Standing for Something
In this national bestseller, the president of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, Gordon B. Hinckley, has created a classic look at the values that can change our world--and how to stand up for them. Drawing on anecdotes from his much-admired life of faith and service, as well as examples from American culture today, he examines ten virtues that have always illuminated the path to a better world: love, honesty, morality, civility, learning, forgiveness and mercy, thrift and industry, gratitude, optimism, and faith. He then shows how the two guardians of virtue--marriage and the family--can keep us on that path, even in difficult times. Standing for Something is an inspiring blueprint for what we all can do--as individuals, as a nation, and as a world community--to rediscover the values and virtues that have historically made us strong and that will lead us to a brighter future.

Standing for Something Details

TitleStanding for Something
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseMar 20th, 2001
PublisherHarmony
ISBN-139780609807255
Rating
GenreReligion, Nonfiction, Christianity, Lds, Church, Self Help, Inspirational

Standing for Something Review

  • Michael
    January 1, 1970
    This is a very nice book about virtues. Mr. Hinckley was the head of the Mormon Church for many years, and wrote this book when he was 89 years old. I don't know very much about the Mormons (or rather, I don't understand very much about the Mormons!)but I thought this was wonderful.Essentially, the author ask people to practice virtues. A virtue is a habit of good or right behavior; almost all virtues are applicable to people who believe in God, or who don't believe in God. Virtues are actions a This is a very nice book about virtues. Mr. Hinckley was the head of the Mormon Church for many years, and wrote this book when he was 89 years old. I don't know very much about the Mormons (or rather, I don't understand very much about the Mormons!)but I thought this was wonderful.Essentially, the author ask people to practice virtues. A virtue is a habit of good or right behavior; almost all virtues are applicable to people who believe in God, or who don't believe in God. Virtues are actions and attitudes that make people--all people--better...and when people are better, society is better. I am a big fan of the virtues, and I have tried to focus in on a few key ones to improve my own character. It works!In this book, the virtues the author promotes are love, honesty, morality, civility, learning, forgiveness, mercy, thrift, industry, gratitude, optimism, and faith. Just imagine if every person in America were to try and improve themselves by fostering, strengthening, considering, and PRACTICING these virtues. I am willing to bet that 99% of our problems would go away. Even if you are nonreligious, or an atheist, or 'spiritual but not religious' (my favorite), these virtues can serve as guideposts for your day to day decisions. The virtues I have been thinking the most about lately are compassion, civility, solidarity, and humility. I have also, over the past few years, been teaching about the virtues in my classroom, which is fun for me (and the kids seem to like it). So be virtuous, and read this short, wonderful book by an old man who saw a lot of life during his many, many decades.
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  • Meghan
    January 1, 1970
    Wow what a world this could be if everyone followed the counsel in this book. What I really loved is that the he discusses things in such an optimistic and grandfatherly way. This book could be read by anyone - not just members. How on earth he has the time to read newspapers, magazines and fine literature is beyond me. I guess if he has the time, we all should - what an example! Reading this book makes you want to be a more excellent person that's for sure.
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  • Keith
    January 1, 1970
    Just reading the introduction gives me a thrill as I see how clearly he understands the ills of our time and that the banishment of the name of God from the United States is deeply tied into the problems we are facing. As Margaret Thatcher said: "'You use the name of Deity in the Declaration of Independence and in the Constitution of the United States, and yet you cannot use it in the schoolroom.' Her words are a rebuke and an indictment of America." (Page xx)"If we are to continue to have the f Just reading the introduction gives me a thrill as I see how clearly he understands the ills of our time and that the banishment of the name of God from the United States is deeply tied into the problems we are facing. As Margaret Thatcher said: "'You use the name of Deity in the Declaration of Independence and in the Constitution of the United States, and yet you cannot use it in the schoolroom.' Her words are a rebuke and an indictment of America." (Page xx)"If we are to continue to have the freedoms that came of the inspiration of the Almighty to our Founding Fathers, we must return to the God who is their true Author." (Page xi) "Today we face challenges the Founding Fathers could not have possibly imagined or conceived; our societal challenges would have horrified them." (Page xviii)"I am more deeply concerned about the growing moral deficit than I am about the monetary deficit." (Page xix)Or, as Hinckley put it on the next page: "People who cary in their hearts a strong conviction concerning the living reality of the Almighty and their accountability to Him for what they do with their lives are far less likely to become enmeshed in problems that inevitably weaken society. The loss of this conviction, the almost total secularizing of our public attitudes, has been largely responsible for the terrible social illnesses now running rampant among us." (Page xxi)"Whatsoever things are true, whatsoever things are honest, whatsoever things are just, whatsoever things are pure, whatsoever things are lovely, whatsoever things are of good report, if there be any virtue, and if there be any praise, think on these things. Those things, which ye have both learned, and received, and heard, and seen in me, do: and the God of peace shall be with you" (Philippians 4:8-9; emphasis added) (Page xxiv)"Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel once made a statement to the effect that those who do not read history will have to repeat it. How sobering a thought!" (Page 75)"That which comes from God is light, and the person who receives and invites this light into his or her life will receive more light. It is that simple. it is that profound." (Page 79)"What might become of this land if we spoke less of its weaknesses and more of its goodness and strength, it's capacity and potential? (Page 117) "Cynics do not contribute, skeptics do not create, doubters do not achieve." (Page 118)"Cal Thomas in the Los Angeles Times wrote ... 'While Americans Throw Religion Out of Schools Russians Want it Back.' " (Page 133) This reminds me of something that my wife learned in her High School in Seattle - that there are five things needed to define a culture: Food, Shelter, Government, Religion, and Aesthetics. "Neglect not the cultivation of the spiritual. To do so is to eventually reap bitter fruit." (Page 133) "What shall it profit a man though he gain the whole world and lose his own soul, or what shall a man give in excahnge for his soul?" (Mark 8:36-37)MarriageThe first cornerstone: Mutual respect and loyalty to one another. (Page 157)The second cornerstone: The soft answer. (Page 161)The third cornerstone: Financial honesty. (Page 163)Family"The evils of the world will continue to escalate unless there is an underlying acknowledgment, even a strong and fervent conviction, that the family is an instrument of the Almighty. It is His creation. it is also the most fundamental and basic unit of society. And it deserves - no, it demands our combined focus and attention." "We go to great lengths to preserve historical buildings and sites in our cities. We need to apply the same fervor to preserving the most ancient and sacred of institutions - the family!" (Page 169-170)"... ten specific things we might do to help such a turnaround." (Page 170-192)1. "Accept responsibility for our role as parents and fulfill our obligations to our children."2. "Get married and stay married."3. "Put the father back at the head of the home."4. "Recognize and value the supreme importance of mothers."5. "Celebrate and treat children as our most priceless treasures."6. "Discipline and train children with love."7. "Teach values to children."8. "Teach children to work."9. "Read to and with children." (I especially like this section.)10. "Pray together."So that I can remember them the chapters are:1. Love: The Lodestar of Life2. Where there is Honesty, Other Virtues Will Follow3. Making a Case for Morality4. Our Fading Civility5. Learning: "With All Thy Getting Get Understanding"6. The Twin Virtues of Forgiveness and Mercy7. Thrift and Industry: Getting Our Houses in Order8. Gratitude: A Sign of Maturity9. Optimism in the Face of Cynicism10. Faith: Our Only Hope Part TWO: The Guardians of Virtue- Marriage- The Family- Epilogue: The Loneliness of Moral LeadershipThree are some books that are just good. Other books are very good. Those very good books we want to cherish. We want to reread them so that we continue to be nourished by what is in them. This is one of those books.
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  • Ashleigh Harris
    January 1, 1970
    A great book for all around practical advice. Very well written from a very intelligent man. If I were going to give a book as a gift for practical advice in life, this is the one that I would give. It touches on a little bit of everything. Plus, the author was a studier of English Literature, which supports that fact that he is brilliant. :)
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  • Elli Williams
    January 1, 1970
    The kind of advice your grandpa would give you mixed with a happy young person's advice, mixed with a religious giant's advice. Very Good.
  • Ellen
    January 1, 1970
    Very good advice and inspiration.2017 challenge: a book written by someone you admire.
  • Kendel Christensen
    January 1, 1970
    Amazing. Absolutely a must-own, must-read. This man distills centuries of wisdom of observation and insight for all--religious and non-religious alike.“Surely all of us can find a way to incorporate into our daily lives a regular pattern of study, a regular opportunity to grow and absorb and learn from the great writers of the world. I am not suggesting that we become geniuses. Most of us will never fall within that designation. But I have concluded that the work of the world is done by basicall Amazing. Absolutely a must-own, must-read. This man distills centuries of wisdom of observation and insight for all--religious and non-religious alike.“Surely all of us can find a way to incorporate into our daily lives a regular pattern of study, a regular opportunity to grow and absorb and learn from the great writers of the world. I am not suggesting that we become geniuses. Most of us will never fall within that designation. But I have concluded that the work of the world is done by basically ordinary people who have learned to work in an extraordinary way.”(Gordon B. Hinckley, Standing for Something, p. 62)“The most miserable people I know are obsessed with themselves.”(Gordon B. Hinckley, Standing for Something, p. 56)“The best antidote I know for worry is work. The best cure for weariness is the challenge of helping someone who is even more tired. One of the great ironies of life is this: He or she who serves almost always benefits more than he or she who is served.”(Gordon B. Hinckley, Standing for Something, p. 56)“Children who are exposed to books at early ages have scholastic advantages throughout their lives. Parents who fail to read to their small children do a disservice to them as well as to themselves. It takes time, yes, much of it. It takes self-discipline and planning. It takes organizing and budgeting the minutes and hours of the day. But it is never boring to watch young minds come to know characters, expressions and ideas . . . What a difference it might make, what an influence could it have in the homes of this country if parents were to work at creating an atmosphere of learning and education at home, so that children were exposed at an early age to thoughts and concepts and attitudes that would build and motivate them for good throughout their lives.“Said Solomon, 'With all they getting get understanding' (Proverbs 4:7).”(Gordon B. Hinckley, Standing for Something, p. 61)“I am suggesting that as we go through life, we 'accentuate the positive'”(Gordon B. Hinckley, Standing for Something, p. 99)BUT my faaaaaaaaavorite is:“Deal with the problems as wisely as you can. Make your decisions. You may be right; you may be wrong. Hopefully, you will be right because you have prayed earnestly over the matter and you have discussed it with your associates. But once these decisions are made, put them behind you and do not worry about them. Turn around, stand tall, put your head up, and look forward to the marvelous opportunities that you have.”(Gordon B. Hinckley, Standing for Something, p. 173)
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  • Nathan Cunningham
    January 1, 1970
    Gordon B. Hinckley was "my" prophet growing up, and reading this inspired work brought back many fond memories of hearing him speak. He always had such an optimistic view of life and humanity, and that attitude shines brightly here as he offers wise suggestions on how to live a happier, richer life. There's a lot I need to work on, but I've seen improvements in my own life as I've tried to put President Hinckley's words into practice. Though he was an LDS leader, he wrote this book in such a way Gordon B. Hinckley was "my" prophet growing up, and reading this inspired work brought back many fond memories of hearing him speak. He always had such an optimistic view of life and humanity, and that attitude shines brightly here as he offers wise suggestions on how to live a happier, richer life. There's a lot I need to work on, but I've seen improvements in my own life as I've tried to put President Hinckley's words into practice. Though he was an LDS leader, he wrote this book in such a way that anyone of any religious belief can gain a lot from it.
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  • Craig&kerri
    January 1, 1970
    You absolutely get drawn into this book. Mr. Hinckley has a wonderful sense of storytelling and sense of humor that makes sense of sometimes otherwise difficult to understand concepts. This man was truly awesome. You will feel a little better about yourself and the world around you each day you read this book and gives some very practical things each person can do to improve the world we live in every day.
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  • Mattaca Warnick
    January 1, 1970
    Gordon B. Hinckley, president of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, provides an overview of 10 forgotten virtues that should be rediscovered by mankind. This is not a Mormon book so much as it is a "moral" book--the principles taught here are non-denominational and could easily be espoused by anyone. An inspiring reminder of what's important.
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  • Brent
    January 1, 1970
    One evening when I was a kid, my family had an outing to L.A.'s Chinatown. We went into a gag shop where a plaque was displayed reading: "We get too soon old and too late smart." I've seen the message several times since. Gordon B. Hinckley authored this book when he was old and smart. If you haven't already read it, do it now; and be smart before you get old.
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  • Michelle Caudle
    January 1, 1970
    I've read this book twice but it was awhile back (I had more time to read back when I drove potato truck!!)and I really need to read it again. I do remember that I really enjoyed it and that it's one of those books that's good to read about once a year to remind you of some of the things we should be doing in our lives!!
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  • Jack
    January 1, 1970
    Such great advice and certainly prophetic. I would recommend this book to anyone wondering or worried about the state of the world. President Hinckley (what I call him) has some excellent and exact advice for curing the ails of families communities and the world. Timely and timeless messages from a truly extraordinary man.
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  • Holli
    January 1, 1970
    This book is full of simple, yet profound truths that inspired to me to try a little harder to be a little better. I read a chapter each morning as a daily devotional and his words resonated with me throughout the day. This is a great read - no matter what your religious affiliation may be!
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  • Christina
    January 1, 1970
    Beautifully written book about how we can turn our nation around. President Hinckley writes to Americans in general - reminding us that he is a prophet for the world, not just members of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. I enjoy his powerful way with words and his humor.I don't usually do this, but I'm going to type his main points in. President Hinckley spotlights 10 virtues that ... umm, read the book title and add "and nation" to the end.1 - LOVE: One of the greatest challenges Beautifully written book about how we can turn our nation around. President Hinckley writes to Americans in general - reminding us that he is a prophet for the world, not just members of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. I enjoy his powerful way with words and his humor.I don't usually do this, but I'm going to type his main points in. President Hinckley spotlights 10 virtues that ... umm, read the book title and add "and nation" to the end.1 - LOVE: One of the greatest challenges we face in our hurried, self-centered lives it to follow this counsel of the Master, to take the time and make the effort to care for others, to develop and exercise the one quality that would enable us to change the lives of others - what the scriptures call charity... Tremendous happiness and peace of mind are the results of loving service to others. Nobody can live fully and happily who lives only unto himself or herself.2 - HONESTY: Integrity is at the heart of commerce in the world in which we live. Honesty and integrity comprise the very underpinning of society. Every bank president, every bank director knows that even with all the regulations and possible safeguards, in the last analysis the strength and safety of any financial institution lie in the integrity of its people. As with banks, so also with merchants, politicians, professional men and women, and leaders from all walks of life. Indeed, the strength and safety of of any organization - including the family - lie in the integrity of its members.3 - MORALITY: Both experience and divine wisdom dictate that moral virtue and cleanliness pave the way that leads to strength of character, peace of mind and heart, and happiness in life. There is no question that the way of safety and the road to a sense of genuine fulfillment lie in sexual abstinence before marriage and fidelity following marriage.4 - CIVILITY: It is not enough just to be good. We must be good for something. We must contribute good to the world. The world must be a better place for our presence. And the good that is in us must be spread to others. This is the measure of our civility.5 - LEARNING: It is incumbent on each of us to equip ourselves to do something worthwhile in society - to acquire more and more light, so that our personal light can help illuminate a darkened world. And this is made possible through learning, through educating ourselves, through progressing and growing in both mind and spirit.6 - FORGIVENESS & MERCY: There are those who would look upon these virtues as signs of weakness. But it takes neither strength nor intelligence to brood in anger over wrongs suffered, to go through life with a spirit of vindictiveness, to dissipate one's abilities in planning retribution, or to press a grievance when someone else is "down". There is not genius or peace in the nursing of a grudge... Those who nurture in their hearts poisonous enmity toward another would be well served to ask the Almighty for the strength to forgive and to extend the hand of mercy.7 - THRIFT & INDUSTRY: We have been seduced into believing that borrowed money has no penalty, that financial bondage is an acceptable way to live. I suggest that it is not. We would do well to look to the condition of our personal finances, to be modest and prudent in our expenditures, to discipline our purchasing and avoid debt to the extent possible, to pay off debt quickly, and to free ourselves from the bondage of others.8 - GRATITUDE: When we walk with gratitude, we do not walk with arrogance and conceit and egotism, but rather with a spirit of thanksgiving that is becoming to us and will bless our lives.9 - OPTIMISM: It will do us no good to be naive about the challenges we face in this country. We do have problems, and they are not a few. There are issues that demand our earnest, inspired attention. But there is too much fruitless carping and criticism of American. What might become of this land if we spoke less of its weaknesses and more of its goodness and strength, its capacity and potential? ... I am an optimist! What a wonderful time it is to be alive, here at the turn of a milestone century! With that frame of reference, my plea is that we stop seeking out the storms and enjoy more fully the sunlight.10 - FAITH: There is no obstacle too great, no challenge to difficult, if we have faith. With faith we can rise above those negative elements in our lives that constantly pull us down... Faith in something greater than ourselves enables us to do what we have said we'll do, to press forward when we are tired or hurt or afraid, to keep going when the challenge seems overwhelming and the course is entirely uncertain.This book really deserves 5 stars, but there wasn't a lot that I hadn't heard from President Hinckley at other times. As much as I would recommend this book for everyone to read, I didn't find any practical application for me. One thing I do feel is more motivation to get involved politically and 'stand for something' good. What a nation we could be if we, as a people, tried to live these virtues.
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  • Serepta
    January 1, 1970
    Absolutely one of the most brilliant works from him. I love this book.
  • Brit Stanford
    January 1, 1970
    Read this book. No matter who you or or what you believe. It is tender and brilliant and down-to-earth wise.
  • Sara ♥
    January 1, 1970
    I love President Hinckley! He's so awesome!This book was really great. The way in which it was written reminded me of what I sometimes forget to think about, which is that the current President of the Church is not just the spiritual leader of our Church, but is the prophet for the WHOLE WORLD. And the target audience of this book is EVERYONE.In this book, President Hinckley expressed his growing concerns (in his usual upbeat manner) about the way in which our society is progressing (or rather d I love President Hinckley! He's so awesome!This book was really great. The way in which it was written reminded me of what I sometimes forget to think about, which is that the current President of the Church is not just the spiritual leader of our Church, but is the prophet for the WHOLE WORLD. And the target audience of this book is EVERYONE.In this book, President Hinckley expressed his growing concerns (in his usual upbeat manner) about the way in which our society is progressing (or rather digressing)... He then tells us of 10 virtues (1 chapter per) that, if reinstated into our society, would help solve the problems of our society. They are:Love, Honesty, Morality, Civility, Learning, Forgiveness and Mercy, Thrift and Industry, Gratitude, Optimism, and Faith.He made some really good points about each one, including many short anecdotes from his and other people's lives, as well as many quotes from the Bible, various wise people from history, classic novels, poetry, etc. Someday I hope to be as well versed as Pres. Hinckley is!Then he talked about marriage and how important it is to not give up on marriage, but instead to communicate, be kind, look for the good in each other, pray, and resolve issues when they arise. Last, he talks about family, and how if we work on our families, the whole nation will see a change. He lists 10 specific things that will help save our homes, and thus our nation, pertaining to raising children:1. Accept responsibility for our role as parents and fulfill our obligations to our children.2. Get married and stay married.3. Put the father back at the head of the home. (About how the father should provide leadership and be a provider, defender, counselor, and "friend who will listen and give support when needed.")4. Recognize and value the supreme importance of mothers.5. Celebrate and treat children as our most priceless treasures.6. Discipline and train children with love.7. Teach values to children. (Like the ones listed above...)8. Teach children to work.9. Read to and with children.10. Pray together (as a family).So overall, it was really great and uplifting. Reminded me of some things I needed to remember and work to do better at... I highly recommend this book to everyone who finds their self thinking, "What on earth is this world coming to???"
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  • Sharon
    January 1, 1970
    I reread this for a book group coming up, looking for the three most impressive stories or anecdotes. Hinckley is very comfortable telling stories and giving anecdotes. I get the impression that he was well read and know from having seen him, when he was alive, how upbeat and positive a man he was. Each of the first 10 chapters defines a single virtue (love, honesty, work, for instance). The last 2 chapters talk about how marriage (chapter 11) and family (chapter 12) guard and cultivate, in prac I reread this for a book group coming up, looking for the three most impressive stories or anecdotes. Hinckley is very comfortable telling stories and giving anecdotes. I get the impression that he was well read and know from having seen him, when he was alive, how upbeat and positive a man he was. Each of the first 10 chapters defines a single virtue (love, honesty, work, for instance). The last 2 chapters talk about how marriage (chapter 11) and family (chapter 12) guard and cultivate, in practical terms, the previously described virtues. Hinckley prescribes healthy approaches to marriage and family living. The last chapter is a general call for people the world over to be leaders in their communities, by living as best they can, even if doing so is hard, even lonely. I enjoyed Mike Wallace's Foreward, anecdotal in itself. An uplifting, poignant, quick read and reread. My favorite story was his boyhood experience being overheard by his mother saying something disparaging to an African American family walking down the street. Hinckley was 5 or so years old. His mother's lecture, as well as her example, was a lesson he carried all his life: we are all children of the same God and have an obligation to respect and help one another. My favorite Hinckley insight in this text is the observation that profanity makes praying difficult--a great reason to avoid speaking profanely, I think. My favorite phrase, "...like asking ice cream to stay hard on the kitchen stove."
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  • Erika B. (SOS BOOKS)
    January 1, 1970
    O how I love and miss President Hinckley. His optimism and spirit practically drips off the pages! My favorite chapter was the one on leadership. I loved how he said we must realize that the price of leadership is loneliness. Favorite quote-“Love is the very essence of life. It is the pot of gold at the end of the rainbow. Yet it is not found only at the end of the rainbow. Love is at the beginning also, and from it springs the beauty that arched across the sky on a stormy day. Love is the secur O how I love and miss President Hinckley. His optimism and spirit practically drips off the pages! My favorite chapter was the one on leadership. I loved how he said we must realize that the price of leadership is loneliness. Favorite quote-“Love is the very essence of life. It is the pot of gold at the end of the rainbow. Yet it is not found only at the end of the rainbow. Love is at the beginning also, and from it springs the beauty that arched across the sky on a stormy day. Love is the security for which children weep, the yearning of youth, the adhesive that binds marriage, and the lubricant that prevents devastating friction in the home; it is the peace of old age, the sunlight of hope shining through death. How rich are those who enjoy it in their associations with family, friends, and neighbors! Love, like faith, is a gift of God. It is also the most enduring and most powerful virtue.” ― Gordon B. Hinckley
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  • Tesia
    January 1, 1970
    I am so disappointed to have read this boo. It is a ridiculous, self-serving book that uses self justification for each of the author's virtues. The virtues he touts are not represented within the examples in the books. You cannot preach about love, mercy, debts, and civility and then cite your role models as U.S. presidents, even specifically mentioning Thomas Jefferson, without explaining how that could be since they live lives facilitating debts, lacking civility for other cultures and races, I am so disappointed to have read this boo. It is a ridiculous, self-serving book that uses self justification for each of the author's virtues. The virtues he touts are not represented within the examples in the books. You cannot preach about love, mercy, debts, and civility and then cite your role models as U.S. presidents, even specifically mentioning Thomas Jefferson, without explaining how that could be since they live lives facilitating debts, lacking civility for other cultures and races, adultery, promiscuity, and seek to punish the weak and oppressed in society. I can summarize this book in the following sentence. Another entitled, demeaning, and narrowed-minded old white man telling everyone what he thinks is true based on his experiences with other people within his same community and reading other old white men with similar opinions.
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  • John
    January 1, 1970
    This was an enjoyable read. I miss President Gordon B. Hinckley. Few people have influenced my life the way he has. It wasn't possible for me to read this book without hearing his voice in my mind. His mannerisms, expressions, and inflections all seemed to be present. But more than the familiarity of his message, I love President Hinckley’s outlook on life. He has an optimism that is realistic. He exemplifies a perfect brightness of hope and how to get there. While life is full of difficult chal This was an enjoyable read. I miss President Gordon B. Hinckley. Few people have influenced my life the way he has. It wasn't possible for me to read this book without hearing his voice in my mind. His mannerisms, expressions, and inflections all seemed to be present. But more than the familiarity of his message, I love President Hinckley’s outlook on life. He has an optimism that is realistic. He exemplifies a perfect brightness of hope and how to get there. While life is full of difficult challenges, he shares some solid principles that have made my own experiences very rewarding. Very inspiring.
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  • Mike
    January 1, 1970
    I love President Hinckley's clear, direct, inspired way of speaking. This come through in his writing as well. You can almost see/hear him behind the pulpit saying most of the things in this book. (Which he has in various settings.)I felt the first half of the book was very uplifting. I felt inspired and uplifted. His words about optimism were particularly meaningful to me. My only thing was that the book did seem to get a bit redundant near the end (I felt like he was simply re-telling the same I love President Hinckley's clear, direct, inspired way of speaking. This come through in his writing as well. You can almost see/hear him behind the pulpit saying most of the things in this book. (Which he has in various settings.)I felt the first half of the book was very uplifting. I felt inspired and uplifted. His words about optimism were particularly meaningful to me. My only thing was that the book did seem to get a bit redundant near the end (I felt like he was simply re-telling the same principle five or six different ways, and I confess that I got a little bored near the end.)Overall, a very inspiring read from a very inspiring individual. 4.5 stars. Recommended!
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  • Shera
    January 1, 1970
    Very nice; very sweet; and oh so dear to me; Not only do I love this old-fashioned book on virtues (we all need a good old-fashioned reminder on how things used to be, and how we can keep some of that in our life today); but you can't even imagine the feeling of reading this book for comfort after losing my Dad, and then unpacking one of his boxes and dusting it off. Just knowing we each had it on our bookshelf is sustaining; remarkable; soothing; eternal. I really enjoy this book; love, Shera
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  • Darci
    January 1, 1970
    Goodbye Dr. Wayne Dyer, Deepak Chopra, Dr. Phil, Zig Ziglar, Stephen Covey, etc.... All we need is this book by Gordon B. Hinckley to become a good people, happy, and successful. Refining our values is the path to a better world. Parallels his book Way To Be! (written for YA). OK, not really goodbye to those others, they all have great insight and wisdom too, but it's all combined in Hinckley's book.
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  • Dawn
    January 1, 1970
    I really appreciated how this book pointed out the steps of a smart relationship not only with yourself, but with God. Pres. Hinckley really resounded on the characteristics of a sound moral person and how to spread those morals to others through example, family, and other means. By reading this book, one can really find something to stand for - stand up for, stand up to, and stand up period. It helps you find what you're willing to stand up for, also. Great book!
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  • Sukhada Chaudhary
    January 1, 1970
    A simple book about lost virtues that form the essence of who we are, as men and women. A great read if you want to reinstate the faith in the worldly ideals and virtues that make us all better human beings :)
  • Rebecca
    January 1, 1970
    An excellent look at what we can do to have happy lives, healthy homes and intact families. If the world took this book as seriously as they do Al Gore's, the world wouldn't need saving. It already would be. =)
  • Amber Hicken
    January 1, 1970
    This was a great book that is a reminder to me of the many reasons why families and values are so important in my life. "No nation can rise above the strength of its homes or the virtue of its people."
  • Bryan Skelton
    January 1, 1970
    This is one of those books that I have to read once a year. It teaches me what I should be. "All of us need to learn that life is a mission and not simply a career.
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