Flora's Fury (Flora Trilogy, #3)
Despite her troublesome attraction to magick, Flora Fyrdraaca has — more or less — spent her life doing what's been expected of her. Yet now, at sixteen, she knows that this path has been strewn with secrets. Secrets have kept her from following her passion of becoming a ranger, of perfecting her use of magick, of proclaiming her hidden identity. But Flora has had enough of living with lies.Convinced that her true mother, Tiny Doom — long believed to have been killed by the evil Birdies — is alive, Flora becomes determined to find her. Doing so will allow Flora to leave behind the lies her false mother, Buck Fyrdraaca, has told her about who she is. She can shake off the slavish drudgery of being a lowly lieutenant in the Army of Califa. And she need never again speak to her former best friend (and recent love) Udo — he's become a total snapperhead. Flora and her red dog, Flynn, are thrown into a journey that takes them to the high seas, onto lawless islands, and into the deadly desert. It's an adventure filled with pirate battles, magickal encounters, and an unexpected romance with a brooding stranger who reveals himself to be a kindred spirit. And it all becomes far more dangerous when Flora realizes how desperately the Birdies want Tiny Doom — and Flora herself — dead.

Flora's Fury (Flora Trilogy, #3) Details

TitleFlora's Fury (Flora Trilogy, #3)
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseMay 8th, 2012
Rating
GenreFantasy, Young Adult, Fiction, Adventure, Young Adult Fantasy

Flora's Fury (Flora Trilogy, #3) Review

  • Hirondelle
    January 1, 1970
    It is an underrated pleasure to get a book you have been waiting for years to be written. And this one I have been waiting since Flora's Dare was out (give or take a couple months. I managed to order again Flora Segunda thinking it was the second book. My brains fundamental wiring is in Portugueses). The book not disappointing is something I no longer take for granted. And shelving a book like that on its reserved shelf place is a really really underrated pleasure! So lots of fun with this book. It is an underrated pleasure to get a book you have been waiting for years to be written. And this one I have been waiting since Flora's Dare was out (give or take a couple months. I managed to order again Flora Segunda thinking it was the second book. My brain´s fundamental wiring is in Portugueses). The book not disappointing is something I no longer take for granted. And shelving a book like that on its reserved shelf place is a really really underrated pleasure! So lots of fun with this book.And it was good! Like the best series, Flora is growing and changing. We find out more about the universe, we got resolution here, brave sacrifices and interesting setups. I loved the ending, open ended enough. And no way this is a trilogy. NO WAY. Not that there are cliffhangers, but the setup for a sequel (from any point of view, not necessarily from the PoV of this Flora) is a better setup for action than any of these 3 books have had. More books please.Though book 2 is still, IMO, the best of this (ah!) trilogy.Quibbles:- Fiking tired of the word fike. Pigface! I get why these, and other replacements for profanity are used, but it can be so offputting, when you can identify the word and what it is. It took me a couple of chapters to realize pigface WAS not a nickname (another quibble. oh so many many nicknames). And even when it is as easy to identify as fike, just too much sometimes.- A lot of gore. (view spoiler)[Like for example the cannibalism (hide spoiler)]. A smidgeon too much for my personal taste but then I am a wimpy-ish grownup. No idea how a real teen would read this series.
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  • Hallie
    January 1, 1970
    I WAS IN A HOUSE WHERE THERE WAS AN ARC OF FLORA'S FURY.It's probably a good thing that I didn't know this in time to steal it bribe my way into possession of it beg incessantly until I made such a nuisance of myself I was thrown out.It's preordered. Again. May 08. Sigh.13/5 - just finished it, and wow. Will update with more later, but I sure hope we get confirmation of book 4 soon. "Flora Trilogy" my hinder.
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  • meeners
    January 1, 1970
    this book is called flora's fury, but it should really be called flora's petulant temper tantrums. it's been a while since i've read the first two books (which i enthusiastically loved); perhaps that's one reason why i struggled so much to get into the rhythm of this one. has ysabeau wilce's writing always been this uneven? and has flora always been this annoying? in the previous books, i always thought that flora's grumpiness and sometimes knee-jerk reaction to certain people and events made se this book is called flora's fury, but it should really be called flora's petulant temper tantrums. it's been a while since i've read the first two books (which i enthusiastically loved); perhaps that's one reason why i struggled so much to get into the rhythm of this one. has ysabeau wilce's writing always been this uneven? and has flora always been this annoying? in the previous books, i always thought that flora's grumpiness and sometimes knee-jerk reaction to certain people and events made sense, felt rooted - the tangible outcome of a deep and intangible history. even if that history was never explicitly detailed you could still sense its palpable weight in the bones of the narrative itself, and therefore trust that whatever flora did, it would make sense to her. but with this one...i dunno. the plot only barely hangs together, for one thing, tending to shamble from one scene to the next via the ever-handy deus ex machina. or, even if not technically a deus ex machina, still a very happy coincidence of random luck and timing - every time. examples include all the instances flora stumbles across key information by accident (overhearing conversations, running into someone who spontaneously offers the answer to a question she hadn't even known to ask, finding items that just happen to have important letters conceiled in them, etc.), and all the instances she finds herself in a Dire Situation due to her own peevish temper tantrums (hence my title suggestion) but is saved in the nick of time by a hunky hot dude with a muscularly grand chest (<--this description taken straight out of the book) or by a magic flying octopus (again, not kidding!) or so on. (actually, the magic flying octopus was what i liked best about the book.)i suppose i was irritated by flora's irrational actions and prejudices because they became a lazy way to propel the plot more than anything else. none of the villain-chasing and ocean-swimming and pirate-swash-buckling felt anchored in physical space, nor did any of it feel truly necessary. if anything, flora's fury felt like the saggy middle book in a poorly plotted trilogy, when in fact it's the third (though maybe there will be more?????). i did enjoy it enough to finish it, though, and i am giving it 3 stars because i think you could do a lot, lot worse. my disappointment stems from the fact that i think wilce could have - and has - done a lot better. oh well. i am starting to hate fantasy trilogies [though a 4th book would of course turn this series into a tetralogy] in principle, but i do still hope she'll write more.
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  • Melissa McShane
    January 1, 1970
    I so looked forward to reading this, and it was a great book, but there was one major problem that kept me from loving it. But first--the great stuff. Flora's finally grown up (in Califa, you're an adult at age 14, and Flora's now 15) but her dream of becoming a Ranger hasn't come true. She's her mother the General's aide, which means more paperwork than anyone should have to do ever, as well as caring for her baby brother Pow. An unlikely chain of events leads to her being requested by one of t I so looked forward to reading this, and it was a great book, but there was one major problem that kept me from loving it. But first--the great stuff. Flora's finally grown up (in Califa, you're an adult at age 14, and Flora's now 15) but her dream of becoming a Ranger hasn't come true. She's her mother the General's aide, which means more paperwork than anyone should have to do ever, as well as caring for her baby brother Pow. An unlikely chain of events leads to her being requested by one of the Birdie overlords to accompany his wife the Duchesa on her journey from the Birdie homeland to Califa. Then pirates happen. And a daring escape. And an overland journey with a surly wer-creature. And it's all because Flora wants to find her birth mother, believed to be dead but revealed at the end of Flora's Dare to still be alive.We get to see a lot more of the Republic of Califa than in previous books, which was great. This alternate-Earth has an alternate-Arizona that's even harsher than the reality, complete with Indian (Bronco) Territory and deadly scorpions. Big ones. There's also other countries with whom Califa trades and negotiates, potential allies against the Birdies, and more magical creatures than the denizens and egregores in the first two books. On the whole, Flora's Fury takes place in a much, much broader world than before, and I liked that a lot. Flora's quest to find her mother has just the right amount of challenge, setbacks, and surprise revelations--I love Evil Murdoch the mule. The ending has Flora make a choice, finally, about who she's going to be, and it's a difficult and therefore meaningful choice.The part I wasn't happy about involved Flora's romantic relationships. (view spoiler)[Okay. I have never liked Udo. He's selfish and vain in Flora Segunda and his grandstanding when they're trying to rescue Boy Hansgen nearly blows the whole operation. Then in Flora's Dare he's shallow enough to get involved with the Warlord's pretentious granddaughter the Zuzu, and greedy and vain enough to get trapped by Springheel Jack's books. But at the end of that book, he finally shows the loyalty and friendship it's always been claimed he has, and turns out to be someone who'd be a good match for Flora. It really looks like that's where their relationship is going. Only in Flora's Fury it seems that they never got past the part where Udo thought Flora rejected him, and he's gone back to the Zuzu and he and Flora aren't even friends anymore. So then we get Tharyn Wraathmyr. He's dark and mysterious, but it turns out he's really just a young guy who's shouldering a lot of burdens, and Flora's attraction to him looks like it could become the real thing. But then--There's that scene where Flora's thinking that she likes Tharyn but doesn't love him, and she's always really loved Udo? Then she chooses Califa over adventure, and Tharyn just disappears in the space of a paragraph, unceremoniously whisked off the stage? And then she meets Udo "for the first time" because she gave up her love for him, and he's suddenly all manly and stuff even though less than a month before that, on the pirate ship, he was still juvenile and pompous? I didn't think Flora could choose Tharyn *and* Califa, but I just didn't believe Udo's transformation, and that's unfortunate because I think their relationship had a much better chance with Flora not remembering their past together. (hide spoiler)]Flora makes a few bad decisions along the way, most of them because she's angry that everyone has been lying to her. In retrospect, I think her reactions were right. Her mother and Udo, among others, kept her out of the loop for no good reason, and I think anyone would be ticked off that they weren't trustworthy enough to be in on those vital secrets. Especially someone who's expected to play a part in them eventually. Especially when it means making someone believe their best friend is dead. That was an excellent motivating factor for getting Flora where she wanted to be.And the ending is pretty great. Even believing all along that it could happen, I still didn't expect it. Overall, I liked it a lot, and I hope a second reading later, knowing all the spoilery stuff, will make it even better.
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  • heidi
    January 1, 1970
    Good resolution to YA love triangle or BEST resolution to YA love triangle? BEST.Well, it's not really a resolution. Flora obviously still has work to do at the end of the book, but her dilemma between PrettyBoy and FurryBoy is handled as both in-character and a brilliant sendup of the problem in other books. But listen to how she describes it."Udo and Sieur Wraathmyr glared at each other. Neither one looked at me. In all the cheap romance novels, the heroine is always thrilled when her rivals f Good resolution to YA love triangle or BEST resolution to YA love triangle? BEST.Well, it's not really a resolution. Flora obviously still has work to do at the end of the book, but her dilemma between PrettyBoy and FurryBoy is handled as both in-character and a brilliant sendup of the problem in other books. But listen to how she describes it."Udo and Sieur Wraathmyr glared at each other. Neither one looked at me. In all the cheap romance novels, the heroine is always thrilled when her rivals fight. In real life, it was just horribly embarrassing. I was not the last piece of bacon."Flora/Nyana is trying to track down her mother, and along the way, she meets dangerous denizens, attractive delivery men, and gorgeous pirates. She's baked in the sun, assaulted by were-panthers, and has heartfelt hissyfits about how no one tells her ANYTHING. At no point does she overcome her motion-sickness.The thing I like best about Flora is that even when she makes a bad decision, it's because she thinks about her options. The pirates have been sent by her mother to kidnap her? That's what THEY say, she's going to go off on her own, thanks.I really appreciate the Nini Mo ... koans? scattered through the book. "That day, that sorrow", she says "Dare, win, or disappear." "Everyone has a talent."Also, I cackled out loud when I found a little bit of Kipling buried in a scene in a remote and dusty outpost fort. "A cup for the dead already, and hurrah for the next to die." I think Kipling would have enjoyed this world, and reading Nini Mo stories. STOP THE PRESSES! I went to look it up and realized that all these years I have thought Kipling wrote "The Revel", but it turns out to have been written by one Bartholomew Dowling. In my defense, it's about soldiers dying of plague in India. You can understand my confusion. Cut off from the land that bore us, Betray’d by the land we find, When the brightest have gone before us, And the dullest are most behind— Stand, stand to your glasses, steady! ’T is all we have left to prize: One cup to the dead already— Hurrah for the next that dies!I stand by my assertion that Kipling would like both Nini Mo and Tiny Doom.Read if: You have liked the other books. You want a sassy, competent, but not superheroic girl who does her best, hates wet socks, and wants to be in on all the secrets.Skip if: You are annoyed by constructed dialect. Um, no, I actually think it's awesome all over and everyone should read these books.
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  • Arminzerella
    January 1, 1970
    Now that Flora Segunda knows her true identity (she is Nyana Hadraada, daughter of Tiny Doom – celebrated heroine of Califa) she is angry with everyone for keeping secrets/lying to her all of these years. In order to get some answers, she works a spell to track down her real mother’s whereabouts. Before she can make use of this knowledge, however, a wer-bear mysteriously appears and runs off with her map. The nerve! Through a series of mishaps Flora and the bear (a ruggedly handsome man known in Now that Flora Segunda knows her true identity (she is Nyana Hadraada, daughter of Tiny Doom – celebrated heroine of Califa) she is angry with everyone for keeping secrets/lying to her all of these years. In order to get some answers, she works a spell to track down her real mother’s whereabouts. Before she can make use of this knowledge, however, a wer-bear mysteriously appears and runs off with her map. The nerve! Through a series of mishaps Flora and the bear (a ruggedly handsome man known in his human form as Tharyn Wraathmyr) end up as traveling companions and their adventures (and the map) eventually take them to Fort Sandy in the hot and desolate waste known as the Arivaipa Territory. Unfortunately, they attract the attention of a Birdie priest, who means to do Tiny Doom serious harm, and the answers to Flora’s questions must wait, as she races against time (and the skinwalker) to warn her mother.Flora bumbles through another exciting set of madcap adventures – it’s great fun to see how she plays so well into the carefully laid plans her adoptive mother, “Buck” Fyrdraaca has for her (despite all of her attempts to escape). This could have been at least 100 pages shorter if Flora didn’t spend so much time feeling sorry for herself, making accusations, and agonizing over her relationships. Mostly, these diversions add to her character’s charm. If you feel a little browbeat with the “pigfaces” and “fikes” you can always skim ahead. Fast-paced and funny with plenty of suspense. And, since Flora has only just discovered the many threads of Buck’s sticky web, there are bound to be more chapters in her story. Hooray!
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  • Carrie
    January 1, 1970
    Great series. This had a few predictable occurrences, but I didn't mind - the rest of everything was so unique and odd! My only complaint is that once Flora learned the alternative swear 'fike'.......it was on pretty much every page! I wish the series wasn't over.
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  • Snail in Danger (Sid) Nicolaides
    January 1, 1970
    I waited somewhat impatiently for this book — I lurked around the author's blog etc. and periodically updated this review with things like "Just read on YSW's twitter that this went to typesetting August 10." And now I've read it, and, hmm. Mixed feelings. Could this book possibly have lived up to my waiting-raised expectation levels? I don't know. I loved the ending but for the first half or so of the book I really wasn't feeling it.Update, 28 May 2012: I re-read this. The ending's great and I I waited somewhat impatiently for this book — I lurked around the author's blog etc. and periodically updated this review with things like "Just read on YSW's twitter that this went to typesetting August 10." And now I've read it, and, hmm. Mixed feelings. Could this book possibly have lived up to my waiting-raised expectation levels? I don't know. I loved the ending but for the first half or so of the book I really wasn't feeling it.Update, 28 May 2012: I re-read this. The ending's great and I really, really want to see where things go next. The transition between the end of Flora's Dare to the beginning of this one — where Flora has obediently gone to the Benica Barracks and then been detached to be junior aide de camp to her mother, the general of the army — is somewhat confusing. (Update, after August 2012 re-read: yeah, the course change isn't as bad here as in, say, John Barnes's Giraut series, but there was a small one, and it does create a feeling of mild confusion. We didn't resume where we left off, and I feel like there's at least a short story or a deleted scene or something between here and there.)I really want to know why (view spoiler)[Buck and Tiny Doom (hide spoiler)] both say they should have killed Axacaya when they had the chance. I want to know why (view spoiler)[the Jack Boots are family. (hide spoiler)] I loved (view spoiler)[Hardhands (hide spoiler)] the octopus, and the appearances of the older generation generally. (If you are able to track down the various short stories Wilce has written, which mostly involve them, I recommend it. They cast an interesting light on the Flora trilogy. I asked YSW on her LJ if there was any chance that these stories would be collected and she made maybe noises at me, IIRC. If they ever were I'd totally buy that. Replace two books, one magazine, and an electronic file with one book? Yes please.) I loved the various twists involving Udo, though I didn't care for the way that Tharyn was being all sulky by the end. My thoughts on (view spoiler)[the love triangle: strong inclination to Team Udo. If only because if Hardhands thinks Tharyn is a great idea, he must be a terrible idea. Hardhands was no fleet-flooted fancy boy when it came to personal relationships. Does Udo know what Cutaway's price was? Does Tharyn? (hide spoiler)]Adults are not useless here, though Flora thinks they are. And not without justification, as they have spent most of her life not telling her important things that it would be useful to know. Agree with everyone who has noted that everything was by no means wrapped up. Reading between the lines, I suspect that YSW is hoping/planning/trying to sell her/a publisher on more volumes. But I may well be wrong there. Not based on inside info ... just a guess. (30 May 2012: YSW just wrote this on FB: "Nini Mo's comment on the end of the Saga of the Second Flora: 'Everything has an end, except for sausages, which have two.'")Oh, and if you have a hardcover, take a look at the front cover under the dust jacket. Easter egg! (view spoiler)[It's the Cierra Califa! logo. See the comments to this review for more info. (hide spoiler)] In general the book design people were nice to this book, I think. The covers under the jacket have some interesting patterning on them, in addition to the Easter egg. I think it may be meant to suggest the waves of the sea ... though maybe I'm just imagining things. I like the cover art of Flora in her uniform, but I kind of wish Flynn were more red. Ah well, that's a minor detail. :)
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  • Gremlin
    January 1, 1970
    Hmmm. I quite liked this series as a whole. For once, a fantasy that isn't Euro-centric, some very interesting gender play, and a smart, willful central character who is independent and capable (but still somewhat annoying in her youth). While I did enjoy all of these books, I sort of liked this one the least, and it's a little hard for me to peg why. I *think* that it's because something was a little different with Flora. Or maybe, it's that something was exactly the same. She was whiny (which Hmmm. I quite liked this series as a whole. For once, a fantasy that isn't Euro-centric, some very interesting gender play, and a smart, willful central character who is independent and capable (but still somewhat annoying in her youth). While I did enjoy all of these books, I sort of liked this one the least, and it's a little hard for me to peg why. I *think* that it's because something was a little different with Flora. Or maybe, it's that something was exactly the same. She was whiny (which she's always been) and impetuous (which she's always been) but somehow, I don't want to accept that in book three. Where is her growth? She's had some crazy adventures in previous years, seen some crazy things, dealt with a number of harsh realities, and learned some truly sad tales about the people in her life. And yet, she's still so dang pouty! And refuses to believe that anyone else might have things going on. Throughout this whole book, she keeps being upset that the adults in her life don't trust her with information - but judging from the way she makes decisions, I can totally understand why they wouldn't. All that being said, I still like her chutzpah. And I LOVE hearing all the continued snippets from Nini Mo's writing throughout (some of the phrases have actually helped me in my real life!). And I really have to say that the author has a definite sense of humor. Plus, for a book that's marketed to middle-grade readers - there's plenty for adults in here! Wilce is quite masterful at innuendo, cursing, and subtle adult humor that manages to stay in line with those of "delicate sensibilities." (She's also got a thing for making her heroine vomit, apparently, but it's never grotesque).I'm not exactly satisfied with how things ended with (view spoiler)[the Wer-bear vs. Udo in Flora's affections. It all just felt sort of dropped. This whole book she builds this entire relationship with Wraathmyr only to have it completely wither/fall apart when she needs to go home? Unfinished. And having her love for Udo removed? While it's kind of clever to have that mean that she can start fresh with him, it seems to have hardly any consequence at all - which makes it seems like she didn't sacrifice anything at all. I want to believe this means that the author has more in store for us, but reading her various answers regarding that question leaves me feeling like that's not a definite. Confusing! (hide spoiler)]Overall, I enjoyed the process of reading these books, but I feel like there's more here that hasn't been covered. Here's hoping!
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  • Kay
    January 1, 1970
    Alright, here goes. Flora's Fury is the third book in what was supposed to be a trilogy, but ends with enough loose ties that there's at least one more coming out. Within we find the protagonist being very very upset because nobody seems to confide in her. Buck won't tell her the rebellion's secret plans, Sieur Wraathmyer (probably spelled wrong) won't share her map, and Tiny Doom is hiding in the middle of nowhere. So Flora takes it all into her own hands. And this promptly results in losing Ud Alright, here goes. Flora's Fury is the third book in what was supposed to be a trilogy, but ends with enough loose ties that there's at least one more coming out. Within we find the protagonist being very very upset because nobody seems to confide in her. Buck won't tell her the rebellion's secret plans, Sieur Wraathmyer (probably spelled wrong) won't share her map, and Tiny Doom is hiding in the middle of nowhere. So Flora takes it all into her own hands. And this promptly results in losing Udo (I can't say more but it's not the way you're thinking), getting a Birdie priest hot on Tiny Doom's tail, finding out far more than she's supposed to learn about the rebellion's plans and her family history, getting at least two people and several animals killed, and ending up a little bit more depressed and confused than she already was.It's a depressing book for at least part of it. Flora ends up maybe learning more about herself along the way, but all I see for most of the book is her going "ok I get it, I learned my lesson, I'll stop", only to promptly get up and say "No one else is doing anything, and no one can do it the way I can". This is how people end up dying for her, or around her, and how she loses people's trust so that they don't tell her that yes, they are actually doing things, they are actually quite actively doing things, which is why she needs to sit down.There's also a lot of feeling "spoony", a little bit of love-triangling, and a LOT of puking. Like seriously, Flora, it's just ridiculous. By 2/3 of the book I was starting to wonder if I had missed an "intimate encounter" of some kind and the author was insinuating that she was pregnant (I didn't and she's not, jsyk).The end result is that I finished this book feeling unimpressed. The writing was great, truly, but some of it just felt recycled. Some of the plot points made me tired.The romance was definitely overdone. And I left the book feeling like Flora just BARELY learned anything. I don't actually know right now if I would read a fourth book. I really don't. I'd be intrigued... maybe if the Wikipedia or FantasticFiction entry wasn't filled out, I'd be tempted. But right now, if I had the ability to, if the book was actually out already, I would just leave it at the library for someone else to read.
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  • Sian Jones
    January 1, 1970
    I know I shouldn't judge a book on what I was expecting, especially when some of my expectations were absolutely unfounded. One expectation -- and I don't know where I got it, except, you know, trilogies being so common -- was that this was the final book of the series. It isn't, but it took me a good way into the book to let go of the idea that certain plotpoints were going to be definitively addressed. I realized about two-thirds in (I'm slow) that this installment in the series is more akin t I know I shouldn't judge a book on what I was expecting, especially when some of my expectations were absolutely unfounded. One expectation -- and I don't know where I got it, except, you know, trilogies being so common -- was that this was the final book of the series. It isn't, but it took me a good way into the book to let go of the idea that certain plotpoints were going to be definitively addressed. I realized about two-thirds in (I'm slow) that this installment in the series is more akin to one of Nini Mo's yellowbacks -- a ripping adventure tale, anchored a bit on either side to plot from the previous books and the book to come, but for the most part, its own picaresque. My problem is, I'm not sure that all the wandering was necessary at this point in the larger overarching plot. I missed Califa like crazy (most of the action takes place in the wilderness, shall we say), and I missed Flora -- she's less vibrant, more pouty. Her previously-established sincerity and smarts seem to have gone somewhat astray over the course of this book. She seems to have forgotten things she learned previously. Still, I do acknowledge that Wilce has set herself a difficult task: not only juggling a fresh, complex, and highly political world, but writing at the same time about the transition from childhood to adulthood from the first-person point-of-view. And if I find Flora somewhat off-putting at this point, maybe it's just because adolescence can be so off-putting, so painful and dreary at the same time. Which is not to say I didn't enjoy the book. I did. (The scene in which Flora rides a wer-bear across a stormy ocean, for example, is pretty much worth the entire price of admission.) I just didn't enjoy it as much as the previous two books. Am I still in for book 4? Yes, please.
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  • Jenifer
    January 1, 1970
    If you took everything that had ever happened in the place that would become San Francisco to the present time, and mixed it up into a fantasy world, you might wind up with Ysabeau Wilce's Califa. With colors borrowed from Betsy Johnson's palette, and clubs rife with throbbing bass guitars, you've got obsidian knife-wielding flayed priests eating hearts, highborn Spanish nobility, spaghetti western gunslingers, lace-dripping pirates, and magical entities that are mashups of the Muppets and Carlo If you took everything that had ever happened in the place that would become San Francisco to the present time, and mixed it up into a fantasy world, you might wind up with Ysabeau Wilce's Califa. With colors borrowed from Betsy Johnson's palette, and clubs rife with throbbing bass guitars, you've got obsidian knife-wielding flayed priests eating hearts, highborn Spanish nobility, spaghetti western gunslingers, lace-dripping pirates, and magical entities that are mashups of the Muppets and Carlos Castenada. Nothing is ever boring. She takes just the right amount of some historical premise and then twists it into a delightful otherworld. (How I wish China de Mieville and Wilce would collaborate on a video game, the world building would be amazing AND you would never know if you'd end up temporarily dead or very dead.) In this instalment, the titular character has learned her real name and that her real mother is alive and sets out to find her. Fun ensues. There are octopuses, bears, boots that possess a man, demons with scissors that cut out memories (if that's not a Mieville thing, I'll eat my fluffy dayglo green tricorn). The only criticism is that the story doesn't properly end. Many loose ends. Which is why I'm scarpering off to read the grown-up tales of Califa in the author's _Prophecies, Libel and Dreams_, which might tell me more. Also, I hear there one can read about the Armistead Maupin side of Califa, the gay lovers and incest and other shockingly, adult things only barely hinted at in the YA series.
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  • Isa Lavinia
    January 1, 1970
    I hate giving a 4 to a Flora book - the Flora Trilogy is honestly one of the best (if not the best! - it may be tied with Megan Whalen Turner's Queen's Thief series for that spot) YA has to offer, but the plot pacing in this one seemed so uneven! Wilce always ties things up nicely, and we can always tell she really thought everything through, but there were parts that really dragged in there. I'm probably being extremely unfair, any other book like this would have gotten a 5 from me, but if I co I hate giving a 4 to a Flora book - the Flora Trilogy is honestly one of the best (if not the best! - it may be tied with Megan Whalen Turner's Queen's Thief series for that spot) YA has to offer, but the plot pacing in this one seemed so uneven! Wilce always ties things up nicely, and we can always tell she really thought everything through, but there were parts that really dragged in there. I'm probably being extremely unfair, any other book like this would have gotten a 5 from me, but if I compare this one to the previous ones, it's a 4.Still, it was great, I can't recommend this series enough! And I do hope there'll be more to come.
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  • Betsy
    January 1, 1970
    This third book in the Flora Segunda series is just as exciting and well-written as the others. The language is clever and frequently hilarious, especially when expletives come into play (pigface, snapper, puggie). I loved the description of Arivaipa/Arizona: "There were poisonous spiders, poisonous cacti, poisonous scorpions, poisonous snakes, poisonous lizards. There were mountain lions, wild bulls, wild horses, and javelina. There were outlaws, cattle rustlers, renegade broncos, miners gone c This third book in the Flora Segunda series is just as exciting and well-written as the others. The language is clever and frequently hilarious, especially when expletives come into play (pigface, snapper, puggie). I loved the description of Arivaipa/Arizona: "There were poisonous spiders, poisonous cacti, poisonous scorpions, poisonous snakes, poisonous lizards. There were mountain lions, wild bulls, wild horses, and javelina. There were outlaws, cattle rustlers, renegade broncos, miners gone crazy from the sun, and lone-wolf bandits, any of whom would kill you over a slice of bacon, a canteen of water -- or a misguided remark about a shirt".
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  • Minh
    January 1, 1970
    Trilogy?! That bloody hell better not be the end of this series, as it was coming to an end I was uncomfortably thinking that Flora was about to take the easy way out when, boom. Cliffhanger from hell. I fluctuated between a 3 and 4 for this book, Flora is so ridiculously annoying, it's hard to believe there's only 2 years between this novel and the start of the series, so much has changed and yet Flora remains as obstinate as ever. Fingers crossed for the continuation of this series, there are Trilogy?! That bloody hell better not be the end of this series, as it was coming to an end I was uncomfortably thinking that Flora was about to take the easy way out when, boom. Cliffhanger from hell. I fluctuated between a 3 and 4 for this book, Flora is so ridiculously annoying, it's hard to believe there's only 2 years between this novel and the start of the series, so much has changed and yet Flora remains as obstinate as ever. Fingers crossed for the continuation of this series, there are just too many plot points hanging for it not to!
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  • victoria.p
    January 1, 1970
    I enjoyed this, but dear god, did no one proof the ebook version? It's missing half its periods and there are a lot of typos and stuff - it's the worst ebook I've run across for these issues.I enjoyed the actual story, though it pains me how obvious things were to me that Flora continually missed (especially at the end with La Bruja), though I admit I didn't see that final reveal coming. I am very interested in seeing the consequences of her payment to Cutaway, as well as what's going to happen I enjoyed this, but dear god, did no one proof the ebook version? It's missing half its periods and there are a lot of typos and stuff - it's the worst ebook I've run across for these issues.I enjoyed the actual story, though it pains me how obvious things were to me that Flora continually missed (especially at the end with La Bruja), though I admit I didn't see that final reveal coming. I am very interested in seeing the consequences of her payment to Cutaway, as well as what's going to happen when she gets the Duquesa back to Califa.
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  • Carissa
    January 1, 1970
    This book would have gotten a 5 star rating (like the other two) if it wasn't for the disappointing ending. I don't even want to talk about it just because I was so disappointed. The last two chapters really got me. Everything before that was absolutely amazing. ugggghhh I just can't believe that ending.
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  • Ryan Mishap
    January 1, 1970
    Fike yeah! Another fine entry in this imaginative series with a complex lead character striving in a world that is an amazing amalgamation of reality, myths, folklore, alternative/punk culture and more. Only a snapperhead wouldn't enjoy these books and if you haven't read them yet, well, Pigface! Get going!
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  • Briana
    January 1, 1970
    This has been my favorite book in the series. It was filled with excitement, intensity, and emotions. This kept twisting and turning and leaving me wanting more.
  • Emily
    January 1, 1970
    If you love this series then join my group, Flora Segunda Lovers!
  • KittyMeowMeow
    January 1, 1970
    An awesome book, I love all the characters except for Udo,he's all over the place.
  • Ashley Lambert-Maberly
    January 1, 1970
    There were a few moments where I felt this might end up 3-ish (which isn't a bad read, just not quite as good as the former two) and then she'd pull the rug out from me slightly and I'd end up being thrilled and delighted again.I will say that I felt the first book was appropriate for a younger audience, and that whomever read that first one would enjoy the second one when it came out, as they'd be slightly older, and this third volume felt very adult to me. Flora's grown, and she has occasional There were a few moments where I felt this might end up 3-ish (which isn't a bad read, just not quite as good as the former two) and then she'd pull the rug out from me slightly and I'd end up being thrilled and delighted again.I will say that I felt the first book was appropriate for a younger audience, and that whomever read that first one would enjoy the second one when it came out, as they'd be slightly older, and this third volume felt very adult to me. Flora's grown, and she has occasional sexy thoughts--so if you're planning on a series to read to your 8 years olds, wait a few years.Mostly I'm left with that tiresome sense of loss that a beloved series is over (without the leavening feeling of rightness that all is well and concluded ... 'cause it's not. There's so much more story that can come, and I hope she writes it!)(Note: 5 stars = amazing, wonderful, 4 = very good book, 3 = decent read, 2 = disappointing, 1 = awful, just awful. I'm fairly good at picking for myself so end up with a lot of 4s).
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  • BookBec
    January 1, 1970
    I liked this better than the second book, largely because I gave myself permission to simply gloss over all of the praterhumans/daemons/otherworldly creatures (read = some kind of nonhuman monster) and the spells (read = some kind of magic) and the family names (read = relative or not, native or overlord). I don't find a great ROI (return on investment) in the Flora books: you can spend lots of energy trying to keep track of everyone's name and monster status and specific spell, but those things I liked this better than the second book, largely because I gave myself permission to simply gloss over all of the praterhumans/daemons/otherworldly creatures (read = some kind of nonhuman monster) and the spells (read = some kind of magic) and the family names (read = relative or not, native or overlord). I don't find a great ROI (return on investment) in the Flora books: you can spend lots of energy trying to keep track of everyone's name and monster status and specific spell, but those things become throwaway details in the end. The books can be fun romps, although I'd wish for less Flora puke and some more growth in her decision-making process. And there were a lot of undercurrents of threats of sexual violence, which Flora belittled. Ah, well, I've finished the trilogy and had enough entertainment not to regret it, but don't think I'll be back for the new stories the author left dangling.
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  • Theresa
    January 1, 1970
    So I'm at the end, and I feel like it left me with as many questions as I had when I started the trilogy. I guess the author wants it that way.I really love Flora. I love how spirited she is. That same spiritedness gets her in a lot of trouble but she certainly isn't a doormat.My favorite character from the past two books was Hotspur, and he barely gets any scenes in this one. I wish I could be there after the end to see his reaction. Ugh. So much is left in the air.I hsppen to absolutely love T So I'm at the end, and I feel like it left me with as many questions as I had when I started the trilogy. I guess the author wants it that way.I really love Flora. I love how spirited she is. That same spiritedness gets her in a lot of trouble but she certainly isn't a doormat.My favorite character from the past two books was Hotspur, and he barely gets any scenes in this one. I wish I could be there after the end to see his reaction. Ugh. So much is left in the air.I hsppen to absolutely love Tharyn. I have to guess I was supposed to be pulling for Udo, but I wasn't. As Flora would say, he always seemed like a bit of a snapperhead. As I was coming to the end of this, I was trying to decide what this series had even been about. I guess the author wanted it to be a coming if age story, finding out who you are. In the end, Flora realized just that.
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  • SBC
    January 1, 1970
    I didn't enjoy this as much as the first two books in the trilogy. The characterisation felt a little loose and less believable. Instead of Flora's Fury, it felt more like it should be called Flora's Teenage Angst. Flora's character and her likes, loves and hates becomes quite fluid and I didn't find a few of her choices and therefore the scenes and the direction of the plot convincing. On the upside, the series continued to have a fascinating setting with interesting events. I'd like to know mo I didn't enjoy this as much as the first two books in the trilogy. The characterisation felt a little loose and less believable. Instead of Flora's Fury, it felt more like it should be called Flora's Teenage Angst. Flora's character and her likes, loves and hates becomes quite fluid and I didn't find a few of her choices and therefore the scenes and the direction of the plot convincing. On the upside, the series continued to have a fascinating setting with interesting events. I'd like to know more about what happened next...
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  • Danae
    January 1, 1970
    Still enjoyed the writing, but the story itself seemed to lack a clear direction and goal. Flora wasn't as sure about what she wanted, and neither are we. The ending is a little muddy-- which in a lot of cases I like an open ending, the main characters off pursuing more adventures, but the plot was loose enough that it just felt like a bit of a letdown. Not sorry I read it, but I think I will remember the first two books more fondly.
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  • Kate
    January 1, 1970
    While I enjoyed Flora's Fury, I don't think I'll re-read the series, as I found the end disappointing. It felt unfinished. i feel that we really need another book to wrap up some major plot threads that were introduced in the last few chapters.
  • L
    January 1, 1970
    4.5 stars. I agree with other reviews. This can't be the end of her adventures. The ending felt rushed after most of the novel, flush with Wilce's usual marvelous pacing and unique narrative voice.
  • Sara
    January 1, 1970
    Well that was a let down. With this being the final book in the series, I expected it to actually conclude, not leave me with permanent loose threads and a cliffhanger.
  • Masayuki Arai
    January 1, 1970
    Which guy does she choose !?I would prefer the bear guy :)
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