Mexican Gothic
An isolated mansion. A chillingly charismatic artistocrat. And a brave socialite drawn to expose their treacherous secrets... After receiving a frantic letter from her newly wed cousin begging for someone to save her from a mysterious doom, Noemí Taboada heads to High Place, a distant house in the Mexican countryside. She’s not sure what she will find—her cousin’s husband, a handsome Englishman, is a stranger, and Noemí knows little about the region. Noemí is also an unlikely rescuer: She’s a glamorous debutante, and her chic gowns and perfect red lipstick are more suited for cocktail parties than amateur sleuthing. But she’s also tough and smart, with an indomitable will, and she is not afraid: Not of her cousin’s new husband, who is both menacing and alluring; not of his father, the ancient patriarch who seems to be fascinated by Noemí; and not even of the house itself, which begins to invade Noemi’s dreams with visions of blood and doom. Her only ally in this inhospitable abode is the family’s youngest son. Shy and gentle, he seems to want to help Noemí, but might also be hiding dark knowledge of his family’s past. For there are many secrets behind the walls of High Place. The family’s once colossal wealth and faded mining empire kept them from prying eyes, but as Noemí digs deeper she unearths stories of violence and madness. And Noemí, mesmerized by the terrifying yet seductive world of High Place, may soon find it impossible to ever leave this enigmatic house behind.

Mexican Gothic Details

TitleMexican Gothic
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseJun 30th, 2020
PublisherDel Rey
ISBN-139780525620785
Rating
GenreHistorical, Historical Fiction, Horror

Mexican Gothic Review

  • chai ♡
    January 1, 1970
    A gothic suspense novel set in 1950s Mexico with a cover like that? [adding book to cart] Who am I to deny myself every single desire that crosses my brain?
  • Nilufer Ozmekik
    January 1, 1970
    OMG! I had no brain right now! The author stole it! I wish she would have put some bravery into my heart because I think I’m not gonna sleep at least for a week and I already brought back Christmas ornaments and enlightened house (I don’t have any idea how much electric bill will coast next month but I’m sure my husband will have the worst scream crying experience of his lifetime.)This book is insanely terrifying, spin-tingling, horrifying, mind blowing, eyes popping, tear jerker (nope it’s not OMG! I had no brain right now! The author stole it! I wish she would have put some bravery into my heart because I think I’m not gonna sleep at least for a week and I already brought back Christmas ornaments and enlightened house (I don’t have any idea how much electric bill will coast next month but I’m sure my husband will have the worst scream crying experience of his lifetime.)This book is insanely terrifying, spin-tingling, horrifying, mind blowing, eyes popping, tear jerker (nope it’s not emotional, you cry like a baby because you realize you just pissed your pants when you were reading it and you’re dying from humiliation! I’ve been there!), paranoid, a dangerous dancing between Mexican folklore, horror stories and Darwin’s theory of natural selection. You want to throw the book and start running outside from your house. ( I took 5 tours around Sunset Boulevard at the rush hour and was saluted by angry drivers’ flipping birds but I didn’t care! Running gave me endorphin and adrenalin I needed.)Here is the eerie, ominous, petrifying plot of the book: Noemi is sent to High Place after her father gets an awkward and suspicious letter from her cousin Catalina, recently got married. The letter implied that she’s suffering from a mental illness or there’s something really wrong about her husband Virgil’s mansion. So Noemi goes there to check her cousin’s medical condition and learn the truth hid behind her letter.But as she takes a few steps to the house, she feels that something is really really wrong about the place : she’s introduced to Virgil’s family resembles us Manson Family meets Adam Family. Yes, they’re completely weird, living by strict rules, having marriages in family, covering the house’s walls with deceased brides. And there is a big tragedy still affects the soul of the house: a daughter kills her family members and commits suicide.So as a normal person, Noemi should cry for help and run as soon as she meets that eerie people, including control freak, demanding Florence, flirting and nasty Virgil, the maids who act like they swore to silence and don’t forget about Howard reminds us of long time zombie extra of Walking Dead ( I think he’s soul-mate of woman in bath in Shining!) And only normal person of the family is naïve, artistic, shy son of Florence: Francis who loves to talk about fungus.I’m not gonna give much spoiler but this riveting, heart shattering, blood freezing, scary book has so many alerting elements including ghosts, sleepwalking, violence, bloodshed, disgusting and extreme vulgarity. It’s so different from the first book of the author but if you ask my opinion that did I enjoy it? Of course I truly did! I tested my pain endurance levels. I screamed a lot and I was flabbergasted, speechless at some chapters. And ending, yes it’s volatile, blasting but also satisfying.This means… here comes another gazillion five stars. But quick note: when you’re reading this book, don’t try to eat your mushroom pizza as like I did. I don’t like to write what happened to me afterwards…This is SOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO twisted, unexpected, gory, exhilarating! I don’t know a sequel comes after that! But if author decides to write it, I’d be happily to consume it without thinking a second!Sooooo much special thanks to NetGalley and Random House Publishing/Ballantine for sharing this fantastic ARC and making my wish come true in exchange my honest review. And I personally congratulate Silvia Moreno-Garcia for this heart throbbing, extra ordinary book.bloginstagramfacebooktwitter
    more
  • Chelsea Humphrey
    January 1, 1970
    "I pray I'll see you again. You must come for me, Noemí. You have to save me."WHEW. You think you know where this book is going, and then it goes there. Mexican Gothic begins in such an unassuming way, where you think you're walking into a traditional haunted house story, and then everything shifts to pull you under like a riptide that doesn't loosen until you turn the final page. Before I dive into my review, I think it's fair to note that the majority of this book is atmospheric, character dri "I pray I'll see you again. You must come for me, Noemí. You have to save me."WHEW. You think you know where this book is going, and then it goes there. Mexican Gothic begins in such an unassuming way, where you think you're walking into a traditional haunted house story, and then everything shifts to pull you under like a riptide that doesn't loosen until you turn the final page. Before I dive into my review, I think it's fair to note that the majority of this book is atmospheric, character driven, and the slowest burn imaginable; for me, this worked spectacularly well, as I love to feel completely absorbed into the narrative in horror novels. And yes friends, this is most definitely a horror novel. I'll include content warnings in a spoiler tag below for those who are interested. "Noemí's father said she cared too much about her looks and parties to take school seriously, as if a woman could not do two things at once."Maybe the reason why this slow burn worked so well for me is because I instantly connected with Noemí; she is confident, intelligent, and the life of the party. When her father receives a suspicious letter from Noemí's cousin, Catalina, he sends Noemí to investigate and report back. As expected, everyone involved gets more than they bargained for, and what begins as a handful of unusual occurrences slowly morphs into a whirlwind of horrifying circumstances."This house, she was sure, was haunted. She wasn't one for believing in things that go bump in the night either, but right that second she firmly felt every spook and demon and evil thing might be crawling about the earth, like in Catalina's stories."One of the things I loved the most about this story is how vastly different the haunted house felt. The author has successfully blended the traditional aspects of the old, decrepit, ghost filled residence and a new, more modern aspect, one I won't go into detail of for fear of spoiling the big twist. I think she nailed it on the head when she stated in her Goodreads interview that this book is for the reader who is both classy and trashy, because it has the high entertainment value that fast fiction lovers rejoice in, but it is also filled with beautifully devastating prose. If you, too, have a love affair with all things that go bump in the night, Mexican Gothic should be your top priority this summer. I cannot recommend this book highly enough to those who have a desire to spend long hours in a derelict house and an iron stomach. "The truth was she was afraid of going to bed, of what nightmares might uncoil in the dark. What did people do after witnessing the horrors they had seen? Was it possible to slip back into normality, to play pretend and go on? She wanted to think this was exactly the case, but she was afraid sleep would prove her wrong."*Content Warning: (view spoiler)[Sexual assault, incest, murder and gore, cannibalism, themes challenging white supremacy and eugenics, discussions surrounding the death of a parent and other family members, miscarriages and stillbirths, discussions surrounding suicide, and the consumption of alcohol and smoking. (hide spoiler)]*Many thanks to the publisher for providing my review copy.
    more
  • Julie
    January 1, 1970
    Mexican Gothic by Silvia Moreno-Garcia is a 2020 Del Rey publication. An exciting new approach to Gothic Horror fiction! I rarely ever comment on a book cover- but this one is stunning! It’s an eye-catcher for sure- but you know what they say about judging a book by its cover. So, the question is- Does the story measure up to that magnificent cover? Mexico City- 1950s Noemí Taboada, a young socialite, who wishes to achieve more in her life than marrying a man her father approves of, is given th Mexican Gothic by Silvia Moreno-Garcia is a 2020 Del Rey publication. An exciting new approach to Gothic Horror fiction! I rarely ever comment on a book cover- but this one is stunning! It’s an eye-catcher for sure- but you know what they say about judging a book by its cover. So, the question is- Does the story measure up to that magnificent cover? Mexico City- 1950s Noemí Taboada, a young socialite, who wishes to achieve more in her life than marrying a man her father approves of, is given the chance to secure her dreams of attending university, if she will travel to “High Place” to check on her cousin, Catalina, who has been writing strange, alarming letters, suggesting she is either quite ill or in grave danger. Upon her arrival to the crumbling mansion, Noemi receives a very frosty greeting from Catalina’s husband, Virgil, and the limited staff. Even more disconcerting to Noemi, is her cousin’s fragility, and the fierce opposition others have to Noemi’s spending time alone with Catalina. Capping things off is the house itself- which offers no modern accommodations, not even common basics, and appears to be rotting at the seams. If that isn’t unsettling enough for you- wait until you get a load of Virgil’s ancient Uncle Howard!! Almost immediately, Noemi begins having extremely vivid, highly sexual, and lurid dreams or hallucinations. Virgil shrugs this off as ‘sleepwalking’ episodes. However, as time passes, the atmosphere in the house becomes even more claustrophobic, and the staff’s demeanor never thaws toward Noemi. One would think they were trying to scare Noemi away, but instead they are becoming more and more insistent that she remains in the house…. As horrifying as that prospect might be, Noemi is also intrigued- by the legends, Virgil, and with the youngest member of the family, Francis- the only friendly face on the entire estate. With Francis’ reluctant help, Noemi is determined to learn the history of the region and to free her cousin from the grasp of her oddly mesmerizing husband and the curse of 'High Place'. This is one super creepy novel! The atmosphere is off the charts spooky and the imagery is incredibly vivid. The blurb calls this a ‘re-imagining of the classic Gothic suspense novel’. Go with that description and think about what that word ‘re-imagining’ might mean. This book has been compared to ‘Rebecca’ by publicists, promoters, and editorial or professional reviewers. Naturally, I’m going to have to agree to disagree about that comparison. Why? Both novels are, without a doubt, Gothic literature. But… I never viewed “Rebecca” as a horror novel. The supernatural tones one senses in that novel, is not at all like what one will experience when reading this novel. If I could rewrite the blurb, I would substitute the word ‘Suspense’ with the word “Horror”. The book is very suspenseful, but you are getting a true horror novel experience here, and not one that is merely implied. While ‘re-imagining’ is a great way to describe this modern spin on the classic genre, in more ways than one it is pure traditional Gothic Horror!! The author did a fabulous job marrying Gothic and Horror, creating a complex and hypnotizing tone, keeping me glued to the pages- especially during the last quarter of the book. That said, keep in mind that Gothic fiction is not known for its blistering pace. However, I felt like this one moved along at a nice clip, despite a lag here and there. It’s dark and ghastly, replete with classic Gothic Grotesquerie, and lots of mind tripping chills and thrills, plus, a little bit of romance for balance and lightness. Overall, this is the best Gothic horror novel I’ve read in ages!
    more
  • Silvia Moreno-Garcia
    January 1, 1970
    FAQIs there a playlist?Yes, go to Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/playlist/233...Are there other goodies?Paper doll PDF: http://www.randomhousebooks.com/wp-co...Book club kit PDF: http://www.randomhousebooks.com/wp-co... Is the town in the book real?It's inspired by a real town which is called Real del Monte/Mineral del Monte and which was a British mining town and has a very particular kind of architecture. It's nicknamed Little Cornwall. Yes, there is an English cemetery there. Photo: https: FAQIs there a playlist?Yes, go to Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/playlist/233...Are there other goodies?Paper doll PDF: http://www.randomhousebooks.com/wp-co...Book club kit PDF: http://www.randomhousebooks.com/wp-co... Is the town in the book real?It's inspired by a real town which is called Real del Monte/Mineral del Monte and which was a British mining town and has a very particular kind of architecture. It's nicknamed Little Cornwall. Yes, there is an English cemetery there. Photo: https://www.flickr.com/photos/1331140...What state does this take place in?Hidalgo, which is known for its mountainous terrain. Fashion-wise, what is Noemi wearing?Not a poodle skirt! Dior premiered his New Look in 1947, which featured a cinched waist, a very full skirt, and a nod to opulence. Hats would have been small in the early 1950s. Here's more on the 1950s and Dior: https://www.dw.com/en/the-new-look-ho...
    more
  • Holly (Holly Hearts Books)
    January 1, 1970
    This was the creepiest and weirdest book I've read so far this year. WHAT A WILD RIDE.Imagine it's the 1950's, you're driving through a small town, up a winding hill, through some rusty gates and through the fog you see a huge Gothic mansion... with a VERY troubled past.Silvia has an outstanding way with setting a mood. Every bit of her writing and setting comes together into this dreamy, Gothic sense that pervades absolutely every bit of the book. It’s enchanting really and helps catch the read This was the creepiest and weirdest book I've read so far this year. WHAT A WILD RIDE.Imagine it's the 1950's, you're driving through a small town, up a winding hill, through some rusty gates and through the fog you see a huge Gothic mansion... with a VERY troubled past.Silvia has an outstanding way with setting a mood. Every bit of her writing and setting comes together into this dreamy, Gothic sense that pervades absolutely every bit of the book. It’s enchanting really and helps catch the reader up and make the strange world within convincing. What is so terrific in this novel is the intricately woven back story to the reckoning. The cryptic but riveting manner with which the passing of time is described had me enchanted. It was, in a way, full of desperation and longing, though strangely beautifulThis is a plot and mystery driven novel. In addition to the alarming present happenings, there's a mysterious past that Noemí has yet to unscramble, and a future that remains grimly uncertain. I loved that she's not supposed to be likable. She's very vain and she knows it and being surrounded by a mysterious family who are incredibly strict:1. Absolute silence! (especially during dinner)2. No driving down to the local town3. No smoking4. No lighting (better keep curtains closed)5. No hot water during baths6. Be a respectful young ladyIt lead's her to become feisty, with numerous confrontations and rebellious acts and you can't help but root for her and hope she finds the answers she seeks. Also on the subject of balance, with all the eeriness and horror, I was glad to have some sweet moments of awkward, youthful romance to lighten things up. Don't expect a passion-filled, all-encompassing love story. It's a simple, yet sweet romance that leaves you smiling.Come to Mexican Gothic for the dark and creepy, and you shall likely leave satisfied.
    more
  • Vibur
    January 1, 1970
    The stuff of potent mushroom trips and psychedelic nightmares. Yeah. It was fun. (I'm kidding. Don't do drugs, kids.)Holy carping crap, this is so creatively creepy, and I love it.The writing. Oh, the writing. There was something about it—the sinister, sinuous lilt of it—that imbued a tangibly morbid intrigue. The weight of it slithering insidiously around me, twisting and twining—as if it was tightening into a noose around my throat, wringing the air from my lungs and swallowing me whole. I'll The stuff of potent mushroom trips and psychedelic nightmares. Yeah. It was fun. (I'm kidding. Don't do drugs, kids.)Holy carping crap, this is so creatively creepy, and I love it.The writing. Oh, the writing. There was something about it—the sinister, sinuous lilt of it—that imbued a tangibly morbid intrigue. The weight of it slithering insidiously around me, twisting and twining—as if it was tightening into a noose around my throat, wringing the air from my lungs and swallowing me whole. I'll say it again, this thing nails creepy. The settings are rendered in vividly evocative detail, evincing an eerie, sinister edge. Now, this won't be the most perfect description, but, all the same, imagine—pale, lumpy mushrooms, sprouting rampantly from plaster and paint. Blotches of mould blooming in dim, musty corners. The cloying scent of decay, clinging to the air. It's all nightmarishly surreal, dreams and reality meshing into a myriad of deranged, hallucinatory imagery (legit, magicmushrooms).I love, love this novel. It's so sinisterly and weirdly wrought, steeped in creepy atmosphere and uncannily psychedelic imaginings and, yes, mushrooms.(Like I said, kids, don't do drugs. Do this.)4.0/5
    more
  • Nenia ⚔️ Queen of Villainy ⚔️ Campbell
    January 1, 1970
    Instagram || Twitter || Facebook || Amazon || PinterestDNF @ p.84I am actually a huge fan of retro Gothic novels from the 60s and 70s, so when I found out about MEXICAN GOTHIC, a Latinx take on the popular Gothic novel subgenre, I was pee-in-my-pants excited. Just look at that cover! OMG. Stunning. Sadly, the cover is the best thing about this book. It was SO BORING. Noemi is a socialite whose father doesn't approve of her superficial ways. She goes to see her cousin in the countryside after Instagram || Twitter || Facebook || Amazon || PinterestDNF @ p.84I am actually a huge fan of retro Gothic novels from the 60s and 70s, so when I found out about MEXICAN GOTHIC, a Latinx take on the popular Gothic novel subgenre, I was pee-in-my-pants excited. Just look at that cover! OMG. Stunning. Sadly, the cover is the best thing about this book. It was SO BORING. Noemi is a socialite whose father doesn't approve of her superficial ways. She goes to see her cousin in the countryside after receiving a mysterious and paranoid-sounding letter about poison and danger-- it sounds like she might fear her husband and his family! Right away, things are... well, not creepy, but definitely not like home. One of the older relatives is a fan of eugenics, the house is creaky and old, and Noemi has strange nightmares every night. Oh, and her cousin has tuberculosis and might be going mad... or maybe not.This had the perfect recipe for a good book but the writing plodded and it was just so uninteresting to me. Wooden, I think, is the term I'm looking for. I had the same problem with THE SEVEN AND A HALF DEATHS OF EVELYN HARDCASTLE, a book that purported to be an engaging mystery but ended up being wooden and kind of lame.Giving this two stars since I feel I could probably find it OK if I forced myself through it, but as tedious as this is, why bother? I have other things to read during this period of self-quarantine that aren't going to make me fall asleep.Thanks to Netgalley/the publisher for the review copy!1.5 stars
    more
  • Debra
    January 1, 1970
    3.5 starsNoemí Taboada is sent by her father to High Place after receiving a letter from her recently married cousin, Catalina. Her cousin's letter in unsettling and her father hopes Neomi can help her cousin and bring back answers as to her cousin's mental status.Noemí arrives at the distant home called High Place. Her husband's family lives there, and she doesn't know them at all, but it doesn't take long for her to know that something isn't quite right with them. Talk about pushy, demanding. 3.5 starsNoemí Taboada is sent by her father to High Place after receiving a letter from her recently married cousin, Catalina. Her cousin's letter in unsettling and her father hopes Neomi can help her cousin and bring back answers as to her cousin's mental status.Noemí arrives at the distant home called High Place. Her husband's family lives there, and she doesn't know them at all, but it doesn't take long for her to know that something isn't quite right with them. Talk about pushy, demanding. and controlling. It becomes crystal clear that her cousin has changed since her marriage. She has moments of clarity and moments where she is clearly not herself. Plus, her cousin's husband, Virgil and his family do not want Noemí bringing in outside doctors or taking her cousin to seek medical attention elsewhere. Not only that, but they also limit the amount of time she is able to visit with her cousin. Strange....hmmmHigh points for originality. This book is creepy with a capital "C". Soon the you-know-what begins to hit the fan and this freakshow of a family begins to show their true colors. There is a saying " you can't choose your family" but this family would disagree.This book is dark, creepy, atmospheric and chilling. The descriptions are very vivid, and I could easily see this book playing out in my mind. I could see this book being a movie. I did wish for the pacing to be a little faster at times. There were parts where I felt as if I were trapped in High place and wanted to escape myself. Overall, very original, dark, atmospheric, chilling and just plain strange at times. Plus, I think this book cured me from ever wanting to eat a certain food item again. BTW- How about that cover?Thank you to Random House Publishing- Ballantine Del Rey and NetGalley who provided me with a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review. All the thoughts and opinions are my own.
    more
  • Elle
    January 1, 1970
    Full of decaying glamour, dark secrets and a good amount of gnarly blood and guts, Mexican Gothic more than met the already high expectations I had for it.I’ve been a big fan of Silvia Moreno-Garcia since picking up Gods of Jade and Shadow last year. One of the best things about her as an author is that she’s sort of genre-fluid (a term I just made up). Gods was a Mexican/indigenous fantasy taking place in the 1920s, Untamed Shore was a noir set in Mexico in the 70s, and now we have Mexican Goth Full of decaying glamour, dark secrets and a good amount of gnarly blood and guts, Mexican Gothic more than met the already high expectations I had for it.I’ve been a big fan of Silvia Moreno-Garcia since picking up Gods of Jade and Shadow last year. One of the best things about her as an author is that she’s sort of genre-fluid (a term I just made up). Gods was a Mexican/indigenous fantasy taking place in the 1920s, Untamed Shore was a noir set in Mexico in the 70s, and now we have Mexican Gothic, a Gothic horror novel from the 1950s that’s set in....you guessed it, Mexico.Honestly reading the first third or so of this book, I was nervous I wouldn’t love it. Moreno-Garcia is so gifted in writing locations and time periods, but the beginning was a lot of Noemí just walking around an old, moldy house. Obviously this just ended up being a set-up for the absolutely insane stuff that happens later in the novel, but if you’re reading Mexican Gothic right now and it feels a little slow, then keep going! I promise it will start to pick up and the tension will only increase. It’s a little bit mystery, mixed with some horror and supernatural elements. There’shistorical context, plus it’s totally dripping in gothic tone. I loved it, and I’m so grateful to have gotten to review an early copy. Mexican Gothic is equal parts menacing and suspenseful, with plenty of bite—check it out when it’s released later this month!*Thanks to Boston Book Fanatic & Jordy’s Book Club of the Mystery Book Club and their partners at Random House for an advance review copy of this book! If you’d like to follow along with us as we read this month’s selection on Instagram, you can find them at @bostonbookfanatic, @jordys.book.club, @mystery.book.club and @randomhouse, respectively.
    more
  • amy ☂︎
    January 1, 1970
    a gothic suspense novel set in 1950s Mexico and a book cover that could cut a bitch. yes, i’m keeping my eye out for this one.
  • Alix Harrow
    January 1, 1970
    I haven't gotten much sleep four three days because my kid is sick and snotty. And yet last night--when he was finally sleeping soundly, when I could have been catching up on hours and hours of sleep--I stayed up til two in the morning finishing this stupid* book.It has everything you** want: a decaying mansion that smells of rot and ruin; a stubborn young socialite drawn into its dark mysteries; ghosts that scream warnings in the walls; a handsome young husband with a corroded soul; a family cu I haven't gotten much sleep four three days because my kid is sick and snotty. And yet last night--when he was finally sleeping soundly, when I could have been catching up on hours and hours of sleep--I stayed up til two in the morning finishing this stupid* book.It has everything you** want: a decaying mansion that smells of rot and ruin; a stubborn young socialite drawn into its dark mysteries; ghosts that scream warnings in the walls; a handsome young husband with a corroded soul; a family curse; cemeteries, convertibles, mushrooms, 50s fashion, wedding gowns with yellowed lace.It was dark, intense, chilling, subversive, sometimes disgusting, smart, intricate, and gorgeous. Read it. You won't regret it.* This book is not stupid. It is stunning. I'm the stupid one, because now my eyes are bleary and bloodshot and I still haven't slept.** Assuming that "you" are a person who loved Wuthering Heights and Crimson Peak and wants to read a better, more subversive version set in the mountains of Hidalgo.
    more
  • ✡ daph pink✡
    January 1, 1970
    This was my most anticipated read of July. Like I was soo fucking excited for this!! there was something so charming and beautiful about the cover that drew me towards it! (I mean just look at this stunning cover and think how beautiful it will look in your bookshelf)❤I honestly don’t like Gothic books, it’s like my second Gothic book (after a failed attempt to read Wuthering heights for like 1000 times.) and ohhh boyyyy I freaking loved it. Like a 5 star rating is less to describe how much I l This was my most anticipated read of July. Like I was soo fucking excited for this!! there was something so charming and beautiful about the cover that drew me towards it! (I mean just look at this stunning cover and think how beautiful it will look in your bookshelf)❤I honestly don’t like Gothic books, it’s like my second Gothic book (after a failed attempt to read Wuthering heights for like 1000 times.) and ohhh boyyyy I freaking loved it. Like a 5 star rating is less to describe how much I loved this book!!!!!!!!!!❤❤Once in a while a book is published that you can’t stop thinking about and you keep pursuing your kith and kin to read it, this is one such book for me. DISCLAIMER: - DON’T READ THIS BOOK AT NIGHT IF YOU HAVE A VIVID IMAGINATION .WHY????????Because it will scare the shit out of you, you will be afraid of your own shadow, it will make your blood run cold, your soul will jump out of your skin, your heart will miss a beat and you will be scared out of your wits! But at the same time there is something so beautiful about its creepiness that you will find it engrossing, captivating, absorbing, riveting, consuming and addictive that you not be able to put it down despite the fact that it scared the daylights out of you!!!!The phenomenal idea of blending the old, nasty and haunted house stories with the modern aspect of eugenics, Darwin’s theory of natural selection, concept of inferior and superior traits and that whole idea of fungal association with humans forming gloom, I mean I have read about symbiosis and mycorrhiza but wtf is this, I mean who in right mind can think this! The author is crazy (good crazy).*adding author to fav authors list.*adding book to my fav book list. SOME OTHER ASPECTS THAT MAKE THE BOOK LOVABLE• Atmospheric :- the beautiful picture the author paints of the high place will make you fall in love with the place despite the fact that you can’t leave it.• Characters :- the confident, intelligent and life of the party Noemi, artistic, shy and lover of mushrooms Francis ,flirting, nasty and dangerous Virgil , controlling ,demandingFlorence and head of the house MR. DOYLE( let’s just leave him, mere thinking about his name give me chills) .• Slowest burning romance• dicey situation and twists This is the first book by this author and it’s definitely not going to be the last. She owns my heart and head (mentally decided to read everything written by her).And definitely going to reread this book again and again till it stops scaring the shit out of me and ik that’s never going to happen.I can’t wait for the day I will be able to buy this book and take in the smell of it, the day this beautiful piece of art will adore my bookshelf!!Not recommend for everyone because you need patience if you truly want to enjoy the book because its slow paced in first half but it’s worth it because the second half will make you fall in love with this book!TW:- sexual assault, incest, murder, cannibalism, death of parent, death of children, stillbirth, miscarriage.Imagine a movie being made on this book💜(I mean it would be soo amazing!)
    more
  • Olivia (Stories For Coffee)
    January 1, 1970
    Maybe a 2.5 STARS?Mexican Gothic held so much promise but couldn’t quite deliver its gory, on-the-edge-of-my-seat gothic thriller I thought I would receive. While the premise was fascinating and sucked me right in, I had to drag my way through the initial 1/3 of the novel before I finally found myself in the groove of the story.One of Mexican Gothic’s biggest weakness was the fact that we always stayed pretty surface level in terms of characterization and plot. Noemí shows up at High Place in ho Maybe a 2.5 STARS?Mexican Gothic held so much promise but couldn’t quite deliver its gory, on-the-edge-of-my-seat gothic thriller I thought I would receive. While the premise was fascinating and sucked me right in, I had to drag my way through the initial 1/3 of the novel before I finally found myself in the groove of the story.One of Mexican Gothic’s biggest weakness was the fact that we always stayed pretty surface level in terms of characterization and plot. Noemí shows up at High Place in hopes of checking in on her cousin, the driving force of the plot, who claimed this cryptic family she married into was hurting her, but we never actually get to know her cousin besides some superficial facts about her. I would have loved to have heard stories from her to learn more about her experiences in the High Place, but instead, she is pushed to the background of the plot and only appears a handful of times.Also, I have to say that the romance wasn’t necessary to the plotline. There was little to no chemistry between the two characters who fall for one another during dire circumstances, and for once, I have to admit that their romance wasn’t believable nor was it very interesting to read.I was very excited for Mexican Gothic, but I’m sad to say that the story fell flat for me and failed to deliver. I simply wasn’t intrigued by the story, the writing style was tough to get through, and the characters were very 1 dimensional, leaving space between me, the reader, and the story that I wish could have sucked me in. READ MY FULL REVIEW HERE: StoriesForCoffee.com
    more
  • Emer (A Little Haze)
    January 1, 1970
    I’m basically obsessed with Silvia Moreno-Garcia now. OBSESSED!!! I adored ‘Gods of Jade and Shadow’ last year but this... I love this even more!‘Mexican Gothic’ is just the best kind of storytelling there is. It’s a book that is fantastically written, utterly compelling, deeply chilling and intensely creepy (good creepy though); I loved every second of it! If you’re a fan of twisty gothic fiction that will make you never want to fall asleep ever again then this is for you! The story follows Noe I’m basically obsessed with Silvia Moreno-Garcia now. OBSESSED!!! I adored ‘Gods of Jade and Shadow’ last year but this... I love this even more!‘Mexican Gothic’ is just the best kind of storytelling there is. It’s a book that is fantastically written, utterly compelling, deeply chilling and intensely creepy (good creepy though); I loved every second of it! If you’re a fan of twisty gothic fiction that will make you never want to fall asleep ever again then this is for you! The story follows Noemí Taboada, a young woman living in Mexico in the 1950s. Her father receives a worrying letter from Noemí’s cousin Catalina who has recently been married and tasks Noemí with going to aid her cousin. Enter High Place, the Mexican countryside house where Catalina is now residing with her in-laws, the mysterious Doyles. High Place is the gothic house of your dreams... or more accurately nightmares.For a start it’s isolated from society, but not in a nice escape to the country where it’s all peaceful and charming sort of fashion. Instead it’s more of an it’s so isolated so no one can hear you scream type setting. It is shrouded in gloom with a permanently misty cemetery alongside it...FILLED with disgusting mushrooms. (I’m actually terrified of mushrooms. I find them abhorrent on so many levels. Just ick!)The house is inhabited by the strangest of strange characters... the Doyles are all sorts of messed up! Papá Doyle basically never leaves his room. The servants don’t even look at you not to mind speak. The matriarch is all sorts of terrifying... just not the kind of family that you want to be housemates with! Catalina’s husband Virgil is hot but in a disturbing kind of way and basically he’s the type of guy that makes you feel violated from the way he looks at you. CREEPIEST OF THE CREEPIEST! High Place is a house where silence is not just expected but demanded. It’s a house that is filled with secrets. It’s a house that seems to be alive with something preternatural. And it is here Noemí must figure out what is truly going on and why it is that her beloved cousin is so deeply troubled and unwell.The pacing in this was FLAWLESS! The story started out deliciously slowly... like a really good teasing kind of slow. Which really helped to heighten the tension and just created a whole lot of foreboding.... that gradually kept building as more and more of the plot was revealed... And then the pay off... MY GOD THAT CLIMAX WAS BRILLIANT! I had no clue how things were going to end but OMG DID THIS BOOK END WITH A BANG! Pretty much the whole way through I was second guessing every plot development trying to figure out what was going on... and I was always wrong! I LOVE BEING SO HOODWINKED!! And Moreno-Garcia’s descriptive writing was a joy to read. I really felt that the world of Noemí and the Doyles came alive on the page. From the chilling imagery of the house (all those descriptions of the ouroboroses decorating the house were incredibly powerful in my opinion), to the contrasting warmth of the run down nearby town and its people, to the descriptions of Noemí’s glamorous clothing confections; altogether everything conjured up a wholly immersive reading experience. I do think that this book focuses slightly more on atmosphere and story rather than character but that in no way means that there aren’t compelling characters in this novel. I really liked Noemí as a main character. She was so fabulously sassy and fiercely loyal to Catalina. She also was the kind of character that was defiantly headstrong and didn’t care what others thought about her which I really liked; this helped to make her feel truly authentic which was important as she needed to feel realistic to give a sense of grounding to the fantastical story. If she had been rather saccharine or bland the book would not have worked so I’m very pleased that she was a character with added bite. And omg Virgil... I HATED HIM! But in a I loved to hate him kind of way because he was so well written. My god that character was just all sorts of disturbing and I can’t really say much more so just bravo Moreno-Garcia. And then there was Francis. Gosh I wanted to shake him so much... in a good way I mean. Because his character arc was super compelling and I was deeply invested in his journey. I realise I’ve given away very little about the plot but this is one of those books that it is best to go into completely blind. The joy is in the slow reveal of this unique story that is a brilliantly strange and hugely memorable mix of historical and gothic fiction with a twist of almost science fiction. This book was simply sublime in my opinion. I honestly wouldn’t change a thing about it, including the cover which is also perfection. Come the end of 2020 I am absolutely positive this will be among my favourite books released this year. *An e-copy of this book was kindly provided to me by the publisher, Quercus/Jo Fletcher Books, via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review* For more reviews and book related chat check out my blog
    more
  • Dannii Elle
    January 1, 1970
    Noemi is used to grand parties, sweeping dresses, and a string of admiring suitors. She isn't used to poverty-stricken towns, ramshackled grand houses, and a dismal mist that coats it all. Yet here she must remain to save both her cousin and her own future.Her father received a scrawled letter from her cousin's new address that spoke less of newlywed bliss and more of the mania of a troubled mind. Noemi has been dispatched to transport her to the nearest psychiatric aid, with dire warnings for t Noemi is used to grand parties, sweeping dresses, and a string of admiring suitors. She isn't used to poverty-stricken towns, ramshackled grand houses, and a dismal mist that coats it all. Yet here she must remain to save both her cousin and her own future.Her father received a scrawled letter from her cousin's new address that spoke less of newlywed bliss and more of the mania of a troubled mind. Noemi has been dispatched to transport her to the nearest psychiatric aid, with dire warnings for the repercussions it will hold for the family name and Noemi's future scholarly endeavours should she fail in this task. It may be more difficult an undertaking than foreseen however, when her new husband and their ominous abode won't release their claws on both her cousin and its new guest.My Gothic-loving heart could not have been more enamoured with this sinister setting and the uncanny occurrences that transpired there. Mysteries were in abundance and it was never clear where their roots lay or why exactly they were taking their menacing toll on the house inhabitants. I loved exploring the mould-ridden interior confines and the dark spaces where secrets and nightmares dwelt.Noemi proved herself a capable protagonist to see the reader through these horrors as her sassy ways, sarcastic wit, and fearsome spirit were a strong tonic against midnight terrors and the morbid house inhabitants. The entire cast were unique in their creation and it proved just as difficult to discern what was a trippy nightmare spectre as it was who to trust or loathe. I loved getting to know this close-knit family and their strange string of ancestors. Whilst never an altogether horrifying read for me, it remained suspenseful and sinister throughout. the finale was a mad dash for truth that left me open-mouthed yet breathless at the revelations and the journey to get there. This was wonderfully unique read and combined the best of Gothic fiction with a vivid historical setting, and vibrant Mexican roots.I received a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review. Thank you to the author, Silvia Moreno-Garcia, and the publisher, Del Ray, for this opportunity.
    more
  • Candace Robinson
    January 1, 1970
    I always love Moreno-Garcia’s fabulous writing! The Beautiful Ones is still my favorite book by her but this was pretty dang close! I also the loved the 1950s setting!Noemí was an awesome character, strong, inquisitive, and caring. And Francis!!! He was such an adorable human being!My favorite thing about this book was the weirdness! Such lovely and beautiful strangeness with a unique atmosphere! There was some delicious creepy things that reminded me of Crimson Peak, which I love so much! This I always love Moreno-Garcia’s fabulous writing! The Beautiful Ones is still my favorite book by her but this was pretty dang close! I also the loved the 1950s setting!Noemí was an awesome character, strong, inquisitive, and caring. And Francis!!! He was such an adorable human being!My favorite thing about this book was the weirdness! Such lovely and beautiful strangeness with a unique atmosphere! There was some delicious creepy things that reminded me of Crimson Peak, which I love so much! This author is def an auto-buy for me!
    more
  • sarah xoxo
    January 1, 1970
    Mexican Gothic is like nothing I have ever read before. Creepy, unsettling and yet glamorous. Quiet, slow and yet mesmerising. This book starts in an unassuming way. A classic haunted mansion trope with only an interesting setting to spice it up. But once I lowered my guard and expectations- everything was flipped on its head and from that moment I was captivated. For the first half to two thirds, I found it quite slow and frankly boring. I adored the atmosphere, but it wasn't living it to the h Mexican Gothic is like nothing I have ever read before. Creepy, unsettling and yet glamorous. Quiet, slow and yet mesmerising. This book starts in an unassuming way. A classic haunted mansion trope with only an interesting setting to spice it up. But once I lowered my guard and expectations- everything was flipped on its head and from that moment I was captivated. For the first half to two thirds, I found it quite slow and frankly boring. I adored the atmosphere, but it wasn't living it to the horror or suspense that I was promised. If you are considering DNF'ing the book- I would urge you to at least read to the plot twist (you'll know it when you see it). From then on, I couldn't stop reading. It was such a unique and original concept that it is worth pushing through the first half to get to it. As for the characters, I had mixed feelings. I found our main character, Noemí to be a really interesting character to follow. This book is set in the 1950's, but Noemí didn't let society hold her back or censor her. Francis was quite possibly my favourite character. He had grown up in this house, and it was interesting to see how it affected him. He was adorable and innocent, but not untouched by the horrors present. I also really liked (probably the wrong word) Virgil's character. He had such a creepy vibe that I felt uncomfortable whenever he was on the page- and I loved it. However, most of the other characters fell flat for me. I didn't care for Catalina or anyone else, which lowered my enjoyment. If you don't feel attached to the characters, you don't care what happens to them- which is what horror and suspense novels tend to hinge on. "Noemí's father said she cared too much about her looks and parties to take school seriously, as if a woman could not do two things at once."The atmosphere and writing surprisingly gave me Maggie Stiefvater vibes. I can't fully explain it, but some of the scenes felt like that lucid dreaming quality of some of Call Down the Hawk in particular. The setting was done impeccably, to the point where I saw the mist, smelt the musty house and felt the terror. I would LOVE to see this adapted as a movie or TV show. It would be everything. "The house, so quiet, with its curtains drawn, was like a dress lined with lead. Everything was heavy, even the air, and a musty scent lingered along the hallways. It felt almost as if it were a temple, a church, where one must speak in low voices and genuflect, and she supposed the servants had acclimatised to this environment and therefore tiptoed along the staircase, unwilling nuns who had made vows of silence."Overall, this was such an interesting reading experience for me. I felt varying degrees of indifference to boredom in the first half, but was enamoured by the rest. I would definitely recommend it to people who like slow burn, character driven novels with a strong atmosphere. I am now excited to try more of this author's backlist, as I think she has the possibility to be a new favourite author. ★★★☆☆.75 starsThank you to Quercus Books for this ARCRelease Date: 23 June 2020
    more
  • Gerardine Betancourt
    January 1, 1970
    This is the third book that I have read by this author and probably my favorite book of this year.In Mexican Gothic we meet Noemì, a glamorous socialite who finds out from her father that her cousin Catalina wrote a very weird letter. The letter explain that she believes her husband is poisoning her. This makes Naomi's father believe that something strange it's happening to Catalina and that she is possibly suffering from some mental illness.Noemì dad wants to send her to High Place, the house w This is the third book that I have read by this author and probably my favorite book of this year.In Mexican Gothic we meet Noemì, a glamorous socialite who finds out from her father that her cousin Catalina wrote a very weird letter. The letter explain that she believes her husband is poisoning her. This makes Naomi's father believe that something strange it's happening to Catalina and that she is possibly suffering from some mental illness.Noemì dad wants to send her to High Place, the house where Catalina lives with her husband to check that everything is all right.When Naomi arrives, High Place is a creepy old looking mansion, gloomy and with a strong musty smell everywhere.Naomi quickly realizes that something is wrong in that house and that she needs to do everything in her power to make her cousin safe.Without spoiling the book Mexican Gothic is a book that contains a bit of everything, has elements of fantasy, terror and suspense. Silvia Moreno García created in Mexican Gothic a strong female character that I loved from the first page. The originality of the story and the descriptions used by the author immerses you and transports you until the last page.Thanks you so much to edelweiss and Del Rey for this arc in exchange for an honest review.⭐⭐⭐⭐⭐Stars.
    more
  • Sara
    January 1, 1970
    ARC received in exchange for an honest review 👩3.5 starsAfter receiving a disturbing letter from her newly wed cousin Catalina, Noemi is sent by her father to investigate the mysterious goings on at the enigmatic High Place mansion. Set against the backdrop of misty Mexican countryside, Noemi soon finds herself embroiled in secrets and lies hundreds of years in the making. This starts off very slow, with an atmosphere that creeps up on you gradually, as we follow Noemi from her decadent life in ARC received in exchange for an honest review 👩3.5 starsAfter receiving a disturbing letter from her newly wed cousin Catalina, Noemi is sent by her father to investigate the mysterious goings on at the enigmatic High Place mansion. Set against the backdrop of misty Mexican countryside, Noemi soon finds herself embroiled in secrets and lies hundreds of years in the making. This starts off very slow, with an atmosphere that creeps up on you gradually, as we follow Noemi from her decadent life in the city to the Mexican countryside. There's monosyllabic staff members, an isolated delapidated house with hidden secrets and even a couple of graveyards to help create this subtle overall feeling of suspense and tension. The pacing at the beginning is almost none existant, as nothing really happens for a good 60% of the book as the writing tries to focus on building this atmosphere and setting the scene. It takes a long time, and isn't always effective - at some points during the early stages I was tempted to set this aside because nothing was moving forward. We have Noemi having stilted conversations with High Place's inhabitants and visiting a couple of townspeople. That's it. All of the people within High Place are also incredibly odd and unlikeable, including Noemi herself. She's perceived at the start as a vapid party girl, flighty in her persuit of men and changing ambitions. She's determined to exert her opinions on Catalina's husband Virgil and his sister Florence, undermining their rules within the household, while manipulating son Francis into doing her bidding. I will say that her character development does get better, particularly towards the end of the book, it just takes a long time to get there. Admittantly it helps that Virgil and Florence are awful, irredeemable characters. Now we come to the last third of the book. I'm still not entire sure what I read in the last 30%. It got weird. And a hell of a lot more interesting than your bog standard gothic historical fare. After we get a big reveal and back story the tone and pacing of this completely changes. It gave me definate The Lie Tree vibes, with a subtle science fiction twist. It was completely unexpected, and welcomed, as the plot picks up immeasurably as the stakes get higher and higher for Noemi and her cousin. I can't help feeling however, that this is two completely separate books that struggle to mesh well together and more could have been done to integrate the tone of the latter half into the beginning. It's disjointed, and that's unfortunate as I enjoyed the last section of this so much more than the start.Go into this blind, and go in expecting a slow build of atmosphere to a weird and truly bizarre ending. It's historical, but it's also really not, and I kind of love it for that.
    more
  • Linda
    January 1, 1970
    "Don't build a wall around your own sufferings or it may devour you from the inside." (Frida Kahlo)Noemi Taboada doesn't know much about suffering. She's a young 22 year old socialite whose only exercise is pushing fancy evening dresses back and forth in her closet. Decisions fall into categories of which parties to attend or not. It's 1951 in Mexico City and as the daughter of a very successful chemical dye businessman all her needs are met. Her father indulges her in piano lessons and patientl "Don't build a wall around your own sufferings or it may devour you from the inside." (Frida Kahlo)Noemi Taboada doesn't know much about suffering. She's a young 22 year old socialite whose only exercise is pushing fancy evening dresses back and forth in her closet. Decisions fall into categories of which parties to attend or not. It's 1951 in Mexico City and as the daughter of a very successful chemical dye businessman all her needs are met. Her father indulges her in piano lessons and patiently awaits her decisions on constantly changing career choices and perspective suitors.But now Senor Taboada will be asking much of this young woman. He has received a frantic letter from his niece Catalina who hints greatly of a life of disarray and chaos. Catalina married an Englishman in secrecy and haste. The newlweds live in a Victorian style house in the far off countryside in Hidalgo. Virgil Doyle traces his family back to generations living on the edge of a once prosperous silver mine. Senor Taboada fears for his niece's health and sends Noemi to observe the situation. Noemi will clutch that train ticket that will shuttle her to a life-changing venture she could never dream possible.Silvia Moreno-Garcia has chosen an absolutely stunning cover for this book. Gaze upon this breath-taking young woman surrounded by the velvet of the swirling design on the wallpaper behind her. In her hands are grasped the sweetness and the delicacy of those flowers. The slope of her fine shoulders may indicate aloof indifference or may reveal the arching stiffness of intensity. You'll only come to find out by lifting the cover and stepping within.Mexican Gothic introduces us to a highly creative and unexpected storyline. Moreno-Garcia has us placing our feet on unstable ground as it turns into a slowly sinking marsh under foot. The pacing is not rushed as we soon take note of what is really happening here. The characters tilt their heads with prim and properness while causing us to take note that there is far more here than what meets the eye.......and what the eye takes in is more than the mind can balance. Bravo, Silvia Moreno-Garcia. Just Bravo for such a job well done.I received a copy of Mexican Gothic through NetGalley for an honest review. My thanks to Random House Publishers and to the talented Silvia Moreno-Garcia for the opportunity.
    more
  • Charlie Anders
    January 1, 1970
    I was proud to give a cover quote to this book, and I've been thinking about it ever since. It's one of those books that keeps you guessing as to what's actually going on, in the best possible way. And it's creepy and horrific and skin-crawling, but these things are used in the service of a really rich narrative about white supremacy, scientific racism and exploitation. Noemi is a really fantastic character whom I found myself rooting for with extra intensity. I've loved Moreno-Garcia's writing I was proud to give a cover quote to this book, and I've been thinking about it ever since. It's one of those books that keeps you guessing as to what's actually going on, in the best possible way. And it's creepy and horrific and skin-crawling, but these things are used in the service of a really rich narrative about white supremacy, scientific racism and exploitation. Noemi is a really fantastic character whom I found myself rooting for with extra intensity. I've loved Moreno-Garcia's writing since Signal to Noise, and this is my favorite book of hers. It was also super interesting to read this book and N.K. Jemisin's The City We Became back-to-back, because they are both deconstructing some of the same tropes and felt like they were in dialogue with each other.
    more
  • Kyra Leseberg (Roots & Reads)
    January 1, 1970
    4.5 starsMove over, Daphne du Maurier --- there is a new queen of gothic suspense and her name is Silvia Moreno-Garcia.The book cover is what initially intrigued me but it was the description that had me obsessed.  I was willing to beg for an advance copy but luckily Del Rey approved me on NetGalley and I'm so thankful that they did because this book lived up to all the hype I'd created in my mind!The equally beautiful and tough debutante Noemí Taboada has received a strange letter from her newl 4.5 starsMove over, Daphne du Maurier --- there is a new queen of gothic suspense and her name is Silvia Moreno-Garcia.The book cover is what initially intrigued me but it was the description that had me obsessed.  I was willing to beg for an advance copy but luckily Del Rey approved me on NetGalley and I'm so thankful that they did because this book lived up to all the hype I'd created in my mind!The equally beautiful and tough debutante Noemí Taboada has received a strange letter from her newly-wed cousin Catalina, begging to be saved.  In it, she claims her husband is trying to poison her and that something is wrong with High Place, their house in the Mexican countryside.Noemí and her father strike a deal that she will travel to High Place and visit Catalina to determine if she's ill or in danger.  Noemí knows little of Catalina's husband Virgil and his family, other than they once held great wealth in a mining empire destroyed by a mysterious epidemic."The house loomed over them like a great, quiet gargoyle. It might have been foreboding, evoking images of ghosts and haunted places, if it had not seemed so tired, slats missing from a couple of shutters, the ebony porch groaning as they made their way up the steps to the door, which came complete with a silver knocker shaped like a fist dangling from a circle." *Upon Noemí's arrival, Catalina claims she has been incredibly ill, diagnosed with tuberculosis, and the letter was written in the throes of a high fever.  While this should be a perfectly acceptable explanation, Noemí can't shake the feeling that something is wrong.  Virgil and his family are peculiar and vaguely menacing and the house itself seems to hold sinister secrets.As Noemí uncovers the truth behind the family and their home, she unearths a madness beyond her wildest dreams.Mexican Gothic seriously has it all:  the atmosphere, the creepy characters, whispers of a family curse, plenty of tragic events in the past, a house that seems to have a life of its own.I was immediately captivated by High Place and its secrets.  This book is everything I could possibly want in a gothic horror novel. (Eat your heart out, Rebecca!)I recommend this book to readers who love literary fiction, gothic, horror, and/or sci-fi.Thanks to Del Rey and NetGalley for providing me with an ARC in exchange for my honest review!  Mexican Gothic is scheduled for release on June 30, 2020.*Quote included is from a digital advance reader's copy and is subject to change upon final publication.For more reviews, visit www.rootsandreads.wordpress.com
    more
  • Stephanie (That's What She Read)
    January 1, 1970
    4.5I am surprised by how much I ended up enjoying Mexican Gothic. The first half is definitely an homage to the pulpy gothic suspense novels and takes a turn into weird horror that I loved. Noemi is also a very likable protagonist. She's strong and questions what is going on more than usual gothic heroines, which I appreciated. As a sleep-deprived mom of a newborn, I enjoyed how compelling this story was and how well it was paced. The main conflict is presented right away and by chapter two Noem 4.5I am surprised by how much I ended up enjoying Mexican Gothic. The first half is definitely an homage to the pulpy gothic suspense novels and takes a turn into weird horror that I loved. Noemi is also a very likable protagonist. She's strong and questions what is going on more than usual gothic heroines, which I appreciated. As a sleep-deprived mom of a newborn, I enjoyed how compelling this story was and how well it was paced. The main conflict is presented right away and by chapter two Noemi is on her way to High Place to visit her cousin. Also a great use of Lovecraftian elements to talk about colonization and white supremacy. I received a digital review copy from Netgalley for review
    more
  • megs_bookrack
    January 1, 1970
    This. Sounds. Incredible!Gothic Horror in the skilled hands of Silvia Moreno-Garcia?Sign me up!!! Seriously, I need this yesterday. This. Sounds. Incredible!Gothic Horror in the skilled hands of Silvia Moreno-Garcia?Sign me up!!! Seriously, I need this yesterday.
    more
  • Vanessa
    January 1, 1970
    This cover gave me years to my life. Why am I getting Knives Out meets The Seven Husbands of Evelyn Hugo???
  • Lady H
    January 1, 1970
    The Guardian describes Mexican Gothic as "Lovecraft meets the Brontes in Latin America," which is rather apt. Moreno-Garcia has written a delectably Gothic, deliciously weird, and appropriately horrifying tale of a young woman tasked with rescuing her cousin, allegedly imprisoned in a dilapidated old mansion, potentially being poisoned by her husband's family.It is an homage to all kinds of classic Gothic tropes: the woman trapped in the attic, a creepy house that may or may not be haunted, vill The Guardian describes Mexican Gothic as "Lovecraft meets the Brontes in Latin America," which is rather apt. Moreno-Garcia has written a delectably Gothic, deliciously weird, and appropriately horrifying tale of a young woman tasked with rescuing her cousin, allegedly imprisoned in a dilapidated old mansion, potentially being poisoned by her husband's family.It is an homage to all kinds of classic Gothic tropes: the woman trapped in the attic, a creepy house that may or may not be haunted, villainous men who are also romantically alluring, incest, and family secrets, but Moreno-Garcia also throws in a Lovecraftian twist of truly weird cosmic horror. It's not so much scary as it is incredibly creepy; Moreno-Garcia knows how to slowly heighten tension and build up dread. Her lush and eerie descriptors are buffeted by her elegant writing style, creating a dank, oppressive tone and a claustrophobic atmosphere. There is also something so very visual about Mexican Gothic; Moreno-Garcia's descriptions are so incredibly vivid. Basically, I would sell my soul to see this adapted into a film! While I love Gothic horror in theory, one of my issues with it is that it can be plodding and slow; happily, I had no such issues with Mexican Gothic. From the very first page I was hooked by Noemi's narrative voice, and the story gets moving fast. The book doesn't overstay its welcome nor does it waste its relatively short page time by meandering; words are certainly not wasted here. The mystery culminates in a gloriously creepy revolution that leaves nothing to the imagination, which I absolutely loved; few horror books wrap up loose ends so neatly, but I appreciate closure very much, so I thought the ending was incredibly satisfying. In an interview, Moreno-Garcia describes Mexican Gothic as "trashy but classy" and compares it to Flowers in the Attic (though she says it isn't quite as trashy as that). While I understand her assertion that this isn't exactly high literature, and that it takes inspiration from trashy Gothic stories, I also think that, thematically, this is quite an achievement! In changing the setting to Mexico and placingwhite people in the position of inscrutable villain/monster rather than the dark-skinned Mexican heroine, Moreno-Garcia subverts traditional Gothic implications of the dark foreigner as Other. This is underscored by the frequent discussions of eugenics in the story, and the heroine's positionality as a budding anthropologist who scorns her hosts' eugenicist beliefs. In short, this book is both brilliant and gratifying, in addition to being delightfully entertaining!
    more
  • aarya
    January 1, 1970
    CW: (view spoiler)[murder, epidemic, incest, attempted rape, cannibalism, racism, eugenics, hallucinations, gore (hide spoiler)]4.5 stars Mexican Gothic is creepy as fuck and I might never sleep again. I say this with the highest of compliments. It’s a must-read for any lover of horror and gothic literature. I want to send it to my old English teachers; Mexican Gothic begs to be taught/analyzed along with the rest of the gothic horror canon.I loved it. I’m too much of a scaredy-cat to ever rerea CW: (view spoiler)[murder, epidemic, incest, attempted rape, cannibalism, racism, eugenics, hallucinations, gore (hide spoiler)]4.5 stars Mexican Gothic is creepy as fuck and I might never sleep again. I say this with the highest of compliments. It’s a must-read for any lover of horror and gothic literature. I want to send it to my old English teachers; Mexican Gothic begs to be taught/analyzed along with the rest of the gothic horror canon.I loved it. I’m too much of a scaredy-cat to ever reread it, but I loved it. I adored Silvia Moreno-Garcia’s 1920s Mayan fantasy Gods of Jade and Shadow last year and her foray into 1950s Mexican gothic horror is equally brilliant. Not many authors can write well in multiple genres, but Moreno-Garcia deserves all the praise for managing that feat. I must read her thriller Untamed Shore soon.Tangential, out-of-context note: I really love mushrooms and now I’m considering cutting them out of my diet. Don’t read at night like me because you will not be able to sleep after finishing at 3 am. 😭Disclaimer: I received a free e-ARC from the publisher in exchange for an honest review.
    more
  • Megan C.
    January 1, 1970
    ALL. THE. STARS. FOR. THIS. BOOK. I didn't so much read it. like was consumed by it. I couldn't put it down - I stayed up late and got up early just to get back to it. It's gothic fiction done in EXACTLY the right way. Deliciously creepy - I could not get enough of this one. It emerged as a clear 2020 favorite for me!
    more
  • charlotte, (½ of readsrainbow)
    January 1, 1970
    “Teonanácatl,” she said. “The flesh of the gods.” On my blog. Rep: Mexican characters & settingCWs: attempted rape, racism, cannibalism, incest, child death, descriptions of gore & body horrorGalley provided by publisherI would be the first to admit that horror/gothic/paranormal genres do not usually feature prominently on my reading lists. But it was Silvia Moreno-Garcia. What was I supposed to do?And Silvia Moreno-Garcia being Silvia Moreno-Garcia, she smashes it out of the park. Her sty “Teonanácatl,” she said. “The flesh of the gods.” On my blog. Rep: Mexican characters & settingCWs: attempted rape, racism, cannibalism, incest, child death, descriptions of gore & body horrorGalley provided by publisherI would be the first to admit that horror/gothic/paranormal genres do not usually feature prominently on my reading lists. But it was Silvia Moreno-Garcia. What was I supposed to do?And Silvia Moreno-Garcia being Silvia Moreno-Garcia, she smashes it out of the park. Her style is so perfectly suited to the story, and the way she slowly ratchets up the creepy tension is just unbelievable. It is pretty much the perfect novel.Mexican Gothic is, as the title suggests, a gothic novel set in Mexico. It follows Noemí, whose cousin writes to her father to ask for help, saying something about how her husband, a man they barely know, is poisoning her. When Noemí arrives, she finds a creepy house and a threatening family, but no clear indication of why her cousin is feeling like this.As ever, Moreno-Garcia’s writing is beautiful and evocative. It’s perfect for the setting because it makes everything just that bit more creepy. That and the way she builds tension just makes the whole thing brilliant. I am very glad I didn’t read this at night because I would definitely have scared myself too much.I think the only thing that could have made this book better was if I had actually read any gothic literature. It’s like that time I read Northanger Abbey and didn’t get half the humour of it. I’m not saying you can’t enjoy this book not having read gothic literature, I just think it adds to the appreciation of it all (I mean, the wallpaper, I think, would make more sense if I knew what it was about). And that’s probably why, for me, it was 4 stars and not 5.But anyway. This is definitely a book you all need to be getting on as soon as it’s out.
    more
Write a review