After Australia
Climate catastrophe, police brutality, white genocide, totalitarian rule and the erasure of black history provide the backdrop for stories of love, courage and hope.In this unflinching new anthology, twelve of Australia’s most daring Indigenous writers and writers of colour provide a glimpse of Australia as we head toward the year 2050.Featuring Ambelin Kwaymullina, Claire G. Coleman, Omar Sakr, Future D. Fidel, Karen Wyld, Khalid Warsame, Kaya Ortiz, Roanna Gonsalves, Sarah Ross, Zoya Patel, Michelle Law and Hannah Donnelly. Edited by Michael Mohammed Ahmad. Original concept by Lena Nahlous.Published by Affirm Press in partnership with Diversity Arts Australia and Sweatshop Literacy Movement.

After Australia Details

TitleAfter Australia
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseJun 9th, 2020
PublisherAffirm Press
Rating
GenreShort Stories, Fiction, Cultural, Australia, Poetry, Anthologies

After Australia Review

  • Michael Livingston
    January 1, 1970
    An exciting and innovative collection, with a diverse set of authors offering up their takes on After Australia. As a political project it's clearly successful, bringing together well known and emerging voices from migrant and Indigenous communities. As an artistic project, it's a triumph as well - the writing is sharp and bursting with ideas, the array of perspectives is dazzling and the whole book just feels utterly necessary. The shorts by Khalid Warsame and Omar Sakr were my favourites, but An exciting and innovative collection, with a diverse set of authors offering up their takes on After Australia. As a political project it's clearly successful, bringing together well known and emerging voices from migrant and Indigenous communities. As an artistic project, it's a triumph as well - the writing is sharp and bursting with ideas, the array of perspectives is dazzling and the whole book just feels utterly necessary. The shorts by Khalid Warsame and Omar Sakr were my favourites, but the whole collection is great.
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  • Marchpane
    January 1, 1970
    After Australia is a great little collection showcasing new writing talent, with all of the contributors being Indigenous or writers of colour. The pieces are not nearly as speculative as I had expected—most are contemporary, or what I’d prefer to call ‘predictive fiction’, extrapolating from our current trajectory into the very near future: sea level rise, displacement of refugees, killer flu etc.There’s a real diversity of backgrounds and experience among this writing cohort. I would have like After Australia is a great little collection showcasing new writing talent, with all of the contributors being Indigenous or writers of colour. The pieces are not nearly as speculative as I had expected—most are contemporary, or what I’d prefer to call ‘predictive fiction’, extrapolating from our current trajectory into the very near future: sea level rise, displacement of refugees, killer flu etc.There’s a real diversity of backgrounds and experience among this writing cohort. I would have like a bit more stylistic variety though; about three-quarters of the contributions were from a first-person, young, urban perspective. Favourites for me were: Omar Sakr’s fierce, sharply drawn ‘White Flu’, Roanna Gonsalves’ gleeful alternate history, ‘The East Australia Company Mango Bridge’, Ambelin Kwaymullina’s ethereal time-travelling poem ‘Message from the Ngurra Palya’.
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  • Jaclyn (sixminutesforme)
    January 1, 1970
    “In situations of oppression, it is often difficult to escape from, or think outside of, the reality of the present day and the burden of the past. But when one is taken outside of the context of the present, the possibilities for change can be immense. In imagining the future, a level of freedom and power is afforded to the imaginer. What seems impossible in the current time and place is made possible. Unlike the present, the future is not necessarily a battleground. Instead, the future is a pa “In situations of oppression, it is often difficult to escape from, or think outside of, the reality of the present day and the burden of the past. But when one is taken outside of the context of the present, the possibilities for change can be immense. In imagining the future, a level of freedom and power is afforded to the imaginer. What seems impossible in the current time and place is made possible. Unlike the present, the future is not necessarily a battleground. Instead, the future is a palimpsest. It is a place where the past and present provide context, but do not dictate the path.” (Afterword: A Timeline to 2050. Lena Nahlous)Standouts for me within this collection of speculative fiction were Bu Liao Qing by Michelle Law, Displaced by Zoya Patel, and Black Thoughts: Pemulwuy by Hannah Donnelly.
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  • Bonnie Boogaard
    January 1, 1970
    A really interest collection of short stories about alternate Australia's. Considering these would have been written before the bush fires, covid-19 and the black lives matter protests, these stories are very much predicting the future of Australia. I look forward to discovering more from these Australian writers!
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  • Thoraiya
    January 1, 1970
    A lullaby wind blows through generations by the scarred stump of a tree; mozzies breed in a flooded opera house; Indigenous Elders guide a starship; the White Flu strikes; goats populate Katoomba; a 55 inch screen fits in a lunch bag; the daughter of two mums makes a journey to the Taj Mahal; swallows migrate; citizenship is stripped; strange things are afoot on the Thunderbolts Way; islands sink into the Pacific; a dog swallows a bottle cap, and nothing is the same.I didn't mean to read all the A lullaby wind blows through generations by the scarred stump of a tree; mozzies breed in a flooded opera house; Indigenous Elders guide a starship; the White Flu strikes; goats populate Katoomba; a 55 inch screen fits in a lunch bag; the daughter of two mums makes a journey to the Taj Mahal; swallows migrate; citizenship is stripped; strange things are afoot on the Thunderbolts Way; islands sink into the Pacific; a dog swallows a bottle cap, and nothing is the same.I didn't mean to read all these stories in one sitting, but I did, and I'm glad, and I'm grateful, after savouring new stories by Karen Wyld, Claire G Coleman and Ambelin Kwaymullina, to have discovered the new (to me) talents of Hannah Donnelly, Future D Fidel, Roanna Gonsalves, Michelle Law, Kaya Ortiz, Zoya Patel, Sarah Ross, Omar Sakr and Khalid Warsame. I hope they'll stay working in the world of the speculative for a while, before heading back to the land of "serious" lit :)
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  • Mohammed Morsi
    January 1, 1970
    What happened? What will happen if we keep upholding a concept, a country called Australia, swooned by racism, denial and bigotry? Read this book and discover what this collection of great authors imagine, think and dream. Read it Australia. Read it. This is After Australia.
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  • Claire Hayward
    January 1, 1970
    Honestly one of the most important and poignant books I've ever read. I can't wait to reread this one cause it hit so hard. Ahhh can't recommend it enough.
  • Josephine Burks
    January 1, 1970
    Well written short stories by a diverse range of writers.
  • Sandy Marion
    January 1, 1970
    Brilliant - but the description does not tell you what this book is really about. The stories don't imagine a society after colonisation, or After Australia -they largely explore what has happened and could happen if we continue down this path of "Australia' held up by racism, dispossession and bigotry, tell how this could continue to affect our lives in future.
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  • Lucy
    January 1, 1970
    Hard to pick a favourite story from this anthology, but there are many I expect I'll return to again and again.
  • James Whitmore
    January 1, 1970
    “Australia is just a glitch,” Wiradjuri writer Hannah Donnelly proclaims. Reflecting on her love of science fiction movies, she notes, “Australia doesn’t exist. It is science fiction already.” These are telling lines in an anthology of “speculative fiction” – a genre often associated with remote, dystopian futures and societal collapse. Dystopian for whom? Any glance at Australia past and present will show society always collapsing for someone, somewhere: in detention and incarceration, on the c “Australia is just a glitch,” Wiradjuri writer Hannah Donnelly proclaims. Reflecting on her love of science fiction movies, she notes, “Australia doesn’t exist. It is science fiction already.” These are telling lines in an anthology of “speculative fiction” – a genre often associated with remote, dystopian futures and societal collapse. Dystopian for whom? Any glance at Australia past and present will show society always collapsing for someone, somewhere: in detention and incarceration, on the colonial frontier, for people displaced by war and weather. “The Arab world was forever ending,” Omar Sakr writes in White Flu. Read more on my blog
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  • Jim Rimmer
    January 1, 1970
    These are the stories that so-called Australia needs.This is a dazzling anthology, though not necessarily bright. Included works range in style, temper and tone.One of those rare books you don't want to finish.For me, special call out goes to Hannah Donnelly.Superb.
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  • Aline-Mwezi Niyonsenga
    January 1, 1970
    Such an impactful anthology. Inspiring and critical.
  • Millie May
    January 1, 1970
    A beautiful collection of well written short stories and poems that capture the past, present and future troubles of australia
  • Jason Baker
    January 1, 1970
    Atrocious, racist, anti-white trash.
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