Annie on My Mind
This groundbreaking book is the story of two teenage girls whose friendship blossoms into love and who, despite pressures from family and school that threaten their relationship, promise to be true to each other and their feelings. The book has been banned from many school libraries and publicly burned in Kansas City. Of the author and the book, the Margaret A. Edwards Award committee said, “Using a fluid, readable style, Garden opens a window through which readers can find courage to be true to themselves.”

Annie on My Mind Details

TitleAnnie on My Mind
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseJul 27th, 1992
PublisherFarrar, Straus and Giroux (BYR)
ISBN-139780374404147
Rating
GenreLgbt, Young Adult, Romance, Fiction, Glbt, Queer

Annie on My Mind Review

  • Sarah Verminski
    January 1, 1970
    Annie On My Mind will always have a special place in my heart, it was the first lesbian themed book I ever read. You may not understand the enormity of this, but just try to understand being 14 and every book you read involves a romance between a man and a woman. Every movie, every TV show, everyone I know is straight, nobody knows I'm gay, I barely understand it myself, and I pick up this book and suddenly it's like I can breathe. Suddenly I don't feel so alone, there's an actual published book Annie On My Mind will always have a special place in my heart, it was the first lesbian themed book I ever read. You may not understand the enormity of this, but just try to understand being 14 and every book you read involves a romance between a man and a woman. Every movie, every TV show, everyone I know is straight, nobody knows I'm gay, I barely understand it myself, and I pick up this book and suddenly it's like I can breathe. Suddenly I don't feel so alone, there's an actual published book I can relate to. It was amazing and freeing, and I'll always be greatful to Nancy Garden for giving me that gift.
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  • Lola
    January 1, 1970
    3.5 stars.This romantic relationship is so… organic. Liza and Annie fall in love with each other gradually and for the right reasons. Neither expected to feel so deeply for the other person, but they cannot deny their feelings for one another without breaking their own heart in the process, even if they both know people in their lives disapprove of them or would disapprove if they knew they were more than friends. They know society is against them, but still they decide to see where their feelin 3.5 stars.This romantic relationship is so… organic. Liza and Annie fall in love with each other gradually and for the right reasons. Neither expected to feel so deeply for the other person, but they cannot deny their feelings for one another without breaking their own heart in the process, even if they both know people in their lives disapprove of them or would disapprove if they knew they were more than friends. They know society is against them, but still they decide to see where their feelings lead them. And they do so very organically; everything happens so naturally I completely believed Liza and Annie were meant to be together and was ready to defend them until I had no more voice. It is told from Liza’s point of view only, meaning that we do not have direct access to Annie’s thoughts, but that didn’t keep me from understanding and getting to know her almost as well as the main character herself. Because Liza is thoroughly authentic and relatable—a real teenager who questions her sexual identity—her thoughts were meaningful and easy to follow. This book was published thirty-six years ago, and yet, I would have believed you if you’d told me it hit the shelves yesterday.Because there are still too many LGBTQ+ people who do not feel safe bringing their relationship with their significant other into the open, and thus being their true selves. Though I’m of the opinion that we as a society are going in the right direction with regards to these issues, there is still work to be done. A heartfelt, slow exploration of love and heartbreak, as well as a beautiful coming of age story that could have used more developed secondary characters, but that was satisfying nonetheless. Most important of all, it is a positive outlook on same-sex relationships, empowering LGBTQ+ people to trust themselves and not let anyone else dictate who they shall love. I hope to one day be able to say that this book is outdated; that it is in no way realistic; that gay people do not face the same problems anymore. But as of today, it is certainly not. Blog | Youtube | Twitter | Instagram | Google+ | Bloglovin’
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  • Virginia Ronan ♥ Herondale ♥
    January 1, 1970
    ”Have you ever felt really close to someone? So close that you can’t understand why you and the other person have two separate bodies, two separate skins?”Oh my! This book hit me with so many different feels I didn’t even understand what was happening to me. I mean I knew ”Annie on My Mind” is an f/f romance and that it wasn’t only banned from school libraries but also publicly burned at some point. I knew this book was published about 36 years ago and that Nancy Garden is a lesbian. I knew all ”Have you ever felt really close to someone? So close that you can’t understand why you and the other person have two separate bodies, two separate skins?”Oh my! This book hit me with so many different feels I didn’t even understand what was happening to me. I mean I knew ”Annie on My Mind” is an f/f romance and that it wasn’t only banned from school libraries but also publicly burned at some point. I knew this book was published about 36 years ago and that Nancy Garden is a lesbian. I knew all this and it intrigued me enough to give the book a decent shot. What I certainly didn’t know, was how deeply this book would actually touch me. T_T There is something honest about Garden’s writing style, some truth that’s in her words and wants to be heard. There is love in her writing, true love, the kind of love you only find once in a lifetime. And there is a rare ability to capture ordinary moments and to make them special somehow. Annie held my hand, stroking it softly. “Don’t talk,” she said. “I won’t let you float away. You can’t go far with me holding on to you. I’ll keep you here, love, shh.”I think what surprised me the most, was how relatable this story was. I mean this is a book that’s been published 36 years ago, yet there still were so many moments my head and my heart could relate to. I found myself in some of those lines and I also found other people I know, which is probably the reason why Nancy Garden wrote the book in the first place. She wanted us to identify with her characters and to understand them better and if you ask me she did a more than just decent job! ;-)”There’s no need for us to pretend to be other people any more, ever again, is there, Liza?” Annie said softly. My eyes stung suddenly, and Annie touched the bottom lids with her finger, asking, “Why tears?”I kissed her finger. “Because I’m happy,” I said. “Because your saying that right now makes me happier than almost anything else could. No – there’s no need to pretend.”Liza and Annie. *sighs* Those two girls! They broke my heart. I loved them both and I could understand their fear to be discovered, their need to hide who they truly were, how they felt about each other. Was it horrible how their love was discovered? Boy, you bet your behind it was! But I think in some way it was also good. I mean it helped them to find themselves and what they wanted to be. ”We didn’t really talk much about being gay; most of the time we just talked about ourselves. We were what seemed important then, not some label.””She put her hand on mine, barely touching it. “It’s all right with me,” she whispered, “if it is with you.”“I – I don’t know,” I said.It was like a war inside me; I couldn’t even recognize all the sides. There was one that said, “No, this is wrong; you know it’s wrong and bad and sinful,” and there was another that said, “Nothing has ever felt so right and natural and true and good,” and another that said it was happening too fast, and another that just wanted to stop thinking altogether and fling my arms around Annie and hold her forever. There were other sides, too, but I couldn’t sort them out.Jeez! Liza’s struggle felt so real and relatable!!! How often did I use the word “relatable” already? Must have been at least three times by now, but it’s true! Damn! This book! See, I can’t even write a decent review because I understand the main characters way too well. Nancy Garden might be no Oscar Wilde or Shakespeare but damn does she know how to convey her characters feelings! *lol* Which automatically brings me to the next topic! More than 30 years and teens and people all over the world still struggle with the same problems Liza and Annie had to face! Of course there changed a lot by now and our society is more open minded, to come out to your family and friends is still quite an issue though. ”What struck me the most, though, was that in that whole long article, the word “love” wasn’t used even once. That made me mad; it was as if whoever wrote the article didn’t know that gay people actually love each other. The encyclopedia writers ought to talk to me, I thought as I went back to bed; I could tell them something about love.”Liza I feel you!!! This passage! I couldn’t agree more! Love, it’s all about love and no label, no lifestyle, it’s NOT a choice!!! You don’t choose to be gay! You are! It’s natural and normal, it’s who you are and how you feel and it’s not something that needs to be cured, it's nothing to be ashamed of! Did I already mention that I hated Mrs. Poindexter? I hated her with a fierce passion! This woman!! Her and Ms. Baxter! And Sally for that matter! They were all so wrong! There were moments I was so angry I had to put down the book in order to resist the temptation to throw it against a wall. XD ”But I have no choice, and someday you may even thank me. I sincerely hope so, not because I want thanks, but because I want to think that you will be – be healed, regain your moral sense, whatever is necessary to set you right again.””Gay,” Sally said softly. “Oh, Liza, what a sad word! What a terribly sad word. Ms. Baxter said that to me and she’s right. Even with drugs and liquor and other problems like that, most of the words are more honestly negative – stoned, drunk out of one’s mind …”ARGH! All those prejudices! I can’t even! Makes me angry all over again. I hated how they all reacted to Liza’s and Annie’s relationship and I’m sure in some parts of the world, for some people it’s still the same. Even after 30 years, after all the sex education, after everything that happened, some people out there still have to face the same – excuse my crude language – bullshit! I mean just take Austria, my country. Is it accepted to be a part of the LGBTQ community? Yes, it is. It is allowed to marry? Yes, it is. Are people staring at you when you’re a girl and hold a girls hand and it’s obvious you’re in a relationship? Yes, they do! So for all the official and legal rights, people still frown upon LGBTQ relationships. I guess it’s because most of them still think like Liza’s father:”Oh, look,” he said, “what difference does it make if a couple of teachers at Foster are lesbians? Those two are damn good teachers and good people, too, as far as I know. Ms. Widmer especially – look at the poems Chad’s written this year, look at how good Liza suddenly got in English. The hell with anything else. I don’t care about their private lives, about anyone’s, at least I …” He picked up his drink again and took a long swallow. “Liza, damn it, I always thought I was – well, okay about things like homosexuality. But now when I find out that my own daughter might be …”It’s tolerated as long as it are the others, but god forbid it might be your own daughter or son who’s gay. I guess in many ways Austria is still a very conservative country and even though we just recently celebrated the pride parade (for the 23rd time I may add) there’s still a lot of work to be done. I guess if you consider other countries we’re doing pretty well though. Let’s just hope things will get even better in the future! =) There’s always hope, right? ”It’s not a problem,” I said. “It’s not negative. Don’t you know that it’s love you’re talking about? You’re talking about how I feel about another human being and how she feels about me, not about some kind of disease you have to save us from.” This was so well said and I couldn’t agree more! Liza nailed it! I think I could go on and on about people’s rights but I’ll stop right here before it gets out of hand. *lol* You know me, I feel strongly about those things and I have an opinion about everything. ;-P Anyway, before I end this review I have to point out two important characters that have become my personal heroes: Ms. Stevenson and Ms. Widmer! <333 They were AMAZING!!! I loved how they supported Annie and Liza and I think they are angels for trying to be there for them. Despite everything that happened they didn’t even hesitate to defend them and tried to help them as best as they could. The world needs more teachers like them and less teachers like Mrs. Poindexter and Ms. Baxter!All told I can really recommend “Annie on My Mind” and I hope many people will read it and will not only be touched by it but also will find themselves between the pages of this special book! =) To say it with Ms. Stevenson’s words:“Don’t let ignorance win,” said Ms. Stevenson. “Let love.”
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  • Elyse
    January 1, 1970
    Update: For those who are looking for 'wonderful' audiobooks --a 'great story' which will hold your interest from start to finish ---THIS IS IT!!! Its still one of my favorite audiobooks...ECHO is 'exceptional'!! I've been thinking about audiobooks --and I saw a member notice this book a few minutes ago--and I just can't say enough good things about it. I 'STILL' have Iris to thank!!! I can't imagine 'anyone' not liking it! Thank you **Iris** for this Audible book. I can't thank Iris enough! (an Update: For those who are looking for 'wonderful' audiobooks --a 'great story' which will hold your interest from start to finish ---THIS IS IT!!! Its still one of my favorite audiobooks...ECHO is 'exceptional'!! I've been thinking about audiobooks --and I saw a member notice this book a few minutes ago--and I just can't say enough good things about it. I 'STILL' have Iris to thank!!! I can't imagine 'anyone' not liking it! Thank you **Iris** for this Audible book. I can't thank Iris enough! (an entire new experience in 'reading/listening' has opened for me). .....shhhhhh, I think 'forever'! Many of you know I had two surgeries on my ankle this year --(a complete ankle replacement). I spent 2 months in bed - (not allowed to walk). During that time I read -and was peaceful. I read all day --how bad could it be?! :)The second stage: walking with crutches and physical therapy 'wasn't' fun. (cut into my reading time to boot).The third stage was the worse: I didn't feel I was getting better. My new ankle 'itself' was already great & flexible - no pain --but I had 'more' pain in the right side of my foot than 'ever'. I kept seeing the doctor. He kept giving me bone scans, back x-rays, shots, etc. Its 'still' a puzzle. (I still have the pain -less -but not gone)Stage 4: I'm walking (not hiking hilly trails, but more than just to my car for a quick run-into a store) This morning I had my longest walk to date since my surgery. 5.5 miles.Thank You you Iris...and my new toy...*audible*!!! :) I'm hooked now. I can't wait to go walking again --and find another book to listen to as I 'practice' walking with my new ankle.THANK YOU SO MUCH, IRIS! (I wouldn't have taken the leap had you not put this in my hands).Thank you to the author, Nancy Garden! The author was a brave woman who wrote this book. The conversation at the end of the book -with the author- is terrific, fascinating -interesting! Its amazing the loops and hoops this book went through. The girls in this story are bright...creative -and in love! The story might be written a little different 'today' ....(but maybe not much) --I don't want to give anything away: its just DAMD GOOD!!!!The voices are PERFECT -REAL -AUTHENTIC! (I was choked a few times). Ever feel like crying -but trying not to cry? (it was like that for me a couple of times). I HIGHLY recommend to EVERYONE! (if you don't believe me --ask Iris)! :)Sooooooooooo lovely!!!5+++ stars!!!
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  • Skyler
    January 1, 1970
    I'm not sure I'm qualified to write much of a review on this book, as I was never an adolescent lesbian. But I will say that it was incredibly easy to relate to--even for an adolescent hetero male--and the situation is touching, if not incredibly sad.Liza is a teenager who finds a companion in a fellow museum-goer one star-struck day. Cautious and excited, she pursues her romance, despite the fact that many around her do not seem to understand. Through the help of a teacher, she finds guidance i I'm not sure I'm qualified to write much of a review on this book, as I was never an adolescent lesbian. But I will say that it was incredibly easy to relate to--even for an adolescent hetero male--and the situation is touching, if not incredibly sad.Liza is a teenager who finds a companion in a fellow museum-goer one star-struck day. Cautious and excited, she pursues her romance, despite the fact that many around her do not seem to understand. Through the help of a teacher, she finds guidance in her love, but one thing leads to another, and when Liza and her girlfriend are caught between the sheets at the lesbian teacher's house, wheels are set in motion by society that end in somewhat maddening circumstances.The beauty of this book is its focus on the teenage crush and how it develops into love. I remember having these thoughts and emotions myself, being so curious and eager, and being scared out of my mind. The fact that the relationship subject surrounds a lesbian couple, only emphasizes that orientation has nothing to do with it. People are people, and we cannot help who we are attracted to. When love grabs us, it grabs hard, especially when we're young, and we seem to always make the craziest decisions in its vise.Some claim the book is shallow, but I think its target audience would disagree. The fact that the emphasis is on healing, instead of hurting, is something to be lauded. The world has seen the tragedy of homosexuality, and it's ready to see how love can go beyond that.
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  • Thomas
    January 1, 1970
    It was like a war inside me; I couldn't even recognize all the sides. There was one that said, "No, this is wrong; you know it's wrong and bad and sinful," and there was another that said, "Nothing has ever felt so right and natural and true and good," and another that just wanted to stop thinking altogether and fling my arms around Annie and hold her forever. There were other sides, too, but I couldn't sort them out.Can we talk about how Annie On My Mind was published in 1982? 1982? Almost 20 y It was like a war inside me; I couldn't even recognize all the sides. There was one that said, "No, this is wrong; you know it's wrong and bad and sinful," and there was another that said, "Nothing has ever felt so right and natural and true and good," and another that just wanted to stop thinking altogether and fling my arms around Annie and hold her forever. There were other sides, too, but I couldn't sort them out.Can we talk about how Annie On My Mind was published in 1982? 1982? Almost 20 years before Ellen came out on the Oprah Winfrey Show? 12 years before "Don't Ask, Don't Tell" was signed into law by the Clinton Administration? This book blows me away, mainly because it contains an honest exploration of emotions teens still face today - and it was published 13 years before I was born.The story focuses on Liza, a budding architect who aspires to attend MIT, and her growing relationship with Annie, an aspiring singer who wants to go to Berkeley. They meet at a museum and have a sword fight of sorts before partaking in other uncouth shenanigans - but beneath their antics lies the foundation of a meaningful, trusting friendship. However, their bond intensifies at a rapid pace, and they soon must figure out their feelings for one another before external factors their them apart.Nancy Garden's writing felt so honest in Annie On My Mind. Sure, a kid nowadays probably would have a smartphone to look up the definition of homosexuality and a laptop to find gay role models, but Liza's confusion and her budding relationship with Annie all came across as affecting and sincere. Liza's uncertainty about sex with Annie and her confusion about the expectations of those around her made me connect with her and her struggles throughout the story. Annie On My Mind shows how much worse it was for gay teens 30 years ago - without the out-and-proud celebrities and the eye-opening technology of today - but it also ends on a note of inspiration and hope. Garden did not render Liza and Annie into martyrs; she gave them dreams and desires, just like everyone else. By doing so, Garden made her characters people.Not a perfect book by any means - more like a 3.5. I wanted more development from Liza's family, from Garden's writing (which felt a little clunky at times), and from Liza and Annie's relationship as a whole. But, Annie On My Mind's significance as the first lgbtq novel transcends any possible rating, and even though Nancy Garden passed away last month, her impact on people within the lgbtq community will last forever.
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  • Emer
    January 1, 1970
    "Have you ever felt really close to someone? So close that you can't understand why you and the other person have two separate bodies, two separate skins? I think it was Sunday when that feeling began." There is a reason that this novel was so groundbreaking upon its release in 1982. It is utterly beautiful and devastating. The teenage love story between Liza and Annie is nothing short of moving. It starts out so simply. Two girls that form a gorgeously written connection that blossoms so natur "Have you ever felt really close to someone? So close that you can't understand why you and the other person have two separate bodies, two separate skins? I think it was Sunday when that feeling began." There is a reason that this novel was so groundbreaking upon its release in 1982. It is utterly beautiful and devastating. The teenage love story between Liza and Annie is nothing short of moving. It starts out so simply. Two girls that form a gorgeously written connection that blossoms so naturally and easily into an all encompassing innocent love that wrongly threatens the world around them. Love is love. And this is one of the most beautifully written love stories I have read. "We didn't really talk much about being gay; most of the time we just talked about ourselves. We were what seemed important then, not some label." What happens to the young girls upon the discovery of their romance is nothing short of shameful and what saddens me is that although this book is 35 years old the homophobia displayed by many of the characters in this book is still prevalent today. "It's not a problem" I said. "It's not negative. Don't you know that it's love you're talking about? You're talking about how I feel about another human being and how she feels about me, not about some kind of disease you have to save us from." But despite the homophobia, despite the obstacles and heartache this book packs a hopeful punch. Love is the victor. "Then you will know the truth, and the truth will set you free."four stars
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  • Rachel Hall
    January 1, 1970
    Reading Annie on My Mind in 2017, what was once considered a groundbreaking coming of age novel on its publication in 1982 admittedly feels incredibly dated. Thankfully attitudes have mellowed, albeit much too slowly, but besides the abhorrent treatment and an appreciation of progress made, the emotions of the story are still very true. Whilst the actual specifics and details may be markedly different for today's teenagers, the ensuing turmoil of self-acceptance and coming to terms with ones ide Reading Annie on My Mind in 2017, what was once considered a groundbreaking coming of age novel on its publication in 1982 admittedly feels incredibly dated. Thankfully attitudes have mellowed, albeit much too slowly, but besides the abhorrent treatment and an appreciation of progress made, the emotions of the story are still very true. Whilst the actual specifics and details may be markedly different for today's teenagers, the ensuing turmoil of self-acceptance and coming to terms with ones identity is still every bit as relevant. Not every moment of Liza and Annie’s story will chime with every gay or ‘confused’ (I hate that term) teenager, but through it they will be able to draw parallels to their own lives. Annie on My Mind is the story of two seventeen-year-old girls whose chance meeting at a museum and their blossoming friendship slowly turns to first love, self-discovery and the struggle to stand up and be proud of who and what they are. When Eliza (Liza) Winthrop visits the Metropolitan Museum of Art in search of inspiration for her architecture project she meets Annie Kenyon and they form a instant connection, despite coming from vastly different backgrounds. Liza is a privately educated pupil at priggish Foster Academy in Brooklyn Heights and as a studious and sensible girl she has been elected student council president. Together with her parents and younger brother, Chad, she has never given too much thought to anything other than aiming to study at MIT, let alone love. Annie Kenyon, meanwhile, lives in a rather more down-at-heel neighbourhoods and as a daughter of an Italian born cab-driver she attends a significantly rougher public school, where she feels very different to her classmates. At Liza’s school, Foster Academy, the emphasis is on upholding morals and adhering to strict rules, most closely scrutinised by two religious zealots in headmistress, Mrs Poindexter, and her acolyte of an admin assistant, Ms Baxter. Launching a fund-raising drive to save the school, Liza’s breach of a bizarre (nonsensical) reporting rule over an ill-advised ear-piercing session carried out by another student, Sally Jarrell, gets her suspended and it is her recounting of this debacle that sets the tone for much of the novel. However, not all the teachers at Foster Academy are quite as small-minded and in art teacher, Ms Stevenson, and English teacher, Ms Widmer, whose discreet cohabitation arrangement may appear very innocent within the confines of the school kindred spirits do exist. The suspension and the burgeoning friendship of Liza and Annie slowly turns to something more and ‘cat-sitting’ for the aforementioned teachers turns out to be a euphemism for their first physical encounters! Despite Liza having to go before the draconian disciplinary panel and her unwillingness to admit to the full extent of her liaison to her parents, an enforced summer separation and first term as freshman allows reflection for both girls and the promise of a Christmas reunion hints at both being determined to give it a shot!Readers hoping for a ‘cheap thrill’ will be sorely disappointed by the contents of Annie on My Mind for there is very little detail about the physical side of the relationship. It takes Liza and Annie a lengthy period of flirting and clumsy fooling around before they manage to hold hands, let alone kiss. Even then the emphasis isn’t on showing the physical manifestations of their love, but in just spending time together, not touching, but simply being close to someone once a connection has been made. The hesitation surrounding the initial stages of the romance takes the form of tomfoolery and play acting and whilst I found this hard to identify with, it was all part of testing the water and gauging an individuals response to ones intimations and overtures. The pantomime charade is a little overly long and frankly embarrassingly twee and felt somewhat stilted, however, I felt part of this clunkiness was beneficial in reflecting how awkward it can feel for things to begin to progress and emotions outside of ones comfort zone to begin to emerge. Once the girls come to accept the progression of the relationship to a more physical love, the hesitation and hurdles are well documented and for many people today this is still a significant obstacle. Annie on My Mind is a beautiful tale of two girls, both wiser than their years, slowly beginning to come to terms with their emotions.Although it is often said that this is a “lesbian love story with a happy ending” and there is the promise of hope and the relationship flourishing, on the evidence of the attitudes of the era, I think that the optimism should be a little more reserved. After all, with Liza being called before the trustees’ council and the bible bashing crones that pass for the staff of Foster Academy spouting an about immorality and Sodom and Gomorrah, I fear this may be wishful thinking. Some youngsters today might have difficulty relating to the two seventeen-year-olds as the passing generation have given way to a more streetwise, open-minded and experienced mindset. I can appreciate that some may find Liza and Annie a little dull, in terms of dating rites but I would urge them to stick with this novel, if only to appreciate the albeit slow progress we have made in accepting homosexuality. I had questions and areas that I felt Nancy Garden neglected to address, most notably the religious beliefs of Liza and Annie, particularly given how devout Foster Academy seemed to be. For example, did the Winthrop family have strict religious beliefs, or was it just Foster Academy that was so conformist? Annie on My Mind is narrated from Liza’s point of view and inevitably it feels that she is more clearly drawn than Annie, despite Annie having largely come to terms with her sexuality, she remains a vaguer and unknown quantity.A wonderful read, not without its faults or particularly great literature, Nancy Garden’s portrayal of first love still has relevance, even for today's more confident and worldly wise teenagers. Honest, sentimental, frequently corny from the overtures of their first meeting, their muddled feelings and their course to becoming lovers, this is a charming and poignant novel that I am throughly glad to have read. The school setting works well and plays an important role through its oppressive and overtly hostile atmosphere when Liza’s is called a lesbian and when her lab partner asks her about the mechanics of lesbian sex. As heavy handed and gauche as this book often feels whilst reading, there is something fitting about the whole ungainliness of the story and it is undoubtedly still true that the course of gay love is still not as recognised or accepted as it deserves to be.
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  • anna (readingpeaches)
    January 1, 1970
    This review is also posted on my blog.I received a galley from the publisher via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.Speaking as a lesbian, I can't even begin to properly explain to you why this book is so important to me. My only wish is that I read it at 15 instead of 25 & I really, really hope there have been a bunch of kids who did just that! I'm sure there must have been though given it's 35 years (!!!) since Annie on My Mind was first published.And I think that's one of the grea This review is also posted on my blog.I received a galley from the publisher via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.Speaking as a lesbian, I can't even begin to properly explain to you why this book is so important to me. My only wish is that I read it at 15 instead of 25 & I really, really hope there have been a bunch of kids who did just that! I'm sure there must have been though given it's 35 years (!!!) since Annie on My Mind was first published.And I think that's one of the greatest things about this book. I can't even imagine what it must have been like to read something this wholesome and this soft back then. It's still lowkey revolutionary now! Lines like "nothing has ever felt so right and natural and true and good" about two girls kissing? I don't think I'm gonna be over it anytime soon. It's amazing to not only see yourself represented by very real, multi-dimensional characters, but also - being told time & time again that there's nothing wrong with the way you are, with the people you love. It's not often that someone defends us so fiercely in books and it really feels like a very much needed warm hug at the end of a hard day. You can tell while reading that the book isn't new. The writing isn't like what we're used to nowadays, no one has a cellphone, the school problems seem a little bit ridiculous. But none of that really matters. Because the writing is still great & hits right in the heart, like it was meant to do all those years ago. And teen sapphic girls can still see themselves in the characters and can still take courage in the characters' journey to self-love & acceptance. There's period-appropriate homophobia here, of course, and it's still appropriate today, unfortunately, and it made my stomach turn more than once. But it's presented as just an obstacle that's possible to overcome, as something we can crush with our love, not as something we need to accept. Because like the dedication says, it's a book for all of us. For teenage sapphic girls who need guidance, who need someone they can trust, someone to tell them loving other girls is Wonderful, who need some hope in their lives. And the beauty of Annie on My Mind is, it provides all of that & more.
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  • Elise (TheBookishActress)
    January 1, 1970
    you know, this is just not doing it for me right now and I'm 45% of the way through. I don't know, it's fine, I think this is just not my genre of book and I was only reading it because of the lesbian classic thing? possibly will be returned to someday.I will say, though, that this quote stuck out to me: "What struck me most, though, was that, in that whole long article, the word 'love' wasn't used even once. That made me mad; it was as if whoever wrote the article didn't know that gay people ac you know, this is just not doing it for me right now and I'm 45% of the way through. I don't know, it's fine, I think this is just not my genre of book and I was only reading it because of the lesbian classic thing? possibly will be returned to someday.I will say, though, that this quote stuck out to me: "What struck me most, though, was that, in that whole long article, the word 'love' wasn't used even once. That made me mad; it was as if whoever wrote the article didn't know that gay people actually love each other. The encyclopedia writers ought to talk to me, I thought as I went back to bed; I could tell them something about love."
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  • ⚔ Silvia ⚓
    January 1, 1970
    BR with my favorite bean ♥🌈 full review now posted!Can you believe this book came to my house to murder me with feels??? Wow the disrespect!!!I can't believe I've owned this book since last June and I've waited until now to read it, but I probably enjoyed it much more now that I would have this summer for various reasons. It takes place in the US in the eighties, when it was also published. I believe it's one of the first, if not the first, YA book that deals with female homosexuality in such an BR with my favorite bean ♥🌈 full review now posted!Can you believe this book came to my house to murder me with feels??? Wow the disrespect!!!I can't believe I've owned this book since last June and I've waited until now to read it, but I probably enjoyed it much more now that I would have this summer for various reasons. It takes place in the US in the eighties, when it was also published. I believe it's one of the first, if not the first, YA book that deals with female homosexuality in such an open and honest way. Because it was published so long ago, I was a little scared that it wouldn't work for me and that it would use harmful tropes (that weren't regarded as such back then). Fool me, I should have done my research.The author was apparently a lesbian herself and reading about the history of this book broke my heart a little (they banned it from schools and burned it publicly in a town somewhere - I don't remember exactly and I don't feel like looking it up again because I'm not ready to cry again).I was so surprised to see how well female homosexuality was treated and this is totally both a "book to educate straight people on the fact that gay people are normal" (I'm paraphrasing the author) and a book for young sapphic girls to see themselves represented and learn that it's okay and that they can get their happy ending.Yes, this book has a happy ending and it killed the tragic lesbian trope before it was invented.Besides its importance in lgbtq+ literature, this was also one of the best and most naturally developed romances I've ever read. Throw all your average abusive tropey straight YA romances in the trash where they belong, this is so healthy and refreshing and it NEEDS to be read.TW: homophobia
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  • Sara
    January 1, 1970
    i didn't read this book until i was in my mid-twenties, though it is a book written for a teen audience. it was published in 1982, but i never even heard about it until i was in a queer women's book club in dc. we decided to read this as one of our selections (as well as "are you there, god? it's me, margaret.") it is truly a beautiful story and perfect for teens struggling with their sexuality. the author, nancy garden, doesn't shy away from many of the difficulties of being queer, but it's hea i didn't read this book until i was in my mid-twenties, though it is a book written for a teen audience. it was published in 1982, but i never even heard about it until i was in a queer women's book club in dc. we decided to read this as one of our selections (as well as "are you there, god? it's me, margaret.") it is truly a beautiful story and perfect for teens struggling with their sexuality. the author, nancy garden, doesn't shy away from many of the difficulties of being queer, but it's heart is really in the relationship of the two main characters. you can't help but root for them. i think we all remember, no mater what your sexual orientation is, how difficult high school can be. this book captures that but also reminds us that without those experiences, we wouldn't be the rockin' women we are today.
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  • Rose
    January 1, 1970
    Initial thoughts: I'm still trying to form thoughts on my reactions to "Annie on My Mind", but the one thing I can say was that this was a wonderful novel and I'm wondering why it took me so long to read it. Beautifully written, the relationship between Annie and Liza is quite resonant, not just in how it develops, but how it endures. I loved the ending, and I was happy to be able to listen to some reflective thoughts on Nancy Garden's life and personal experiences following the story.Full revie Initial thoughts: I'm still trying to form thoughts on my reactions to "Annie on My Mind", but the one thing I can say was that this was a wonderful novel and I'm wondering why it took me so long to read it. Beautifully written, the relationship between Annie and Liza is quite resonant, not just in how it develops, but how it endures. I loved the ending, and I was happy to be able to listen to some reflective thoughts on Nancy Garden's life and personal experiences following the story.Full review:"Annie on My Mind" was written approximately 30 years ago as of the year I'm writing this review (2012), and it feels as relevant today as it was in the time it was written (1982). I selected this read in honor of "Banned Books Week" and I have to say it's one of the most powerful novels I've had the pleasure of reading, not just in the GLBT spectrum but notably among young adult novels that show a sense of power, growth, and resonance in an individual spectrum as well as in the face of adversity. It shapes itself around a developing relationship between two young women and how that relationship fosters into love despite the contrasting social attitudes. I think one of the things about this novel that struck me, even considering the simple structure of the overarching plot and contrasting elements that might strike a familiar chord in terms of the antagonism the protagonists face, was that it provides a sharp eye into Liza's coming to terms with herself and sentiments. Her experiences are intimate without necessarily being overt, and there's a passion behind her coming to terms with how much she cares for Annie, even as she struggles to define what it is, what it means, and how to find legs to stand on with it.Liza's a senior class president attending a prominent private school that seems to be waning in terms of its prominence and funding. She meets Annie who, in contrast, attends a public school. The book focuses on how their feelings emerge and the awkwardness that entails with trying to come to terms with those sentiments - and I found that very realistic in the progression of the novel. Yet they keep their relationship secret as they recognize the social stigmas surrounding them, but eventually their relationship is blown wide open in an incident that threatens to tear them, and their worlds, apart - particularly from Liza's viewpoint considering her distinct identification in the matter. I commend how Garden treats the unfolding plot with sensitivity and ultimately in a way that makes the reader want to see how the relationship between the girls endures and what comes of it. I rooted for Liza and Annie and the two teachers who are also caught in the crossfire of that turn in the story, and I felt for Liza even as she faces direct challenges against who she is and how she mentally, sometimes externally, knocks down those prejudices - though it's also balanced with some of her qualms and moments of uncertainty. Granted, I think this novel set a tone for many books that follow it in the same spectrum of exploring dimensions of sexual orientation and relationships. I wonder, perhaps, that this novel could've even delved deeper into exploring the complexity of those prejudices and knocking them down, but I think for the story that was told, it does very well.One of the most important themes I've found in young adult literature is the establishment of identity. It's even a prominent theme among adults - finding your path to happiness, finding your heart, finding what makes you - well - you and being comfortable with that. "Annie on My Mind" builds upon that thematic with its protagonists well, though I admit that there are parts that I think could've been further delved into in retrospect. Still, I can see why many liked this novel and why it has such an impact. I definitely felt, appreciated, and would indubitably recommend it.Overall score: 4.5/5
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  • Julia
    January 1, 1970
    "What struck me most, though, was that, in that whole long article, the word 'love' wasn't used even once. That made me mad; it was as if whoever wrote the article didn't know that gay people actually love each other. The encyclopedia writers ought to talk to me, I thought as I went back to bed; I could tell them something about love."This quote sums up pretty well what I loved the most about this book. Liza and Annie are only 17 year old when they fall in love, and this whole time, despite all "What struck me most, though, was that, in that whole long article, the word 'love' wasn't used even once. That made me mad; it was as if whoever wrote the article didn't know that gay people actually love each other. The encyclopedia writers ought to talk to me, I thought as I went back to bed; I could tell them something about love."This quote sums up pretty well what I loved the most about this book. Liza and Annie are only 17 year old when they fall in love, and this whole time, despite all their fears and insecurities and obstacles they faced, they refuse to believe that their feelings were anything other than wonderful. They made each other utterly happy, what they had was beautiful, and it was just absurd to them that other people had the audacity to think it "dirty" or "wrong".It was also the reason I read this in the first place, because I don't have the heart to read coming out stories of characters who are influenced to think that the way they feel is sinful and must be fought. Those just make me sad, and this book did the exact opposite. Liza and Annie's feelings for each other were pure magic, and they knew it.On a separate note, I'm deeply sad that I can't read a whole book about Isabelle Stevenson and Katherine Widmer's relationship. They were so incredible and important and it's a shame we only started hearing about their past right in the end of this book. I want to read the whole story of them (view spoiler)[meeting as teenagers too, going to college, Isabelle joining the WAC and the being discharged, the aftermath of that, them becoming teachers (hide spoiler)]...
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  • Lisa
    January 1, 1970
    First impression: UGH. I'd heard about the use of archaic words, but man a-live. Thankfully that went away after a while.More importantly, Annie bothered me. A lot. Who breaks into spontaneous Shakespearean character? Annoying Shakesperean character? I didn't get what it was about her that entranced Liza.But then everything changed. I realized the metaphor behind the Shakespeare, and eventually the two of them (Annie in particular) stopped doing it. They gradually became, as Annie said, "real." First impression: UGH. I'd heard about the use of archaic words, but man a-live. Thankfully that went away after a while.More importantly, Annie bothered me. A lot. Who breaks into spontaneous Shakespearean character? Annoying Shakesperean character? I didn't get what it was about her that entranced Liza.But then everything changed. I realized the metaphor behind the Shakespeare, and eventually the two of them (Annie in particular) stopped doing it. They gradually became, as Annie said, "real." I also enjoyed the subplot of Foster's Academy. It didn't take me (too) long to know where that particular climax was headed, but it didn't matter. I wanted to know what would happen. I was able to predict another plot point, but that didn't matter either. I loved Annie and Liza together. I loved Liza. I appreciated the confusion and inner turmoil both girls went through. A severe understatement: I don't imagine this is easy, and Nancy Garden respected that. I do feel that maybe a few things went ignored, like Sally's character and transition, but I don't feel it affected the the integrity of the story too much.Despite being able to predict a few things, I never really knew where this story would conclude. I'm used to stories like these ending in tragedy, or simply in tears, or with a question mark. Once I wondered if it would end with something like "and I decided to be straight." No stereotypes reinforced here. I hope it's worked to get more than a few people thinking.This was just a good book. Totally recommended.
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  • Starsandsun
    January 1, 1970
    If you’ll have a starter pack for F/F books I think this one is a must. A safe choice. F/F-YA is very delicate genre especially if you’re just staring to figure things out. A lot of FF/YA can be a bit traumatic for me. But for this one, everything is just so light and balanced.Re-reading this for the nth time and like the very first time I read it, it always makes me smile.Now with the new edition. :))Highly recommend.
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  • Tinything
    January 1, 1970
    I had a mix feeling about this book. Let just say i dont hate it but i dont like it either. And there is going to be some complaining i guess. It just frustrated. Not that the book is bad. It actually good, i think. It just the characters in the book made me so frustrated. A bit of spoiler and lots of complaining about people. -> (view spoiler)[ Some people in this book are so close-minded. Like Sally, Ms. Baxter and Mrs. Poundexter, i just had to say their names! God!! I just want to choke t I had a mix feeling about this book. Let just say i dont hate it but i dont like it either. And there is going to be some complaining i guess. It just frustrated. Not that the book is bad. It actually good, i think. It just the characters in the book made me so frustrated. A bit of spoiler and lots of complaining about people. -> (view spoiler)[ Some people in this book are so close-minded. Like Sally, Ms. Baxter and Mrs. Poundexter, i just had to say their names! God!! I just want to choke them, tie them down and toss them into the sea and let the salt water clean their so narrow minded away! Can’t they just mind their own business?! Who interested in who, what genders, does it really matter? It’s not even their own business. It’s not like we plan to destroy the world. It’s just two humans who has romantic interest in each other and fall in love! For fuck sake! I also always wondered why those people can change how they view someone completely the moment they discovered that someone is gay. Isn’t that someone the same person that they knew so many years ago?! How can they just forget everthing and suddently see that person as some kind of weird creature or something? SIGH... Cheers for Liza’s dad, ms. Stevenson and ms. Widmer. I like these people. (hide spoiler)]Phew, feel a bit better.I am probably in a foul mood right now, sorry. Dont mind me. And to be honest, personally, i dont like the writing style. The English is easy to understand. I like that. The whole story was told in a flashback of Liza’s POV, though. There were a few bit of present time but only a paragraph or so, then it back to flaskback again. It kind of made me unsettle. Like you know what will happened. It just a matter of how and when it is going to happen. All the time during reading this book, i just can’t wait for the story go back to the present and continue from there. It just kind of ruined my mood of enjoying the story. (view spoiler)[ and when it does, TADA! It is at 99% of the book. No shocking at all >_> (hide spoiler)] But i did like how Liza and Annie met and got to know each other and they let their relationship progressed.3.5 stars
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  • Sara➽ (Ink Is My Sword)
    January 1, 1970
    3.5 "Healthy teen relationship rep" Starsyes, I placed this in my classic shelf, what are you gonna do about that? Lesbian classic lit.RTC
  • Anja V
    January 1, 1970
    It's Annie and me they're all sitting around here like cardboard people judging; it's Annie and me. And what we did that they think is wrong, when you pare it all down, was fall in love. -"If you two remember nothing else from all this," Ms. Widmer said, "remember that. Please. Don't - don't punish yourselves for people's ignorant reactions to what we all are.""Don't let ignorance win," said Ms. Stevenson. "Let love." There's one simple reason why I put off reading Annie on My Mind for so long It's Annie and me they're all sitting around here like cardboard people judging; it's Annie and me. And what we did that they think is wrong, when you pare it all down, was fall in love. -"If you two remember nothing else from all this," Ms. Widmer said, "remember that. Please. Don't - don't punish yourselves for people's ignorant reactions to what we all are.""Don't let ignorance win," said Ms. Stevenson. "Let love." There's one simple reason why I put off reading Annie on My Mind for so long and that is because I knew what to expect. Annie was written in 1982, and with most books written in that time involving a same-sex couple, it focuses on the shame the couple feels about their homosexuality, their struggle to accept themselves and of course the negative reaction from the public they face because of their relationship. Reading about all of that is rather difficult for me, as I feel really strongly about it. Homophobia makes me absolutely furious (duh), and whenever I read about it, I have to pause the book from time to time to calm myself down. The reason why I still continue to read these books is simple: As furious as they make me, they also make me grateful. Grateful to see that even though our society is still not perfect, we've made incredible progress and still continue to do every day. Grateful for all the people who fought so that people like me today can live freely and happily. Gratefull to see that more and more people agree, love is love, easy as that. Don't get me wrong though. Annie on My Mind does address homophobia and such, but first and foremost, it's a story about two young girls falling for each other. It's about how the world seems to look different, and about how scary and exciting it can be. It's about the power and the intensity of your first love. There's a reason why this book is considered a classic and why even after so many years, people continue to read it. If you are interested in queer themed books, Annie is a must read for you.
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  • Charlotte Annelise
    January 1, 1970
    This book follows Eliza, a seventeen-year-old girl. She is heavily involved in her school's activities and loves going to museums in New York. When she meets Annie, their love for each other grows and the two realise they cannot let anyone know about their romance. I did not realise this book would be so difficult to read. While it is mostly positive surrounding gay people, many of the characters are very harsh. I wouldn't recommend this book to someone who isn't fully comfortable with their sex This book follows Eliza, a seventeen-year-old girl. She is heavily involved in her school's activities and loves going to museums in New York. When she meets Annie, their love for each other grows and the two realise they cannot let anyone know about their romance. I did not realise this book would be so difficult to read. While it is mostly positive surrounding gay people, many of the characters are very harsh. I wouldn't recommend this book to someone who isn't fully comfortable with their sexuality yet. Although it is a bit of a confronting read because of the horrible reactions to their relationship, it has a great history because it was banned in the United States. It was a very prominent book in helping young gay people in the '80s, '90s, '00s, and now the '10s accept their sexuality. The writing was full of cliches and it's definitely not the kind of book you would read for the writing. The characters had great personalities and were very strong. Because the novel kind of reads like a diary, the readers get a very good insight into Liza's mind. This allows the readers to understand her reasoning behind her decisions.I don't know if many lesbian young adult romance books have come before this one, but this one is considered one of the first. Therefore, what happens in the book is what you would expect. There was a lot of homophobia by other characters, and the outcome was predictable. This novel had many sweet moments to it, and for that, I enjoyed it. The plot was very clear and well structured. I'm really happy that I got to read it. Thank you to Open Road Integrated Media for the advanced reader copy that I received via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Les Read
    January 1, 1970
    Annie on My Mind is a beautiful love story about a friendship that blooms into love for two young women who are from different sides of the track. Liza attends a private high school and comes from a white-collar family, and Annie attends a public school and comes from a lower-income part of town. They're both bright and accomplished teenagers: Liza, who is applying for MIT to study architecture and Annie, a talented singer who dreams of being accepted into the music program at UC Berkeley. The c Annie on My Mind is a beautiful love story about a friendship that blooms into love for two young women who are from different sides of the track. Liza attends a private high school and comes from a white-collar family, and Annie attends a public school and comes from a lower-income part of town. They're both bright and accomplished teenagers: Liza, who is applying for MIT to study architecture and Annie, a talented singer who dreams of being accepted into the music program at UC Berkeley. The connection that they feel is immediate, and it grows as they spend more time with each other.This is a deeply introspective and well-written coming-of-age novel. Truly an extraordinary work from both a historical and literary standpoint. Dare, I say, its significance to American culture rivals Harper Lee's To Kill a Mockingbird? Annie on My Mind was published in 1982. I read this novel for the first time as a high school student in 1999, then again as an adult in 2016. Over the years, the story has not lost its beauty, its meaning, or even its relevance in today's society. Looking at current statistics of teenagers who have become homeless after coming out to their families, you'll agree that this book still has a very important place in our library shelves. Even as our society continues to progress, Annie on My Mind will be our reminder of where we were before, where we are today, and where we need to be tomorrow.
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  • Ant
    January 1, 1970
    I know this is a predictable and outdated novel. I've read negative reviews and complaints about it before (some from aspiring LGBTQ writers, and I respect their opinions.) Yes, I am aware of its flaws despite the rating I gave it.But it still remains as one of my favorites. Why? Because when I first read it (I was fourteen then), it brought me hope. During a time in my life where I was confused of my feelings, and thought myself as "abnormal", this book showed me that I wasn't alone. That even I know this is a predictable and outdated novel. I've read negative reviews and complaints about it before (some from aspiring LGBTQ writers, and I respect their opinions.) Yes, I am aware of its flaws despite the rating I gave it.But it still remains as one of my favorites. Why? Because when I first read it (I was fourteen then), it brought me hope. During a time in my life where I was confused of my feelings, and thought myself as "abnormal", this book showed me that I wasn't alone. That even though I would experience prejudice after coming out, I could still find happiness. I was attending a homophobic high school at the time (they wouldn't allow a Gay-Straight Alliance club, or even a discussion about sexual orientation in health class), so the novel provided an escape for me.I remember sneaking into the library to read it at a corner. About a couple years later, I bought a copy from a used book store(I was so nervous, although the cashier didn't seem to notice.) Right now it is a battered copy, and I'd read it a few times every year (mostly my favorite parts.) It inspired me to write LGBTQ fiction. This book will always be in my bookshelf because of how it changed me.This is a beautiful lesbian love story with a hopeful ending. I definitely recommend it if you like romance with build-up.
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  • Just a man's point of view
    January 1, 1970
    I think reviewing Annie on my mind should be a little different than other contemporary lesbian romances.We should keep in mind that this book was written with a purpose. In the words of the author: "I wrote it to give solace to young gay people, to let them know they were not alone, that they could be happy and well adjusted and also to let heterosexual kids know that we gay people aren't monsters".We should remember that this book was published in 1982, that it was banned from Kansan City scho I think reviewing Annie on my mind should be a little different than other contemporary lesbian romances.We should keep in mind that this book was written with a purpose. In the words of the author: "I wrote it to give solace to young gay people, to let them know they were not alone, that they could be happy and well adjusted and also to let heterosexual kids know that we gay people aren't monsters".We should remember that this book was published in 1982, that it was banned from Kansan City schools and publicly burned.In other words this is a book of liberty, an instrument for freedom rights, written with heart for oppressed teens and a courage monument.Its message is very simple. Homosexual people just love like everybody else. And true love is always noble, beautiful, meaningful, precious.For two thirds of the book, the story is delicate, sweet. Two nice, intelligent seventeen years old girls, Liza and Annie, meet and fall in love. Feeling between them is immediate, and then these feelings grow and bud into love. They become aware of their own homosexuality, they see it's a good and natural thing for them and gradually come to accept it.They live their story in the closet, share first kisses and discover sex. There are not sex scenes in the novel, but the reader knows there is sex between them.What really works well in their relationship (and how it's described) is a mixt of friendship and spontaneity.I'm a big fan of friendship inside a love relationship, and Liza and Annie keep supporting each others as friends in every phase of their story.And then they are seventeen years old girls, they behave as such, doing silly and childish things among more serious, adult attitudes. That was so credible and funny.By the way, I'm asking myself if the term "unicorn" related to lesbians (with so many controversial meanings today), is born with this book as Liza and Annie meet in front of the unicorn tapestries of The Cloisters museum in New York and start to address each other as unicorns.What comes next is easy to expect, as everything before was hinting that that moment was coming, but I put it under spoiler.(view spoiler)[At exactly two thirds of the book they get caught. In Liza's school, attended by socially wealthy pupils, bigotry reigns and that is an ominous sign pending on her head.While Annie, who frequents a poor school, make it to escape, Liza undergoes the ordeal.She is forced to come out to her parents (which doesn't come without hurt) and ends up openly exposed to all her school.As they got caught at the home of two good lesbian teachers they also put them in serious trouble. The two adult teachers, who generously help the two girls, sharing their past experience and problems, are wonderful secundary characters.Liza falls into a crisis and for some months she has to deal with herself, leaving Annie alone. But at the very end she will accept and overcome everything and Annie, of course, will be there. (hide spoiler)]Out of the spoiler, there is a clash between ignorance and bigotry on one hand and understanding people on the other. All is so realistic. The MC are not heroes, they are very human. They stumble, fall and get up again. Liza's family will have to struggle, too. Price will be paid, but at the end love will win.I've seen in some of the previous reviews that some people (straight of course) minimized as unlikely what happens to them. They say the negative characters are just a caricature.But I tell you, Italy is just out of the battle for the civil union new law for homesexuals. Those people are real. Bigotry, intollerance, racism, it's all there.And while the situation is certainly much better since 1982 and I firmly believe the positive forces are winning, still the fight against ignorance must go on.I loved this little great book, both for its message of hope and for its simplicity and good heart.
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  • Emma
    January 1, 1970
    “What matters is the truth of loving, of two people finding each other. That’s what's important, and don't you forget it.” I really wish I’d read this book earlier. I definitely still appreciated it as an adult, but I feel like this book could have been incredibly important for me as a younger teen. Being able to read a book about two girls in high school falling in love, a story about two girls realizing they like girls…a story like this one would have made a huge difference in my life. It too “What matters is the truth of loving, of two people finding each other. That’s what's important, and don't you forget it.” I really wish I’d read this book earlier. I definitely still appreciated it as an adult, but I feel like this book could have been incredibly important for me as a younger teen. Being able to read a book about two girls in high school falling in love, a story about two girls realizing they like girls…a story like this one would have made a huge difference in my life. It took me a long, long time to figure out my own queerness, and a lot of that was due to the complete lack of any f/f relationships in the books I read, the movies I watched…the stories I was told in any form, really.This book makes me grateful for how far things have come in the last 35 years. It reminds me of the ways in which my life is easier thanks to the struggles that the generations of queer people before me have had to endure. There’s still quite a long way to go, but Annie and Liza’s story gives me hope for the future.I received a copy of this book from the publisher via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Jennifer Wardrip
    January 1, 1970
    Reviewed by Sally Kruger, aka "Readingjunky" for TeensReadToo.comNancy Garden's ANNIE ON MY MIND, originally published in 1982, was recently re-released. (It includes an interview with the author herself.) The book represents an early example of realistic young adult fiction depicting a lesbian relationship between two high school seniors. It is still a fitting portrayal for today's teens. Liza and Annie meet in a New York museum and develop a fast friendship. Both seem to realize there is somet Reviewed by Sally Kruger, aka "Readingjunky" for TeensReadToo.comNancy Garden's ANNIE ON MY MIND, originally published in 1982, was recently re-released. (It includes an interview with the author herself.) The book represents an early example of realistic young adult fiction depicting a lesbian relationship between two high school seniors. It is still a fitting portrayal for today's teens. Liza and Annie meet in a New York museum and develop a fast friendship. Both seem to realize there is something different about their relationship, but admitting that at the start is difficult for both. The story is told as Annie remembers it, and focuses mostly on her struggle to accept the facts she is learning about herself. The book's first half takes the reader into the growing friendship between the girls. There is considerable time spent describing how they discover their common interests and the activities they find to spend time together. The girls come from different backgrounds - Liza attends a relatively sheltered, private school currently struggling with financial difficulties, while Annie attends public school and is faced with drugs, violence, and other social problems public schools must deal with both then and now. As the girls' relationship develops, the plot becomes more involved in Liza's role as student council president and her school's struggle with a fund-raising campaign. Liza and Annie begin to accept the true direction of their friendship, and of course, as other people become aware, controversy surfaces. Will the admission of their gay lifestyle cause acceptance or abandonment by family and friends? Could their situation adversely affect a similar relationship between two teachers in Liza's private school? ANNIE ON MY MIND delves into the acceptance of homosexuality. It seems there will always be two sides to this controversy, but the re-release of the book may ask readers to decide if things are changing as time passes. What really matters in love - what is "right" for those involved or what is perceived as "right" by those whose views may differ?
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  • Laura
    January 1, 1970
    Omg this book was amazing. I'm still crying over it, goddamn __________________________________Finally getting to read this book with this cutie!!
  • Agnese
    January 1, 1970
    Maybe I'm too picky or I've read too many amazing books, but I just can't give this book more than 2,5. 3 is too much for it.Maybe it's because it's more for teens than people my age and I'm too old. Maybe 1980s it was great and so, but definitely not anymore. It's too slow and naive, I just couldn't believe it, I was longing for this book to end.I really feel bad about giving this book 2, but I can't help myself. I know it's not the book, it's me... Sorry
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  • bianca
    January 1, 1970
    I've been debating with myself on what to rate this book... It is 3.5 stars to me, but since goodreads still hasn't added the half a star option honestly goodreads wtf I've decided to round it up to 4 instead of 3.This is a really cute, kind story about love, self descovering and self acceptance. Reading an LGBT+ book that was written in the fucking 80s is really interesting. I got to read how things were back then, even when I knew things were more difficult for the LGBT+ community, reading a b I've been debating with myself on what to rate this book... It is 3.5 stars to me, but since goodreads still hasn't added the half a star option honestly goodreads wtf I've decided to round it up to 4 instead of 3.This is a really cute, kind story about love, self descovering and self acceptance. Reading an LGBT+ book that was written in the fucking 80s is really interesting. I got to read how things were back then, even when I knew things were more difficult for the LGBT+ community, reading a book on the subject gives me new points of view and ways of analyzing it. The relationship between Liza and Annie is so cute, so pure, I really was craving for them to have a happy ending; they deserve nothing but good things. I actually think I fell in love with Annie... Where can I find a girlfriend like her????At times, I found myself having to put the book down for a few minutes because it made me sO MAD. The homophobia and sTUPIDITY in this book really upset me. However, I am not saying this as a bad thing. It actually amazes me how much the comments and situations Liza had to bear with got to me. I guess I was constantly putting myself in her shoes. Fucking empathy. Also, one thing I really loved and think is important to remark is how fucking important literature and books in general are in this story. When Annie and Liza find books related to homosexuality, it gives them a whole new spectre of resources to do some research and try to understand a bit better what's happening (because, let's not forget, censorship was a big deal back then and there was no Internet to come to for information. Lol). I found that really nice and real, something that still happens nowadays (damn, it happens to me every single day).All in all, this is a really great book everyone should try and read, especially if you are part of the LGBT+ community. It fills you with hope and optimism and, of course, feels for this two young girls and their unbreakable love for each other.
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  • Manon
    January 1, 1970
    I was provided an ARC via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.Annie on My Mind is a classic. I’ve heard about it for years and was not disappointed in the least.Our main character is Liza, 17. She meets Annie by chance and they fall for each other. But the story is set in 1982 and I don’t think they even knew what homophobia was back then.I really loved this story. It was a quick read but still made me feel so much. I was enraged, happy, sad; I felt everything. Mostly rage though. The way I was provided an ARC via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.Annie on My Mind is a classic. I’ve heard about it for years and was not disappointed in the least.Our main character is Liza, 17. She meets Annie by chance and they fall for each other. But the story is set in 1982 and I don’t think they even knew what homophobia was back then.I really loved this story. It was a quick read but still made me feel so much. I was enraged, happy, sad; I felt everything. Mostly rage though. The way Liza was treated by her school director was horrifying, and so unfair, both times.I also loved the way the story was told.This is a must read.
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  • Ann
    January 1, 1970
    My favorite part about this book is that 90 percent is simply a love story between two teenagers. Liza and Annie are both very different people, from Annie’s love of plants and music to Liza’s passion for architecture. But they find they have lots of things in common, such as cats, and their interests contrast nicely, drawing them closer to together. They are friends who gradually realize there is more between them than friendship, and fairly soon their only problem is finding a place where they My favorite part about this book is that 90 percent is simply a love story between two teenagers. Liza and Annie are both very different people, from Annie’s love of plants and music to Liza’s passion for architecture. But they find they have lots of things in common, such as cats, and their interests contrast nicely, drawing them closer to together. They are friends who gradually realize there is more between them than friendship, and fairly soon their only problem is finding a place where they can ‘be alone together’.Well, not their only problem. Their other worry is hiding their relationship form their parents, because they are both girls. That and the ending – when they get found out – makes up the other 10 percent of the book.I did think Mrs. Poindexter was too much a caricature of the bigoted bad guy, but the fact that she started so many balls rolling against Liza and Annie, and Ms. Stevenson and Ms. Widmer, is a good example of how ‘mob mentality’ can quickly throw things out of proportion and cause people to do things they wouldn’t ordinarily. She did seem to want to rule Foster with an iron fist, and that at least was believable, since she used a subtle ‘velvet glove’ to enforce her edicts.I also liked how Liza, even though she ran scared at first when she went off to college, quickly realized what she’d be giving up by letting Annie go. Not all painful lessons have to end unhappily, and I love that she finally got the courage to call.
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