pretends to be all down home by dropping the g's off all her words (gettin', fightin', talkin', home schoolin', eatin', feedin') and never refers to them but 'em (come an get 'em) she'll be able to fool the masses into thinking she's living like a modern "Little House on the Prairie". Which apparently she has been able to do quite successfully.The truth of the matter is, she is not a lonely little prairie wife, strugglin’ to work a family ranch. She's gobs and gobs richer than her fans (most likely richer than just about everyone in Oklahoma), home schools with two teachers (I bet you thought she did the teachin' too, dinja?) had/has nannies for her kids as they were growin' up, had a ghostwriter and staff work on her cookbooks and recipes, clears easily a cool million in ad revenue from her blog and let's face it talks way too much about how she loves her husband and how hot he is in his Wranglers which personally makes me think he's a dud in the bedroom, otherwise, who are you trying (sorry, tryin') to convince by yappin' about it all the time? I don't care that you hit the hubby landowner jackpot (land stolen from the Native Americans) and pushed out four lil' brats, that doesn’t make you better or smarter or more interesting than anyone else who has done the same thing but on much less money, having to be far more creative than cooking in a kitchen bigger than most people’s homes (and that's not mentioning The Lodge which is literally a hotel/TV kitchen studio on their property built especially for her Food Network TV Show. You could land a Cessna in the living room).Ree Drummond is as phony as the shade of red she dyes her hair.Yet them regular folks out here eat it up. I admit at first I kind of fell for it too though it didn’t really make sense that she could be feedin' all them cattle-folk, schoolin' four children, bakin' pies for the church social, helpin' out with all the chores on the ranch, makin' a good supper for her family (and all the other meals), keepin' up her blog by writin' and takin' hundreds of photos, doin’ a TV show, writin' cookbooks, developin' recipes and wranglin' whatever's in Marlboro Man’s Wranglers on a regular basis. I mean she's called The Pioneer Woman not some durned Super Pioneer Woman who has a laser spatula for flippin' griddle-cakes and a giant cowboy bean-pot of radioactive energy that is the source of her powers.So when I did a little diggin' round the old cowherd called th’ internet, daggummit what d'ya think I found? Non-believers who were happy to turn a spotlight on Ree's duplicity.And frankly if'n The Pioneer Woman tain't no real pioneer it kind of renders her cookbooks, somewhat ridiculous.The recipes are simple Ladies Auxiliary type, for beginners with step by step photos that I guess are there in case you have no clue what sweatin' an onion in a fryin' pan looks like. Actually I don’t really see the point of the step by step pictures since they are very small and not particularly clear. Also step by step instructions for simple recipes is overkill.It’s not that I don't like some of the recipes. But often they are recipes that you don’t even need a recipe for - like potato skins. Is there anyone who can currently walk into a kitchen and peel a potato that doesn't know how to make potato skins?She does have an good recipe for cinnamon rolls (her mother's) and other recipes from various friends and family members that are pretty good too but as long as Cinnabon exists in the Pillsbury refrigerator case I see no point in going to all that work and I severely doubt that Ree does either.The pictures are lovely (though over-saturated with Photoshop filters) and some of her humor is hokey and sweet. If only it were genuine. Well, if any of it was.Curse me out if you're a fan of hers if you like but just know that you are defending a fake who laughs all the way to the bank. And she's laughing at YOU.
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  • Christy Stewart
    January 1, 1970
    This book is 1 part of the most basic recipies you'll ever need and 15 parts pictures of her family and horses. It's more of a love letter to her kids than an actual cook book, but if you need to know that to make eggs in a basket you put egg on toast, go ahead and buy this.And with all the photos of horses throughout the book, there was not ONE horse recipe. What a jip.
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  • Diana
    January 1, 1970
    Although I like to watch the Food Network, I can’t say I have watched Pioneer Woman very often. In this cookbook, we learn a lot about Ree Drummond. She’s shares about her day to day life on the ranch including lots of photographs of her family, pets, etc. The recipes include pictures and easy to follow instructions. In fact, the step by step instructions each have their own picture of that particular step. I understand her blog, which I have never visited, is set up this same way with lots of v Although I like to watch the Food Network, I can’t say I have watched Pioneer Woman very often. In this cookbook, we learn a lot about Ree Drummond. She’s shares about her day to day life on the ranch including lots of photographs of her family, pets, etc. The recipes include pictures and easy to follow instructions. In fact, the step by step instructions each have their own picture of that particular step. I understand her blog, which I have never visited, is set up this same way with lots of visual instruction. She admits in the book’s introduction that her recipes are hearty and most definitely not low calorie. This is very true and since I didn’t really watch Pioneer Woman or visit the blog, I was unaware these would be heavy recipes. Pretty much everything is so, so heavy. For me personally, I had to lighten them up a bit. For instance, for the meatball recipe I used ground turkey in place of ground beef. The recipes I tried from this book were absolutely delicious but not a cookbook I could cook from often. I would probably need to space out eating recipes from this book.
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  • False
    January 1, 1970
    First of all, why would you even buy this book since all of the recipes are on her website for free--unless you just had to have the complete Pioneer Woman Experience--and there are legions. She is highly marketed. What you aren't told is that her husband is something like the eighth largest land owner in the U.S. She has staff on many levels. In other words, she's a 1%'er who can choose to create and live her life style. Not a simple ranch wife. Not by a long shot.She's quick to admit, this is First of all, why would you even buy this book since all of the recipes are on her website for free--unless you just had to have the complete Pioneer Woman Experience--and there are legions. She is highly marketed. What you aren't told is that her husband is something like the eighth largest land owner in the U.S. She has staff on many levels. In other words, she's a 1%'er who can choose to create and live her life style. Not a simple ranch wife. Not by a long shot.She's quick to admit, this is not healthy food. Lots of butter and chocolate and cheese and carbs. Old-fashioned, one might say, but also one in keeping with this persona she has developed. Nothing for me to prepare, but good recipes for the masses who eat in this manner.Every time I come across her, all I can think is how vastly different her life would be with a farm, four children and poverty-level income. The charm would evaporate like a stick of melted butter over corn muffins.
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  • Trudi
    January 1, 1970
    I don't cook, not really. I can make an okay omelet, an edible lasagna, pretty yummy mashed potatoes and gravy ... and that's about it. And it isn't that I'm SO INEPT, I just don't really have the desire to cook. I don't like it. It's not fun for me. But here's the thing -- I LOVE to eat and I LOVE to watch food being prepared. Yes, I'm a food porn addict. I watch the Food Network, I drool over online recipes imagining what things would taste like. But would I ever bother to gather all the ingre I don't cook, not really. I can make an okay omelet, an edible lasagna, pretty yummy mashed potatoes and gravy ... and that's about it. And it isn't that I'm SO INEPT, I just don't really have the desire to cook. I don't like it. It's not fun for me. But here's the thing -- I LOVE to eat and I LOVE to watch food being prepared. Yes, I'm a food porn addict. I watch the Food Network, I drool over online recipes imagining what things would taste like. But would I ever bother to gather all the ingredients together and assemble said dish in my own kitchen? No way man. But I'm trying to mend my cookingless ways. Every now and then I'll pick up a larger-than-life gorgeously photographed cookbook with all the best intentions in the world of taking it home and actually putting it to use this time in the kitchen rather than just feeding my porn addiction as I drool over all the pretty pictures. Oh what dew-eyed, misplaced delusion and optimism one gal can suffer from. Countless cookbooks have made it onto my lap, but none have made it into my kitchen (at least not with me there).I have a sneaky, tingly feeling that this is all about to change thanks to Ree Drummond and her pioneer cooking kitchen ways. Drummond was a city girl living in Los Angeles and on a trip home to Oklahoma was swept off her feet by a living, breathing, working cowboy (he had the boots and hands to prove it). Drummond married "Marlboro Man" and he absconded with her to his cattle ranch which is also a sanctuary for wild Mustangs. Miles away from sushi and double lattes, Drummond learns to cook for burly ranch hands burning 7000 calories before 11 o'clock in the morning -- not to mention a growing brood of ravenous children. These are recipes I can get behind -- simple, easy, down home stick to your ribs (and your arteries) sumptuous awesomeness. Food all about the flavor; unpretentious fare that doesn't require trips to a specialty grocery store or a certificate from the Culinary Institute of America. Drummond's recipes are not only simple country fare, but she presents each dish step by step accompanied by splendid photography so that even an underachiever like me can get motivated (and succeed) in the kitchen. If you can't get your hands on this book, check out her blog -- you will drool, I promise!!!
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  • Kate
    January 1, 1970
    The only exposure I had to Ree Drummond before e-borrowing this from the library was when I accidentally stumbled across a post on her blog about making Eggs Benedict. I clicked out of there quick after reading her recommendation that you make an "F5 tornado" out of boiling water to hold the eggs together. Eeesh, no thanks. So later I e-borrowed this book since the fish-out-of-water-cookbook idea sounded interesting...and was immediately confused. Was this a memoir or a cookbook? Or is it both? The only exposure I had to Ree Drummond before e-borrowing this from the library was when I accidentally stumbled across a post on her blog about making Eggs Benedict. I clicked out of there quick after reading her recommendation that you make an "F5 tornado" out of boiling water to hold the eggs together. Eeesh, no thanks. So later I e-borrowed this book since the fish-out-of-water-cookbook idea sounded interesting...and was immediately confused. Was this a memoir or a cookbook? Or is it both? And why are there so many pictures? So many pictures that it took annoying food porn to a whole new level. Seriously, I know what bacon looks like just...sitting there, I don't need several pictures of the bacon. Also, eight thousand pictures of your kids are not even remotely interesting to me. But okay whatever, clicking (repeatedly) eventually gets me to another recipe.Because I'd never heard the term "Egg in the Hole," I actually got excited when Ree explains that she had to learn how to make them from her husband's grandmother before he would go through with the wedding. THIS is what I was looking for! Well-loved family recipes, down-home country food, you get my point. And then I realized it took four Kindle pages and seven photos to give me a recipe for an egg fried in the middle of a slice of bread. Dude, that is not a RECIPE. That is frying an EGG. Yes, some people need to start with the basics, but calling this a RECIPE (with photos!)is ridiculous. I'm returning this book without finishing it because I can't wade through another thousand repetitive food-porn/ranch-porn photos and endless rhapsodizing about how hot "Marlboro Man" (don't EVEN get me started on that nickname) is.
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  • Kerri
    January 1, 1970
    This book was my first exposure to Pioneer Woman, other than stumbling on her blog a few times. I will say this: don't pick her book up expecting to go on a diet. She makes good, hearty meals for hard working ranchers and a family full of growing kids, so if you're looking for salad recipes this is not the place to start.The grouping of this book was great -- I found it very easy to find a recipe for whatever my purposes were, and I enjoyed that her penchant for photography shone through, weavin This book was my first exposure to Pioneer Woman, other than stumbling on her blog a few times. I will say this: don't pick her book up expecting to go on a diet. She makes good, hearty meals for hard working ranchers and a family full of growing kids, so if you're looking for salad recipes this is not the place to start.The grouping of this book was great -- I found it very easy to find a recipe for whatever my purposes were, and I enjoyed that her penchant for photography shone through, weaving recipes with her family and life story pictures. My only complaint (if you can call it that) is her "butter and grease" heavy mentality, that hearkens to a somewhat untrained Paula Deen attitude.The photos in this book are worth the read by themselves - she takes each recipe and breaks it down step by step into pictures so that you would have to be a trained ape to screw it up. Delicious food, beautiful scenery, and a lifestyle that I covet keep me coming back to PW's writing. Julia Child she is not, but intriguing and "cooking for the real person" types recipes are what you will find here.
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  • Margaret McCullough
    January 1, 1970
    I've been following Ree Drummond since she first began blogging a few years ago. Her quick wit makes it a pleasure to read even the most mundane of daily tasks. When I found out there was to be a cookbook, I knew I *had* to have it. Ree is obviously a visual person (something I appreciate) because her recipes are shown with tons of step-by-step pictures. I think the whole reason I buy cookbooks to begin with are the pictures... :-) It's the only cookbook on my counter because I use it so much. T I've been following Ree Drummond since she first began blogging a few years ago. Her quick wit makes it a pleasure to read even the most mundane of daily tasks. When I found out there was to be a cookbook, I knew I *had* to have it. Ree is obviously a visual person (something I appreciate) because her recipes are shown with tons of step-by-step pictures. I think the whole reason I buy cookbooks to begin with are the pictures... :-) It's the only cookbook on my counter because I use it so much. There is more to this book than recipes, which are accompanied by stories about that particular recipe. It's actually fun to read. Ree also has pictures of her family, friends, and a little bit of life on the ranch. A few of my family's favorite recipes are: perfect pot roast (awesome), linguine with clam sauce (to.die.for.), & Patsy's blackberry cobbler (oh so yummy). I've still got many recipes to try out, but everyone loves these so much, they don't want to try anything new! One of these days, I'm going to try out her lasagne recipe. She makes it with breakfast sausage and cottage cheese. It doesn't sound good to me, but if she's making it, I think it's gotta be good!
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  • Nancy
    January 1, 1970
    I didn't know that I could have such a great time READING a cookbook. The usual cookbook is just page after page of boring black and white text. Not so with the Pioneer Woman Cooks. Ree Drummond combines her love of family, food and ranching in a beautiful homage to the people, places and things that she loves. Her photography is stunning. The visual step-by-step instructions are easy to follow, and the ingredients are items that you can find in a typical grocer store. Add to that the fact that I didn't know that I could have such a great time READING a cookbook. The usual cookbook is just page after page of boring black and white text. Not so with the Pioneer Woman Cooks. Ree Drummond combines her love of family, food and ranching in a beautiful homage to the people, places and things that she loves. Her photography is stunning. The visual step-by-step instructions are easy to follow, and the ingredients are items that you can find in a typical grocer store. Add to that the fact that the serving sizes fit a real family, plus it's all with food that you would want to eat makes this cookbook a true thing of useful beauty. Ree isn't you typical ranch wife, she still craves sushi and Starbucks, but she was determined to make a home for her Marlboro man and her brood of children, so why not grab the bull by the horns and do the best that a city loving woman can do. Start a blog and learn to cook. Works for me. Love this book and I look forward to reading more about her adventures on the Pioneer Woman blog.
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  • Cindy
    January 1, 1970
    A few good recipes, But Instead of 1/3 or more of the book taken up by pictures of cowboys, and cute animals (some they plan on killing and eating later) it would have been nice to have more actual recipes. I don't need a full page picture of her husband's butt in any of my cookbooks; a little self indulgent to me.
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  • Robert
    January 1, 1970
    Absolutely beautifully done book, practically a picture on every page. I love how there is a picture for every step in the recipes. (That is a BIG plus!) I would like to give 5 stars, but honestly, many of the recipes, while not bad, are just too mediocre, (Huevos Hyacinth and Egg-In-The-Hole to name just two). And let's be honest, Ree Drummonds' whole shtick as The Pioneer Woman is dubious at best.
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  • Christine
    January 1, 1970
    If you've followed her blog as I have, you'll be pleased to find that author Ree Drummond sticks to her characteristic mix of wry humor and butter by the pound. I'm glad. It's been working for her. In The Pioneer Woman Cooks, her cookbook slash photographic memoir, Ree brings to life the story of her city upbringing with her farm woman reality, currently wrangling four kids and a husband on a working cattle ranch in Oklahoma. Mesmerizing photographs of family members, get-togethers and muddy far If you've followed her blog as I have, you'll be pleased to find that author Ree Drummond sticks to her characteristic mix of wry humor and butter by the pound. I'm glad. It's been working for her. In The Pioneer Woman Cooks, her cookbook slash photographic memoir, Ree brings to life the story of her city upbringing with her farm woman reality, currently wrangling four kids and a husband on a working cattle ranch in Oklahoma. Mesmerizing photographs of family members, get-togethers and muddy farm work blend well with humorous anecdotes — and serve to show you why her family is so hungry!Cute, ranch-laden, photo-intense asides with amusing anecdotes leave you longing for a house on the prairie in a way that 'Little House on the Prairie' episodes never did. Miss Mustang International, my favorite of these sections, showcases the farm's haughtiest mares, snobby and cool as horses can be, deadlocked in imaginary pageantry.What apparently didn't work was the step-by-step visual instructions Ree compiles for each recipe. Drummond's gorgeous pix can be viewed on her website, and it's this stunning photography that leaves viewers drooling for more. Normally. In this publication, however, her photos fall flat. Whether an error in photo correction or on press, it's a sad reality that the green tint of the tutorial pictures makes the food less than appetizing. (Let's flag this for correction on the second printing, Harper Collins. You're far too professional for this type of error. Unless it's just my copy. Hmm.)Now I bought the book despite its meat-centered mains partly to support a fellow blogger, but mostly because Drummond's recipes can be counted upon to work. This is turning out to be a rare feat in cookbookery. For obvious reasons, I won't comment on the chicken-fried steak or meatloaf recipes, sticking instead to ones I've already tried.PW's Creamy Mashed Potatoes: killer Thanksgiving staple.Maple Pecan Scones: get this, already made them three times.Cinnamon Rolls: yum.Migas: delectable, eggy nachos. I know, right?Egg in the Hole: something I've made before, but the extra butter does make it better. Like two days in row better.And I've only had the book for two weeks. In short, Drummond's pithy writing style and remarkable large-scale photography make this book almost as much a coffee table item as a kitchen resource. If you like having cookbooks you can rely on with unfussy authors you'd ask over for lunch, pick up The Pioneer Woman Cooks. You won't be disappointed, especially if you like butter as much as I do.
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  • Steven Peterson
    January 1, 1970
    This cookbook is a boatload of fun. The story of how a big city woman became a country girl, serving hearty food to ranchers, is interesting in its own right. The variety of pictures that portray life on a ranch--having little to do with the recipes--adds a very nice context against which to look at the recipes. Just so, photos of the Pioneer woman, the ranchers, the kids, the dogs, and the horses. One minor thing that reminds me of growing up in central Illinois. Our three meals were breakfast, This cookbook is a boatload of fun. The story of how a big city woman became a country girl, serving hearty food to ranchers, is interesting in its own right. The variety of pictures that portray life on a ranch--having little to do with the recipes--adds a very nice context against which to look at the recipes. Just so, photos of the Pioneer woman, the ranchers, the kids, the dogs, and the horses. One minor thing that reminds me of growing up in central Illinois. Our three meals were breakfast, dinner, and supper. No such term as lunch! And that is the rubric used on the ranch--making me enjoy this a tad more.But, it's the recipes that are central here.In the morning. Egg in the hole. When I was a kid, we used to eat a variant of this. Simple to make and tasty! Sliced bread, butter (the author loves cooking with butter—this is not a healthy cooking cookbook), eggs, salt, and pepper. Pretty simple ingredients. And a simple recipe. Hole out the bread. Brown one side in butter. Crack an egg in the middle, and go from there. End result? Tasty. Another breakfast treat: basic breakfast potatoes. Red potatoes, onion, vegetable oil, salt, and pepper (the author likes to add bacon fat; although that adds a lot of taste, I’d leave it out!). I’ve just bought the potatoes and intend to make this over the next couple days. Some dinner (or lunch, if you prefer) recipes that are likely to tempt me to make them. Chili, cube steak hearty sandwich, macaroni and cheese.Supper (or dinner, if you prefer). Some illustrative dishes that look delicious: Chicken spaghetti, chicken-fried steak, a very nice recipe for meatloaf (too many slices of bacon for me, although it adds a delightful element to the dish), and linguine with clam sauce. One exquisite side dish—burgundy mushrooms. Ingredients include mushrooms, butter (of course!), Worcestershire sauce, burgundy wine, pepper, bouillon cubes (chicken and beef), dill weed, garlic powder, and pepper. The last part of the book? Desserts. Once more, hearty.So, in the final analysis, a fun cookbook! I have tried one recipe and will try a few more. There are a lot that I won’t try, simply because I want to keep fat and cholesterol down. But for those who like hearty dishes, this would be a useful source of recipes.
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  • Kathy (Bermudaonion)
    January 1, 1970
    If you’re not familiar with The Pioneer Woman, you need to be! This woman is amazing! She’s a ranch wife and manages to maintain an amazing blog, homeschool four kids, take gorgeous pictures and create a beautiful cookbook.I was mesmerized by The Pioneer Woman Cooks by Ree Drummond when I got it. In this wonderful cookbook Ree explains how she became The Pioneer Woman, shows a little of ranch life and shares some of her great recipes. The beauty of the recipes is that they’re created from simple If you’re not familiar with The Pioneer Woman, you need to be! This woman is amazing! She’s a ranch wife and manages to maintain an amazing blog, homeschool four kids, take gorgeous pictures and create a beautiful cookbook.I was mesmerized by The Pioneer Woman Cooks by Ree Drummond when I got it. In this wonderful cookbook Ree explains how she became The Pioneer Woman, shows a little of ranch life and shares some of her great recipes. The beauty of the recipes is that they’re created from simple ingredients that anyone can find and they’re for dishes your family will really eat. Both Carl and I found lots of recipes that we want to try – sour cream pancakes, Marlboro Man’s favorite sandwich, spicy pulled pork, macaroni and cheese, comfort meatballs, just to name a few. There are only one or two recipes in here that don’t appeal to either one of us.One of the great things about the recipes in The Pioneer Woman Cooks is all of the pictures – there is a photograph for each step of the recipe. Because of this, I think this cookbook would be great for beginning as well as experienced cooks. Oh, and did I mention that Ree took all of the photographs in this book herself? I was amazed.Since cheese and olives are the two basic food groups and this recipe looked easy, I decided to fix Olive Cheese Bread first, and I have to tell you this recipe is to die for.
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  • Manami
    January 1, 1970
    pros: she's very upfront about what this is--high calorie food, very basic, meat and potatoes.cons: this collection of recipes is some of the most basic stuff you'll ever see. there's literally recipes for meatloaf and mashed potatoes. ridiculous.all her food is extremely meat and potatoes midwest themed. it's only good because it's got intense amounts of meat or butter or sour cream. i cannot imagine this is actually what she or her family eats on a regular basis. she herself is nauseating. she pros: she's very upfront about what this is--high calorie food, very basic, meat and potatoes.cons: this collection of recipes is some of the most basic stuff you'll ever see. there's literally recipes for meatloaf and mashed potatoes. ridiculous.all her food is extremely meat and potatoes midwest themed. it's only good because it's got intense amounts of meat or butter or sour cream. i cannot imagine this is actually what she or her family eats on a regular basis. she herself is nauseating. she presents herself as a simple rancher's wife, when it's clear that she does not do all the things that she claims to in this book. and that's okay--no one needs to run a food network show and bake pies for the church social or whatever, while hand-raising 4 kids. there is clearly a large staff behind this woman who make her life possible--assistants and cleanup helpers and nannies and ghostwriters and what-not, but these people are completely edited out of this cookbook version of her life, which seems to feature her handling all these things by herself. For a book that has 10 pictures of her husband's ranch hands, there's no mention of the army that must support her. In fact, there is some point where she says she is still waiting for this army. How disappointing and fake.
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  • Michaiah
    January 1, 1970
    I've been a huge fan and avid reader of ThePioneerWoman.com for nearly two years, and have been anxiously awaiting this cookbook. It is without a doubt the most colorful, beautiful cookbook I own, and I'm sure one of the most colorful and beautiful cookbooks ever published. And it's more than just a cookbook. Ree combines plenty of recipes, including the stories behind them, with her own gorgeous photography and interesting details of her ranch life. I love cookbooks, and every time I get a new I've been a huge fan and avid reader of ThePioneerWoman.com for nearly two years, and have been anxiously awaiting this cookbook. It is without a doubt the most colorful, beautiful cookbook I own, and I'm sure one of the most colorful and beautiful cookbooks ever published. And it's more than just a cookbook. Ree combines plenty of recipes, including the stories behind them, with her own gorgeous photography and interesting details of her ranch life. I love cookbooks, and every time I get a new one, especially one with many pictures, I look through the entire thing as soon as I have the time. However, I can honestly say that this is the first cookbook I have ever READ the entire way through and couldn't put down. Who ever thought a cookbook would be a page-turner? Now, I have yet to actually cook anything out of the book, but I have made several of Ree's recipes from her blog and have never been disappointed. We're not ranchers here, so we can't afford to eat such high calorie food on a daily or weekly basis, but I will be making these recipes on special occasions (and will probably be making up special occasions in the near future) and can't wait to taste all the yumminess.
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  • Laurie
    January 1, 1970
    I first stumbled across The Pioneer Woman blog through her photography section and immediately was fascinated with her writing and her life. Completely down to earth, she started the blog only about 3 years ago and it has morphed into something huge. Her husband is a cattle rancher in Oklahoma, where they also house wild mustangs for the government. Everything she does is with class and high quality and attention to detail. This book showcases her unique style of teaching recipes. She takes pict I first stumbled across The Pioneer Woman blog through her photography section and immediately was fascinated with her writing and her life. Completely down to earth, she started the blog only about 3 years ago and it has morphed into something huge. Her husband is a cattle rancher in Oklahoma, where they also house wild mustangs for the government. Everything she does is with class and high quality and attention to detail. This book showcases her unique style of teaching recipes. She takes pictures of every (and I do mean EVERY) step along the way. This would be great for a beginning cook to actually see what the food should look like as it is cut, cooked, presented. It's also great for an experienced cook because the food itself is delicious and packed full of flavor. It can be a bit heavy on the calories, but there isn't a bad recipe in the whole book. That in itself is unusual for a cookbook! Anything you try will get rave reviews. She also writes stories to go along with the recipes, so it reads well even as just a book. For an example of her recipe writing style, check out her blog at ThePioneerWoman.com.
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  • Rebecca
    January 1, 1970
    This cookbook is like no other in my cupboard... which is both a good thing and a bad thing. I've only recently started reading her blog recently, and knowing that she has a blog, I'm a little disappointed at how few recipes are in the book. She had soo many recipes w/ pictures taken at her disposal, so I expected more recipes (especially considering how big the book is). So that's the bad, but there is good! I love having step-by-step instructions for each of the recipes. And I love knowing tha This cookbook is like no other in my cupboard... which is both a good thing and a bad thing. I've only recently started reading her blog recently, and knowing that she has a blog, I'm a little disappointed at how few recipes are in the book. She had soo many recipes w/ pictures taken at her disposal, so I expected more recipes (especially considering how big the book is). So that's the bad, but there is good! I love having step-by-step instructions for each of the recipes. And I love knowing that none of the pictures were taken by a professional photographer and that the food wasn't artistically enhanced by someone. Ree Drummond took all the pictures and made all the food, so it's possible for an actual human being to make the food look the way she does!I also like the set-up, having the different recipes organized by what meal you would typically eat it at (although I wouldn't eat any of these for lunch). The best though, is seeing her sense of humor come out in the recipes. This cookbook is fun to just read through, even if you don't have time to make any of the recipes right then.
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  • Renee
    January 1, 1970
    This is a strange little cookbook. I happened to watch an episode of The Pioneer Woman and thought that my family might like her simple, easy recipes. So I downloaded one of her cookbooks on my Kindle and starting leisurely bookmarking recipes while watching my children play on the beach. At first I was annoyed. There were pictures everywhere! Pictures of her kids, husband, friends, horses, cows... oh yeah, and lots of step by step pictures of food. I was feeling a little ripped off. I'd bought This is a strange little cookbook. I happened to watch an episode of The Pioneer Woman and thought that my family might like her simple, easy recipes. So I downloaded one of her cookbooks on my Kindle and starting leisurely bookmarking recipes while watching my children play on the beach. At first I was annoyed. There were pictures everywhere! Pictures of her kids, husband, friends, horses, cows... oh yeah, and lots of step by step pictures of food. I was feeling a little ripped off. I'd bought this cookbook for some easy recipes, not to go through some lady's family photo album! But then I started reading about those pictures, and was charmed. Ree Drummond takes her love of food and family and shares it in such a humble, humorous way I have changed my initial opinion of being ripped off to feeling like I bought a little gem. I got a taste of Ree's life sweet life (real or not...I don't care) along with a taste of her simple, delicious food. Though I still think it's a strange cookbook, it's an oddly satisfying read. Enjoy!
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  • April
    January 1, 1970
    I love Ree's blog. I've been reading it for over two years now and go there almost daily. I really had high hopes for this cookbook and pre-ordered it months ago. Yesterday the package came and I was so excited. I read through the whole book in one sitting. The book is colorful and the pictures are beautiful, BUT - most of it is already on her blog. I was hoping for all new recipes and pictures, but time and time again I would turn the page and see a recipe or pictures that are already on her bl I love Ree's blog. I've been reading it for over two years now and go there almost daily. I really had high hopes for this cookbook and pre-ordered it months ago. Yesterday the package came and I was so excited. I read through the whole book in one sitting. The book is colorful and the pictures are beautiful, BUT - most of it is already on her blog. I was hoping for all new recipes and pictures, but time and time again I would turn the page and see a recipe or pictures that are already on her blog. There are some new recipes, but not many. For a recipe book it doesn't have very many recipes. I think that this book would be great introduction for someone that knows nothing about Ree or her life, but for me it was a letdown.
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  • Melinda
    January 1, 1970
    I got this for Christmas, and sat down and read it. Yes, read a cookbook! Everything that I love about ThePioneerWoman.com is also in her cookbook. She loves her husband, she loves her children, and she loves her life even thought is has hardship and difficulty. The photography is wonderful, the recipes are top notch REAL food with interesting twists, and her humor is an added spice!Get this, read it, and cook from it!!!
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  • Yasmine Alfouzan
    January 1, 1970
    I remember when I first stumbled upon Ree's now-famous website a couple of years ago: I was blown away by the photography and how funny she is.But that got boring.And she never improved.The recipes are boring and most of them are available on her website. And I'm sick of her never referring to her husband by his real name. This isn't Sex and the City, Ree. If I had to describe this in one word? Amateur at best.
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  • Lisa
    January 1, 1970
    I actually sat down and read this cookbook cover to cover, then I tried a few of the recipes and they got raves from my hungry crew so I figured I should review it. The recipes in this book had ingredients that I had in my pantry, which seems to never happen with other cookbooks. No nonsense food with lots of beef and potatoes, but that is just like my family likes it. Love the pictures that showed the step-by-step instructions, very helpful.
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  • Anne OK
    January 1, 1970
    Got my copy and love the layout of the cookbook. It's classic Pioneer Woman and after scanning the book quickly, it looks like there are lots of wonderful recipes. Beautifully photographed. A wonderful Christmas gift idea for anyone who loves to cook. Ree Drummond has hit a homerun with her recipes and life stories in my opinion.
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  • Colleen
    January 1, 1970
    I had to buy it. Wish me luck on actually cooking! The writing and photos are amazing though, I may attempt to mimic her culinary skills.
  • Camisha Maze
    January 1, 1970
    This book has lots of great comfort food recipes! I also love the story she tells along the book
  • Sara Habein
    January 1, 1970
    Anyone who picked up this cookbook and expected a straightforward, recipes-only affair must not be all that familiar with the internet presence that is Pioneer Woman.Each of her recipes have step-by-step photos documenting the process, which can be tremendously helpful for beginning cooks. Drummond takes all the photos herself, and it has been fun to watch the evolution of her photography reading her site over the years. She’s the first one to admit she’s no photography expert, but she’s no slou Anyone who picked up this cookbook and expected a straightforward, recipes-only affair must not be all that familiar with the internet presence that is Pioneer Woman.Each of her recipes have step-by-step photos documenting the process, which can be tremendously helpful for beginning cooks. Drummond takes all the photos herself, and it has been fun to watch the evolution of her photography reading her site over the years. She’s the first one to admit she’s no photography expert, but she’s no slouch either. Her photos use natural light well, and though not a professional “food stylist,” her dishes always look fantastic. If the success marker of a cookbook is making the reader hungry, then she’s done her job.While I enjoyed her asides about daily life, I do wish that more of the material had not already been published on the blog. This is a small complaint, sure, but regular readers will not find a wealth of new material. However, the cookbook would make an excellent introduction for someone not familiar with her work — and it is only an introduction. At around 240 pages, she doesn’t offer an overflow of recipes, but the ones she does offer define her cooking style well.The main reason why I wanted to buy the book was so I could have easy access to her recipes that I always mean to make, but never get around to printing. The Marlboro Man sandwich, pico de gallo, onion strings, pizza crust, and chicken fried steak — I hate to have to look things up on my laptop all the time. (This where the iPad users get all smug, but I’m a dino who is just not there yet, all right?)(The full review for this book can be found on Glorified Love Letters.)
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  • Anastasia
    January 1, 1970
    The diet that my husband and I follow for our diabetes management gives us one day of cheating. The point is to eat so much of the bad stuff that you are happy to stay away from it for a whole week. And I almost always turn to the Pioneer Woman. She started out as a website and her forte is step by step pictures, and being pretty damn funny too. You can get a lot of recipes off her website. But there's really something special about having her book in the house. It includes stories from her life The diet that my husband and I follow for our diabetes management gives us one day of cheating. The point is to eat so much of the bad stuff that you are happy to stay away from it for a whole week. And I almost always turn to the Pioneer Woman. She started out as a website and her forte is step by step pictures, and being pretty damn funny too. You can get a lot of recipes off her website. But there's really something special about having her book in the house. It includes stories from her life and beautifully shot photographs. The recipes are written as though she was your best friend who was instructing you in her own kitchen. We've tried the chicken spaghetti, chicken fried steak, and her chocolate sheet cake. Oh my lord, the sheet cake. I make this pretty much every cheat day. I sent the rest with my husband to work and my name was cursed many times as people went back for more.They couldn't decide whether I was "evil" or a "genius." The best compliment a part time pastry chef can get. This is not diet food. It's comfort food. Sauces, and cheese and copious amounts of butter. But every bit of it is good. After looking through it, I felt like I should start a blog, ala Julie and Julia fame. Only I would call it Ree and Anastasia. Not as catchy but we can work on it. I can make every recipe in the book and document my glorious well deserved weight gain.But I guess I'll just stick to cheat days and a life of chocolate sheet cake. I cannot imagine getting tired of that. Ever.
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  • Heather
    January 1, 1970
    I became a fan of Pioneer Woman some time ago when I happened upon her blog one day. I've enjoyed her humor, the glimpses into her life, her children and the handsome Marlboro Man that she married. And now I am enjoying her first book The Pioneer Woman Cooks: Recipes from an Accidental Country Girl. More than just a cookbook, this book gives you a look into daily life on a working cattle ranch. Full of photographs that she has taken of her family, cattle and bits of her homelife, and stories of I became a fan of Pioneer Woman some time ago when I happened upon her blog one day. I've enjoyed her humor, the glimpses into her life, her children and the handsome Marlboro Man that she married. And now I am enjoying her first book The Pioneer Woman Cooks: Recipes from an Accidental Country Girl. More than just a cookbook, this book gives you a look into daily life on a working cattle ranch. Full of photographs that she has taken of her family, cattle and bits of her homelife, and stories of how she fell in love with a rancher, her "Pesky Brother-in-Law Tim", and little bits of information like "The Difference Between Chaps and Chinks", this book is a feast, both visually and gastronomically. I can't wait to try the recipe for Pico de Gallo (I've been on a Pico de Gallo kick for months now. I don't know why!) I'm also eager to try the recipe for Spicy Pulled Pork and Sherried Tomato Soup. And the Rib-Eye Steak with Whiskey Cream Sauce looks divine!This book is destined to become one of my favorite cookbooks. I love the humor and warmth with which it is written, and the only drawbacks that I can see are the lack of nutritional information (which I always appreciate) and the lack of less "hearty" fare (since I'm trying to get myself eating more healthfully once again, and this book is a little heavy on the richness and fat that I need to avoid). Otherwise I LOVE, LOVE, LOVE this cookbook!
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  • Tattered Cover Book Store
    January 1, 1970
    Jackie says:This book is a lot of fun. Part cookbook, part scrapbook (complete with the author's own photography and honest to goodness clip art), and all love affair with food, family and ranch life. There are homey tidbits (like what NOT to scratch after seeding a jalapeno), old fashioned recipe instructions ("throw on a big pile of pico de gallo" or "if your husband walks in as you're completing this step, shield the bowl with your body and stir quickly. What he doesn't know won't hurt him.") Jackie says:This book is a lot of fun. Part cookbook, part scrapbook (complete with the author's own photography and honest to goodness clip art), and all love affair with food, family and ranch life. There are homey tidbits (like what NOT to scratch after seeding a jalapeno), old fashioned recipe instructions ("throw on a big pile of pico de gallo" or "if your husband walks in as you're completing this step, shield the bowl with your body and stir quickly. What he doesn't know won't hurt him.") and other hilarities, this book is as much fun to simply sit and read as it is easy to follow the recipes which include tons of step by step photographs. There are also plenty of pictures of the kids, the cowboys,the horses, the basset hounds and even the dirty dishes to show that anything good tends to make a bit of a mess. This is cooking for cowboys and kids, and it couldn't be more entertaining or mouthwatering! She's also got a great blog with a recipe share link called Tasty Kitchen (with even MORE fabulous recipes). Foodies--check her out and I think you too will fall under her humorous charm: www.thepioneerwoman.com.***Please look for this great book at an independent bookstore near you. There is a store finder at www.indiebound.com***
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