These Nameless Things
Dan escaped captivity from the mountain long ago, but believes his brother is still there and waits each day in a nearby town for his escape. What Dan doesn't realize is that the rest of the townspeople are also waiting--but for reasons he never imagined.

These Nameless Things Details

TitleThese Nameless Things
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseJun 30th, 2020
PublisherFleming H. Revell Company
ISBN-139780800735302
Rating
GenreFiction, Thriller, Mystery Thriller, Suspense

These Nameless Things Review

  • Miranda Reads
    January 1, 1970
    Latest Booktube Video ranks all the books I read in February. While you probably know where this one stands based on my review...check out the video to see the rest!The Written Review: It's a book you've read before, long ago, and you can't remember all the details or exactly when all the frightening thing happen, but you have a distinct premonition. And you don't like it. Dan and his friends have made a darling little community for themselves - everyone pitches in to grow crops, th Latest Booktube Video ranks all the books I read in February. While you probably know where this one stands based on my review...check out the video to see the rest!The Written Review: It's a book you've read before, long ago, and you can't remember all the details or exactly when all the frightening thing happen, but you have a distinct premonition. And you don't like it. Dan and his friends have made a darling little community for themselves - everyone pitches in to grow crops, they take care of each other...and they don't talk about the mountain. The mountain. It looms behind their little community and despite being hardly talked about, it is constantly on the forefront of everyone's mind. None of us in the town remembered anything of consequence about our lives before the horror of the mountain. All Dan can really remember is that he had (has?) a brother who he last saw under the mountain. He wants to go back but at the same time is horrified by what lurks beneath. "Can't you feel this place? It's coming for us. Something here is coming for us." But now, more than ever, Dan is feeling a pull towards his brother...and to the mountain itself. ...I had no one.But the voices never left Overall, the concept of this one blew me away - I was hooked from the start and I could NOT put it down.I loved teasing out what the mountain could be and the general air of mystery behind it. When the girl came out of the mountain, and then the other girl came back from beyond - whew! I was feeling chills.The characters for the most part felt real - though the dialogue did feel stilted at times, which caused Dan to seem far younger than his age suggested, causing a slight disconnect for me. Towards the end I pieced together enough to figure out that the author drew inspiration from a few things and I think that's what kept it from being a five-star book for me. If the story stood a bit more on its own and a bit less on other things, I would have absolutely fallen in love.But all in all, this one did take me by surprise and I really enjoyed my time between these pages! "Can you tell me what happened, Mary?""No," she whispered. With thanks to Shawn Smucker and Revell Publishing for sending me a free copy in exchange for an honest review
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  • Shawn Smucker
    January 1, 1970
    So, yes, I am the author and, yes, I'm giving it five stars! Don't trust my rating! Read it for yourself. If you have any questions about the book, please feel free to ask them here and I'll answer as best I can! Thanks for taking the time to read These Nameless Things.
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  • Debra
    January 1, 1970
    “Through me is the way to the city of woe.Through me is the way to sorrow eternal.Through me is the way to the lost below. Justice moved my architect supernal.I was constructed by divine power,supreme wisdom, and love primordial.Before me no created things were.Save those eternal, and eternal I abide.Abandon all hope, you who enter.” ― Dante Alighieri, InfernoDan has long ago escaped the captivity of the mountain but has waited in the nearby town for his brother, Adam to join him. For some re “Through me is the way to the city of woe.Through me is the way to sorrow eternal.Through me is the way to the lost below. Justice moved my architect supernal.I was constructed by divine power,supreme wisdom, and love primordial.Before me no created things were.Save those eternal, and eternal I abide.Abandon all hope, you who enter.” ― Dante Alighieri, InfernoDan has long ago escaped the captivity of the mountain but has waited in the nearby town for his brother, Adam to join him. For some reason, others have left the mountain, but Adam has not. Adam has been waiting for a long time for his brother, what he doesn't know is that others in the town have been waiting as well. "It's the kind of place you have to leave o your own. Everyone who has ever left has battled their own way out. In this place, our guilt consumes us." This is a very thought-provoking book that looks at guilt, grief, personal demons, anger, etc. It is a nod to Dante's Inferno (if you haven't figured that out already). I found it to be beautifully written and atmospheric. My advice is to go into this as blind as possible knowing nothing more than the small synopsis. This is Christian fiction, which I did not know when I requested the book. I was intrigued by the synopsis. You should be as well. I found this to be well written, a little slow in the middle but I acknowledge that this book is about a journey and journeys are not always fast-moving. There are beautiful passages that drip with despair, guilt, and hope. "...I went deeper than that. Deeper than the floor of the house, deeper than the foundations of the canyon, deeper than the dreams or nightmares or memories. I stayed there in that depth, and I slept like I never have before and will probably never sleep again, there on the edge of the river." I am purposely not saying much more about the storyline. What I will say that I found it to be intriguing, captivating, thought-provoking, and well thought out. A journey that is not to be missed.Thank you to Revell Publishing and NetGalley who provided me with a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review. All the thoughts and opinions are my own.
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  • J. Bill
    January 1, 1970
    Another compelling, thoughtful work from Shawn Smucker. Real characters with real struggles in a surreal world -- such as the one we often find ourselves in when we struggle with our failings, self-forgiveness, and redemption.
  • Andi
    January 1, 1970
    This is a book I will ponder long because it tells a rich truth that I recognize but, fittingly, can’t name. A story of waiting for something to happen that could have happened long ago. A rich journey. A quiet return. Like allegory meets fairytale meets post-apocalyptic hope. Highly recommended.
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  • Amber
    January 1, 1970
    I found this book to be both enjoyable and deeply thought-provoking, as is true of everything I've read from this author so far. Most of all, I was impressed by how it explores the profound and far-reaching effects of the choices we make in life and of the butterfly effect that occurs when we are willing to take responsibility for them, as well as when we are not.
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  • Diane
    January 1, 1970
    Something is mysterious beyond the mountain from where they all came. No one wanted to go back. They had a village, friends, gardens. They seemed happy, yet some of them kept leaving to go East. Smucker book is riveting. It’s about guilt, shame, forgiveness, and moving on.
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  • Alison Treat
    January 1, 1970
    An eerily beautiful and mysterious novel, rich in symbolism. Each new twist gave me chills. The themes of guilt, forgiveness, grace, and eternity were expertly woven into the fabric of the story. I will be thinking about this book for a long time.
  • Josh Olds
    January 1, 1970
    These Nameless Things is a Dante’s Inferno-esque tale that deals with one man’s personal hell and his struggle for redemption. Smucker doesn’t hide the connections. The entrance into the mountain cave bears the famous warning Abandon all hope ye who enter here and a few other Easter eggs make the connection obvious and substantive. Our main character is Dan, who was—like every resident of the mountainside town—once a captive within the mysterious mountain. He knows he was tortured. He knows he e These Nameless Things is a Dante’s Inferno-esque tale that deals with one man’s personal hell and his struggle for redemption. Smucker doesn’t hide the connections. The entrance into the mountain cave bears the famous warning Abandon all hope ye who enter here and a few other Easter eggs make the connection obvious and substantive. Our main character is Dan, who was—like every resident of the mountainside town—once a captive within the mysterious mountain. He knows he was tortured. He knows he escaped. And now he lives with the purpose of guiding others who have escaped out of the mountainside and into a new life in town. He also knows that his brother is still in the mountain.Dan’s memories start to return and with that some of the secrets of the mountain are revealed. Or, well, at least made known as secrets. Dan’s once-mundane life is now filled with suspicion and uncertainty. And that only gets worse when a woman escapes the mountain and tells Dan that his brother is the last one left.These Nameless Things would have worked better as a short story. It is difficult—even with Smucker’s obvious skill—to maintain the aura and singular mystery of the story over the length of the entire novel. Fifty pages in, I was waiting for answers, any answers. A hundred pages in, I still did not know the world I was in, or its rules, or even, really, its people. The feeling of confusion and lostness is deliberate, but the sheer amount of time I was left in lostness made me disconnect from the book. I skipped forward a couple of chapters. I paged back a bit to see if I’d missed something. I read faster because absolutely nothing seemed to be happening that I could understand. Having persevered to the end, I can say it was worth it, but the journey can seem off-putting and, like the mountain, not everybody will make it out safely.This is my first Smucker book so maybe that’s his style. The press release I received with this book said “These Nameless Things will have readers frantically flipping pages for answers in this thought-provoking narrative.” That’s certainly true. This isn’t a light or easy read. It’s heavy, weighty, literary. The symbolism and imagery are poignant and powerful, but overshadow the story. I think Smucker could have rectified this by adding a second storyline—flashbacks to Dan and his brother before the mountain. It would have given the reader context for the mystery and a break from the heaviness of the mountain’s mystery.These Nameless Things is a slow, methodical, literary read. Know what you’re getting into before you read it. It’s markedly different and unique, which will both be its selling point and its struggle. The strength of the writing and the imagery kept me going despite a weak plot. I appreciate it in concept, but it falls a bit short in execution. Five stars for the writing and imagery. Three for the plot. I’ll average it at four overall.
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  • Patty Baechler
    January 1, 1970
    These Nameless Things is a pretty quick read but one that will stay on your mind for days and weeks. While These Nameless Things is fiction the story is one many of us, if not all of us, can relate to in our own lives. As Dan and the other characters in the book walk through the painful memories of their past decisions, they learn to forgive, accept and build lasting friendships. Through their journey they also learn to forgive themselves.I received an Advanced Digital Copy of the book from the These Nameless Things is a pretty quick read but one that will stay on your mind for days and weeks. While These Nameless Things is fiction the story is one many of us, if not all of us, can relate to in our own lives. As Dan and the other characters in the book walk through the painful memories of their past decisions, they learn to forgive, accept and build lasting friendships. Through their journey they also learn to forgive themselves.I received an Advanced Digital Copy of the book from the publisher.
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  • Amanda Gardner
    January 1, 1970
    This is one amazing book . If you like mysteries. It’s also one of these books that once you start it’s hard to put down. The Author really goes in depth with this book . Awesome is all I can say . I received a copy from the publisher . And I would highly recommend this book to anyone who loves a mystery type book .
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  • Nancy Wolfe
    January 1, 1970
    These Nameless Things is being launched in strange times, when a focus onsomething other than civil awareness in a broken world seems trivial and shallow. But this book ... *this* book ... is not only timely; it is timeless. It reveals how our personal contributions to the grief, despair, and darkness of the world, however long hidden, can lead first to overwhelming despair and a sense of loss that, with God's grace and mercy, emerge as hope and freedom. Lifelong challenges for everyone.Shawn Sm These Nameless Things is being launched in strange times, when a focus onsomething other than civil awareness in a broken world seems trivial and shallow. But this book ... *this* book ... is not only timely; it is timeless. It reveals how our personal contributions to the grief, despair, and darkness of the world, however long hidden, can lead first to overwhelming despair and a sense of loss that, with God's grace and mercy, emerge as hope and freedom. Lifelong challenges for everyone.Shawn Smucker keeps us intrigued with an undercurrent of suspense, more mystery than anxiety. And from the very first words, I thought I knew. But I didn't, in the best possible way.
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  • J.D. DeHart
    January 1, 1970
    I have enjoyed Shawn Smucker's writing for the past few years now, and was delighted to see another book from this author. Smucker does wonderful and thought-provoking work in sharing the interior world of characters, and brings to mind the work of Frank Peretti and Ted Dekker in some ways. I'm always glad to read this author's work and recommend his books.
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  • Sharon Hicks
    January 1, 1970
    This book easily drew me in. I quickly got caught up in the actions, emotions and character’s drama in the story. This is my third fiction book that I have read from Shawn Smucker. His books are action packed, with meaningful deep seeded thoughts. This book actually mimics many of my current thoughts I am havIng during our current pandemic, then, living in a time where society vividly sees injustice and discrimination. Changes need to happen. The storyline leaving a bad place, then trying to fin This book easily drew me in. I quickly got caught up in the actions, emotions and character’s drama in the story. This is my third fiction book that I have read from Shawn Smucker. His books are action packed, with meaningful deep seeded thoughts. This book actually mimics many of my current thoughts I am havIng during our current pandemic, then, living in a time where society vividly sees injustice and discrimination. Changes need to happen. The storyline leaving a bad place, then trying to find a good place leaves good questions - What is life’s purpose, the responsibility of living in a community, because there are good and hard times, then the past, our memories, guilt, and real forgiveness. #thesenamelessthings has a great beginning, middle and ending.This is a fun, yet meaningful read, or book club conversation book.#thesenamelessthings
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  • Charles
    January 1, 1970
    A book set in a quiet village, where everyone comes together to support each other, until their memories start to return. As the mountain they have all escaped from looms large, the story of Dan, his brother, and the villagers starts to unfold, as secrets are revealed. The book will take you on a journey of guilt, forgiveness, and friendship. It is a beautifully written book, with memorable characters, and I enjoyed it! My wife did receive a complimentary copy from the publisher, and I am glad s A book set in a quiet village, where everyone comes together to support each other, until their memories start to return. As the mountain they have all escaped from looms large, the story of Dan, his brother, and the villagers starts to unfold, as secrets are revealed. The book will take you on a journey of guilt, forgiveness, and friendship. It is a beautifully written book, with memorable characters, and I enjoyed it! My wife did receive a complimentary copy from the publisher, and I am glad she did!
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  • Amy K
    January 1, 1970
    I received an Advanced Digital Copy of the book from the publisher. This is Shawn's best work to date. Inspired by Dante's inferno, it is a fictional depiction of what love for family and true sacrifice really look like. It is an on the edge of your seat story with a struggling and relatable hero whose courage leads to a far greater journey than he ever would have expected to take. It may seem that a story about waiting would be lack suspense, but Shawn's ability to weave tension and uncertaint I received an Advanced Digital Copy of the book from the publisher. This is Shawn's best work to date. Inspired by Dante's inferno, it is a fictional depiction of what love for family and true sacrifice really look like. It is an on the edge of your seat story with a struggling and relatable hero whose courage leads to a far greater journey than he ever would have expected to take. It may seem that a story about waiting would be lack suspense, but Shawn's ability to weave tension and uncertainty makes this story well worth the read.
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  • Rebekah
    January 1, 1970
    Whenever I read one of Shawn Smucker’s books I need a couple of days before I can rate and review it. His writing always seems to start slow and small and build with every chapter until days and even weeks after you finish reading. Each of his books is layered with so much important truth you can’t just close it when you’re done and move onto the next book on your shelf. You need to sit with it. You need to ponder it. These Nameless Things is no different. Like a long forgotten memory it works i Whenever I read one of Shawn Smucker’s books I need a couple of days before I can rate and review it. His writing always seems to start slow and small and build with every chapter until days and even weeks after you finish reading. Each of his books is layered with so much important truth you can’t just close it when you’re done and move onto the next book on your shelf. You need to sit with it. You need to ponder it. These Nameless Things is no different. Like a long forgotten memory it works its way into your consciousness slowly, and then it doesn’t let go. Even before the memory has a name it is changing you and reminding you and even, just a bit, horrifying you. And then it is whispering gentle hope that sits with you and embraces you and changes you long after you finish. Read this book. Let it remind you of all the nameless things you have forgotten. And then let it hold you in its promises of redemption.
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  • Jennie
    January 1, 1970
    This isn't the first book I have read from this author. I really enjoy the author's writing style, and the storylines, a bit mysterious, but it leads to much discovery. The first couple chapters were a little slow going for me, but don't set it down, a mysterious woman arrives and the story picks up from there. The mountain, the waiting, and the wondering!
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  • Tera
    January 1, 1970
    Wow! Once again Smucker has given us a thought provoking story. The book has contrasts between good and evil. It causes you to reflect on your own guilt and shortcomings while realizing that we do have an escape those feelings when we cling to the One who is always good.
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  • Amy Nabors
    January 1, 1970
    With These Nameless Things, Shawn Smucker gives us his best work to date. His writing just keeps getting better. With the same other-worldly and supernatural essence to the story like his previous books, These Nameless Things made me feel what the characters were going through physically and emotionally. The imagery of each scene and how he shows you what each character, especially the main character, is going through evoked such an emotional response I would some times catch my breath. While I With These Nameless Things, Shawn Smucker gives us his best work to date. His writing just keeps getting better. With the same other-worldly and supernatural essence to the story like his previous books, These Nameless Things made me feel what the characters were going through physically and emotionally. The imagery of each scene and how he shows you what each character, especially the main character, is going through evoked such an emotional response I would some times catch my breath. While I read fiction as my escape, in the midst of all that is going on right now in the world, These Nameless Things reminded me that forgiving not only others but ourselves brings healing and where there is healing there is always hope.
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  • Sue
    January 1, 1970
    I received an advanced reader copy of These Nameless Things by Shawn Smucker. This was the first book I have read from this author. I really enjoyed it! I read it all in one day! I had to know what was going to happen next. If you want a book that draws you in, read These Nameless Things.
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  • Joanne Sher
    January 1, 1970
    A mysterious, suspenseful, engaging story about guilt, memory, fear, and delving into what you least want to remember. The characters, particularly the main character, Dan, came to life for me, and the action kept me guessing and thinking deeply about guilt, forgiveness, sacrifice, and trust. Shawn Smucker, with a nod to Dante's Inferno, takes us on a spiritual journey with folks like us from the depths of our own personal demons toward where God wants us. This book will encourage deep thoughts, A mysterious, suspenseful, engaging story about guilt, memory, fear, and delving into what you least want to remember. The characters, particularly the main character, Dan, came to life for me, and the action kept me guessing and thinking deeply about guilt, forgiveness, sacrifice, and trust. Shawn Smucker, with a nod to Dante's Inferno, takes us on a spiritual journey with folks like us from the depths of our own personal demons toward where God wants us. This book will encourage deep thoughts, late-night read-a-thons, and, finally, hope despite, or perhaps because of, change. Highly recommended.I received an Advanced Digital Copy of the book from the publisher.
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  • Susie Finkbeiner
    January 1, 1970
    Wow. This book. More details later. But for now. Wow.
  • Jemima Reads
    January 1, 1970
    This was a great read. I wasn't sure what to expect from the story but I am glad I went with it. I wasn't familiar with Shawn Smucker but I will be checking out more of his work based on his novel. Solid writing, great character development and dialogue. The story is complex and slow burning, and the ending is thought provoking and will stay with you for a while. If you're looking for a good book, then this is it! Disclosure: I would like to thank the publisher for my advanced reader copy of the This was a great read. I wasn't sure what to expect from the story but I am glad I went with it. I wasn't familiar with Shawn Smucker but I will be checking out more of his work based on his novel. Solid writing, great character development and dialogue. The story is complex and slow burning, and the ending is thought provoking and will stay with you for a while. If you're looking for a good book, then this is it! Disclosure: I would like to thank the publisher for my advanced reader copy of the book. This is my honest review.
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  • Matt Orth
    January 1, 1970
    This book is a redemptive journey through the devastating emotions of fear, regret, and guilt. Featuring vivid human characters and a lyrical landscape filled with ominous mountains, desolate trees, and soothing fields, the allegorical tale is reminiscent of Lewis, and was a poetic reminder that true hope is worth the wait, and humans forgiving each other is one of the most powerful forces in creation.
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  • Tara
    January 1, 1970
    Thought-provoking, humbling and always inspiring. Shawn Smucker is masterful in his unique and moving style of writing. He doesn't let his readers down in These Nameless Things.
  • Jeanie Fritz
    January 1, 1970
    These Nameless Things is a beautiful story about love and forgiveness. It reminded me of C. S. Lewis's The Great Divorce. The characters are memorable and relatable, and the writing is powerful and evocative. The story lingers long after the last page is read.
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  • Aaron J Smith
    January 1, 1970
    Shawn Smucker is a storyteller. This book is a story that showcases rich characters, compelling narrative, and imaginative play. I highly recommend reading, just set aside some time because you're not going to want to put it down.
  • Randi Sampson
    January 1, 1970
    Do you ever find yourself really WANTING to love a story... but simply unable to find yourself getting into it? Not because of writing or story line... but simply just because? I must admit this is where I found myself with These Nameless Things. I absolutely wanted to love this book. I've read previous books by Shawn Smucker and greatly enjoyed and appreciated his unique voice among this genre. Likewise, this book had that same fantastic writing and storytelling that I had come to expect. It wa Do you ever find yourself really WANTING to love a story... but simply unable to find yourself getting into it? Not because of writing or story line... but simply just because? I must admit this is where I found myself with These Nameless Things. I absolutely wanted to love this book. I've read previous books by Shawn Smucker and greatly enjoyed and appreciated his unique voice among this genre. Likewise, this book had that same fantastic writing and storytelling that I had come to expect. It was complex, it was mysterious, it was well thought out and beautifully written... a book that at it's surface I feel like I should really have enjoyed. Unfortunately though, try as I might, I just really couldn't connect with this one. While the story did have a bit of a slow start and kept me feeling a bit in the dark, I don't believe that was actually it for me. For this story, that mystery really adds to the suspense and keeps you reading. No, for me I think perhaps it's simply a matter of timing. With all that is going on in the world (and in life) at the moment, I think this was just not quite what I needed in the moment. I need something a bit more lighthearted. Perhaps if I had or do read at a different time and a different state of mind, I would have gotten much more enjoyment out of it and I do hope to revisit at a later time too. Despite my lack of connection, I would still give this book a solid 3.5 stars based on the writing and the concept alone. While it wasn't for me in the moment, it is a thought provoking and mysterious tale that I know many are going to absolutely love. **I received a complimentary copy of this book from the publisher via Netgalley for consideration. All thoughts are 100% my own.
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  • Andrea
    January 1, 1970
    First of all, you need to know this is strongly influenced by Dante’s Inferno. If you know that going into it, you won’t be surprised by the plot or setting. Having just recently listened to a podcast do a review of The Divine Comedy over several episodes, I really enjoyed the setting and plot of this book.It does not have a lot action, but it does have a lot of character and feeling. We have time to sit and feel with these characters. Sometimes we are sitting alone with a character and sometime First of all, you need to know this is strongly influenced by Dante’s Inferno. If you know that going into it, you won’t be surprised by the plot or setting. Having just recently listened to a podcast do a review of The Divine Comedy over several episodes, I really enjoyed the setting and plot of this book.It does not have a lot action, but it does have a lot of character and feeling. We have time to sit and feel with these characters. Sometimes we are sitting alone with a character and sometimes we are sitting amongst a group of characters. So it isn’t really the story of one person. It is a little bit about everyone contributing to the whole even when they aren’t trying to be a part of the whole.This will make you think about guilt, forgiveness, truth, grace, past and present, the connections between people, and the space to process all of this. This is a great study of people.
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