The Gurus, the Young Man, and Elder Paisios
This powerful memoir tells the story of a Greek youth who, out of a desire to know the truth empirically, began to experiment in yoga, hypnotism, and various occult techniques. Eventually drawn back to the Faith of his forefathers Orthodox Christianity he visited the ancient monastic republic of Mount Athos in his native Greece, where he was brought to a knowledge of the Truth of Jesus Christ by the saintly Elder Paisios (1924 1994). Nevertheless, believing he had only found part of the truth on the Holy Mountain, he chose to give the same opportunity to Hindu yogis that he had given to Elder Paisios and other Orthodox monks. Thus, at the age of twenty-five, he embarked on a trip to India, where he undertook his search in the ashrams of three famous gurus, one of whom was worshipped as a god. His experiences in India, along with his subsequent encounters with Elder Paisios on Mount Athos, are recounted in the present book in vivid detail. Popular in Greece since its first publication there in 2001, The Gurus, the Young Man, and Elder Paisios is a page-turning narrative of both outward adventures and inward struggles. What stands out most in this book, however, is the radiant image of Elder Paisios, possessed of divine gifts, laboring in prayer for his fellow man, and overflowing with unconditional love. Through this, one sees the uncreated Source of the elder s love and of the author s spiritual transformation: the true God-man Jesus Christ, Who honors man s personal freedom while drawing him, through love, into everlasting union with Himself.

The Gurus, the Young Man, and Elder Paisios Details

TitleThe Gurus, the Young Man, and Elder Paisios
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseNov 1st, 2008
PublisherSt. Herman Press
ISBN-139781887904162
Rating
GenreReligion, Nonfiction, Spirituality, Christianity, Christian

The Gurus, the Young Man, and Elder Paisios Review

  • Nicole
    January 1, 1970
    I couldn't put this book down. Not one I'd recommend for a non-Orthodox reader... unless it was someone who was dabbling in dark magic. This seriously scared the bejeebees out of me. I had to read it during the day and then put something else between me and bedtime. The story of a man who pursued both Hindu mysticism and Orthodox Christianity and gave them a chance to show him which had the real power.
    more
  • Jackie Petroulias
    January 1, 1970
    While I have deep respect for Elder Paisios and I believe that he was spiritually evolved WELL beyond most of humanity, I cannot accept the claims made in this book. Like any dogmatic religion, the author leads us down a Greek Orthodox path, not only claiming that all other paths do not lead to God, but quite the opposite, that they are DEMONIC! Regardless of his experiences, his claims and his writing, I can never accept that the majority of humanity has got it all wrong and is filled with demo While I have deep respect for Elder Paisios and I believe that he was spiritually evolved WELL beyond most of humanity, I cannot accept the claims made in this book. Like any dogmatic religion, the author leads us down a Greek Orthodox path, not only claiming that all other paths do not lead to God, but quite the opposite, that they are DEMONIC! Regardless of his experiences, his claims and his writing, I can never accept that the majority of humanity has got it all wrong and is filled with demons trying to push them in the wrong direction. I remain optimistic that any person's quest to a better and more spiritual self will prove to be fruitful. Elder Paisios was a great man, as was Ghandi, Mother Teresa, as is the Dalai Lama and SO many other wonderful spiritual figures, regardless of their beliefs. The 3 stars are for some wise tidbits in this book, including the following excerpt - which moved me and reminded me of my own path:"Modern man wants everything to fit within his own perspective and resents being awakened from his blissful stupor. This is why he mocks, slanders, distorts, attacks, rejects, and hates whatever lies beyond his own worldview. He does not want to think, because television has taught him to hate thinking. He does not want to ask himself questions, because it's too tiring to do so. He doesn't want to struggle to go beneath life's superficiality, because modern culture has made him comfortable as he lives the pampered life of a hungry consumer in a cage of materialism. In a state of spiritual death, his life is defined by the biological life of his body, and his interests are defined by his exclusive fixation on his bodily needs and desires, which only make his bonds to matter and material goods more constricting. When a man despises the immortal soul, the higher part of his being, and becomes deeply attached to his body, he becomes utterly carnal and condemns himself to a life that is degrading."
    more
  • Brian Glass
    January 1, 1970
    Many years ago I dabbled in esoteric practices similar to what this author writes about. I got out a lot sooner than he did and returned to the Christian faith. The depth to with this man experienced evil is mind-boggling and very real. I just finished reading "The Mystical Theology of the Eastern Church" by Vladimir Lossky. Whereas Lossky rearranged the very structure of my mind, this book demonstrated spiritual reality at the level of experience. The only way to get a deeper experience than re Many years ago I dabbled in esoteric practices similar to what this author writes about. I got out a lot sooner than he did and returned to the Christian faith. The depth to with this man experienced evil is mind-boggling and very real. I just finished reading "The Mystical Theology of the Eastern Church" by Vladimir Lossky. Whereas Lossky rearranged the very structure of my mind, this book demonstrated spiritual reality at the level of experience. The only way to get a deeper experience than reading this book is to try it yourself.
    more
  • Debbi
    January 1, 1970
    Dionysius Farasiotis (a pen-name) didn’t just want to believe something because someone said it was true, he wanted to know the truth. This led him on a Spiritually dangerous journey. Since he didn’t seem to have grown up with much or any religion, he was open to anything that might reveal the meaning of life, and he went searching in some of the darker corners of the world. He delved into Mind Control, occult, Hinduism, and Christianity. I found it interesting that, for someone who seemed to wa Dionysius Farasiotis (a pen-name) didn’t just want to believe something because someone said it was true, he wanted to know the truth. This led him on a Spiritually dangerous journey. Since he didn’t seem to have grown up with much or any religion, he was open to anything that might reveal the meaning of life, and he went searching in some of the darker corners of the world. He delved into Mind Control, occult, Hinduism, and Christianity. I found it interesting that, for someone who seemed to want to be scientific in his approach, he was attracted to wild and mystical experiences. Besides wanting to know truth he was also asking, “What can you do for me?” Perhaps not the most altruistic, but there are several accounts of people who set out to disprove Christianity only to find themselves face to face with a Savior.I think this is a book that will stick with me for many years to come, mostly because of the sections with Elder Paisios (I’ve already spent some time delving into that a bit in previous posts). In many ways this book was the companion to Eat, Pray, Love in which Elizabeth Gilbert rejects Christianity, goes to India, and embraces Hinduism. That book is a very gentle, fun, and comfortable look at ashrams and gurus. In the The Gurus, the Young Man, and Elder Pasios we discover a dark and sinister side of Hinduism. It was definitely more intense and “in-your-face” than the other book. However, there were aspects of it that were a bit disappointing. As I mentioned, the author was very interested in mystical experiences. It reminded me a lot of my Protestant days when people went from experience to experience and spiritual high to spiritual high. I came away wondering how this guy dealt with the boring everyday experiences of getting up, saying your prayers, reading your Bible, and going to work (or church)? Could he stand the monotony? I was thankful for the “Testimonies from Greek Spiritual Fathers” in the back of the book because, honestly, some of the experiences he relates are pretty amazing and left we wondering how much he had embellished. Those “letters of recommendations” helped to assuage my skepticism.
    more
  • Daniel
    January 1, 1970
    Amazing book. I sometimes have trouble sleeping when I think about it too much. It's an endearing account of the life of Elder Paisios the New of Mount Athos and a thrilling conversion tale. Miracles, angelic visitations, demonic attacks, the occult, etc. Read it immediately.
    more
  • Monik
    January 1, 1970
    O carte care ar trebui promovata mai intens. Dezvaluie substraturile unei lumi controversate, mascate sub o aparenta cel putin inselatoare.
  • Christina
    January 1, 1970
    The author's quest for truth and spiritual anchoring is one that many people will be able to identify with. However, the many supernatural hurdles he encountered along the way were jarring and downright creepy! I have never dabbled in witchcraft and the occult - I have simply never been interested, and at a subconscious level, I think I know better than to mess around with the world of spirits. I couldn't relate to his experiences completely, but I do believe in competing forces of good/evil, li The author's quest for truth and spiritual anchoring is one that many people will be able to identify with. However, the many supernatural hurdles he encountered along the way were jarring and downright creepy! I have never dabbled in witchcraft and the occult - I have simply never been interested, and at a subconscious level, I think I know better than to mess around with the world of spirits. I couldn't relate to his experiences completely, but I do believe in competing forces of good/evil, light/darkness and therefore can accept the many paranormal events recounted in this book. Elder Paisios's protective presence is palpable throughout the author's journey to India and his experimentation with Silva mind control and the like, ultimately returning him to his Orthodox roots.Some quotes that resonated: "[...] I felt that whatever I did changed me and affected me deeply. My actions, my words, and my thoughts alter my soul. I don't know how I should live, and I don't know where I should go. It's as though I'm sculpting myself daily, but without a design, without a model, and totally at random. I shouldn't continue living my life in this way, but I don't know how to live.""Prayer, as I learned, is a relationship between two persons, God and man, who move towards each other. Thus, the swiftness or slowness with which a person advances in prayer depends on both the human and divine wills. Neither the freedom of God in His sovereignty nor the freedom of man in his free choice are ever violated. For his part, man offers his good intention, his labors, and his desire to draw near to God. God, in turn, offers His grace.No matter how great a man's ascetic labors may appear before the eyes of man, his offerings are infinitesimal in contrast with what God offers. Man takes one step, and God responds with a thousand in order to bridge the gap. Nevertheless, man's small and insignificant step in God's direction is absolutely crucial, because it reveals man's intention and good disposition, giving God the "right" to approach him, without infringing his spiritual freedom. Unlike the hate-filled, tyrannical devil, God deeply respects human freedom and never violates it, because He loves man. He desires a relationship of love with man, and love can exist only when people are free.""[...] first man falls in his mind, and later in deed.""Having personally experienced both the Christina Mysteries and magic, I can affirm that there is nothing magical about Holy Communion or other Mysteries of the Christian Faith. The Mysteries are performed with the power of Christ and require conscious and voluntary participation. In order for Christ to act within the divine Mysteries, the communicant has to will to participate in the Mystery consciously: he must yearn for it, and he is required to prepare for it with personal struggle. This is why those who nonchalantly approach the Mysteries out of habit experience very little change, if they experience anything at all. When, however, a person manifests his desire for God and his assent to being united with Him by taking pains to repent sincerely, God in turn will approach the genuinely repentant one to the extent and degree that He knows will be beneficial for that person's soul."
    more
  • Kaz
    January 1, 1970
    This book is a fantastic read for Orthodox Christians interested or swayed by the spirituality and philosophy of India. Although it seems to try to cater to any open-minded reader, it quickly takes the form of contrasting between Orthodox Christianity and Hinduism/Yoga, that could seem somewhat preachy to the average unbiased reader. This likewise occurs with some of the accounts of spiritual warfare in the book, which may take much salt to swallow for those unfamiliar or in disbelief.In this va This book is a fantastic read for Orthodox Christians interested or swayed by the spirituality and philosophy of India. Although it seems to try to cater to any open-minded reader, it quickly takes the form of contrasting between Orthodox Christianity and Hinduism/Yoga, that could seem somewhat preachy to the average unbiased reader. This likewise occurs with some of the accounts of spiritual warfare in the book, which may take much salt to swallow for those unfamiliar or in disbelief.In this vain, I also feel that Farasiotis's emphasis on the prayers of Elder Paiosios may confuse the average layman as to the power of Christ and the position of His saints as vessels of Grace - this tries to be later rectified, but only in passing. According to the testimony Archimandrite Theoklitos of St Arsenios Monastery, there is a second part of this book that may in fact clear up this very issue; but it as of yet remains to be published. May God grant the speedy publishing of that much-needed second half. Without it, this becomes more of a memoir than a guide for the disillusioned.
    more
  • Timothy Bartel
    January 1, 1970
    A simple, straightforward memoir of a by turns beautiful and bizarre spiritual journey. It'll make you want to go live on Mt Athos.
  • Alina
    January 1, 1970
    Avem multe invataturi de tras de pe urma acestei carti.
  • Elaina
    January 1, 1970
    Before this book, I don't think I've ever experienced so much emotion packed into 320 pages of reading. “The Gurus, The Young Man, and Elder Paisios” was that book. Dionysius Farasiotis is one author who writes about his experiences of life in such depth that I felt part of his story. At moments I wanted to get out of his hardships and rejoice in his struggles. He made everything jump of the pages. Get ready to experience the story of Dionysuis, one not easily forgotten.Dionysius Farasiotis was Before this book, I don't think I've ever experienced so much emotion packed into 320 pages of reading. “The Gurus, The Young Man, and Elder Paisios” was that book. Dionysius Farasiotis is one author who writes about his experiences of life in such depth that I felt part of his story. At moments I wanted to get out of his hardships and rejoice in his struggles. He made everything jump of the pages. Get ready to experience the story of Dionysuis, one not easily forgotten.Dionysius Farasiotis was a man much like others that you cross paths with every day. He was clever, curious, adventurous, and always in wonder. He had questions that I believe crosses through all of our minds. “Why am I here?”, “What is my purpose”, and “What is the full human potential” were such thoughts. Looking back on his situation, Dionysius believes that he was led astray by the evil one to the Hindu religion and began participating in hypnotism, black magic, yoga, and other obscure activities. But almost by accident, he ended up on Mount Athos, a Holy Mountain home to many Orthodox Christian Monasteries. Coming into contact with a zealous monk named Elder Paisios (now a canonized Saint in the Orthodox Church), the course of his life was about to change…If you want a book that keeps you up until midnight because you just HAVE to find out what happens, then this is the book for you. This book is for readers who are focused on the big picture of life. It is enticing and definitely teaches valuable lessons. Read the book to uncover these lessons and answer questions you didn’t even know you had.
    more
  • Volkert
    January 1, 1970
    I began reading The Gurus, the Young Man, and Elder Paisios, a long time ago. It's been perhaps more than a year. While I was initially intrigued by the story of someone from my generation from Greece, who went on a similar spiritual journey to my own, I got bogged down in the somewhat bizarre mystical experiences described in the second to the last chapter, entitled "Inside the Ashrams of India."The darkness that enveloped much of that chapter caused me to put the book down until a day ago, whe I began reading The Gurus, the Young Man, and Elder Paisios, a long time ago. It's been perhaps more than a year. While I was initially intrigued by the story of someone from my generation from Greece, who went on a similar spiritual journey to my own, I got bogged down in the somewhat bizarre mystical experiences described in the second to the last chapter, entitled "Inside the Ashrams of India."The darkness that enveloped much of that chapter caused me to put the book down until a day ago, when I thought I should try to finish it. I'm very glad I picked it up again, and I can now highly recommend wading through the difficult parts to enjoy the light at the end of the tunnel. What a bright light it is, and it's well worth the journey.The author's comparison of The Jesus Prayer ("Lord Jesus, have mercy on me.") with the mantras of Hinduism starting on page 281, is worth reading. But somehow, it's worth more having read everything that precedes it.One of my favorite books on Orthodox spirituality in recent years has been Wounded by Love, and it was gratifying to see Elder Porphyrios mentioned in The Gurus, the Young Man, and Elder Paisios many times. Having read both these books now makes me want to learn more about Elder Paisios as well.If you pick up this book, be sure to stick it out until the end. You'll be glad you did. (December 30, 2010.)
    more
  • Davoud Taghavi
    January 1, 1970
    A very sincere autobiography of one's man journey from western occult practices and new-age hindu spirituality to his own authentic tradition through Elder Paisios in a small skete in Mt.Athos. Although appropriate for an orthodox reader, those with some level of familiarity with the richness of the mystical hindu tradition and it's production of centuries of spiritually accomplished men, will find this work problematic. One wonders whether sheer bad luck landed 'Dionysios' in the repeated hands A very sincere autobiography of one's man journey from western occult practices and new-age hindu spirituality to his own authentic tradition through Elder Paisios in a small skete in Mt.Athos. Although appropriate for an orthodox reader, those with some level of familiarity with the richness of the mystical hindu tradition and it's production of centuries of spiritually accomplished men, will find this work problematic. One wonders whether sheer bad luck landed 'Dionysios' in the repeated hands of false gurus that have proliferated modern india. Could things have been different if he had found an authentic hindu master who could have directed him back to Elder Paisios? Although a great read, I left the book wishing for a more different but beautiful ending: reaching the beauty of greek orthodoxy without repudiating/maligning the truth in the 'other.'
    more
  • Casey
    January 1, 1970
    This memoir is cah-raaaay-zee. It serves as a warning that there is real, physical evil in the world, waiting to consume us if we give it the chance. But it also shows that God is constantly knocking at the door to our hearts, ready and waiting for us to allow him to save us from that evil no matter how many times we succumb to it. The prayers of holy men and women help to protect us - so thank God for them!Of course if you aren't religiously inclined you would probably just roll your eyes at th This memoir is cah-raaaay-zee. It serves as a warning that there is real, physical evil in the world, waiting to consume us if we give it the chance. But it also shows that God is constantly knocking at the door to our hearts, ready and waiting for us to allow him to save us from that evil no matter how many times we succumb to it. The prayers of holy men and women help to protect us - so thank God for them!Of course if you aren't religiously inclined you would probably just roll your eyes at this whole account. Regardless, they're praying for you too.
    more
  • Charles
    January 1, 1970
    This book is really a spiritual classic for Orthodox Christians, non Christians may find the book offensive, not by it's intent but by the content. It is the spiritual journey of a Greek to the Orthodox Church. This journey makes it's way through the world of the occult and Indian Hinduism. It contrasts Orthodoxy and Hinduism through the authors experience. Much spiritual meet is here for the discerning reader.
    more
  • Waplo
    January 1, 1970
    Not the typical Christian book against eastern religions saying everything is demonic with simplistic evidence.The author tells his path between Orthodoxy and eastern religions and his travels in India, he explains in a detailed and realistic way his dilemmas and doubts. Having been in a similar situation I can personally relate to what he says, and how he says it.
    more
  • Paul
    January 1, 1970
    This is a riveting story of a man's spiritual journey. I read it this summer and have passed it around the family. I applaud the author on his honesty and his depth of detail, and I found the story inspiring and though-provoking; you may well examine your own faith after reading this.
    more
  • Travis
    January 1, 1970
    Can't recommend highly enough. A CLASSIC.
  • Constantin-Bogdan Feştilă
    January 1, 1970
    O carte completă!
  • octacore
    January 1, 1970
    O carte "ziditoare de suflet", pe care am citit-o pe nerăsuflate. Am găsit aici confirmarea celor afirmate de către parintele Serafim Rose în cartea sa "Ortodoxia și religia viitorului". Capcanele practicilor religioase păgâne, idolatre sunt demascate de către autor, în urma experiențelor personale. Pe de o parte se arată puterile de sorginte demonică ale liderilor diferitelor secte, pe de altă parte, sunt disecate tehnicile propovăduite de aceștia, disimularile pe care le fac, pentru atragerea O carte "ziditoare de suflet", pe care am citit-o pe nerăsuflate. Am găsit aici confirmarea celor afirmate de către parintele Serafim Rose în cartea sa "Ortodoxia și religia viitorului". Capcanele practicilor religioase păgâne, idolatre sunt demascate de către autor, în urma experiențelor personale. Pe de o parte se arată puterile de sorginte demonică ale liderilor diferitelor secte, pe de altă parte, sunt disecate tehnicile propovăduite de aceștia, disimularile pe care le fac, pentru atragerea occidentalilor și profunda incompatibilitate cu Hristos, în ciuda afirmațiilor facute de aceștia. Nu o dată, o simplă rugăciune, un "glonț duhovnicesc" a fost suficient pentru a alunga duhul necurat, făcând imposibile "meditația" și invocările hinduse. De la vrăjitorii africani, la budisti (sectă desprinsă din hinduism, pentru "inovația" de a accepta femei ca discipoli), la miile de secte hinduse, cu miile lor de zei zoomorfi sau antropomorfi și chiar până la mișcări "occidentalizate", ca feminismul, meditatia transcedentală, psihanaliza, hipnoza, teozofia, idolatria veche grecească, etc, autorul relevă similitudini care depașesc mii de kilometri sau mii de ani distanță. Întrebarea firească este: cum e posibil ca dupa doua mii de ani, in Nepal să existe oracole care permit unor entități să le posede, pentru a transmite răspunsurile la întrebările oamenilor, similar cu oracolele Greciei antice? Și răspunsul devine evident, în lumina ortodoxă: orice lucru/învățătura, nouă sau veche, nu poate fi decât de la Dumnezeu sau de la diavol, cu consecințe lesne de închipuit, în ambele situații. Impresionant și, în același timp, dând un plus de autenticitate relatării, au fost nenumăratele căderi duhovnicești ale autorului, și ajutorul necondiționat pe care parintele Paisie i l-a acordat, de fiecare dată când s-a aflat pe marginea prăpastiei, culminând chiar cu o exorcizare! Foarte frumoasă a fost comparația dintre smerenia bătrânului si mândria/patimile autorului, pe care le învăluia și le neutraliza, aducând pacea Sfantului Duh în inima chinuită a autorului. Este de asemenea păcut "stilul" sau "duhul" în care este scrisă cartea, fără goana după senzațional, întâlnită la Klaus Kenneth, fără exaltări, interjecții și figuri de stil ieftine. Dimpotrivă, descrierile sunt personale, fie pline de teamă, în contextul unor practici păgâne, sau a întâlnirii unor guruși puternici (cu putere demonica), fie pline de bucurie, pace și liniște, în cazul unor experiențe duhovnicești, mijlocite de parintele Paisie. M-am simțit mic citind că Jung, parintele psihanalizei era fan al hinduismului, și că "descoperirile" sale sunt de fapt concepte hinduse, ambalate în limbaj occidental sau ca Herman Hesse este responsabil pentru vapoare întregi de oameni duși în India pentru "iluminare". Iar despre ce iluminare poate fi vorba, e clar analizând oamenii care și-au pierdut mințile, încercând să-și trezească șarpele Kundalini, sau evaluând mizeria și condițiile de trai ale oamenilor din India, generate de infamul sistem al castelor de acolo. Concluzia este simplă: "făra mine nu puteți face nimic", iar toate celelalte "sisteme" religioase sau filosofice sunt de fapt lucrarea si una din miile de fețe ale "balaurului cel bătrân".
    more
  • Emiliya Ahmadova
    January 1, 1970
    I have indeed enjoyed reading this book. It is full of wisdom and first-hand experiences that can help anyone. Therefore, I would recommend this book to every struggling soul or anyone who turned away from God or keeps searching for the meaning of his existence. The author's experiences with demonic forces as well as God’s grace and love give the readers valuable lessons. He clearly explains how the dark forces trap the innocent souls and drag them in the world of darkness and emptiness away fro I have indeed enjoyed reading this book. It is full of wisdom and first-hand experiences that can help anyone. Therefore, I would recommend this book to every struggling soul or anyone who turned away from God or keeps searching for the meaning of his existence. The author's experiences with demonic forces as well as God’s grace and love give the readers valuable lessons. He clearly explains how the dark forces trap the innocent souls and drag them in the world of darkness and emptiness away from God.The author has also introduced us to the saint elder Paisios- a man from whom we must learn how to love unconditionally and achieve God's grace.After reading this book I was pushed to write the following:You pray to statues representing many Gods and offer sacrifices to them as well as keeping animal as something sacred. How can you enter paradise if you are constantly fooled by Satan and worshiping him? There is only One God that you must worship but you have forsaken Him. Animals are his creation. A cow cannot be worshiped or treated like God.Fool is searching for answers or a meaning of the life in wrong places and keep jumping from one religion to next. He feels as if something is missing. He turns to yoga, meditation, witchcraft, astrology, hypnosis or fortune tellers looking for solution. However, the answers that he finds come from Satan. With the wrong choices, his soul becomes a prisoner of demonic forces. Slowly he starts experiencing strange occurrences unaware that they come from dark side that settled deep down in his soul. He has built a bond with evil forces! Is it late for him? Who can save him now?It is time to free yourself from the demonic forces. Confess, repent, pray and worship to true God. He is loving God who will forgive and take you back even though you are worthless of His forgiveness.
    more
  • James Kurtz
    January 1, 1970
    Fascinating adventure but also disturbing account for any Christian having gone astrayA necessary book for Christians to read that despite warnings, go astray into the world of Yoga, Hinduism, Occult, Eastern Mysticism, and Magic. Like the author, I did not accept warnings because I was already exploring this path from an early age. Then would simply denounce or defy anyone to tell me different. What’s imperative and held my attention was the personal account of visiting the ashram of Satyananda Fascinating adventure but also disturbing account for any Christian having gone astrayA necessary book for Christians to read that despite warnings, go astray into the world of Yoga, Hinduism, Occult, Eastern Mysticism, and Magic. Like the author, I did not accept warnings because I was already exploring this path from an early age. Then would simply denounce or defy anyone to tell me different. What’s imperative and held my attention was the personal account of visiting the ashram of Satyananda in Munger, India and the Eastern Orthodox Monastery of Mt Athos in Greece. Although many will not accept Hinduism as Demonology, I would highly recommend reading the book “Orthodoxy and the Religion of the future” https://www.amazon.com/Orthodoxy-Reli... by Father Seraphim Rose. This will give more background to support the integrity of the book reviewed.
    more
  • Brianna
    January 1, 1970
    I read it in practically one sitting while sick in bed today. It reminds me of a lot of the stories about the Desert Fathers, only more real. Not to say the Desert Father stories aren't real, it's just with over a thousand years between me and them, and the different culture and time and everything, I feel a sense of disconnect when I read them, and have a times doubted that it happened, or thought that if it did happen, it doesn't happen now. But this book... it takes place in the modern day. I read it in practically one sitting while sick in bed today. It reminds me of a lot of the stories about the Desert Fathers, only more real. Not to say the Desert Father stories aren't real, it's just with over a thousand years between me and them, and the different culture and time and everything, I feel a sense of disconnect when I read them, and have a times doubted that it happened, or thought that if it did happen, it doesn't happen now. But this book... it takes place in the modern day. And a lot of the decisions and thoughts and ideas of the author I can see reflected in my own life; with just a slightly different upbringing, that could be me.Definitely one of my favorite Orthodoxy-books so far. Considering I just finished it 10 minutes ago, it hasn't had much of an effect, but it strikes me as one of those books that will be quietly life-changing.
    more
  • Patrascu Monica
    January 1, 1970
    This book not only matched my spiritual journey but also helped me clear out many of my questions that were still in my mind waiting to be formed into words. What this young man experienced is not far from what I've experienced for 6 years. All those spiritual attacks and darkness is real, and some get to taste it way more than they would initially intent too. But this is what happens when you are thirsty for knowing God, and the Truth, you search beneath every rock. Not that I recommend it. I w This book not only matched my spiritual journey but also helped me clear out many of my questions that were still in my mind waiting to be formed into words. What this young man experienced is not far from what I've experienced for 6 years. All those spiritual attacks and darkness is real, and some get to taste it way more than they would initially intent too. But this is what happens when you are thirsty for knowing God, and the Truth, you search beneath every rock. Not that I recommend it. I would say that this would be a great help for those that waver in their oriental spiritual practices, because so many things that confuse the mind are explained there. I have yet to find another book that could match the reality of the spiritual wars at play in our present days.
    more
  • Stephen
    January 1, 1970
    A remarkably profound book about a young man's perilous journey caught between eastern religion and Eastern Orthodoxy, guided by the interactions of St. Paisios of Mount Athos. It's not a book filled with grand theological musings, yet through the author's interactions with the beloved Elder, the love of Christ radiates through the pages and conveys the message of the Gospel simply and powerfully. Also important in this book is the contrast between Christianity and popular religious practices to A remarkably profound book about a young man's perilous journey caught between eastern religion and Eastern Orthodoxy, guided by the interactions of St. Paisios of Mount Athos. It's not a book filled with grand theological musings, yet through the author's interactions with the beloved Elder, the love of Christ radiates through the pages and conveys the message of the Gospel simply and powerfully. Also important in this book is the contrast between Christianity and popular religious practices today, such as Yoga, Meditation, and a plethora of eastern religions. It's a rare contrast, but it is an increasingly important one as these practices take hold in certain aspects of the West.
    more
  • Maria
    January 1, 1970
    Αυτό το βιβλιο περιγράφει ΛΕΠΤΟΜΕΡΩΣ τον Ινδουισμό και πως αυτός επηρέασε με το σύστημα των καστών ολόκληρη την Ινδική κοινωνία για χιλιάδες χρόνια. Ο συγγραφέας, έχοντας βιώσει και τις δυο παραδόσεις σε βάθος μέσα από τη γνωριμία με τους αντιπροσώπους τους (γκουρού και σουάμι από τη μια, τον γέροντα Παισιο και τους αγιορείτες μοναχούς από την άλλη), μιλάει για τη βαθιά αντίθεση μεταξύ των δυο, αντίθεση όμοια με το σκοτάδι και το φως, την εκμηδένιση και την ανύψωση του ανθρωπίνου προσώπου, την υ Αυτό το βιβλιο περιγράφει ΛΕΠΤΟΜΕΡΩΣ τον Ινδουισμό και πως αυτός επηρέασε με το σύστημα των καστών ολόκληρη την Ινδική κοινωνία για χιλιάδες χρόνια. Ο συγγραφέας, έχοντας βιώσει και τις δυο παραδόσεις σε βάθος μέσα από τη γνωριμία με τους αντιπροσώπους τους (γκουρού και σουάμι από τη μια, τον γέροντα Παισιο και τους αγιορείτες μοναχούς από την άλλη), μιλάει για τη βαθιά αντίθεση μεταξύ των δυο, αντίθεση όμοια με το σκοτάδι και το φως, την εκμηδένιση και την ανύψωση του ανθρωπίνου προσώπου, την υποδούλωση και την ελέυθερη σ΄χεση του ανθρώπου με το Θεό.
    more
  • Eshy Grewal
    January 1, 1970
    As a convert to Orthodox Christianity from Sikhism, this book is amazing. It made more sense what I went through growing up. Although this books talks about the authors experience with Hinduism and not Sikhism, my family were still heavily influenced by it. I love it and it has definitely made my faith stronger. St Paisios is truly remarkable and lovable. God bless this author and thank you for sharing your experience.
    more
  • William Tu
    January 1, 1970
    Very interesting book, this man has been demon-possessed and gets delivered by Elder Paisios. He dabbled in the occult and had many visions and experiences from demons in Greece and India. But his experience with God were the strongest and eventually he chose the Orthodox faith, instead of eastern religions.
    more
  • Radu
    January 1, 1970
    It was hard to put this book down once I started reading it.Amazing book...amazing story. It made it clear for me what and who is hiding behind certain ocult practices and oriental religions that are so appealing at first to the westerners. Highly recommend it.
    more
  • Ana Vukašinović
    January 1, 1970
    Trying to write something meaningful here but don't have enough words to express how great this book is. I highly recommend it to anyone on the search of meaning.
Write a review