The Lord of Death (Inspector Shan, #6)
Praise for the Tao Yun Shan series: “Majestic.”—The New York Times Book Review “A powerful picture of courage in the face of tyranny.”—The Washington Post “Nothing I’ve read or seen about how China has systematically crushed the soul of Tibet has been as effective.”—Chicago Tribune Shan Tao Yun is an exiled Chinese national and a former Beijing investigator on parole from the Tibetan gulag to which he had been consigned as punishment. He is ferrying a corpse on muleback over the slopes of Chomolungma—Everest—at the request of a local wisewoman who says the gods have appointed this task to him, when he encounters what looks like a traffic accident. A government bus filled with imprisoned illegal monks has overturned. Then Shan hears gunfire. Two women in an approaching sedan have been killed. One is the Chinese minister of tourism; the other, a blond Westerner, organizes climbing expeditions. Though she dies in his arms, Shan is later met with denials that this foreigner is dead. Shan must find the murderer, for his recompense will be the life and sanity of his son, Ko, imprisoned in a Chinese “yeti factory” where men are routinely driven mad. Eliot Pattison is an international lawyer based near Philadelphia. His five previous Shan novels have been critical and commercial successes. He won the Edgar® Award for Best First Novel and was nominated for the Crime Writers’ Association Golden Dagger.

The Lord of Death (Inspector Shan, #6) Details

TitleThe Lord of Death (Inspector Shan, #6)
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseJun 1st, 2009
PublisherSoho Crime
ISBN-139781569475799
Rating
GenreMystery, Fiction, Crime, Cultural, China, Religion, Buddhism, Thriller, Mystery Thriller

The Lord of Death (Inspector Shan, #6) Review

  • PDXReader
    January 1, 1970
    Eliot Pattison really hit his stride in this latest entry in his Inspector Shan series. Some of his previous books have gotten a little overly political, bogging down the story. Not so this time around. Don't get me wrong - the relationship between the Chinese regime and the Tibetan citizens is still a vital part of the novel, but it's so tightly interwoven that it doesn't overwhelm the plot. The book has everything I look for in a mystery - great characterization, solid investigation, a complex Eliot Pattison really hit his stride in this latest entry in his Inspector Shan series. Some of his previous books have gotten a little overly political, bogging down the story. Not so this time around. Don't get me wrong - the relationship between the Chinese regime and the Tibetan citizens is still a vital part of the novel, but it's so tightly interwoven that it doesn't overwhelm the plot. The book has everything I look for in a mystery - great characterization, solid investigation, a complex plot, and a conclusion where all the pieces fit together. On top of that, it educates, allowing readers to learn just a little more about Tibet and its people. This is a great book, and one I'll definitely be recommending to my friends.
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  • Elizabeth
    January 1, 1970
    Eliot Pattison writes mysteries set in modern Tibet. His protagonist is a Han Chinese sentenced to imprisonment in Tibet after he investigated corruption in the highest levels of government instead of pretending the blindness that was expected of him. He sympathizes greatly with the Tibetan people whose culture has been almost but obliterated by the Chinese. These books are dense with information and emotion. Its impossible not to feel some of the enormous loss that Tibet has suffered. All the c Eliot Pattison writes mysteries set in modern Tibet. His protagonist is a Han Chinese sentenced to imprisonment in Tibet after he investigated corruption in the highest levels of government instead of pretending the blindness that was expected of him. He sympathizes greatly with the Tibetan people whose culture has been almost but obliterated by the Chinese. These books are dense with information and emotion. Its impossible not to feel some of the enormous loss that Tibet has suffered. All the characters are engaging even the most corrupt official. The spiritualism of the Tibetan monks is so appealing and frustrating at the same time as they endure the loss of their culture as part of a greater pattern rather than resist it. Yet this same endurance allows them to disconnect from the physical brutality of their captors.
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  • Michael
    January 1, 1970
    Excellent, engaging mystery set in contemporary Tibet which is 6th in the series about a former Chinese police inspector, Shan, and his volunteer work on cases that pit him against the oppressive Chinese regime. In this one (my first read in the series), Shan is serving the Buddhist community by transporting the bodies of sherpas who have died on climbing expeditions in the Himalayas while he struggles to gain some leverage that can save his son, who is being tortured in a local prison/mental ho Excellent, engaging mystery set in contemporary Tibet which is 6th in the series about a former Chinese police inspector, Shan, and his volunteer work on cases that pit him against the oppressive Chinese regime. In this one (my first read in the series), Shan is serving the Buddhist community by transporting the bodies of sherpas who have died on climbing expeditions in the Himalayas while he struggles to gain some leverage that can save his son, who is being tortured in a local prison/mental hospital as a subversive. He comes across the aftermath of two disasters, one a violent liberation of Buddhist monks being bused to jail and another the highway murder of the Chinese Minister of Tourism and an unknown Western female passenger. His capture at the scene of the latter, up the mountain road from the first, puts him on a long dangerous path of placating the Chinese authorities by solving the crimes while continuing to protect the Buddhist community from escalation of their oppression. In his portrayal of Shan's efforts, Pattison does much to elucidate the relationship of the international climbing community, the Chinese and local business interests in the revenue generated from tourism, and the spiritual motivations of regional residents to assure that the gods of the mountains are respected and that traditional values protected from the cultural decimation by both the Chinese and Western invasion. The plot felt overly complex, yet the narrative was satisfying in character development, its progressive unfolding of mysteries, and its surprise ending.
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  • Nelie
    January 1, 1970
    I thought the Shan mystery series was getting a little formuliac before this book. I was getting a little overwhelmed by convenient hidden temples, hidden tibetan treasures, and underground passages in the middle of nowhere and fugitive tibetan buddhist monks saving things at the last minute in overly convenient (and overly frequent) ways. This mystery takes place on the slopes of Mt. Everest on the Chinese side and the mountain plays a big role in the mystery. It hangs together well and the cha I thought the Shan mystery series was getting a little formuliac before this book. I was getting a little overwhelmed by convenient hidden temples, hidden tibetan treasures, and underground passages in the middle of nowhere and fugitive tibetan buddhist monks saving things at the last minute in overly convenient (and overly frequent) ways. This mystery takes place on the slopes of Mt. Everest on the Chinese side and the mountain plays a big role in the mystery. It hangs together well and the characters seem more believable and a bit less one-dimensional than some of the past novels. There are fugitive Tibetan monks but they are not the focus of the story and there's only one (and 1/2) hidden temples/passages. As is true of the best of Pattison's Shan series, I learned something new about Tibetan history too by reading this book.
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  • Beth
    January 1, 1970
    Many years ago I read the first in the Inspector Shan series, The Skull Mantra, and liked it so much that I kept the book. These many years later I happened upon book 6 in my public library and was entranced again. The Inspector is Chinese and has been banished to Tibet due to having pissed off some higher-ups. He has learned Tibetan and the tenets of Buddhism, and is now working for a Tibetan company that provides materials and support for those climbing Mt. Everest. Of course there are murders Many years ago I read the first in the Inspector Shan series, The Skull Mantra, and liked it so much that I kept the book. These many years later I happened upon book 6 in my public library and was entranced again. The Inspector is Chinese and has been banished to Tibet due to having pissed off some higher-ups. He has learned Tibetan and the tenets of Buddhism, and is now working for a Tibetan company that provides materials and support for those climbing Mt. Everest. Of course there are murders and the Inspector must solved the mysteries, because his son's life depends on it. The Inspector Shan series is steeped in local lore, mysticism and culture, and has a number of twists and turns. I highly recommend it!
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  • Georgina Thynne
    January 1, 1970
    In this new adventure, Inspector Shan (former Beijing police investigator, but now undocumented gulag survivor in Tibet) must discover who murdered Wu, the Chinese Minister of Tourism, and Megan Ross, an American mountaineer who died in Shan’s arms on the lower slopes of Chomolungma (Mt Everest), but whom no one believes is dead, and prove that the hated Colonel Tan is innocent of these murders. Why? Because Tan, who is in charge of Ladrung prison, is the only person who can help Shan rescue his In this new adventure, Inspector Shan (former Beijing police investigator, but now undocumented gulag survivor in Tibet) must discover who murdered Wu, the Chinese Minister of Tourism, and Megan Ross, an American mountaineer who died in Shan’s arms on the lower slopes of Chomolungma (Mt Everest), but whom no one believes is dead, and prove that the hated Colonel Tan is innocent of these murders. Why? Because Tan, who is in charge of Ladrung prison, is the only person who can help Shan rescue his son Ko, who is being held in a “special medical unit”. And time is running out: Ko is scheduled to undergo experimental brain surgery within 48 hours to “eliminate antisocial tendencies”. Add to this mix a dead Nepalese sherpa, a reincarnated mule, a busload of escaped monks, a fortuneteller, a drunken former monk, two bounty-seeking thugs, and an expert American mountaineer intent on discovering the truth about his father, and you have the ingredients for an elaborate thriller that is, like all Pattison’s books, impressively researched, both politically and historically.
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  • Patricia
    January 1, 1970
    Amazing series of mystery in Tibet that holds true to the horrific situation the Tibetans endure at the hands of the Chinese government. Tibet is like no place on earth and the author captures its essence brilliantly. The entire series should be read in order to enjoy an excellent mystery and also to honor those Tibetans who strive to endure.
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  • Rome Doherty
    January 1, 1970
    My kind of mystery. Read on the train on my phone. Exotic locale , interesting hero, political values implicit.
  • Julie Weston
    January 1, 1970
    Eliot Pattison continues to add to his series about Inspector Shan and Tibet and what the China are doing to destroy a country. Exciting, tragic, page-turning.
  • Marc Severson
    January 1, 1970
    Again the reader is taken to the faraway land and placed there as if watching the story unfold right before their eyes!
  • Rhonda
    January 1, 1970
    I love this series. The character of Tan Yao Shun is so well-developed and full of depth that his journey becomes your own, his ever-growing wisdom and compassion becoming much like a philosophical discussion with a Tibetan lama. It is not light reading and can often be heartbreaking, but it's also memorable and will become a part of you.
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  • Snap
    January 1, 1970
    I attended a lecture on Chod meditation from the Bon Tibetan tradition (very interesting). When I came home I had the urge to read another of Eliot Pattison's books, all set in Tibet. I usually stay behind at least one book because I enjoy the series so much. In THE LORD OF DEATH, Shan (an exiled Chinese national and former Beijing Investigator) has been requested by a local wisewoman to lead a mule bearing a corpse over the slopes of Chomolungma (Everest). She tells him the gods have assigned h I attended a lecture on Chod meditation from the Bon Tibetan tradition (very interesting). When I came home I had the urge to read another of Eliot Pattison's books, all set in Tibet. I usually stay behind at least one book because I enjoy the series so much. In THE LORD OF DEATH, Shan (an exiled Chinese national and former Beijing Investigator) has been requested by a local wisewoman to lead a mule bearing a corpse over the slopes of Chomolungma (Everest). She tells him the gods have assigned him this task. He comes upon a traffic accident. A government bus has overturned and monks who were being transported to prison are escaping. But that's not all that's happening. Shan hears gunfire. Two women have been shot and killed. One is the Chinese Minister of Tourism and the other is a blond Westerner, an organizer of climbing expeditions. As always these books are a fascinating look at Tibet. In THE LORD OF DEATH, Pattison we read about the American connection to the Tibetan resistance -- Tibetan trainees at Camp Hale in the Colorado Rockies. The Everest region was one of several areas of operation and Pattison weaves the past with the present. Then there is just the drama of the amazing Everest region -- a story all its own. Then add the Tibetan people, the Buddhist monks -- and it's a story worth reading.
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  • Mundi
    January 1, 1970
    Pattison's Inspector Shan series is one of my favorites, and I can come back to one after an extended absence and still fall right into the grooves and furrows of Pattison's writing. Learning Buddhist teachings from fellow gulag inmates - incarcerated monks, guilty of not being Communist - Inspector Shan has learned to hone his detective skillset with meditation, and it is his immersion onto Buddhism that is most often able to help him see how the pieces of the crime puzzle fit together. Alway Pattison's Inspector Shan series is one of my favorites, and I can come back to one after an extended absence and still fall right into the grooves and furrows of Pattison's writing. Learning Buddhist teachings from fellow gulag inmates - incarcerated monks, guilty of not being Communist - Inspector Shan has learned to hone his detective skillset with meditation, and it is his immersion onto Buddhism that is most often able to help him see how the pieces of the crime puzzle fit together. Always a great read, Pattison's Inspector Shan has mystery and mysticism, politics and torture, and Shan's particular wit and cagey cat-and-mouse political word play with the bureaucrats he is forced to deal with just to stay alive. The biggest horror of this series, is that it is built upon actual events unfolding on the other side of the world, even now. The story of a man who found himself on the wrong side in a political reform, outcast to the hinterlands, and who now, despite being an outsider - and looking, physically, a great deal like the Big Bully - uses his skills as detective, and his willingness to be open to all possibilities, to defend the people and the culture of his exile.
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  • J
    January 1, 1970
    I DON'T HIDE OR PROMOTE MY REVIEWS.This may be my favorite Inspector Shan book to date.Like most of Pattison's Shan stories, this one includes subtle resolutions. Bad guys often partially get off; innocent people frequently get metaphorically skewered. But Shan always surmounts his obstacles -- and emerges humble and practical as ever.I savor Pattison's descriptions of the stark mountain environment of Tibet. But this volume is short on that, compared to some of the other Shan stories.In fact, a I DON'T HIDE OR PROMOTE MY REVIEWS.This may be my favorite Inspector Shan book to date.Like most of Pattison's Shan stories, this one includes subtle resolutions. Bad guys often partially get off; innocent people frequently get metaphorically skewered. But Shan always surmounts his obstacles -- and emerges humble and practical as ever.I savor Pattison's descriptions of the stark mountain environment of Tibet. But this volume is short on that, compared to some of the other Shan stories.In fact, a fair amount of attention goes to explaining how the high-altitude trek business to allow Westerners to ascend Mount Everest is despoiling Mother Nature, shifting the economy and culture among the formerly remote sherpa villages.What particularly drew me in this time is that Shan is struggling not only to solve a murder or two, he is also trying to save his estranged son's life.Because I check books out of the library, I can't always read a series in sequence. Last I'd read, Shan's son was doing wall back in mainstream China. Obviously a lot has changed since my last read. Just gotta hunt down those interim volumes!!
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  • Sophie
    January 1, 1970
    I didn't like this one quite as much as the other books in this series, but it was still excellent. In order to save his son, Shan has to find out the truth behind the murder of two women. I don't know if it was the lack of Lokesh and Gendun or the fact that this book was the shortest of the lot, but this book was much more focused on the crime plot than the others were. It was an interesting case, but I admit I am always a lot more interested in everything else - the people Shan meets and how t I didn't like this one quite as much as the other books in this series, but it was still excellent. In order to save his son, Shan has to find out the truth behind the murder of two women. I don't know if it was the lack of Lokesh and Gendun or the fact that this book was the shortest of the lot, but this book was much more focused on the crime plot than the others were. It was an interesting case, but I admit I am always a lot more interested in everything else - the people Shan meets and how they are living. So there wasn't enough of that for my liking, but there were quite a few very powerful moments that moved me deeply. Interestingly enough I was thinking that there was something different about this book, and about halfway through I checked if it was the same translator, and it turned out it wasn't. The new one wasn't bad, either, but the difference was noticeable anyway. I'm planning to reread them in English, so I'm curious about how that will feel like.
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  • Heather
    January 1, 1970
    I like the way that Pattison manages to interweave the plot and the characters of his novel with the historyand, especially, the landscape of Tibet without diverging too sharply into the didactic. The novel's main weakness is that a number of the characters are hard to distinguish one from another; Pattison does not do enough to separate their personalities, and it doesn't help that his main character persists in threatening one person after another in the same way: Beijing will realize how you' I like the way that Pattison manages to interweave the plot and the characters of his novel with the historyand, especially, the landscape of Tibet without diverging too sharply into the didactic. The novel's main weakness is that a number of the characters are hard to distinguish one from another; Pattison does not do enough to separate their personalities, and it doesn't help that his main character persists in threatening one person after another in the same way: Beijing will realize how you've made a mess of things and you'll loseeverything that separates us. As an American with an interest in both China and Tibet, I think that Pattison'sdecision to make his main character a Chinese person sympathetic to Tibetans and forced to live in Tibet in a manner not much elevated above the Tibetans yields some really interesting perspectives, though I am sure that both Tibetans and Chinese might construct things differently.
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  • Kate
    January 1, 1970
    Inspector Shan is an exiled Chinese national, who used to work as an investigator in Beijing, until he was thrown into a Tibetan gulag as punishment for some transgression. Yet, he continues to prove useful; often he's the only one who can connect the dots and figure out who committed the crimes and why. So Beijing puts up with him, reluctantly, constantly reminding him they can throw him back into a prison camp.In the Lord of Death, he's been given a task by a native Tibetan fortuneteller as tr Inspector Shan is an exiled Chinese national, who used to work as an investigator in Beijing, until he was thrown into a Tibetan gulag as punishment for some transgression. Yet, he continues to prove useful; often he's the only one who can connect the dots and figure out who committed the crimes and why. So Beijing puts up with him, reluctantly, constantly reminding him they can throw him back into a prison camp.In the Lord of Death, he's been given a task by a native Tibetan fortuneteller as transporter of dead bodies. He happens upon an accident, which as he discovers, is really a murder scene.As a story of the clash between China and Tibet and between China and the many monasteries, as well as of the clash between China and trying to find out the real truth, these Inspector Shan stories are fascinating, page-turning tales. Highly recommended.
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  • Peter
    January 1, 1970
    This is another in the Inspector Shan Tibetan novels by lawyer/philosopher Eliot Pattison. This outing is set at the foot of Everest as the corruption of Chinese officials and the avarice of Tibetan capitalists combine with the thrill seeking lusts of Western climbers to create a deadly situation for locals and local monks. There is also an interesting tie back to one of the great undiscussed 'spy-missions' of the 20th century, the unkept assurance of assistance by the U.S. for the Tibetans agai This is another in the Inspector Shan Tibetan novels by lawyer/philosopher Eliot Pattison. This outing is set at the foot of Everest as the corruption of Chinese officials and the avarice of Tibetan capitalists combine with the thrill seeking lusts of Western climbers to create a deadly situation for locals and local monks. There is also an interesting tie back to one of the great undiscussed 'spy-missions' of the 20th century, the unkept assurance of assistance by the U.S. for the Tibetans against the Chinese. This story is such a tragedy and Pattison tells it so adriotly with his combination of flawed characters and a deep appreciation for the meaning and ways of buddhism.I love this series.
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  • Margaret Sankey
    January 1, 1970
    Sixth in a strong series, this volume has former Beijing Inspector Shan (who was banished for investigating corruption among powerful party leaders) out of the gulag and in the relative calm of internal exile in a remote Tibetan village. The murder of the Tourism Minister, a missing female American climber, stolen statues of the Lord of Death, a new Religious Affairs officers bent on destroying monasteries and and connections to the American-backed Tibetan resistance 40 years before cause the lo Sixth in a strong series, this volume has former Beijing Inspector Shan (who was banished for investigating corruption among powerful party leaders) out of the gulag and in the relative calm of internal exile in a remote Tibetan village. The murder of the Tourism Minister, a missing female American climber, stolen statues of the Lord of Death, a new Religious Affairs officers bent on destroying monasteries and and connections to the American-backed Tibetan resistance 40 years before cause the local authorities to coerce Shan back into detective work with millions in foreign climbing money at stake.
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  • Booknblues
    January 1, 1970
    This book is the 6th and currently last of the Inspector Shan series. I must say that I am a bit sad that there are no more for me to read.This one is a bit different as Shan has moved away from his beloved monks and is working to free his imprisoned son Ko from the dreaded "Yeti factory" an experimental clinic for prisoners.Shan has been working transporting the dead from Mount Everest. During one such expedition he encounters a bus accident in which some monks escape. At the same time he finds This book is the 6th and currently last of the Inspector Shan series. I must say that I am a bit sad that there are no more for me to read.This one is a bit different as Shan has moved away from his beloved monks and is working to free his imprisoned son Ko from the dreaded "Yeti factory" an experimental clinic for prisoners.Shan has been working transporting the dead from Mount Everest. During one such expedition he encounters a bus accident in which some monks escape. At the same time he finds a murdered minister and an American woman dies in his arms.The stakes are high for him to solve this mystery because it means life and death for his son.
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  • Chris
    January 1, 1970
    Shan, the ultimate seeker of truth, continues to mystify all to include this reader. Just when you think you have it figured out another wrinkle appears. Lots of surprises in this one which mixes modern excitement of mountain climbing, normal political intrigue in the current Tibet, and Cold War fighting from the recent past. I always get a kick out of how Shan is polite and helpful to his enemies while they are cursing and threatening him. Lots of gore and torture techniques make for an unsettl Shan, the ultimate seeker of truth, continues to mystify all to include this reader. Just when you think you have it figured out another wrinkle appears. Lots of surprises in this one which mixes modern excitement of mountain climbing, normal political intrigue in the current Tibet, and Cold War fighting from the recent past. I always get a kick out of how Shan is polite and helpful to his enemies while they are cursing and threatening him. Lots of gore and torture techniques make for an unsettling read. Makes you wonder if the author will still be welcome in China.
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  • Catherine Woodman
    January 1, 1970
    This is only the second one of these SHan books that I have read--they are supurbly written, the story in convoluted and could either be seen as confusing, original, or esoteric, and they are pleasantly paced. they are just not really my cup of tea--I have yet to warm to Shan and I really think that is a distance that is imposed by the author rather than inherent in the character (well, there is both, actually, but there is more distance than is appealing or psychologically accessible). I would This is only the second one of these SHan books that I have read--they are supurbly written, the story in convoluted and could either be seen as confusing, original, or esoteric, and they are pleasantly paced. they are just not really my cup of tea--I have yet to warm to Shan and I really think that is a distance that is imposed by the author rather than inherent in the character (well, there is both, actually, but there is more distance than is appealing or psychologically accessible). I would read another one but I wouldn't put it on my hold list at the library.
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  • Kristena West
    January 1, 1970
    I love all inspector Chan mysteries, they go beyond what one would expect. I am always so grateful that the traditions of Buddhism are part of the story line and some of the hidden mysteries are revealed. The problems that Chan faces as a "hidden" Buddhist ex Chinese investigator, are filled with tragedy and moral challenges that hopefully I will never have to face. In writing these expose's on what China is doing to the Tibetans' Pattison supports the efforts of everyone who is trying to help t I love all inspector Chan mysteries, they go beyond what one would expect. I am always so grateful that the traditions of Buddhism are part of the story line and some of the hidden mysteries are revealed. The problems that Chan faces as a "hidden" Buddhist ex Chinese investigator, are filled with tragedy and moral challenges that hopefully I will never have to face. In writing these expose's on what China is doing to the Tibetans' Pattison supports the efforts of everyone who is trying to help this situation. My highest recommendation.
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  • Paula Hebert
    January 1, 1970
    this is the latest in a series of mystery/thrillers set in the unlikely area of chinese occupied tibet. former inspector shan, sent to the gulag for political crimes, keeps getting put in the unenviable position of solving crimes for his enemies. you will learn more about the peaple of tibet, the government of china and the fascinating belief of buddism, than you could ever learn in a newspaper or net site. plain writing, good characters, great story!
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  • Susan
    January 1, 1970
    Free Tibet!! Want to boycott China and "made in China" goods after reading Pattison's most recent Inspector Shan mystery. Reminds me of my country's dirty, nasty war against our "Native" American cultures and peoples. It is so crude, senseless, cruel, self destructive, imagine such behavior has been perpetrated against aboriginal peoples at least since the celts over ran the picts and since the picts over ran the druids and on and on and on...
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  • Alain DeWitt
    January 1, 1970
    Another solid outing for Pattison and Inspector Shan. I can't ever recall coming across another author with so high a cultural IQ. I'd love to know how it is that he is so well-versed in Tibetan culture. I will say that I think it's time for Pattison to do a little more with this character. I don't think Shan can spend all his time as the knight-errant of Tibet; he needs a story arc and growth (beyond the 'merely' spiritual).
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  • Laura
    January 1, 1970
    A gripping, powerful tale of Tibet under Chinese rule and of the lengths one man will go to ease another's suffering. Pattison continues the Detective Shan series by sending him to the foot of Tibet's most famous mountain, Everest, where he must help an enemy in order to save his son and a disappearing way of life. Awesome. This is why I anticipate each new Detective Shan book with such excitement.
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  • Pam
    January 1, 1970
    Another great book in the Inspector Shan series. This one takes place on the Tibetan side of Mount Everest, where you learn not of of the history of the mountain, but also of the rebellion forces that stood against the Chinese, and the current status of Tibetan-Chinese relationship and systematic destruction of Tibetan culture.
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  • Jessica
    January 1, 1970
    The setting and the culture is definitely the selling point here and it's quite interesting, but I struggle with the form Pattison uses to present his stories. I'm not sure if it's just a lack of line breaks around the scene changes or what, but there's a pervasive sense that the reader is showing up in the middle of the action and needs to spend a page or two catching up.
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  • Kathy
    January 1, 1970
    I enjoyed reading about a part of Tibet I've been to (base camp of Everest and surrounding area - though no farther UP - wheez!), and the mystery had lots of twists and turns and interesting characters. I found the book rather depressing on the whole, though. The plight of the Tibetan people is depressing, so it's not surprising, but it is disheartening.
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