Annie on My Mind
This groundbreaking book is the story of two teenage girls whose friendship blossoms into love and who, despite pressures from family and school that threaten their relationship, promise to be true to each other and their feelings. This book is so truthful and honest, it has been banned from many school libraries and even publicly burned in Kansas City. Of the author and the book, the Margaret A. Edwards Award committee said, “Nancy Garden has the distinction of being the first author for young adults to create a lesbian love story with a positive ending. Using a fluid, readable style, Garden opens a window through which readers can find courage to be true to themselves.”

Annie on My Mind Details

TitleAnnie on My Mind
Author
FormatPaperback
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseMar 31st, 1992
PublisherFarrar, Straus and Giroux (BYR)
ISBN0374404143
ISBN-139780374404147
Number of pages234 pages
Rating
GenreYoung Adult, Glbt, Romance, Fiction, Queer

Annie on My Mind Review

  • Sarah Verminski
    October 4, 2009
    Annie On My Mind will always have a special place in my heart, it was the first lesbian themed book I ever read. You may not understand the enormity of this, but just try to understand being 14 and every book you read involves a romance between a man and a woman. Every movie, every TV show, everyone I know is straight, nobody knows I'm gay, I barely understand it myself, and I pick up this book and suddenly it's like I can breathe. Suddenly I don't feel so alone, there's an actual published book Annie On My Mind will always have a special place in my heart, it was the first lesbian themed book I ever read. You may not understand the enormity of this, but just try to understand being 14 and every book you read involves a romance between a man and a woman. Every movie, every TV show, everyone I know is straight, nobody knows I'm gay, I barely understand it myself, and I pick up this book and suddenly it's like I can breathe. Suddenly I don't feel so alone, there's an actual published book I can relate to. It was amazing and freeing, and I'll always be greatful to Nancy Garden for giving me that gift.
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  • Elyse
    October 24, 2015
    Update: For those who are looking for 'wonderful' audiobooks --a 'great story' which will hold your interest from start to finish ---THIS IS IT!!! Its still one of my favorite audiobooks...ECHO is 'exceptional'!! I've been thinking about audiobooks --and I saw a member notice this book a few minutes ago--and I just can't say enough good things about it. I 'STILL' have Iris to thank!!! I can't imagine 'anyone' not liking it! Thank you **Iris** for this Audible book. I can't thank Iris enough! (an Update: For those who are looking for 'wonderful' audiobooks --a 'great story' which will hold your interest from start to finish ---THIS IS IT!!! Its still one of my favorite audiobooks...ECHO is 'exceptional'!! I've been thinking about audiobooks --and I saw a member notice this book a few minutes ago--and I just can't say enough good things about it. I 'STILL' have Iris to thank!!! I can't imagine 'anyone' not liking it! Thank you **Iris** for this Audible book. I can't thank Iris enough! (an entire new experience in 'reading/listening' has opened for me). .....shhhhhh, I think 'forever'! Many of you know I had two surgeries on my ankle this year --(a complete ankle replacement). I spent 2 months in bed - (not allowed to walk). During that time I read -and was peaceful. I read all day --how bad could it be?! :)The second stage: walking with crutches and physical therapy 'wasn't' fun. (cut into my reading time to boot).The third stage was the worse: I didn't feel I was getting better. My new ankle 'itself' was already great & flexible - no pain --but I had 'more' pain in the right side of my foot than 'ever'. I kept seeing the doctor. He kept giving me bone scans, back x-rays, shots, etc. Its 'still' a puzzle. (I still have the pain -less -but not gone)Stage 4: I'm walking (not hiking hilly trails, but more than just to my car for a quick run-into a store) This morning I had my longest walk to date since my surgery. 5.5 miles.Thank You you Iris...and my new toy...*audible*!!! :) I'm hooked now. I can't wait to go walking again --and find another book to listen to as I 'practice' walking with my new ankle.THANK YOU SO MUCH, IRIS! (I wouldn't have taken the leap had you not put this in my hands).Thank you to the author, Nancy Garden! The author was a brave woman who wrote this book. The conversation at the end of the book -with the author- is terrific, fascinating -interesting! Its amazing the loops and hoops this book went through. The girls in this story are bright...creative -and in love! The story might be written a little different 'today' ....(but maybe not much) --I don't want to give anything away: its just DAMD GOOD!!!!The voices are PERFECT -REAL -AUTHENTIC! (I was choked a few times). Ever feel like crying -but trying not to cry? (it was like that for me a couple of times). I HIGHLY recommend to EVERYONE! (if you don't believe me --ask Iris)! :)Sooooooooooo lovely!!!5+++ stars!!!
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  • Skyler
    May 21, 2009
    I'm not sure I'm qualified to write much of a review on this book, as I was never an adolescent lesbian. But I will say that it was incredibly easy to relate to--even for an adolescent hetero male--and the situation is touching, if not incredibly sad.Liza is a teenager who finds a companion in a fellow museum-goer one star-struck day. Cautious and excited, she pursues her romance, despite the fact that many around her do not seem to understand. Through the help of a teacher, she finds guidance i I'm not sure I'm qualified to write much of a review on this book, as I was never an adolescent lesbian. But I will say that it was incredibly easy to relate to--even for an adolescent hetero male--and the situation is touching, if not incredibly sad.Liza is a teenager who finds a companion in a fellow museum-goer one star-struck day. Cautious and excited, she pursues her romance, despite the fact that many around her do not seem to understand. Through the help of a teacher, she finds guidance in her love, but one thing leads to another, and when Liza and her girlfriend are caught between the sheets at the lesbian teacher's house, wheels are set in motion by society that end in somewhat maddening circumstances.The beauty of this book is its focus on the teenage crush and how it develops into love. I remember having these thoughts and emotions myself, being so curious and eager, and being scared out of my mind. The fact that the relationship subject surrounds a lesbian couple, only emphasizes that orientation has nothing to do with it. People are people, and we cannot help who we are attracted to. When love grabs us, it grabs hard, especially when we're young, and we seem to always make the craziest decisions in its vise.Some claim the book is shallow, but I think its target audience would disagree. The fact that the emphasis is on healing, instead of hurting, is something to be lauded. The world has seen the tragedy of homosexuality, and it's ready to see how love can go beyond that.
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  • Thomas
    June 17, 2013
    It was like a war inside me; I couldn't even recognize all the sides. There was one that said, "No, this is wrong; you know it's wrong and bad and sinful," and there was another that said, "Nothing has ever felt so right and natural and true and good," and another that just wanted to stop thinking altogether and fling my arms around Annie and hold her forever. There were other sides, too, but I couldn't sort them out.Can we talk about how Annie On My Mind was published in 1982? 1982? Almost 20 y It was like a war inside me; I couldn't even recognize all the sides. There was one that said, "No, this is wrong; you know it's wrong and bad and sinful," and there was another that said, "Nothing has ever felt so right and natural and true and good," and another that just wanted to stop thinking altogether and fling my arms around Annie and hold her forever. There were other sides, too, but I couldn't sort them out.Can we talk about how Annie On My Mind was published in 1982? 1982? Almost 20 years before Ellen came out on the Oprah Winfrey Show? 12 years before "Don't Ask, Don't Tell" was signed into law by the Clinton Administration? This book blows me away, mainly because it contains an honest exploration of emotions teens still face today - and it was published 13 years before I was born.The story focuses on Liza, a budding architect who aspires to attend MIT, and her growing relationship with Annie, an aspiring singer who wants to go to Berkeley. They meet at a museum and have a sword fight of sorts before partaking in other uncouth shenanigans - but beneath their antics lies the foundation of a meaningful, trusting friendship. However, their bond intensifies at a rapid pace, and they soon must figure out their feelings for one another before external factors their them apart.Nancy Garden's writing felt so honest in Annie On My Mind. Sure, a kid nowadays probably would have a smartphone to look up the definition of homosexuality and a laptop to find gay role models, but Liza's confusion and her budding relationship with Annie all came across as affecting and sincere. Liza's uncertainty about sex with Annie and her confusion about the expectations of those around her made me connect with her and her struggles throughout the story. Annie On My Mind shows how much worse it was for gay teens 30 years ago - without the out-and-proud celebrities and the eye-opening technology of today - but it also ends on a note of inspiration and hope. Garden did not render Liza and Annie into martyrs; she gave them dreams and desires, just like everyone else. By doing so, Garden made her characters people.Not a perfect book by any means - more like a 3.5. I wanted more development from Liza's family, from Garden's writing (which felt a little clunky at times), and from Liza and Annie's relationship as a whole. But, Annie On My Mind's significance as the first lgbtq novel transcends any possible rating, and even though Nancy Garden passed away last month, her impact on people within the lgbtq community will last forever.
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  • Sara
    May 28, 2007
    i didn't read this book until i was in my mid-twenties, though it is a book written for a teen audience. it was published in 1982, but i never even heard about it until i was in a queer women's book club in dc. we decided to read this as one of our selections (as well as "are you there, god? it's me, margaret.") it is truly a beautiful story and perfect for teens struggling with their sexuality. the author, nancy garden, doesn't shy away from many of the difficulties of being queer, but it's hea i didn't read this book until i was in my mid-twenties, though it is a book written for a teen audience. it was published in 1982, but i never even heard about it until i was in a queer women's book club in dc. we decided to read this as one of our selections (as well as "are you there, god? it's me, margaret.") it is truly a beautiful story and perfect for teens struggling with their sexuality. the author, nancy garden, doesn't shy away from many of the difficulties of being queer, but it's heart is really in the relationship of the two main characters. you can't help but root for them. i think we all remember, no mater what your sexual orientation is, how difficult high school can be. this book captures that but also reminds us that without those experiences, we wouldn't be the rockin' women we are today.
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  • Rose
    September 5, 2012
    Initial thoughts: I'm still trying to form thoughts on my reactions to "Annie on My Mind", but the one thing I can say was that this was a wonderful novel and I'm wondering why it took me so long to read it. Beautifully written, the relationship between Annie and Liza is quite resonant, not just in how it develops, but how it endures. I loved the ending, and I was happy to be able to listen to some reflective thoughts on Nancy Garden's life and personal experiences following the story.Full revie Initial thoughts: I'm still trying to form thoughts on my reactions to "Annie on My Mind", but the one thing I can say was that this was a wonderful novel and I'm wondering why it took me so long to read it. Beautifully written, the relationship between Annie and Liza is quite resonant, not just in how it develops, but how it endures. I loved the ending, and I was happy to be able to listen to some reflective thoughts on Nancy Garden's life and personal experiences following the story.Full review:"Annie on My Mind" was written approximately 30 years ago as of the year I'm writing this review (2012), and it feels as relevant today as it was in the time it was written (1982). I selected this read in honor of "Banned Books Week" and I have to say it's one of the most powerful novels I've had the pleasure of reading, not just in the GLBT spectrum but notably among young adult novels that show a sense of power, growth, and resonance in an individual spectrum as well as in the face of adversity. It shapes itself around a developing relationship between two young women and how that relationship fosters into love despite the contrasting social attitudes. I think one of the things about this novel that struck me, even considering the simple structure of the overarching plot and contrasting elements that might strike a familiar chord in terms of the antagonism the protagonists face, was that it provides a sharp eye into Liza's coming to terms with herself and sentiments. Her experiences are intimate without necessarily being overt, and there's a passion behind her coming to terms with how much she cares for Annie, even as she struggles to define what it is, what it means, and how to find legs to stand on with it.Liza's a senior class president attending a prominent private school that seems to be waning in terms of its prominence and funding. She meets Annie who, in contrast, attends a public school. The book focuses on how their feelings emerge and the awkwardness that entails with trying to come to terms with those sentiments - and I found that very realistic in the progression of the novel. Yet they keep their relationship secret as they recognize the social stigmas surrounding them, but eventually their relationship is blown wide open in an incident that threatens to tear them, and their worlds, apart - particularly from Liza's viewpoint considering her distinct identification in the matter. I commend how Garden treats the unfolding plot with sensitivity and ultimately in a way that makes the reader want to see how the relationship between the girls endures and what comes of it. I rooted for Liza and Annie and the two teachers who are also caught in the crossfire of that turn in the story, and I felt for Liza even as she faces direct challenges against who she is and how she mentally, sometimes externally, knocks down those prejudices - though it's also balanced with some of her qualms and moments of uncertainty. Granted, I think this novel set a tone for many books that follow it in the same spectrum of exploring dimensions of sexual orientation and relationships. I wonder, perhaps, that this novel could've even delved deeper into exploring the complexity of those prejudices and knocking them down, but I think for the story that was told, it does very well.One of the most important themes I've found in young adult literature is the establishment of identity. It's even a prominent theme among adults - finding your path to happiness, finding your heart, finding what makes you - well - you and being comfortable with that. "Annie on My Mind" builds upon that thematic with its protagonists well, though I admit that there are parts that I think could've been further delved into in retrospect. Still, I can see why many liked this novel and why it has such an impact. I definitely felt, appreciated, and would indubitably recommend it.Overall score: 4.5/5
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  • Jennifer Wardrip
    April 29, 2008
    Reviewed by Sally Kruger, aka "Readingjunky" for TeensReadToo.comNancy Garden's ANNIE ON MY MIND, originally published in 1982, was recently re-released. (It includes an interview with the author herself.) The book represents an early example of realistic young adult fiction depicting a lesbian relationship between two high school seniors. It is still a fitting portrayal for today's teens. Liza and Annie meet in a New York museum and develop a fast friendship. Both seem to realize there is somet Reviewed by Sally Kruger, aka "Readingjunky" for TeensReadToo.comNancy Garden's ANNIE ON MY MIND, originally published in 1982, was recently re-released. (It includes an interview with the author herself.) The book represents an early example of realistic young adult fiction depicting a lesbian relationship between two high school seniors. It is still a fitting portrayal for today's teens. Liza and Annie meet in a New York museum and develop a fast friendship. Both seem to realize there is something different about their relationship, but admitting that at the start is difficult for both. The story is told as Annie remembers it, and focuses mostly on her struggle to accept the facts she is learning about herself. The book's first half takes the reader into the growing friendship between the girls. There is considerable time spent describing how they discover their common interests and the activities they find to spend time together. The girls come from different backgrounds - Liza attends a relatively sheltered, private school currently struggling with financial difficulties, while Annie attends public school and is faced with drugs, violence, and other social problems public schools must deal with both then and now. As the girls' relationship develops, the plot becomes more involved in Liza's role as student council president and her school's struggle with a fund-raising campaign. Liza and Annie begin to accept the true direction of their friendship, and of course, as other people become aware, controversy surfaces. Will the admission of their gay lifestyle cause acceptance or abandonment by family and friends? Could their situation adversely affect a similar relationship between two teachers in Liza's private school? ANNIE ON MY MIND delves into the acceptance of homosexuality. It seems there will always be two sides to this controversy, but the re-release of the book may ask readers to decide if things are changing as time passes. What really matters in love - what is "right" for those involved or what is perceived as "right" by those whose views may differ?
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  • Les Read
    January 13, 2016
    Annie on My Mind is a beautiful love story about a friendship that blooms into love for two young women who are from different sides of the track. Liza attends a private high school and comes from a white-collar family, and Annie attends a public school and comes from a lower-income part of town. They're both bright and accomplished teenagers: Liza, who is applying for MIT to study architecture and Annie, a talented singer who dreams of being accepted into the music program at UC Berkeley. The c Annie on My Mind is a beautiful love story about a friendship that blooms into love for two young women who are from different sides of the track. Liza attends a private high school and comes from a white-collar family, and Annie attends a public school and comes from a lower-income part of town. They're both bright and accomplished teenagers: Liza, who is applying for MIT to study architecture and Annie, a talented singer who dreams of being accepted into the music program at UC Berkeley. The connection that they feel is immediate, and it grows as they spend more time with each other.This is a deeply introspective and well-written coming-of-age novel. Truly an extraordinary work from both a historical and literary standpoint. Dare, I say, its significance to American culture rivals Harper Lee's To Kill a Mockingbird? Annie on My Mind was published in 1982. I read this novel for the first time as a high school student in 1999, then again as an adult in 2016. Over the years, the story has not lost its beauty, its meaning, or even its relevance in today's society. Looking at current statistics of teenagers who have become homeless after coming out to their families, you'll agree that this book still has a very important place in our library shelves. Even as our society continues to progress, Annie on My Mind will be our reminder of where we were before, where we are today, and where we need to be tomorrow.
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  • Lisa
    May 2, 2011
    First impression: UGH. I'd heard about the use of archaic words, but man a-live. Thankfully that went away after a while.More importantly, Annie bothered me. A lot. Who breaks into spontaneous Shakespearean character? Annoying Shakesperean character? I didn't get what it was about her that entranced Liza.But then everything changed. I realized the metaphor behind the Shakespeare, and eventually the two of them (Annie in particular) stopped doing it. They gradually became, as Annie said, "real." First impression: UGH. I'd heard about the use of archaic words, but man a-live. Thankfully that went away after a while.More importantly, Annie bothered me. A lot. Who breaks into spontaneous Shakespearean character? Annoying Shakesperean character? I didn't get what it was about her that entranced Liza.But then everything changed. I realized the metaphor behind the Shakespeare, and eventually the two of them (Annie in particular) stopped doing it. They gradually became, as Annie said, "real." I also enjoyed the subplot of Foster's Academy. It didn't take me (too) long to know where that particular climax was headed, but it didn't matter. I wanted to know what would happen. I was able to predict another plot point, but that didn't matter either. I loved Annie and Liza together. I loved Liza. I appreciated the confusion and inner turmoil both girls went through. A severe understatement: I don't imagine this is easy, and Nancy Garden respected that. I do feel that maybe a few things went ignored, like Sally's character and transition, but I don't feel it affected the the integrity of the story too much.Despite being able to predict a few things, I never really knew where this story would conclude. I'm used to stories like these ending in tragedy, or simply in tears, or with a question mark. Once I wondered if it would end with something like "and I decided to be straight." No stereotypes reinforced here. I hope it's worked to get more than a few people thinking.This was just a good book. Totally recommended.
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  • Ant
    August 15, 2010
    I know this is a predictable and outdated novel. I've read negative reviews and complaints about it before (some from aspiring LGBTQ writers, and I respect their opinions.) Yes, I am aware of its flaws despite the rating I gave it.But it still remains as one of my favorites. Why? Because when I first read it (I was fourteen then), it brought me hope. During a time in my life where I was confused of my feelings, and thought myself as "abnormal", this book showed me that I wasn't alone. That even I know this is a predictable and outdated novel. I've read negative reviews and complaints about it before (some from aspiring LGBTQ writers, and I respect their opinions.) Yes, I am aware of its flaws despite the rating I gave it.But it still remains as one of my favorites. Why? Because when I first read it (I was fourteen then), it brought me hope. During a time in my life where I was confused of my feelings, and thought myself as "abnormal", this book showed me that I wasn't alone. That even though I would experience prejudice after coming out, I could still find happiness. I was attending a homophobic high school at the time (they wouldn't allow a Gay-Straight Alliance club, or even a discussion about sexual orientation in health class), so the novel provided an escape for me.I remember sneaking into the library to read it at a corner. About a couple years later, I bought a copy from a used book store(I was so nervous, although the cashier didn't seem to notice.) Right now it is a battered copy, and I'd read it a few times every year (mostly my favorite parts.) It inspired me to write LGBTQ fiction. This book will always be in my bookshelf because of how it changed me.This is a beautiful lesbian love story with a hopeful ending. I definitely recommend it if you like romance with build-up.
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  • Julia
    March 13, 2016
    "What struck me most, though, was that, in that whole long article, the word 'love' wasn't used even once. That made me mad; it was as if whoever wrote the article didn't know that gay people actually love each other. The encyclopedia writers ought to talk to me, I thought as I went back to bed; I could tell them something about love."This quote sums up pretty well what I loved the most about this book. Liza and Annie are only 17 year old when they fall in love, and this whole time, despite all "What struck me most, though, was that, in that whole long article, the word 'love' wasn't used even once. That made me mad; it was as if whoever wrote the article didn't know that gay people actually love each other. The encyclopedia writers ought to talk to me, I thought as I went back to bed; I could tell them something about love."This quote sums up pretty well what I loved the most about this book. Liza and Annie are only 17 year old when they fall in love, and this whole time, despite all their fears and insecurities and obstacles they faced, they refuse to believe that their feelings were anything other than wonderful. They made each other utterly happy, what they had was beautiful, and it was just absurd to them that other people had the audacity to think it "dirty" or "wrong".It was also the reason I read this in the first place, because I don't have the heart to read coming out stories of characters who are influenced to think that the way they feel is sinful and must be fought. Those just make me sad, and this book did the exact opposite. Liza and Annie's feelings for each other were pure magic, and they knew it.On a separate note, I'm deeply sad that I can't read a whole book about Isabelle Stevenson and Katherine Widmer's relationship. They were so incredible and important and it's a shame we only started hearing about their past right in the end of this book. I want to read the whole story of them (view spoiler)[meeting as teenagers too, going to college, Isabelle joining the WAC and the being discharged, the aftermath of that, them becoming teachers (hide spoiler)]...
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  • Agnese
    October 29, 2012
    Maybe I'm too picky or I've read too many amazing books, but I just can't give this book more than 2,5. 3 is too much for it.Maybe it's because it's more for teens than people my age and I'm too old. Maybe 1980s it was great and so, but definitely not anymore. It's too slow and naive, I just couldn't believe it, I was longing for this book to end.I really feel bad about giving this book 2, but I can't help myself. I know it's not the book, it's me... Sorry
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  • Just a man's point of view
    January 12, 2016
    I think reviewing Annie on my mind should be a little different than other contemporary lesbian romances.We should keep in mind that this book was written with a purpose. In the words of the author: "I wrote it to give solace to young gay people, to let them know they were not alone, that they could be happy and well adjusted and also to let heterosexual kids know that we gay people aren't monsters".We should remember that this book was published in 1982, that it was banned from Kansan City scho I think reviewing Annie on my mind should be a little different than other contemporary lesbian romances.We should keep in mind that this book was written with a purpose. In the words of the author: "I wrote it to give solace to young gay people, to let them know they were not alone, that they could be happy and well adjusted and also to let heterosexual kids know that we gay people aren't monsters".We should remember that this book was published in 1982, that it was banned from Kansan City schools and publicly burned.In other words this is a book of liberty, an instrument for freedom rights, written with heart for oppressed teens and a courage monument.Its message is very simple. Homosexual people just love like everybody else. And true love is always noble, beautiful, meaningful, precious.For two thirds of the book, the story is delicate, sweet. Two nice, intelligent seventeen years old girls, Liza and Annie, meet and fall in love. Feeling between them is immediate, and then these feelings grow and bud into love. They become aware of their own homosexuality, they see it's a good and natural thing for them and gradually come to accept it.They live their story in the closet, share first kisses and discover sex. There are not sex scenes in the novel, but the reader knows there is sex between them.What really works well in their relationship (and how it's described) is a mixt of friendship and spontaneity.I'm a big fan of friendship inside a love relationship, and Liza and Annie keep supporting each others as friends in every phase of their story.And then they are seventeen years old girls, they behave as such, doing silly and childish things among more serious, adult attitudes. That was so credible and funny.By the way, I'm asking myself if the term "unicorn" related to lesbians (with so many controversial meanings today), is born with this book as Liza and Annie meet in front of the unicorn tapestries of The Cloisters museum in New York and start to address each other as unicorns.What comes next is easy to expect, as everything before was hinting that that moment was coming, but I put it under spoiler.(view spoiler)[At exactly two thirds of the book they get caught. In Liza's school, attended by socially wealthy pupils, bigotry reigns and that is an ominous sign pending on her head.While Annie, who frequents a poor school, make it to escape, Liza undergoes the ordeal.She is forced to come out to her parents (which doesn't come without hurt) and ends up openly exposed to all her school.As they got caught at the home of two good lesbian teachers they also put them in serious trouble. The two adult teachers, who generously help the two girls, sharing their past experience and problems, are wonderful secundary characters.Liza falls into a crisis and for some months she has to deal with herself, leaving Annie alone. But at the very end she will accept and overcome everything and Annie, of course, will be there. (hide spoiler)]Out of the spoiler, there is a clash between ignorance and bigotry on one hand and understanding people on the other. All is so realistic. The MC are not heroes, they are very human. They stumble, fall and get up again. Liza's family will have to struggle, too. Price will be paid, but at the end love will win.I've seen in some of the previous reviews that some people (straight of course) minimized as unlikely what happens to them. They say the negative characters are just a caricature.But I tell you, Italy is just out of the battle for the civil union new law for homesexuals. Those people are real. Bigotry, intollerance, racism, it's all there.And while the situation is certainly much better since 1982 and I firmly believe the positive forces are winning, still the fight against ignorance must go on.I loved this little great book, both for its message of hope and for its simplicity and good heart.
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  • Ann
    December 8, 2011
    My favorite part about this book is that 90 percent is simply a love story between two teenagers. Liza and Annie are both very different people, from Annie’s love of plants and music to Liza’s passion for architecture. But they find they have lots of things in common, such as cats, and their interests contrast nicely, drawing them closer to together. They are friends who gradually realize there is more between them than friendship, and fairly soon their only problem is finding a place where they My favorite part about this book is that 90 percent is simply a love story between two teenagers. Liza and Annie are both very different people, from Annie’s love of plants and music to Liza’s passion for architecture. But they find they have lots of things in common, such as cats, and their interests contrast nicely, drawing them closer to together. They are friends who gradually realize there is more between them than friendship, and fairly soon their only problem is finding a place where they can ‘be alone together’.Well, not their only problem. Their other worry is hiding their relationship form their parents, because they are both girls. That and the ending – when they get found out – makes up the other 10 percent of the book.I did think Mrs. Poindexter was too much a caricature of the bigoted bad guy, but the fact that she started so many balls rolling against Liza and Annie, and Ms. Stevenson and Ms. Widmer, is a good example of how ‘mob mentality’ can quickly throw things out of proportion and cause people to do things they wouldn’t ordinarily. She did seem to want to rule Foster with an iron fist, and that at least was believable, since she used a subtle ‘velvet glove’ to enforce her edicts.I also liked how Liza, even though she ran scared at first when she went off to college, quickly realized what she’d be giving up by letting Annie go. Not all painful lessons have to end unhappily, and I love that she finally got the courage to call.
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  • ♫✯Em loves Hollenstein✯♫❤pizza rolls over gender roles❤Don't fall in love with the moment and think you're in love with the girl
    August 4, 2014
    A tad slow but adorable <3This book will stay with me forever. It's a beautiful, beautiful love story. I write this review after having reread the book for the first time since reading it last year, and I loved it even more this time. The characters, Annie and Liza's romance.. it felt so real, and beautiful. Their story is a gorgeous one, and this book really has so much emotion and truth in it. It isn't just a coming out or coming-of-age story, it is a ground-breaking love story. I felt A tad slow but adorable <3This book will stay with me forever. It's a beautiful, beautiful love story. I write this review after having reread the book for the first time since reading it last year, and I loved it even more this time. The characters, Annie and Liza's romance.. it felt so real, and beautiful. Their story is a gorgeous one, and this book really has so much emotion and truth in it. It isn't just a coming out or coming-of-age story, it is a ground-breaking love story. I felt happy and peaceful while reading this- it's the perfect novel to curl up in front of a fireplace with- but it's also a brutal reminder of how things were in the past. People are so much more accepting now, but it was hard to read about what happened to Liza as a result of her and Annie's relationship. The fact that the head-teacher fired two teachers for being gay was horrible to read. But the ending was so worth those beautifully sad pages. The ending was perfectly beautiful, romantic and sweet. It was like unicorns, candy-canes and fluffy kittens. This book is a valuable gift to me, and I am so happy it exists, despite the homophobes and doubters, and angry mobs of parents.
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  • Kurt
    February 3, 2015
    First of all this book touched me. I don't remember now what scene or thought "it" was, but for a brief moment I felt young and in love (on a sunny day). Sure the actions of the leads read much younger, initially anyway, and the setting for the story was as if it were 1972. No matter. I felt better after reading this charming book.
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  • Christina Wilder
    October 18, 2012
    Review also appears on The Book Lantern: http://www.thebooklantern.co.uk/2013/...I am embarrassingly behind on reading most of the books that often grace the banned/challenged list. One that’s often caught my eye was Annie On My Mind, which continues to receive vitriol for its portrayal of two young women who fall in love with each other.Young Adult as a genre has come a long way. Sure, there are the major setbacks of romanticizing abuse and cringe-worthy "teenspeak", but while there's the oblig Review also appears on The Book Lantern: http://www.thebooklantern.co.uk/2013/...I am embarrassingly behind on reading most of the books that often grace the banned/challenged list. One that’s often caught my eye was Annie On My Mind, which continues to receive vitriol for its portrayal of two young women who fall in love with each other.Young Adult as a genre has come a long way. Sure, there are the major setbacks of romanticizing abuse and cringe-worthy "teenspeak", but while there's the obligatory uproar over LGBT subjects, they are no longer the rarity. Books like Boy Meets Boy, Empress of the World, Luna, and countless others are available to teens everywhere in most libraries, bookstores, and of course online. It’s not as quite as barren out there as it was when I was in high school, which was about fifteen years ago. Yes, I’m old.Annie On My Mind came out in the early eighties, when being gay was still equated with AIDS and books that portrayed homosexuals in a positive light were few and far between. It's quite dated, as the dialogue and characterization in the first half of the book is stilted and awkward. An example:(pg. 12 in the paperback edition I read)"We're terribly sorry, sir," Annie said, with a look of such innocence I didn't see how anyone could possibly be angry at her. "The knights are so-so splendid! I've never seen them before - I got carried away.""Harrumph!" the guard said, loosening his hold on my shoulder and saying again, "Old enough to know better, both of you."It's worth pressing on, however, because truly shines once the story focuses on the relationship between Annie and Liza. Annie has already faced her attraction to other girls, but the affection that Liza feels for Annie is all new to her. Her subsequent frustration with Annie and herself feels genuine, but the stilted dialogue still carries through until their relationship becomes more serious. It’s then that the book seems to truly focus on the subject matter, which is the love story between these characters and the effect it has on their community. Naturally they find opposition, mostly when Liza’s private school discovers their relationship (as well as a similar one). Liza, being the student council president, is quite literally threatened when a couple of meddling school administrators decide to hold a trial of sorts to determine if Liza will keep her position, stay in the school, and have her “deviance” put on her permanent record, thus ruining her chances at going to MIT.Ultimately Liza comes to the realization that her love for Annie is what was put on trial:(pg. 199) It's Annie and me they're all sitting around here like cardboard people judging; it's Annie and me. And what we did that they think is wrong, when you pare it all down, was fall in love.It’s this message that makes this book a winner for me. Dated references and cartoonish depictions aside, Annie on My Mind is a love story for the ages. I tend to dislike romance as a genre and I’m also a die-hard cynic, but the end had me choked up. This book is very much archaic by today’s standards. Annie and Liza argue over things that seem flat out ridiculous (which tapestry to sit by where they eat their lunch…really?) and while it’s obvious that they’ve started having sex, the act is barely mentioned in passing. Of course Annie On My Mind didn’t need sex scenes, but while Liza does notice Annie’s physical attributes, we don’t really go into her thought process with her sexual attraction to another girl, which could be helpful to young adults who are struggling with their attraction and desire. It may not feel like it, but we’re starting to move in the right direction as far as LBGT issues are concerned. Gay couples are depicted in popular TV shows and movies, and coming out is no longer a death sentence to an entertainer’s career. In real life, hate speech directed towards LBGT people isn’t as tolerated as it once was, which isn’t to say it never happens, but people notice these things now and speak up against it. It’s a slow process, but we’re getting there. Keeping that in mind, it’s essential that books like these are read and discussed, because while it certainly has its faults, it’s the love story that prevails.
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  • Amy
    January 31, 2009
    This book is a love story about a teen who finds her soul mate and finds out she is gay at the same time. It deals not only her internal struggle with this realization, but the sometimes misguided effort of those around her to deal with it. It seems very cutting edge for it's time. Written in the early 1980s, it is a pretty realistic account of how the world reacted to gays at the time without losing the love story and focusing too much on gay discrimination.I think this book would appeal to tee This book is a love story about a teen who finds her soul mate and finds out she is gay at the same time. It deals not only her internal struggle with this realization, but the sometimes misguided effort of those around her to deal with it. It seems very cutting edge for it's time. Written in the early 1980s, it is a pretty realistic account of how the world reacted to gays at the time without losing the love story and focusing too much on gay discrimination.I think this book would appeal to teens because it is mostly a beautifully written love story about two teens in love for the first time. Teens will definitely relate to that part of it. What they may have trouble relating to is the gay discrimination being so intense. Being called in front of an inquisition at school for having sex (whether homosexual or heterosexual) is pretty far fetched today. They did do a good job of setting the stage for this by referring to a heterosexual couple who were expelled from the school because of a pregnancy. The teachers being fired because they live together and have books about lesbianism does not seem very realistic for today, but was pretty realistic when the book was written in the early 1980s.The Developmental markers that were addressed are Parent Involvement in Schooling and Achievement Motivation. Her parents do not do a perfect job of accepting and embracing her lesbianism, but they do stand behind her against the school and fight for her school record to remain clean. They still incourage her to go to college and do well in school.I found the characters very believable because at the end of the day this was a love story. It focused more on the emotion than sexual orientation and I found that very convincing because emotion is what love is all about, especially for a teen. It also showed how people were trying to be nice and help, but weren't and I think teens go through that a lot. I would promote this book to teens as a well written love story that would appeal to teens who like romance. I think it is a mistake to focus too much on differences and would choose to focus on the common emotions that teens go through with their first romance, whether it is homosexual or heterosexual. This book could also be promoted as an interesting look at predudice and how they change over time. Not only of homosexuals, but also of the heterosexual pregnancy. The view of acceptable sexual conduct at different times in history would appeal to some teens, even if it is just because the topic of sex in general appeals to teens.VOYA codes: 5Q, 4P, S
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  • B I A N C A
    January 26, 2017
    I've been debating with myself on what to rate this book... It is 3.5 stars to me, but since goodreads still hasn't added the half a star option honestly goodreads wtf I've decided to round it up to 4 instead of 3.This is a really cute, kind story about love, self descovering and self acceptance. Reading an LGBT+ book that was written in the fucking 80s is really interesting. I got to read how things were back then, even when I knew things were more difficult for the LGBT+ community, reading a b I've been debating with myself on what to rate this book... It is 3.5 stars to me, but since goodreads still hasn't added the half a star option honestly goodreads wtf I've decided to round it up to 4 instead of 3.This is a really cute, kind story about love, self descovering and self acceptance. Reading an LGBT+ book that was written in the fucking 80s is really interesting. I got to read how things were back then, even when I knew things were more difficult for the LGBT+ community, reading a book on the subject gives me new points of view and ways of analyzing it. The relationship between Liza and Annie is so cute, so pure, I really was craving for them to have a happy ending; they deserve nothing but good things. I actually think I fell in love with Annie... Where can I find a girlfriend like her????At times, I found myself having to put the book down for a few minutes because it made me sO MAD. The homophobia and sTUPIDITY in this book really upset me. However, I am not saying this as a bad thing. It actually amazes me how much the comments and situations Liza had to bear with got to me. I guess I was constantly putting myself in her shoes. Fucking empathy. Also, one thing I really loved and think is important to remark is how fucking important literature and books in general are in this story. When Annie and Liza find books related to homosexuality, it gives them a whole new spectre of resources to do some research and try to understand a bit better what's happening (because, let's not forget, censorship was a big deal back then and there was no Internet to come to for information. Lol). I found that really nice and real, something that still happens nowadays (damn, it happens to me every single day).All in all, this is a really great book everyone should try and read, especially if you are part of the LGBT+ community. It fills you with hope and optimism and, of course, feels for this two young girls and their unbreakable love for each other.
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  • Rebecca McNutt
    February 26, 2015
    I remember reading this book back in middle school (right before it was removed from the school library). What was unique about it was that it wasn't afraid to be honest, it was a book that dared to tell the truth: love is not a crime. Violence and hatred is.It's the story of two young girls who fall in love and this was in a century where being gay was seen as a disease and mental illness, so naturally people were ignorant as to the truth about it. The truth is, it's a story about friendship, l I remember reading this book back in middle school (right before it was removed from the school library). What was unique about it was that it wasn't afraid to be honest, it was a book that dared to tell the truth: love is not a crime. Violence and hatred is.It's the story of two young girls who fall in love and this was in a century where being gay was seen as a disease and mental illness, so naturally people were ignorant as to the truth about it. The truth is, it's a story about friendship, love and understanding. It's a novel that was way ahead of its time when it first came out and though it's rather dated now, it's still worth reading.
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  • Geraldine Soh
    December 11, 2011
    To me, no words can describe how was the book. Probably, there are, but, somehow, I felt that words like beautiful, amazing, inspiring are just understatements about the book. I guess, the book is 'fascinating' and 'magical'; just like what Liza felt about Annie.The way Nancy Garden writes or describes about the story or places or the characters or even how they feel, is so vivid and real. I don't know why but it literally made my heart ache every time the book talks about Liza and Annie.And the To me, no words can describe how was the book. Probably, there are, but, somehow, I felt that words like beautiful, amazing, inspiring are just understatements about the book. I guess, the book is 'fascinating' and 'magical'; just like what Liza felt about Annie.The way Nancy Garden writes or describes about the story or places or the characters or even how they feel, is so vivid and real. I don't know why but it literally made my heart ache every time the book talks about Liza and Annie.And the way Nancy Garden portrayed the Choir Screen, The Temple Of Dendur, The Cloisters and The Unicorn Tapestries, it just made me want to see them for myself in person. The words are indeed that strong and powerful and needless to say, beautiful.LGBTQ books are definitely not without obstacles and depressing parts; but that is exactly the real world from the past to present. Annie On My Mind allows homosexuals to connect with this book and reassures them that they are not alone as well as allowing straight people to understand the confusion and struggles that gay people have to face in this society. Definitely, I think this book will continue to serve this purpose till the time where gay people will be fully accepted in this world.Love this book to bits! I'm going to read it again. Everyone should to, regardless of what your sexual orientation is. :)
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  • Diana
    December 4, 2013
    "I read somewhere the other day that love is good as long as it's honest and unselfish and hurts no one" (161). Once again another book recommended by my English teacher and read it in three days. Today I finished the novel and I must admit that I truly cried. Not a tear, but a sob. I really connected to this novel because it relates to things I'm going through currently. I learned so much from this novel that it's unbelievable. I learned new things about life and society; but most importantly a "I read somewhere the other day that love is good as long as it's honest and unselfish and hurts no one" (161). Once again another book recommended by my English teacher and read it in three days. Today I finished the novel and I must admit that I truly cried. Not a tear, but a sob. I really connected to this novel because it relates to things I'm going through currently. I learned so much from this novel that it's unbelievable. I learned new things about life and society; but most importantly about myself. I learned to fight for what you love despite the opinions of others. You will only get as far as YOU want. Don't let anyone stop you. Nancy Garden presents two teenage girls who fall in love without realizing. They faced many challenges because of religious views and also because this took place in the 1950's when homosexuality was very risky to be exposed. But they fought for their love which is amazing. This novel has helped me feel less alone and with a sense of hope and acceptance of who I am. I strongly identify myself with these two young girls, Liz and Annie. I bet MY lover does too. And as I read, I show my girlfriend somethings that I feel relate to us. And I'm hoping that she too reads it. This even inspired me to write my girlfriend a letter based on how I felt when I finished reading the book. Really amazing book.
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  • Aragorn
    May 27, 2013
    Love is more than just the carnal desire--it is more than lust. It is more than the passion of the moment. As the saying goes, love knows no bounds. It does not see the colour of skin. It does not see gender. It does not see age. It does not see blood or wealth. Love simply is. It is the force that binds us all together. Love does not judge--why must we?"Annie on My Mind" is the story of a seventeen-year-old girl named Liza Winthrop who becomes enchanted with Annie Kenyon, a seventeen-year-old f Love is more than just the carnal desire--it is more than lust. It is more than the passion of the moment. As the saying goes, love knows no bounds. It does not see the colour of skin. It does not see gender. It does not see age. It does not see blood or wealth. Love simply is. It is the force that binds us all together. Love does not judge--why must we?"Annie on My Mind" is the story of a seventeen-year-old girl named Liza Winthrop who becomes enchanted with Annie Kenyon, a seventeen-year-old from a public school in a poor neighbourhood. "Annie on My Mind" is an emotional journey taken from the eyes of Liza as she becomes increasingly aware that her feelings for Annie are not merely those of friendship. People from Annie's private school discover the budding relationship and, in a fit of judgemental self-righteousness, threaten to tear their relationship together entirely.When I first started to read this book, I knew about the lesbian plot in the book. I knew it would be interesting, in the eyes of a straight man, to come to some closer understanding of -some- of the trials that homosexuals go through because of ignorance, arrogance, and flat-out stupidity. I found it interesting to see the relationship evolve as it did. It was genuine, and that was all that mattered, even if the principal of the school Liza attended did not agree.
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  • T
    August 26, 2012
    As soon as i heard the first words, "It's raining annie", i was captured. I was transported instantly into the hearts and souls of these two young girls in love. She was able to convey the love and joy underneath the confusion and difficult situations, and not in a sad depressing way. It was 7 hours of melancholy, a deeply personal and touching tale.This is one of those books that cannot be forgotten. I can see the characters, feel what they felt, and would insist to anyone that i know, that th As soon as i heard the first words, "It's raining annie", i was captured. I was transported instantly into the hearts and souls of these two young girls in love. She was able to convey the love and joy underneath the confusion and difficult situations, and not in a sad depressing way. It was 7 hours of melancholy, a deeply personal and touching tale.This is one of those books that cannot be forgotten. I can see the characters, feel what they felt, and would insist to anyone that i know, that they haven't read or listened to a story of quality quite like this. It's also one of those books that cannot be reviewed with words, it's one of those things you just have to experience for yourself.
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  • Sheida
    December 4, 2015
    It feels weird not giving this book 5 stars considering how emotional it made me and how well-written it was but I feel like - and I never thought this was something I would say - it was about 50 pages too short. A few more pages in the beginning to properly develop the start of the relationship so that it wouldn't feel so rushed and a few more pages at the end to give a more thorough explanation for all that occurs afterwards and it would have been perfect. This is more of a 4.5 rating though b It feels weird not giving this book 5 stars considering how emotional it made me and how well-written it was but I feel like - and I never thought this was something I would say - it was about 50 pages too short. A few more pages in the beginning to properly develop the start of the relationship so that it wouldn't feel so rushed and a few more pages at the end to give a more thorough explanation for all that occurs afterwards and it would have been perfect. This is more of a 4.5 rating though because everything else was great and so, dear Goodreads, please, for the love of god, it's almost 2016, give us the ability to use half stars.
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  • Romane
    May 22, 2015
    This book is a major letdown. At first, I was really fired up to read this, because I stumbled upon a lot of good reviews. The first chapter was okay, but the rest was just extremely boring — with the unnecessary detailing of trivial matters, and the annoying way in which Liza refers to herself and Annie as "gay people like us." I hated their medieval roleplay.I am not moved by the storyline at all. The story seems very predictable, and of course it contains cliché moments where the main charact This book is a major letdown. At first, I was really fired up to read this, because I stumbled upon a lot of good reviews. The first chapter was okay, but the rest was just extremely boring — with the unnecessary detailing of trivial matters, and the annoying way in which Liza refers to herself and Annie as "gay people like us." I hated their medieval roleplay.I am not moved by the storyline at all. The story seems very predictable, and of course it contains cliché moments where the main characters — Liza and Annie — seem to think that they have original problems compared to other people. I super appreciate LGBT novels, but I'm just disappointed with this. It dawned on me that it was delivered, in a way, for the sake of being shelved in the LGBT-themed books, rather than being written as a story about two girls falling in love.
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  • Kaitlin
    August 26, 2016
    I don't what to say except that this is the most beautifully written book I have read. It was written and released in the 1980s and the book itself did caused a lot of controversy back then when the lgbtq+ was a talked about issue and how the religious people would think that being gay was a sin. Reading this book really a game changer and how different it was when someone was gay or lesbian and how different they were to some people who thought being gay was a disease or something that can be c I don't what to say except that this is the most beautifully written book I have read. It was written and released in the 1980s and the book itself did caused a lot of controversy back then when the lgbtq+ was a talked about issue and how the religious people would think that being gay was a sin. Reading this book really a game changer and how different it was when someone was gay or lesbian and how different they were to some people who thought being gay was a disease or something that can be cured.Highly recommend to read this if you are an lgbt supporter or if you would like to just have a book to read.
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  • rachel
    October 30, 2011
    I thought this was pretty antiquated and read much like the "problem novels" that one of the blurbs on the back said it's not like. The voices of Liza and Annie read older than 17 sometimes, and younger than 17 at others. The whole thing has sort of a timeless quality. I can see how people admire it, but I found it hard to like in a scrappy human sort of way.Still, it's cool to be able to look on the public reaction to homosexuality in the 80's and think it's antiquated in the first place.
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  • Mike
    November 11, 2012
    I've been into LGBT fiction for a while. I'm not sure why, but for some reason, it's practically the only contemporary I can stand. And obviously, this is an important book in the genre, it being the first. This is the book that got publicly burnt in Kansas City and banned from more schools than you could imagine for having a lesbian couple in it. So naturally, I had to read it - if it's banned, it's for me. And I have to say that I quite enjoyed it. Sure, it's dated, but I'm sort of thankful - I've been into LGBT fiction for a while. I'm not sure why, but for some reason, it's practically the only contemporary I can stand. And obviously, this is an important book in the genre, it being the first. This is the book that got publicly burnt in Kansas City and banned from more schools than you could imagine for having a lesbian couple in it. So naturally, I had to read it - if it's banned, it's for me. And I have to say that I quite enjoyed it. Sure, it's dated, but I'm sort of thankful - I don't want this to be the social environment of the day. And the fact that it's dated doesn't get in the way of its quality.A lot of people complained about the writing, but I'm not really sure why, after having read it. It was awkward on occasion, but for the most part, it reminded me of something out of Julie Anne Peters or Ellen Wittlinger - not particularly special, but still engaging. (I suspect the resemblance is no coincidence, considering that both write LGBT fiction.)But the real strength of the book was the characters. Both Annie and Liza were well-rendered, and they acted like real people. I really liked Liza as a narrator, in particular. It got to the point where I got genuinely worried for them when bad things started happening to them, simply because I cared about their romance so much.The romance between the two is another very well done part of the book. It was slow-burning - too slow-burning perhaps, since they didn't do anything further than normal friendship until almost halfway through. But it was believable and interesting, and even when you thought they were being stupid together, you could see why they did it. (This is a nice contrast from... say... Luna, where the characters seem to be morons for no reason.)Unfortunately, this book is hampered down by chronic lack of plot. It's not until two thirds of the way in where anything interesting or really, anything at all happens. There's a subplot about Liza's presidency of the student council that is completely interesting and goes no where, and there's little plotting other than that for most of the book. It's too bad, because once the plot really starts, it's actually quite interesting. If Garden had tightened the pacing, it could've been really entertaining. But sadly, like most contemporary works, Garden shows that she can write well and develop good characters, but she can't write a plot to back them up.Nevertheless, this is definitely a worthwhile book, and a must-read for any fans of LGBT fiction. And what with it being so important, I can't urge you enough to at least try it, if for no other reason, then the historical context.
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  • Biondy
    February 17, 2013
    Judul: Annie on My MindPenulis: Nancy GardenPenerbit: Aerial FictionHalaman: 233 halamanTerbitan: 1992 (pertama terbit 1982)This groundbreaking book is the story of two teenage girls whose friendship blossoms into love and who, despite pressures from family and school that threaten their relationship, promise to be true to each other and their feelings. This book is so truthful and honest, it has been banned from many school libraries and even publicly burned in Kansas City.Of the author and the Judul: Annie on My MindPenulis: Nancy GardenPenerbit: Aerial FictionHalaman: 233 halamanTerbitan: 1992 (pertama terbit 1982)This groundbreaking book is the story of two teenage girls whose friendship blossoms into love and who, despite pressures from family and school that threaten their relationship, promise to be true to each other and their feelings. This book is so truthful and honest, it has been banned from many school libraries and even publicly burned in Kansas City.Of the author and the book, the Margaret A. Edwards Award committee said, “Nancy Garden has the distinction of being the first author for young adults to create a lesbian love story with a positive ending. Using a fluid, readable style, Garden opens a window through which readers can find courage to be true to themselves.”Review"Annie on My Mind" bercerita tentang dua orang gadis muda. Liza, si ketua murid di sekolah swasta Foster, suatu hari bertemu dengan Annie, seorang gadis periang dengan bakat seni yang luar biasa, di museum. Dari satu pertemuan itu berlanjut ke pertemuan-pertemuan selanjutnya. Hingga akhirnya mereka sadar bahwa mereka jatuh cinta satu sama lain. Ya, ini memang novel dengan tema lesbian. Saya cukup suka pada karakter-karakternya. Liza si ketua murid di sebuah sekolah swasta, yang bercita-cita untuk menjadi arsitek, dan Annie si periang dan berbakat seni, yang sekolah di sebuah tempat yang berbalik 180 derajat dari sekolah Liza. Tentu saja dalam kasus mereka, bukan perbedaan yang menghambat hubungan. Persamaan merekalah yang menjadi tantangan terbesar. Novel ini sendiri bersikap sangat positif terhadap lesbianisme. Mendukung malah. Tentu saja ini tidak berarti bahwa hubungan Liza dan Annie lancar jaya sepanjang novel. Tidak. Hubungan mereka memiliki naik-turunnya sendiri. Ada tantangan dari luar, juga dukungan dari orang terdekat, yang mendampingi kisah cinta mereka.Kalau mencari novel bertema LGBT dengan pesan dan akhir yang positif (seperti yang tertera di blurb-nya), maka saya merekomendasikan novel ini.Buku ini untuk tantangan baca:- 2013 New Authors Reading Challenge- 2013 Books in English Reading Challenge- 2013 What's in A Name Reading Challenge
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