Rumo & His Miraculous Adventures (Zamonia, #3)
From the author of the cult classic "The 13 1/2 Lives of Captain Bluebear" comes another fantastical journey into Zamonia. This captivating story from the unique imagination of Moers is astonishingly inventive, amusing, and engrossing.Rumo is a little Wolperting - a domesticated creature somewhere between a deer and a dog - who will one day become the greatest hero in the history of Zamonia. Armed with Dandelion, his talking sword, he fights his way across Overworld and Netherworld, two very different realms chock-full of adventures, dangers, and unforgettable characters: Rala, the beautiful girl Wolperting who cultivates a hazardous relationship with death; Urs of the Snows, who thinks more of cooking than of fighting; Gornab the Ninety-Ninth, the demented king of Netherworld; Professor Ostafan Kolibri, who goes in search of the Non-Existent Teenies; General Ticktock, the evil commander of the Copper Killers; Ushan DeLucca, the finest and most weather-sensitive swordsman in Zamonia; Volzotan Smyke, the corpulent Shark Grub; Rolv of the Forest, a Wolperting who can pass through the White Fire; Yggdra Syl, the guardian of the Nurn Forest and its talkative animals; Professor Abdullah Nightingale, inventor of the Chest-of-Drawers Oracle; and, the worst of luck, the deadly Metal Maiden...

Rumo & His Miraculous Adventures (Zamonia, #3) Details

TitleRumo & His Miraculous Adventures (Zamonia, #3)
Author
FormatHardcover
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseSep 7th, 2006
PublisherThe Overlook Press
ISBN1585677256
ISBN-139781585677252
Number of pages688 pages
Rating
GenreFantasy, Fiction, European Literature, German Literature, Humor

Rumo & His Miraculous Adventures (Zamonia, #3) Review

  • Lisa
    September 22, 2007
    Moers may have become my favorite author. I picked this book up on a whim, off the sale table at Powell's, and it was stunning. I think it's a children's book, but it's the rare children's book that doesn't adjust the language to read at "a sixth-grade reading level" or sanitize any of the violence. This book turned out to be the beautiful love child of J.K. Rowling and Norton Juster, raised by L. Frank Baum and the entire staff DC Comics. Beautifully illustrated, marvelously gory and violent wh Moers may have become my favorite author. I picked this book up on a whim, off the sale table at Powell's, and it was stunning. I think it's a children's book, but it's the rare children's book that doesn't adjust the language to read at "a sixth-grade reading level" or sanitize any of the violence. This book turned out to be the beautiful love child of J.K. Rowling and Norton Juster, raised by L. Frank Baum and the entire staff DC Comics. Beautifully illustrated, marvelously gory and violent while still lighthearted and playful, stunningly imaginative, and incredibly detailed. I'm in love. I immediately went out and bought the other two books of his that have been translated into English.
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  • Michael
    March 10, 2016
    Oh, my what a fun and crazy read this was. If you have a hankering for fantasy, comedy, and awesomely unsettling illustrations, combined in one amazing adventure then you have come to the right place. Right from the word go we are introduced to a little Wolperting (a dog-like creature) called Rumo (named after the famous Zamonian card game). His content life being looked after by Hackonian Dwarves is thrown into chaos when he and the friends are taken captive by the evil Demonocles. So then begi Oh, my what a fun and crazy read this was. If you have a hankering for fantasy, comedy, and awesomely unsettling illustrations, combined in one amazing adventure then you have come to the right place. Right from the word go we are introduced to a little Wolperting (a dog-like creature) called Rumo (named after the famous Zamonian card game). His content life being looked after by Hackonian Dwarves is thrown into chaos when he and the friends are taken captive by the evil Demonocles. So then begins a madcap turn of events that sees Rumo go from one peril to another in a wild and wacky journey that left me with many warm and happy fuzzies.I totally loved the debut novel in the series, 13 1/2 Lives of Captain Blue Bear and love Rumo equally as well. Moers ability to create a world so bizarrely mind-blowing, and populate it with the most fantastical characters imaginable is simply amazing. This is easily the most creative and fun series I have read and may soon be my number one favorite. Seriously with characters like a talking sword called Dandelion, and a Shark Grub Volzotan called Smyke, what's is there not to like?
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  • Amanda NEVER MANDY
    November 28, 2015
    Rumo the wonder pup is named after a card game. If I had to choose a card game name for myself I would go with “Solitaire”. Not as catchy of course, but maybe going by a shortened version of the name instead might improve it a little.THEM: “How is the girl book cave treating you Solly?”ME: “Not a cave built for two friend, move along.”Sounds perfect to me.BACK TO THE REVIEWRumo the wonder pup is a Wolperting but it took him a while to learn this fact because like my favorite Bluebear from anothe Rumo the wonder pup is named after a card game. If I had to choose a card game name for myself I would go with “Solitaire”. Not as catchy of course, but maybe going by a shortened version of the name instead might improve it a little.THEM: “How is the girl book cave treating you Solly?”ME: “Not a cave built for two friend, move along.”Sounds perfect to me.BACK TO THE REVIEWRumo the wonder pup is a Wolperting but it took him a while to learn this fact because like my favorite Bluebear from another Zamonia story, Rumo’s first memory is of just existing. Thankfully this existence has placed him in the arms of a caring adoptive farm family. But what kind of story would it be if things stayed safe and happy? Thus begins a journey that lands Rumo in numerous situations that have zero learning curves. Think fast or be eaten alive would be the motto of this fantastical story of imaginary critters in imaginary lands.WHY I LOVED IT:Read the paragraph above again and let me know how anyone could not want to know more about this odd story. An engaging writing style plus off the wall illustrations wraps this one up with a big, fancy, glittery bow.WHY I DIDN’T LOVE IT ENOUGH TO GIVE IT FIVE STARS:It’s a bit much in the length department. I would find myself putting it down more often than I would have liked simply because the daunting idea of that much still left to go kept bubbling up. A great story should wipe this thought from your mind making the pages flutter on by. I can’t put my finger on exactly what it was that caused this flaw in my reading. Maybe it was the layers upon layers of adjectives or maybe it was because it was a lot darker than I expected. There is a lot of war, fighting and death in this one and not as much humor as was in the first book I read about this fictional world. So really, not the book’s fault but more a preference issue with this read.And now it’s on to wherever my silver thread might take me.
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  • David
    February 9, 2008
    We should all have some Wolperting in us. Walter Moers is a magical writer.
  • Sylvester
    November 7, 2012
    I completely disagree with the Washington Post - Rumo is no mash-up of Rowling/Douglas Adams/Shel Silverstein, nor is it *silly*. Moers is like no one else I've ever read, I think I can safely say that he stands alone in his style of writing. This particular novel has more plotline than previous ones I've read, and yes, it was too long - but it was too much of a *good* thing, which is better than too much of a bad thing. Everyone has got to try reading a Moers book at least once - he is so fabul I completely disagree with the Washington Post - Rumo is no mash-up of Rowling/Douglas Adams/Shel Silverstein, nor is it *silly*. Moers is like no one else I've ever read, I think I can safely say that he stands alone in his style of writing. This particular novel has more plotline than previous ones I've read, and yes, it was too long - but it was too much of a *good* thing, which is better than too much of a bad thing. Everyone has got to try reading a Moers book at least once - he is so fabulously inventive and quirky that it restores my goodwill towards humanity. Rumo is quite bloody and violent, which doesn't seem to help it as a children's book - however, kids can be quite bloodthirsty beings, and enjoy fantasy battles immensely without mixing them up with real life, so...be warned, but don't deprive them of the wonder, either.It's lines like these that endear me to 'Rumo':'Rice-grain literature! Rice-grain literature! Whole novels inscribed by Bonsai Mites on grains of creamed rice! Hundreds of titles in stock!'Bonsai Mites - only one of the hundreds of creatures which populate Moers' books. No humans in sight. Highly recommended.
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  • Starslug
    August 12, 2009
    The one of the great achievements of Rumo is that, despite being a book of epic proportions, never becomes a chore to read. There are many more to choose from: for example, the delightful illustrations by the author spaced throughout, the biazare flights of imagination, the varied and unique characters, and a plot that is strange but never hard to follow. Strange is a good way to describe Rumo, but it is a strangeness grounded in both science and in literary savviness. Cliches are subverted with The one of the great achievements of Rumo is that, despite being a book of epic proportions, never becomes a chore to read. There are many more to choose from: for example, the delightful illustrations by the author spaced throughout, the biazare flights of imagination, the varied and unique characters, and a plot that is strange but never hard to follow. Strange is a good way to describe Rumo, but it is a strangeness grounded in both science and in literary savviness. Cliches are subverted with loving care, and insiduous and obscure references peppered throughout the text makes it especially rewarding to a knowledgable reader. (An example: a set of surgical tools based off prehistoric sea-creatures.) Knowing that many more are still lurking inside makes re-reading a tantalising prospect.For all its weird and wonderful creatures, Rumo does occasionally touch some darker depths. In fact, in its twisting and dreamlike folds, it manages to hit almost every spot: surreal humour, pure escapism, genuine adventure, and also manages to be quite moving at points.A fabulous book, quite possibly my favourite. It manages the near impossible feat of rambling engagingly.
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  • Iloveshakespeare
    April 1, 2011
    Oh war das toll. Ich habs natürlich geschafft die Bücher komplett achronologisch zu lesen, aber das tut dem Ganzen keinen Abbruch. Bemerkenswert finde ich nicht nur die Fülle an Sub-plots und Geschichten in Geschichten die alle letztlich von Bedeutung sind, sondern auch die Tatsache, dass die unaussprechlichen Grausamkeiten das wohlige Gefühl, dass sich bei mir einstellte, nicht kleinkriegen konnten. Ich war entrüstet, empört, angeekelt und dann kurz darauf entzückt, glücklich und verzaubert. Ru Oh war das toll. Ich habs natürlich geschafft die Bücher komplett achronologisch zu lesen, aber das tut dem Ganzen keinen Abbruch. Bemerkenswert finde ich nicht nur die Fülle an Sub-plots und Geschichten in Geschichten die alle letztlich von Bedeutung sind, sondern auch die Tatsache, dass die unaussprechlichen Grausamkeiten das wohlige Gefühl, dass sich bei mir einstellte, nicht kleinkriegen konnten. Ich war entrüstet, empört, angeekelt und dann kurz darauf entzückt, glücklich und verzaubert. Rumo ist natürlich toll. Ich will außerdem ein Einhörnchen, aber das wollte ich ja schon als ich Ensel und Grete las.Am Schönsten ist aber die allerletzte Seite, weil ich das Buch mit einem breiten Grinsen geschlossen habe.
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  • Nathan
    December 8, 2010
    I picked this book up on a whim from the local used book store. A walking talking wolf thing wielding a dandelion knife possessed by a demon just sounded fun. The blurb stating the book was equal parts J.K. Rowling, Douglas Adams, and Shell Silverstein seemed a little hard to live up to, but it was interesting praise none the less. When I looked on goodreads and saw an average rating of over 4 stars, I was sold. I'm a bit sad to say that the book didn't live up to the four star rating, the high I picked this book up on a whim from the local used book store. A walking talking wolf thing wielding a dandelion knife possessed by a demon just sounded fun. The blurb stating the book was equal parts J.K. Rowling, Douglas Adams, and Shell Silverstein seemed a little hard to live up to, but it was interesting praise none the less. When I looked on goodreads and saw an average rating of over 4 stars, I was sold. I'm a bit sad to say that the book didn't live up to the four star rating, the high praise, or my expectations. That's not to say it was bad, but it was nowhere near brilliant. Rumo, that main characters, is among the most dull, flat, and uninteresting main characters I've ever read. His assertion that he's bad with words and only good at fighting is valid. As I was reading I kept going to find out what what happen to some of the other, more interesting or dynamic characters, Rumo himself was just the vehicle to get me there. The other characters were good for the most part. Not always exciting, not always funny, but generally good, well made characters. There were certainly some laugh out loud moments, and some great page turning reading as well. The book also contains a lot of unnecessary world building. Multiple page back stories on characters that are only mentioned were a bit annoying. The amount of invented creatures was matched only by the number of made up words. Many of the creatures, and words, were unnecessary. Like the tangential back stories, I think the book may have been a bit better off minus a few of them. Overall though, this was a good, fun fantasy read. If you're a fantasy fan it worth reading, but I can't imagine putting it on any must read, or best of lists.
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  • Saskia Marijke Niehorster-Cook
    June 3, 2010
    I was at once taken in by this great saga of a wolperting dog who is smarter and braver than most inhabitants from his Island Zamonia. If a bit more graphically violent than it's first companion book " The first 13 &1/2 lives of Captain Bluebear", the miraculous adventures of this hero begin with his kidnapping as a baby. His unfortunate luck brings him to be a captive on a floating rock inhabited by savage cyclops whose main desire is to eat live beings in gruesome manners. Fortunately, thi I was at once taken in by this great saga of a wolperting dog who is smarter and braver than most inhabitants from his Island Zamonia. If a bit more graphically violent than it's first companion book " The first 13 &1/2 lives of Captain Bluebear", the miraculous adventures of this hero begin with his kidnapping as a baby. His unfortunate luck brings him to be a captive on a floating rock inhabited by savage cyclops whose main desire is to eat live beings in gruesome manners. Fortunately, this wolperting meets a shark grub that helps him grow up and confront his enemies.BUT WAIT! THIS IS JUST THE BEGINNNING! THERE IS MORE!As Rumo explores this fascinating world, he comes across a gamut of strange yet interesting characters that sometimes hunt him, sometimes haunt him and sometimes help him; all the while our dear character becomes wiser and more endearing. To write a full summary is to do it a disservice. This is a book I highly recommend to ALL. It is full of witticism, cleverness, unaccountable imagination, and oddly enough, great criticism to the world we live in. It is as if inventing this world, Mr. Moers draws a simile in which we must compare Zamonia to our world; somehow we are found lacking, our world pales in comparison, even though it also feels as if we are somehow safer here. If given a chance I would, without thinking twice, jump into Zamonia and live there the rest of my days... (688 pgs)
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  • Kristina Andreeva
    November 28, 2015
    "Представете си един скрин!Да, грамаден скрин с много чекмеджета,пълен с всичките тайни на Замония,наистина с всички, подредени по азбучен ред.Скрин, левитиращ в абсолютния мрак.Представяте ли си го?Хубаво!А сега вижте как едно от чекмеджетата се отваря!Това с буквата "Р"."Р" като Румо.Погледнете в него! Дълбоко навътре!Преди то отново да се е затворило."Обичам Замония и още една история, разказана за този страхотен свят, ме радва толкова много! "Румо & Чудесата в тъмното" е третата книга от "Представете си един скрин!Да, грамаден скрин с много чекмеджета,пълен с всичките тайни на Замония,наистина с всички, подредени по азбучен ред.Скрин, левитиращ в абсолютния мрак.Представяте ли си го?Хубаво!А сега вижте как едно от чекмеджетата се отваря!Това с буквата "Р"."Р" като Румо.Погледнете в него! Дълбоко навътре!Преди то отново да се е затворило."Обичам Замония и още една история, разказана за този страхотен свят, ме радва толкова много! "Румо & Чудесата в тъмното" е третата книга от романите на Валтер Мьорс за Замония, но всички от тях могат да се четат и без другите и пак да успеете да разберете света. Нещо като Светът на Диска на Тери Пратчет.Книгата се разказва за Румо, който е волпертингер - тоест куче, но куче с рога, което ходи на два крака, може да говори (о, момент - това се отнася само за цивилизованите волпертингери! Другата част са просто диви кучета.), бързо е и се бие доста добре. Все качества, характерни и за останалите от неговата раса.Волпертингерите обаче, макар и цивилизовани, все още следват някои първични инстинкти, като например този да оставят новородените си на произвола на съдбата, отделени още от момента на раждането си и оставени в кош за боклук или в гората. Така малкият Румо има късмета да попадне на мили и работливи джуджета, които го отглеждат.Но идват дяволските циклопи (обичат да изяждат храната си жива и не докосват тази, която вече не мърда), които залавят малкото кутре и джуджетата за храна... Тук започва приключението на героя, който пораства много бързо както физически, така и психически, печели съюзници и никога не забравя Сребърната нишка, която неизменно е винаги някъде в небето, приканваща го да я последва...Не бих определила "Румо" като детска книга, макар и вероятно доста хора да я сметнат за такава. Валтер Мьорс умее да разказва за отвратителни и жестоки неща все едно пише простичка детска приказка за доброто. Вкарва лудост, политика и много, много гадни чудовища - от същества, родени от изгнили листа, трупове и кръв, до врахоци - нямам намерение да ги описвам, пък и честно казано трудно ми стига въображението да изградя образа им докрай в съзнанието си. Същевременно чрез многото си истории, които в повечето случаи нямат връзка с действието, ни запознава със света на героите си и показва огромното си въображение, без което книгата наистина би била едно просто приключение на куче с говорещ меч (и този път в меча няма заключен само един, а двама, което беше свежа идея), което побеждава злото. "И тук чекмеджето с буквата "Р"временно се затваря."
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  • ilovepancakes
    November 16, 2010
    Wacky. Weird. Whimsical. A wonderful cure for chronic insomnia. I understand that the native language of this book is not English, so I ought to cut some slack, but I am traumatized from the agonizing amount of effort I put in to finish this book. I almost quit after 300 pages, but, by God, I swore I would not let some measly book defeat me! I never give up on a book, unless it is "The Tommyknockers" or "Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance".I almost kept a running tally of redundant words, Wacky. Weird. Whimsical. A wonderful cure for chronic insomnia. I understand that the native language of this book is not English, so I ought to cut some slack, but I am traumatized from the agonizing amount of effort I put in to finish this book. I almost quit after 300 pages, but, by God, I swore I would not let some measly book defeat me! I never give up on a book, unless it is "The Tommyknockers" or "Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance".I almost kept a running tally of redundant words, just to keep myself from falling asleep as the storyline twitched along with no sense of direction like an epileptic rabbit (I never again want to see the words "subterranean" or "give a wide berth to" or "alchemy" or any of its derivatives lest I start screaming and never stop). Just as the storyline began to look enticing, off it would bound in a mad fit to introduce us to some other random event. With random events came a team of random characters and superfluous detail. Knowledge is power, but learning about every minute back story of every single character encountered in the book was not enlightening or endearing. It was frustrating to the umpteenth degree and weighed down the storyline. So many times I progressed twenty or thirty pages only to close the cover of the book and say, "Maybe tomorrow it will be better. Maybe." But it never was.
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  • Emily
    June 26, 2009
    This book reads like a children's book for adults. Although the tale starts off innocently enough, and maintains a child-like quality, it quickly delves into a lot of violence and some pretty scary ideas/monsters. (Nurn Forest, The Metal Maiden, The Vrahoks!) So don't look at the illustrations and think this is good for younger children, unless you think that they can handle ample violence and literary gore!The book is broken down into two parts:The Overworld and the Underworld. I personally enj This book reads like a children's book for adults. Although the tale starts off innocently enough, and maintains a child-like quality, it quickly delves into a lot of violence and some pretty scary ideas/monsters. (Nurn Forest, The Metal Maiden, The Vrahoks!) So don't look at the illustrations and think this is good for younger children, unless you think that they can handle ample violence and literary gore!The book is broken down into two parts:The Overworld and the Underworld. I personally enjoyed the latter more. It was a little more tightly constructed, which brings me to my main problem with the story. It spans over 600 pages, which is not a problem--sometimes I think the longer to the better!! This book though, I think could have been about 200 pages shorter. There was a lot of random tangents about side character histories' and a lot of meandering when traveling from place to place that I think was unecessary. I reccommend this story to anyone that enjoys fantasy for sure. I read a lot on the bus, and I found my self giggling quietly, both at the words on the page but often times more so at the illustrations that are interspersed throughout the story. I just bought another book by Moers ('The City of Dreaming Books'). Hope I enjoy it just as much...if not more! :)
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  • Lori
    January 4, 2008
    Sometimes a book just calls out to me from a bookstore shelf, and this one did. German author Moers creates an other-world fairy tale with a hero known as Rumo, a "Wolperting": a dog/wolf creature with an abundance of teeth, antlers, oppossable thumbs, and the abilities to fight like a Spartan, speak and build civilizations. I was hooked from the first page, which I felt compelled to read outloud. The writing is playful and sharp. For all its wierdness, the story becomes compelling very quickly. Sometimes a book just calls out to me from a bookstore shelf, and this one did. German author Moers creates an other-world fairy tale with a hero known as Rumo, a "Wolperting": a dog/wolf creature with an abundance of teeth, antlers, oppossable thumbs, and the abilities to fight like a Spartan, speak and build civilizations. I was hooked from the first page, which I felt compelled to read outloud. The writing is playful and sharp. For all its wierdness, the story becomes compelling very quickly.I'm only about a third of the way through, not feeling any rush, but the more I read of this the more I want to read. As for the plot, I'm not sure I can really sum that up. My favorite section so far is Moers' metaphor for a doctoral dissertation: an awkwardly constructed, unfinished structure with staircases that wander to nowhere, footnotes that buzz around in swarms, darkened rooms full of theories waiting to find logical connections, and general mayhem. This exist, of course, only in the mind of the doctoral student, and he guards it feverishly.Odd creatures, dark humor, veiled satire, other worlds--escapist fiction at its most entertaining. Just what I love to read when I'm on a break from work.
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  • Maria Elmvang
    January 31, 2010
    Walter Moers is a fairly new discovery, but so far I've loved everything I've read by him. This was no exception, although it started out a lot more slowly than the other books, so took me longer to get thoroughly hooked. However, by the time Rumo made it to Wolperting, there was no looking back.I love Walter Moers' quirky humour, and the way he lets the book medium help him tell a story and set an atmosphere. Rumo was a lot darker than the two other books, and it seemed like Walter Moers tried Walter Moers is a fairly new discovery, but so far I've loved everything I've read by him. This was no exception, although it started out a lot more slowly than the other books, so took me longer to get thoroughly hooked. However, by the time Rumo made it to Wolperting, there was no looking back.I love Walter Moers' quirky humour, and the way he lets the book medium help him tell a story and set an atmosphere. Rumo was a lot darker than the two other books, and it seemed like Walter Moers tried to combine more plotlines and tangents than he perhaps should have. The reasons for some of the digressions sometimes didn't become obvious until several hundreds of pages later.A terrific book, and I came to care a lot for the characters and the universe both. Fortunately I still have one Zamonian book left to read.
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  • Alexis
    November 18, 2012
    This audiobook was so much fun! and i love Walter Moer's zany Zamonia :) I had a great time following Rumo journey from a Hackonian dwarf farm to Roaming Rock and Wolperting, to Hel and back again. I learned the blood song and can now hold my own in a karaoke contest with the dead Yetis. I'm sure I'll be taking a peek into the drawer labeled "R" on Professor Nightingale's chest-of-drawers oracle again soon, but this time in hardcopy...I heard there are illustrations!
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  • Knigoqdec
    February 13, 2016
    Да предизвикаш смъртта и живота, когато си все още малък и не знаеш нищичко за света. Това дали е смелост? Или пък глупост? Или пък и двете?Изглежда, че когато е замесена Сребърната нишка, нещата стоят по-иначе...http://knigoqdec.blogspot.bg/2016/02/...
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  • Michelle
    November 9, 2015
    4.5 Sterne.
  • Bücher_bummel
    June 15, 2016
    3 1/2, leider konnte ich dem Hörbuch nur schlecht folgen, aber weiterhin super fantasievoll :)
  • Kurt
    February 18, 2013
    The follow-up to Moers' 13 1/2 LIVES OF CAPTAIN BLUEBEAR, this novel gives us the story of two late characters in that book, the Wolperting hero Rumo of Zamonia and his less savory associate, Volzotan Smyke, a gambling-addicted sharkgrub. And if those introductory words don't put you off, then this might be the book for you.Unlike the absurdist memoir character of BLUEBEAR, Rumo's story has a more directed arc - one defined by a Silver Thread that only he can see that beckons him to places beyon The follow-up to Moers' 13 1/2 LIVES OF CAPTAIN BLUEBEAR, this novel gives us the story of two late characters in that book, the Wolperting hero Rumo of Zamonia and his less savory associate, Volzotan Smyke, a gambling-addicted sharkgrub. And if those introductory words don't put you off, then this might be the book for you.Unlike the absurdist memoir character of BLUEBEAR, Rumo's story has a more directed arc - one defined by a Silver Thread that only he can see that beckons him to places beyond where he is. As a Wolperting - which, for your information, is a bi-pedal dog-like creature with tiny horns whose martial abilities as a species are unparalleled (which is saying something in the warlike world of Zamonia) - he runs up against predictable challenges of an unpredictable nature. This is mainly due to Moers' fertile imagination. To wit: the Dead Yeti, a platoon of mighty Yeti that mostly died in some Cogitating Quicksand that tried to warn them away, it really did, but then they died when they stepped into it anyway and the Cogitating Quicksand took up residence in their heads so that even though they're dead they haven't really lost consciousness. Phew. Similar to BLUEBEAR, Moers goes off on frequent tangents. Meet a new character? Better have a little bubble-story that encompasses who that person is, why s/he is the way s/he is, and how s/he got to where s/he is now. The constant digressions are fairly charming and, especially after BLUEBEAR, much more focused. I mean, Bluebear is just a bear telling you his amazing life story, but Rumo's on a mission. Naturally, there's a girl involved, but he doesn't really understand what "girls" are, which is a minor complication. Also, he can't swim.In spite of its length, the tenor of the writing is more or less middle-grade level, but it's length is not what really sets it into young-adult world. No, what catapults into the farther reaches of YA (if not adult) is the very frank gore and violence that are a part of Rumo's world. For instance, Rumo picks up a two-bladed sword (don't call it a knife, even if it is very small), into each blade of which has been forged the brain of a deceased creature - a Troglotroll who has taken the vicious name of Dandelion and an actual Demonic Warrior by name of Krindle the Cleaver (who himself was cut down by a Yeti by the name of Skullop the Scyther) whose favorite song is "The Blood Song."Blood! Blood!Blood must spurt and blood must flow!Blood! Blood!Blood must gush from every foe!Blood as far as the eye can see!Blood for all eternity!(Come on! You know the chorus! ALL TOGETHER NOW!)Part of the magic of Moers' writing is how many balls he juggles. He throws character after character into the mix and an astonishing number of them return in ways that make fairly logical sense ("logical" for a place like Zamonia, anyway). At a certain point, it becomes a waiting game - exactly how will Professor Kolibri make his return appearance, who drove him insane, and what could even drive someone like him crazy, given that he has four brains (he's a Nocturnomath, see...)?RUMO shares many of the faults of BLUEBEAR but given its more typical genre it is without question a faster read. Weird, fairly wonderful, violent (not gratuitous or gory so much as casual) with an epic cast. Oh, General Ticktock. Oh, the Lindworms. Oh, the Demonocles. For what it's worth, you could read this without having read BLUEBEAR and you'd be just fine. The one is not so much a sequel of the other so much as it is a volume set in the same world.
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  • Bine
    July 17, 2012
    Hach, da habe ich mal wieder mein Lieblingshörbuch und Buch gehört. Ich kann wirklich nicht zählen, wie oft ich das Hörbuch schon gehört habe. Aber es dürfte so zwischen 10 und 20 Mal sein. Und trotzdem finde ich die Geschichte immer wieder soooo spannend. Ich kann gar nicht sagen, wie toll ich dieses Buch finde. Es ist einfach mein Lieblingsbuch, punkt. Die Charaktere sind so liebenswert und die Geschichte so abwechslungsreich und spannend. Ich kenne keinen Autoren, der derartig viel Ideenreich Hach, da habe ich mal wieder mein Lieblingshörbuch und Buch gehört. Ich kann wirklich nicht zählen, wie oft ich das Hörbuch schon gehört habe. Aber es dürfte so zwischen 10 und 20 Mal sein. Und trotzdem finde ich die Geschichte immer wieder soooo spannend. Ich kann gar nicht sagen, wie toll ich dieses Buch finde. Es ist einfach mein Lieblingsbuch, punkt. Die Charaktere sind so liebenswert und die Geschichte so abwechslungsreich und spannend. Ich kenne keinen Autoren, der derartig viel Ideenreichtum und Fantasie hat, wie Walter Moers. Ich vergöttere dieses Buch. Wahnsinn. Diese Rezension wird dem Buch nicht im Geringsten gerecht. Keine meiner Worte könnten das.Ich kann vielleicht noch sagen, warum das Buch mein liebstes von Walter Moers ist. Denn ich habe alle seine anderen Zamonienromane gelesen, finde die auch wahnsinnig toll, aber dieses ist einfach meiner Meinung nach das Beste.Es ist herutergebrochen eigentlich eine Heldengeschichte, ein von der Handlung her klassischer Abenteuerroman. Wir begleiten Rumo beim Erwachsenwerden und Bewältigen verschiedenster Abenteuer. Das hört sich so langweilig an, umso erstaunlicher, wie Walter Moers es schafft, aus diesem Grundstoff ein so neuartiges grandioses Buch zu machen.Im Gegensatz zu seinem großen ersten Zamonienroman "Die 13 1/2 Leben des Käptn Blaubär" steht in dem Roman nicht der Kontinent Zamonien im Vordergrund, sondern meiner Meinung nach die Charaktere. Sie sind alle so wahnsinnig genial, ich liebe sie alle.Rumo ist nicht wie so oft bei Walter Moers ein allwissender Überheld, sondern jemand, der sich erst langsam entdecken muss und dabei sehr oft sympathisch unbeholfen wirkt. Das mag ich wirklich sehr an Rumo. Wenn ich jetzt mit den ganzen anderen Charakteren anfange, werde ich wohl nie fertig... Ich sage nur so viel, dass ich Smeik, Uschan de Lucca, Friftar, General Tick Tack, Urs, Grinzhold und Löwenzahn, Storr den Schnitter und alle anderen sooo grandios finde. Es gibt beim besten Willen keinen Charakter, der keine Geschichte hat. Alle Geschichten werden so nebenbei in den Raum geworfen und man denkt sich immer wieder "Wo hat der Moers diese Geschichte bitte wieder hergezaubert?" Der Ideenreichtum dieses Mannes ist der Wahnsinn. Ich kann es nur immer wieder sagen. Und das alles wirkt dabei noch so selbstverständlich. Ich bin hin und weg und das nach jedem Mal lesen oder hören.Ich finde, dass es in der Geschichte viel um Helden und Antihelden geht und gerade die Unterscheidung thematisiert beziehungsweise in Frage gestellt wird. Wann ist man ein Held? Wann ein Schurke? Wie viel trägt jeder Charakter von beiden Seiten in sich? Oh man, es ist genial.Entschuldigt, dass ich bei dem Buch nicht wertfrei sein kann, aber es ist nun mal mein Lieblingsbuch. Was soll ich machen?Übrigens kann ich euch nicht sagen, ob ihr das Buch lieber lesen oder hören solltet. Beides ist einfach nur genial. Beim Lesen hat man Walter Moers geniale Zeichnungen, die man sich ewig angucken kann und im Hörbuch hat man Dirk Bachs überragende Performance. Er Ruhe in Frieden. Hach, was ist uns da für ein stimmliches Genie abhanden gekommen, ich bin immer noch nicht darüber hinweg. Von Storr dem Schnitter bis zu den unvorhandenen Winzlingen schwingt er sich in alle Tonlagen. Es tut mir leid, ich bin einfach nur begeistert von dieser Erzählleistung. Also, ich kann euch das Buch genauso wie das Hörbuch nur wärmstens, ach was, lichterloh brennend ans Herz legen.141481247175138481 Sterne für dieses Buch <3
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  • Chels
    June 12, 2012
    They always say never to judge a book by its cover, but I always do. In my opinion it should be "Don't Judge a book ONLY by its cover." but the cover should be judged.The reason I say this is because I went to the library one day pressed for time. I am odd with how i look around at books. I really just go to a genre section I like, then find a good title, then if i like the cover+title I scope out a few pages to see how it is written, then I go from there. This book had me at the cover. I love w They always say never to judge a book by its cover, but I always do. In my opinion it should be "Don't Judge a book ONLY by its cover." but the cover should be judged.The reason I say this is because I went to the library one day pressed for time. I am odd with how i look around at books. I really just go to a genre section I like, then find a good title, then if i like the cover+title I scope out a few pages to see how it is written, then I go from there. This book had me at the cover. I love when lengthy novels still incorporate ant sort of artistic flare. Why is creativity and illustration reserved for children's books? I saw this book, The art on the cover, the title of it, and was instantly in love. Opened the book to find a beautifully illustrated map of "Zamonia" as well as an illustrated key of they main characters. I was already sure i was getting this book, but if i wasn't this would of sealed the deal for me. I nearly had a heart attack when I flipped through to find little doodles here and there, and fully illustrated pages elsewhere.Anyways, After getting into this book it actually took me quite a while to read which is odd for me because i can gobble down books in a few days tops. a single day depending on how much I am into the book and how long it is. I am not complaining though. It was slightly challenging to read only because of how it is written and then how it is translated. Not hard to read just a little difficult to get into at first and get comfortable reading. At least in my opinion. I liked that about it though, I was reading that book every possible minute I could. Every spare minute I had at work and then plenty of time at home. It was a really Fun read. Rumo was an interesting character and I loved his story and all the fascinating people he meets and things he see's along his journey. This book really does take you on an adventure. I don't think there is anything I didn't like about this book. The book is quite detailed and actually pretty graphic at times which I loved. Rumo also can kick some butt too(eventually)and i found his battle scenes fun to read and imagine. The Author didn't slack on the Gore either thankfully. Anyways I'm sorry this review is somewhat vague, I read the book earlier this year and a few more since then so my memory is a little foggy and also trying to add elements of other random books into the mix. :P I will definitely be getting the other 2 books before Rumo. Anyways, This book is super fun to read and I enjoyed it. :)
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  • Catherine
    July 25, 2011
    Rumo, Rumo, Rumo! After reading my first Moers book, the one based on the paintings I was absolutely hooked. DO NOT be put off by how thick the book is, the amazing pictures take up quite a bit of space amongst the text. This is not your typical everything is peachy faerie tale, there are MANY dark and fowl creatures and situations along the way. Your imagination is certainly stretched beyond itself, with not all moments being caught in pictures. The book is structured to come across new charact Rumo, Rumo, Rumo! After reading my first Moers book, the one based on the paintings I was absolutely hooked. DO NOT be put off by how thick the book is, the amazing pictures take up quite a bit of space amongst the text. This is not your typical everything is peachy faerie tale, there are MANY dark and fowl creatures and situations along the way. Your imagination is certainly stretched beyond itself, with not all moments being caught in pictures. The book is structured to come across new characters and to hear of their life stories which give readers a break from Rumo. I particularly loved the stories of Rala, Smythe and Ursan. There is plenty of fighting and war and Moers does not pretty up death by wrapping it up in a lolly wrapper, not straying away from the awful gruesomeness that some of the characters inevitably face (poor cabinet maker). Although the Wolpertings and story are completely fictitious, the running of government, education and life style are subtle undertones of human life. It isn't a typical they all get away unscathed ending which I enjoyed. Truly one of the most original books I have ever read, could not put it down. I can't wait to read more of his books. I want to be a wolperting!!
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  • Bookslut
    August 25, 2013
    Oh! So magnificent! Longish, it's true--some of the back stories peppered throughout maybe could have been whittled back or out to decrease the bulk of it, but what a fabulous journey. I thought this was like Lord of the Rings, but much more enjoyable and creative. Any lover of fantasy should read this book, especially because it is that rare gem of well-written fantasy, not just a genre stock fiction. How had I never heard of Mr. Moers before? I thought this was a pleasure, and I plan to read a Oh! So magnificent! Longish, it's true--some of the back stories peppered throughout maybe could have been whittled back or out to decrease the bulk of it, but what a fabulous journey. I thought this was like Lord of the Rings, but much more enjoyable and creative. Any lover of fantasy should read this book, especially because it is that rare gem of well-written fantasy, not just a genre stock fiction. How had I never heard of Mr. Moers before? I thought this was a pleasure, and I plan to read all the available translated books of Zamonia. I don't think you have to necessarily read them in order--this was number three (two is not available in English), and I didn't feel any worse for not having read 1 or 2. The chronology of the later books may be more important. Anyway, I would have given it 5 stars if it had been a weeny bit shorter, or just a tad less violent. There were some portions that very gut-wrenching, though it was written in a way that was light-hearted enough that my wussy stomach could mostly handle it. A great book!p.s. I love a book with maps!
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  • Joshua
    September 6, 2009
    This is my favorite Walter Moers book so far. Rumo is a Wolperting who discovers his abilities to be more than just pet just in time to be captured with his adopted family by the Demonocles and taken to Roaming Rock in anticipation of being dinner for them. Under the coaching of Volzotan Smyke (first seen in "Bluebear") he is brought to his potential to fight the Demonocles and free himself and his fellow captives.He is then free to follow his Silver Thread which takes him to the city of Wolpert This is my favorite Walter Moers book so far. Rumo is a Wolperting who discovers his abilities to be more than just pet just in time to be captured with his adopted family by the Demonocles and taken to Roaming Rock in anticipation of being dinner for them. Under the coaching of Volzotan Smyke (first seen in "Bluebear") he is brought to his potential to fight the Demonocles and free himself and his fellow captives.He is then free to follow his Silver Thread which takes him to the city of Wolperting. Being a Wolperting he is immediately taken in and trained to fight as a true Wolperting. He also finds what the Silver Thread represents; a lovely female Wolperting named Rala. One day while he is out trying to impress her, he comes home to find the city completely devoid of all Wolpertings and a gaping hole in its center. He then goes on a rescue mission to the underworld, following the scent of his friends.He is assisted by an unlikely cast of characters and eventually saves his friends and Rala from Gornab and General Tick-Tock. Fun and slightly scary!
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  • Lisa
    August 29, 2011
    If you mixed together The Princess Bride, The Phantom Tollbooth, and 300, then you might have something approaching Rumo & His Miraculous Adventures. Rumo is a well-written fantasy with strange creatures, graphic fighting, and a very high body count. I loved how it told stories within stories. This was especially prominent near the beginning of the book, and I thought it was brilliant; however, as the book went on there were fewer stories within stories and the frame story became the main ac If you mixed together The Princess Bride, The Phantom Tollbooth, and 300, then you might have something approaching Rumo & His Miraculous Adventures. Rumo is a well-written fantasy with strange creatures, graphic fighting, and a very high body count. I loved how it told stories within stories. This was especially prominent near the beginning of the book, and I thought it was brilliant; however, as the book went on there were fewer stories within stories and the frame story became the main action. The text was accompanied by really cool illustrations. In spite of being intimidated by the book's size (nearly 700 pages), not having a strong interest in fantasy, and finding the violence a little much at times, I really enjoyed the story. Apparently the author, Walter Moers, has written at least two other books set in the same fantasy world. Based on my experience reading Rumo, I would definitely at least pick one of Moers's other books up and give it a try.
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  • Sam
    February 19, 2015
    Moers' Quest-Narrative ist eines der besten Werke der deutschen Phantastik. Inspiriert von den Klassikern der Weltliteratur, der Divina Commedia, Don Quixote, Gargantua et Pantagruel, Gothic Literature, H.P. Lovecraft und vielen weiteren, spinnt er eine Geschichte die mitreißt und begeistert. Dazu sein unverkennbarer Illustrationsstil, der nicht passender für die Geschichten Zamoniens sein könnte. Warum dennoch nur vier Sterne? Vor einigen Jahren habe ich Rumo noch fünf gegeben. Letzten Endes si Moers' Quest-Narrative ist eines der besten Werke der deutschen Phantastik. Inspiriert von den Klassikern der Weltliteratur, der Divina Commedia, Don Quixote, Gargantua et Pantagruel, Gothic Literature, H.P. Lovecraft und vielen weiteren, spinnt er eine Geschichte die mitreißt und begeistert. Dazu sein unverkennbarer Illustrationsstil, der nicht passender für die Geschichten Zamoniens sein könnte. Warum dennoch nur vier Sterne? Vor einigen Jahren habe ich Rumo noch fünf gegeben. Letzten Endes sind die Zamonien-Bücher eine Hommage auf höchstem Niveau. Das Rad wird hier nicht neu erfunden - wie auch - aber man merkt schon sehr stark woran Moers sich orientiert. Das ist mir früher nicht so aufgefallen. Eine Rangliste würde für mich so ausfallen: 1. Die 13 1/2 Leben des Käptn Blaubär2. Die Stadt der träumenden Bücher3. Rumo & die Wunder im Dunkeln 4. Der Schrecksenmeister5. Ensel und Krete6. Das Labyrinth der träumenden BücherMomentan würden 1 & 2 fünf Sterne, 3-5 vier Sterne und 6 drei Sterne bekommen.
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  • Martin
    August 4, 2013
    Here's the my blog where I post my reviews too :) http://room2347.wordpress.com/I like plot driven books. I am always a little afraid of books that involve too much background information and characters that are (or at least seem to be) redundant. Sure Rumo could have a lot shorter. But would it have been the same fun and thrilling ride? Probably not.The book lives from it's background. Without it the book plot would be something like: "Rumo grows up searches for love and fights for it." I was a Here's the my blog where I post my reviews too :) http://room2347.wordpress.com/I like plot driven books. I am always a little afraid of books that involve too much background information and characters that are (or at least seem to be) redundant. Sure Rumo could have a lot shorter. But would it have been the same fun and thrilling ride? Probably not.The book lives from it's background. Without it the book plot would be something like: "Rumo grows up searches for love and fights for it." I was afraid of books with too much background information but Moers took that away from me. We are thrown into a wonderful yet dangerous world, inhabited by wonderful yet dangerous creatures. Each information you can gain is a gift by the author. This book has everything. Two worlds, love, losses, fights, growing up, even biology. The world around Rumo is as interesting as his adventure itself. This was book by walter Moers and my first Zamonia book and it will not be my last.Sure this is one of those books you have to get into, but once you you won't be able to put it down.
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  • Rahul Mishra
    May 8, 2013
    Walter Moers is a story teller. Not a novelist, not a brilliant literary genius... he is a story teller. His genius is in spinning a yarn and ensuring you are hooked. He may have ADHD, the way keeps changing track and tells stories about each character, each city, each historical event... and through all of it he keeps you hooked.Rumo, a wolperting- which is a half dog, half deer- and his journey through Zamonia to find Rala, his silver thread... his encounters with the copper killers, his journ Walter Moers is a story teller. Not a novelist, not a brilliant literary genius... he is a story teller. His genius is in spinning a yarn and ensuring you are hooked. He may have ADHD, the way keeps changing track and tells stories about each character, each city, each historical event... and through all of it he keeps you hooked.Rumo, a wolperting- which is a half dog, half deer- and his journey through Zamonia to find Rala, his silver thread... his encounters with the copper killers, his journey through 'Hel', his talking sword... this is the perfect/awesome bedtime story.And its intelligent to!Dont be fooled, this is not a children's book, its dark at times... very dark. I'm talking Torture chamber's, blood dripping from the ceiling... horror stories!! But it is also one of the best books in its genre of 'fantasy-fiction-for-all' that I have read.Think of the princess bride... with better imagination!A must read.
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  • Dave
    November 3, 2013
    Translated from the German. A fractured fairy tale comic adventure that's whimsical, weird, violent, philosophical and great fun for me. Bronson Pinchot is a terrific narrator with a fantastic range of vocal characterizations. The story could have been a serialized cartoon that would have fit nicely as a addition to the Bullwinkle Show. Rumo, the protagonist of the story, is a Wolperting, a sentient horned canid creature, whose adventures begin when the farm he lives on is attacked by giant demo Translated from the German. A fractured fairy tale comic adventure that's whimsical, weird, violent, philosophical and great fun for me. Bronson Pinchot is a terrific narrator with a fantastic range of vocal characterizations. The story could have been a serialized cartoon that would have fit nicely as a addition to the Bullwinkle Show. Rumo, the protagonist of the story, is a Wolperting, a sentient horned canid creature, whose adventures begin when the farm he lives on is attacked by giant demonic creatures who capture him and every living creature in his immediate surroundings. Rumo meets several peculiar characters on his many adventures. There is a lot of violence and scheming along with some ethical and philosophical lessons. Haunted forests, magical treasures and possessed swords with dual personalities. I'm looking forward to the other books in the series.
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  • Vanessa
    February 1, 2014
    Mit gewaltiger Stimmakrobatik gibt Dirk Bach jeder Figur dieses Meisterwerks eine eigene persönliche Stimme. Das Buch zu Lesen war schon ein Abenteuer für sich aber es sich vorlesen zu lassen und noch dazu von Dirk Bach ist noch mal eine ganz andere Liga. Der kleine Wolpertinger Rumo wird von Teufelsfelszyklopen entführt und gefangen genommen. Während seiner Gefangenschaft nimmt ihn Volzotan Smeik unter die Fittiche und so wird in Rumo der Kampfgeist geweckt. Zusammen mit Smeik flieht er und beg Mit gewaltiger Stimmakrobatik gibt Dirk Bach jeder Figur dieses Meisterwerks eine eigene persönliche Stimme. Das Buch zu Lesen war schon ein Abenteuer für sich aber es sich vorlesen zu lassen und noch dazu von Dirk Bach ist noch mal eine ganz andere Liga. Der kleine Wolpertinger Rumo wird von Teufelsfelszyklopen entführt und gefangen genommen. Während seiner Gefangenschaft nimmt ihn Volzotan Smeik unter die Fittiche und so wird in Rumo der Kampfgeist geweckt. Zusammen mit Smeik flieht er und begibt sich auf eine Phantastische Reise quer durch Zamonien.
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