Alan Moore's Writing for Comics
Alan Moore, Hugo-Award winning author of WATCHMEN and the acknowledged master of comic book writing, shares his thoughts on how to deliver a top-notch script An essay originally written in 1985 to appear in an obscure British fanzine (right at the time that Moore was reshaping the landscape of modern comics), WRITING FOR COMICS was lost to time until its collection in these pages, expanded with a brand new essay by the author on how his thoughts on writing have changed in the two decades since. An insightful and eye-opening look into a brilliant creative mind, perfect for Moore devotees and fiction writers of all literary forms looking to hone their craft.

Alan Moore's Writing for Comics Details

TitleAlan Moore's Writing for Comics
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseJun 24th, 2003
PublisherAvatar Press
ISBN-139781592910120
Rating
GenreSequential Art, Comics, Language, Writing, Nonfiction, Graphic Novels, Comic Book

Alan Moore's Writing for Comics Review

  • Laura
    January 1, 1970
    In 1985, an up and coming comics guy wrote a series of essays on writing comics. Over time, that man became whatever the hell Alan Moore is today; this man whose work has preyed on me, made me cry, turned me on, turned me off, and even, from time to time, completely failed to hold my attention. (I started to list examples of which did which, then decided I’m not quite ready to commit those facts to eternity). Years later, the essays were compiled into a pamphlet and Moore graciously added a post In 1985, an up and coming comics guy wrote a series of essays on writing comics. Over time, that man became whatever the hell Alan Moore is today; this man whose work has preyed on me, made me cry, turned me on, turned me off, and even, from time to time, completely failed to hold my attention. (I started to list examples of which did which, then decided I’m not quite ready to commit those facts to eternity). Years later, the essays were compiled into a pamphlet and Moore graciously added a post script which was essentially “boy, was I naïve.” Naïve as it may be, it’s raw, honest, and deep. Take for example his suggestion on writing horror: “First think about what sort of things horrify you. Analyze your own fears thoroughly enough and you might be able to reach some conclusions about the broad mass of human fear and anxiety. Be ruthless about this, and submit yourself to as much emotional pain as necessary to get the question answered: What horrifies me? Pictures of little kids starving in Africa horrifies me. Why does that horrify me? It horrifies me because I can’t stand the thought of tiny children being born into a world of starvation and miserly and horror and never knowing anything but hunger and pain and fear, never knowing that there could possibly be anything other than needing food as desperately as a suffocating man needs air, and never hearing anything but weeping and moaning and despair. Yeah, well, okay, but why can’t I stand that? I can’t stand that because I like to perceive the world as having some form of just and fair order, without which much of existence would seem meaningless, and know there is no possibility of them perceiving the world in those terms. I also know that were I to be in their situation I wouldn’t be able to see any unifying design above the hunger and misery, either. So does that mean that there is no order, no point to existence, above all no point to my existence? Is that what scares the shit out of me every time I see all those fly-specked bellies on the six o’clock news? Yeah. Yeah, probably it is. What scares me is probably not what’s happening to them but what it implies concerning me. That isn’t a terribly easy or noble thing to have to face up to, but it’s the sort of wringer that you have to put yourself through in order to have any valuable understanding of the material that you are working with.” (13-14). I can believe the man who wrote that was writing the Watchmen; who put his thumb on the fears that brooded over my generation’s childhood. Who said frankly -- this horrible thing is horrifying mostly because it what it says about me, and yes, I'm horrified by my own lack of empathy. And that yes, this is a man who made me cringe by putting a golliwog into the penultimate League of Extraordinary Gentlemen. He also suggests that the brilliant thing that Stan Lee did with comics was moving the characters from one dimension to two. “[A]t the time this was breathtakingly innovative and seemed a perfectly good way of producing comics that had relevance to the times in which they were being produced. Progress since that point has been minimal.” (23-24) Which was a back handed dig that made me roll my eyes, but he goes on to say “I think much of the blame for this state of affairs must rest in the largely unquestioning adherence to the dictum “If a character can’t be summed up in 15 words then the character is no good.” I mean, who says? While its certainly possible to sum up the character and motivation of Captain Ahab in a well turned phrase like ‘This insane amputee with a grudge against a whale,’ Herman Melville obviously though it appropriate to take slightly longer over the job.” Heh. And yeah. And I do think that most of the good comic books these days have moved beyond the 15 words. I know I wouldn’t want to try to capture John Constantine, Dream, or even Batman that succinctly. In his ending essay he said something that made me feel oddly connected to him. “Love yourself and love the world. . . . And if you want to write about something, then you must know it must understand it as fully as possible. Must love it, even if it is unlovable. Particularly if it is unlovable. Hey, now, you’re a professional writer, why not volunteer to give a talk to a group of murders and rapists over at the nearest prison? How could anyone fail to benefit in understanding from an experience like that? What could be damaged except maybe your prejudices and preconceptions. Immerse yourself in the least desirable element and swim.” (47). I’ve helped write opinions about the lawfulness of convictions and civil commitments and prison discipline for years before (and since) I actually bestirred myself to visit a prison. I shook hands with a sexually violent predator who had the same name as one of my best friends. While I can’t say that I love anyone there, walking through those gates – and out – was a thing worth doing. And now I shall back away from this review before I start thinking too hard about the connection between drafting graphic novels and drafting court opinions. Moving on.
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  • Brian Johanningmeier
    January 1, 1970
    I'm a fan of Alan Moore but I don't want to read something and then be told in the Afterward to forget everything I've just read.
  • Shawn Birss
    January 1, 1970
    There is nothing wrong with the book. However, it is fairly common good advice given in any book on writing fiction. I did pick up about three sentence's worth of new relevant advice for comic script writing. Also, for anyone who is familiar with Alan Moore, and appreciates his cranky-old-man manner regarding comics and the comic industry, the tone is to be enjoyed. There is also some good kick-in-the-pants challenge to creative people. But without Alan Moore's name on the front, there isn't rea There is nothing wrong with the book. However, it is fairly common good advice given in any book on writing fiction. I did pick up about three sentence's worth of new relevant advice for comic script writing. Also, for anyone who is familiar with Alan Moore, and appreciates his cranky-old-man manner regarding comics and the comic industry, the tone is to be enjoyed. There is also some good kick-in-the-pants challenge to creative people. But without Alan Moore's name on the front, there isn't really a lot to this that isn't found with greater depth and more helpful application in the works of Eisner and McCloud. If one *must* learn about script and story writing from Alan Moore, I recommend reading some of his scripts, alongside their corresponding books. I did so, and found it helpful. However, as I've learned more about comic scriptwriting, and the broad spectrum of methods employed to create them, I've discovered that Alan Moore's scripts are kind of like diving in the deep end. He's frighteningly thorough and specific in his description of each panel in his scripts. I recommend a look at Bendis/Maleev scripts, or Morrison/Quitely instead. In short, this is a tiny, overpriced book that reads like stream-of-consciousness advice from an old master, which, though good, can all be found elsewhere, and with higher quality.
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  • Greg Fisher
    January 1, 1970
    This is a reprint of an essay Alan Moore wrote years ago for serial publication in a small press magazine (or was it a fanzine? I'll check). In it he discusses writing for comics and gives his unique perspective -- the kind of perspective that created The Watchmen, revamped Miracleman, rejuvenated The Swamp Thing and led to Promethea, Top Ten and other ABC comics.An afterward, written by the Alan Moore of today discusses how he writes today and how radically different it is from the way he wrote This is a reprint of an essay Alan Moore wrote years ago for serial publication in a small press magazine (or was it a fanzine? I'll check). In it he discusses writing for comics and gives his unique perspective -- the kind of perspective that created The Watchmen, revamped Miracleman, rejuvenated The Swamp Thing and led to Promethea, Top Ten and other ABC comics.An afterward, written by the Alan Moore of today discusses how he writes today and how radically different it is from the way he wrote then. He gives a suggestion that writers start out like he did with careful plotting and pushing the boundaries of comics and then evolve into a simple writing as you go and trust your creativity method as you mature.Easy reading this is not but essential if you want to write comics and leave a lasting legacy. There are many wonderful writers out there and they're raising bar. This book can help you rise to the challenge.
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  • Himani Agrawal
    January 1, 1970
    3.5 starsPros:a. gave me a deeper understanding of how best to appreciate graphic novels/ comic books - seriously, read this if you want to truly understand what it means to read a comic book and the depth of detailing a writer and illustrator go through to produce a creative which is not a. cinema or b. literature but a creative medium of its own rightb. good reference for getting to know a lot of comic book titlesc. good tips on writing as a wholeCons: a. since I am not a comic book writer and 3.5 starsPros:a. gave me a deeper understanding of how best to appreciate graphic novels/ comic books - seriously, read this if you want to truly understand what it means to read a comic book and the depth of detailing a writer and illustrator go through to produce a creative which is not a. cinema or b. literature but a creative medium of its own rightb. good reference for getting to know a lot of comic book titlesc. good tips on writing as a wholeCons: a. since I am not a comic book writer and this is clearly for someone who wishes to start writing there is a lot of content that is virtually useless to me even in this small 50 page bookb. Alan Moore recants most of what he says in the afterword and though I appreciate the sentiment IMHO it just doesn't make sense
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  • RB
    January 1, 1970
    Plan on writing a comic? Or any story, really? If you said yes to either of those, and enjoy Alan Moore's work, this book is essential. It doesn't have detailed layouts of his outlines or comics before they were published, but what is does include is an essay that spans through every element of storytelling, describing what works with examples from his own work and other, while showing clearly the failings of many modern comics, to asking the reader to reach for more in their work, and this is a Plan on writing a comic? Or any story, really? If you said yes to either of those, and enjoy Alan Moore's work, this book is essential. It doesn't have detailed layouts of his outlines or comics before they were published, but what is does include is an essay that spans through every element of storytelling, describing what works with examples from his own work and other, while showing clearly the failings of many modern comics, to asking the reader to reach for more in their work, and this is all told in the captivating voice of Mr. Moore who is as passionate as ever here. "Alan Moore's Writing for Comics" is an insightful, invaluable book for aspiring writers or fans of Moore's output.
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  • Levi
    January 1, 1970
    Comic book writers writing about writing comic books has increased my interest in comics. This allowed some insights that were helpful in my own endeavors to do some comic book writing. There are certainly some tricks, ideas, and advice that was quite helpful, especially as a new writer.That's where I think this works the best: as an introduction to comic book writing. I wouldn't necessarily see this as an exhaustive guide, but it helps get ideas flowing and provide examples about how to move fo Comic book writers writing about writing comic books has increased my interest in comics. This allowed some insights that were helpful in my own endeavors to do some comic book writing. There are certainly some tricks, ideas, and advice that was quite helpful, especially as a new writer.That's where I think this works the best: as an introduction to comic book writing. I wouldn't necessarily see this as an exhaustive guide, but it helps get ideas flowing and provide examples about how to move forward with those ideas.
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  • Tomas
    January 1, 1970
    Book is awesome. Alan Moore is too. Not even the text is good or the thoughts that are being communicated, which are very insightful and eye-opening by the way. The book itself as a whole is great. Being without table of contents and being only forty-something pages long. No blather, no bullshit. My impression is only positive. Hooray.
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  • Brian
    January 1, 1970
    Moore talks about his technique. Advice from a master, but it's a pretty dry read.
  • Matt Kelland
    January 1, 1970
    It's interesting, but as he says himself, the techniques are dated. Good for the basic concepts of how to approach writing, not so much as a practical primer.
  • Michael Lent
    January 1, 1970
    Meant to be read and reread. As a fellow writer, Moore's books and lectures (saw him speak at Comic-Con) remind me to aspire, ask more of myself and always digger.
  • Lindsey.parks
    January 1, 1970
    Invaluable.
  • Gamal Hennessy
    January 1, 1970
    The first thirty pages had a lot of venting and very little advice. The last ten pages are very helpful for anyone trying to understand writing for comics, especially if you already have experience writing in another medium.
  • A. B. Neilly
    January 1, 1970
    It is an article about the techniques Alan Moore used to use. It is followed by an article about how he abandoned all those techniques and you should create your own. Funny and informative.
  • Leonard Pierce
    January 1, 1970
    Good enough for what it is, and Moore, as the best comics writer ever, has some interesting things to say, but honestly, it's a bit bold to call this thing a book...it's really more of a pamphlet.
  • Green Hedgehog
    January 1, 1970
    Алан Мур – без сомнения талантливый человек. Автор таких общепризнанных шедевров как «Хранители», «V for Vendetta». На его счету нехилая плеяда комиксов в уже существующих циклах. И даже несколько собственных серий. Но при этом, как и у большинства талантливых людей, у него есть целый набор странностей - не всем понятный взгляд на мир, игнорирование чужого мнения и общественных правил, своеобразный свод правил, которых от придерживается. Впрочем, на мой взгляд, это нормальное поведение гениально Алан Мур – без сомнения талантливый человек. Автор таких общепризнанных шедевров как «Хранители», «V for Vendetta». На его счету нехилая плеяда комиксов в уже существующих циклах. И даже несколько собственных серий. Но при этом, как и у большинства талантливых людей, у него есть целый набор странностей - не всем понятный взгляд на мир, игнорирование чужого мнения и общественных правил, своеобразный свод правил, которых от придерживается. Впрочем, на мой взгляд, это нормальное поведение гениального человека. И да, я считаю, что этот человек – гений. По крайней мере о всем том, что касается создания миров, сюжетов и героев. Понятно, что книгу такого человека, посвященную тому, как нужно создавать комиксы я прочел с интересом. И надо сказать, что в ней, достаточно сильно отразилась личность самого автора. Начну с того, что эта книга позиционируется вроде бы как для начинающих авторов. Для тех, кто только задумывается над этой карьерой. Но и для опытных писателей в этой книге есть многое, что позволит взглянуть на свою работу под другим углом. И это касается даже не только комиксов, а вообще любых произведений. Например, в самом начале своей книги Алан Мур заявляет о том, что в первую очередь любому произведению нужна идея. Да, согласен, что подобную мысль нельзя назвать оригинальной, но судя по многим книгам и фильмам, с которыми я знаком – для многих это новость. Многие из создателей считают, что главное последовательность событий, или там мир, в котором происходит действие, или герои. Но нет – первоочередная вещь – это идея. И так последовательно Мур разбирает все составляющие произведения. Герои, мир, сюжет, отдельные сцены, динамика и так далее. Он объясняет, как не дать читательскому интересу пропасть между панелями в комиксах, как правильно выставить динамику, в чем большинство писателей ошибаются, когда придумывают характеры своим героями. И да, действительно, на многие вещи у него свой собственный взгляд, не всегда совпадающий со точкой зрения других «мэтров». В других вещах он может подтвердить устоявшиеся истины, но вкладывает в них свое виденье. Тем не менее – весь это комплекс взглядов в любом случае интересен. Даже послесловие, в котором он рассказывает о том, как, по его мнению, должен развиваться автор, или что же такое творчество и популярность.Хочу еще отдельно отметить язык этой книги. Читается она легко (я читал её в любительском переводе, так что плюс тем, кто её переводил), и при этом не остается ощущения какого-то поучения, как это бывало в других руководствах по письму. Я бы сказал, что это скорее похоже на последовательные записи в блоге, в которых автор рассказывает о своих мыслях по заданному вопросу. Он не опускается до уровня читателей и не «сюсюкает» с ними, но при этом, не особо кичится своими регалиями. Ну, разве что немного и не без причин.С этим, кстати, связан один из минусов книги. Автор проводит целую кучу аналогий с другими формами искусства. Фильмы, книги, картины, музыка и, конечно же - комиксы. Он с легкостью манипулирует именами, названиями и явлениями. Вот только, что делать тем, чья эрудиция отличается от авторской – не сказано. Приходится копаться в Интернете, составлять список – какие фильмы, книги и комиксы стоит изучить. Так что, получается, что за такой небольшой (меньше двухсот страниц) книги, тянется достаточно длинный хвост из «сопутствующей» литературы. Ну и читать от этого довольно трудно. Что имеет в виду автор, когда упоминает того или иного человека или произведение? Как это связано с темой? Пока не выяснишь – дальше читать не так интересно. Проще говоря – книга, при всем своем небольшом объеме крайне интересна. Даже какие-то банальные вещи в изложении автора играет новыми красками и смыслами. Из побочных эффектов – хочется перечитать некоторые из работ Алана Мура, чтобы попытаться найти все изложенные им приемы в «практическом применении».
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  • Derek
    January 1, 1970
    I was going to give this book four stars but then I looked back and saw how long it took me to get through a 50-page book.There are some really good things in this book. Moore makes interesting points about writing and storytelling techniques. He is is talking about comic book writing specifically, but I think that good writing shares certain features, regardless of whether it's in a comic book or a french novel. Moore's advice could certainly be useful for any writer. He also has some useful (c I was going to give this book four stars but then I looked back and saw how long it took me to get through a 50-page book.There are some really good things in this book. Moore makes interesting points about writing and storytelling techniques. He is is talking about comic book writing specifically, but I think that good writing shares certain features, regardless of whether it's in a comic book or a french novel. Moore's advice could certainly be useful for any writer. He also has some useful (comic book) examples to illustrate his points.However, the writing style did wear on me. Moore goes on multiple rambles. I actually wouldn't argue if someone described this whole book as one long ramble. That's cool in one sense because it feels like Moore is actually talking to you. (He seems to me like the kind of guy who goes on long tangents and rambles during normal conversation.) The rambling is uncool in another sense though: sometimes you read a long passage and by the end you've forgotten what the original point was.Overall, there are some useful nuggets in this book and I would recommend it to anyone who wants to be writer- whether you like comic books or not.
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  • Adrian182
    January 1, 1970
    Writing for Comics. Moore, Alan. Writing for Comics (2003). How To. High School Target Audience. Alan Moore, author of such popular comics as The Killing Joke, Watchman, Swamp Thing and Miracleman takes to the page to teach other prospective writers how to dip their feet into the waters of comic book creation. The beauty of reading a How To book about writing comics by a comic writer is the accentuation of language and style that emits from his writing. Amidst the book are short exercises to hel Writing for Comics. Moore, Alan. Writing for Comics (2003). How To. High School Target Audience. Alan Moore, author of such popular comics as The Killing Joke, Watchman, Swamp Thing and Miracleman takes to the page to teach other prospective writers how to dip their feet into the waters of comic book creation. The beauty of reading a How To book about writing comics by a comic writer is the accentuation of language and style that emits from his writing. Amidst the book are short exercises to help the reader exercise their prose and sequential narrative chops, which adds an element of hands on practice that is a great addition to the information given. I have chosen to make this book target high school students because of Moore’s robust range of language. Also, the ideas that are presented are best suited for readers who are a bit more developed and mature. Alan Moore gives writers rules when considering the art of comic book creation, and does so in a way that reminds the reader why they picked up the book in the first place. Target audience: ages 15-24
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  • Michel Ortega
    January 1, 1970
    Los consejos de Alan Moore para todas aquellas personas interesadas en comenzar a escribir cómics. Los fundamentos que establece el legendario y mítico escritor inglés son enseñanzas importantes.Leí en una reseña en Amazon, decía que eran consejos básicos e inútiles; considero que los detalles que ofrece son sutiles, llenos de sabiduría y sobre el uso que él haría, como lo haría y como lo ha hecho.El ensayo sobre Superman Annual #11, un comic clásico del '85, lleno de goce, 40 paginas explicadas Los consejos de Alan Moore para todas aquellas personas interesadas en comenzar a escribir cómics. Los fundamentos que establece el legendario y mítico escritor inglés son enseñanzas importantes.Leí en una reseña en Amazon, decía que eran consejos básicos e inútiles; considero que los detalles que ofrece son sutiles, llenos de sabiduría y sobre el uso que él haría, como lo haría y como lo ha hecho.El ensayo sobre Superman Annual #11, un comic clásico del '85, lleno de goce, 40 paginas explicadas y narradas paso a paso el proceso y cada caso. Alan Moore ofrece detallados procesos en la construcción de una historieta, pensar, escribir y como ejecutar la viñeta, una enseñanza perfecta, completa.Respecto al escrito final, con el que termina la edición, una lección para tomar en cuenta, cada momento en un futuro, esperando pronto alcanzar esa meta, escribir una historia que sea perpetua.
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  • Stuart
    January 1, 1970
    Somehow I always conflate Alan Moore and Michael Moorcock in my mind. I hope they do not object. I know well which books are written by each. But there's something in its tone,message and general attitude to the topic of writing of Moore's book that reminds me a great deal of Moorcock's polemics in the mid-60s in New Worlds magazine, that Moorcock then edited. Goodreads says these essays of Moore's were written in 1985. That context is important. This book is not just Alan Moore's opinion for wh Somehow I always conflate Alan Moore and Michael Moorcock in my mind. I hope they do not object. I know well which books are written by each. But there's something in its tone,message and general attitude to the topic of writing of Moore's book that reminds me a great deal of Moorcock's polemics in the mid-60s in New Worlds magazine, that Moorcock then edited. Goodreads says these essays of Moore's were written in 1985. That context is important. This book is not just Alan Moore's opinion for what makes for good writing, and it is that, but a time capsule of a transitional moment in the history of comics. Some of these discussions are well known now but if I can think back to 1985 I recall there were issues just bubbling up as DC's Crisis was just reaching the shelves. All in all, this book though short since it was originally no more than a four piece magazine installment is a nice little statement on writing. I would recommend it for aspiring writers and anyone interested in Alan Moore's process or comics in general.
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  • Robert Pocock
    January 1, 1970
    This slender volume reprints an extended essay from 1985 along with a short follow-up from 2003. The main piece consists of Alan Moore's thoughts on the mechanics and thought processes behind the writing of a comic strip and is illustrated with discussions of examples from his own work and that of other artists (from comics and other art forms). The follow-up essay, in much condensed form, explores some of these same topics from the perspective of a now established, and experienced writer. Most This slender volume reprints an extended essay from 1985 along with a short follow-up from 2003. The main piece consists of Alan Moore's thoughts on the mechanics and thought processes behind the writing of a comic strip and is illustrated with discussions of examples from his own work and that of other artists (from comics and other art forms). The follow-up essay, in much condensed form, explores some of these same topics from the perspective of a now established, and experienced writer. Most interesting for me is the way Alan Moore describes different aspects of the creative process and some mechanisms he has used or uses to generate "ideas". (I found myself thinking of the BBC Radio programme 'Chain Reaction' where he discusses this in an interview with Brian Eno.)
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  • Bracicot
    January 1, 1970
    Super interesting, thoughtful advice about the nature of good writing and more specifically of good comics composition. Of particular interest is Moore’s analysis of a 40-page superman comic he wrote, which went over both process and motivation, plot and story and hiw they interact, and visual and verbal thinking. Still looking for a straight-up description of the format and conventions of a comics script, though.
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  • Brian
    January 1, 1970
    Overly chatty, stream-of-consciousness-style advice with a nugget or two every few pages. Somewhat underwhelming. Then you get to the Afterword, written decades after the main text, and it becomes more compelling and more inspiring, but a little annoying since it devalues (or recognizes the actual value of) what you've just read. I'll write down a few worthwhile tidbits in my sketchbook and then likely never touch this book again.
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  • Rob
    January 1, 1970
    It's an interesting insight into how Moore wrote things back in the 80's, with some good advice overall. The format (two columns, side by side, per page) in a book the size of a comic bothered me somehow. And, as others have said, the afterward is basically 'ignore everything in this book before this chapter, then probably this one as well', which actually gave me a chuckle more than it bothered me.
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  • Otto Hahaa
    January 1, 1970
    Alan Moore kirjoittaa kolmekymmentä vuotta sitten sarjakuvien tekemisestä ja kommentoi kirjoittamaansa viisitoista vuotta myöhemmin.Hyvin kirjoitettu kuten Alan Moore yleensä. Jotain yleistä voi oppia, vaikka sarjakuvamaailma on muuttunut aika paljon. Kommentissa Alan Moore huomauttaa, että osa hän vinkeistään oli jo muuttunut kliseiksi samalla hetkellä kun hän niistä kirjoitti.
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  • Braden
    January 1, 1970
    The 2013 Afterword is a little more interesting and practical to writers than the basic, fundamental steps towards narrative creating suggested in the actual meat of this essay. Remember to explore your limits!
  • V
    January 1, 1970
    Good advice for beginners. I wish there had been more graphics or illustrations in a book about writing comics. He mentions some works of art and it would have been nice to have an actual photo or illustration for example.
  • Shawn Michael
    January 1, 1970
    You learn many things throughout life and years later you'll find out that what you've thought back then is not the same thing you think right now. From the man that made comics an important medium for storytelling.
  • Intortetor
    January 1, 1970
    una guida a come sceneggiare un fumetto secondo uno dei più grandi sceneggiatori di fumetti di sempre, con tanto di postfazione che quasi venti anni dopo smentisce i suggerimenti dati.se si ama il fumetto è una lettura che non può mancare.
  • RazoDrn10
    January 1, 1970
    I liked the comic, I enjoy reading this
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