Your Blue Is Not My Blue
From Aspen Matis, author of the acclaimed true story Girl in the Woods, comes a bold and atmospheric memoir of a woman who—in searching for her vanished husband—discovers deeper purpose.Aspen’s and Justin’s paths serendipitously aligned on the Pacific Crest Trail when both were walking from Mexico to Canada, separately and alone—both using thru-hiking in hopes of escaping their pasts. Both sought to redefine themselves beneath the stars. By the time they made it to the snowy Cascade Range of British Columbia—the trail’s end—Aspen and Justin were in love.Embarking on a new pilgrimage the next summer, they returned to those same mossy mountains where they’d met, and they married. They built a world together, three years of a happy marriage. Until a cold November morning, when, after kissing Aspen goodbye, Justin left to attend the funeral of a close friend.He never came back. As days became weeks, her husband’s inexplicable absence left Aspen unmoored. Shock, grief, fear, and anger battled for control—but nothing prepared her for the disarming truth. A revelation that would lead Aspen to reassess not only her own life but that of the disappeared as well.The result is a brave and inspiring memoir of secrets kept and unearthed, of a vanishing that became a gift: a woman’s empowering reclamation of unmitigated purpose in the surreal wake of mystifying loss.

Your Blue Is Not My Blue Details

TitleYour Blue Is Not My Blue
Author
ReleaseJun 1st, 2020
PublisherBrilliance Audio
ISBN-139781799753605
Rating
GenreAutobiography, Memoir, Nonfiction, Biography

Your Blue Is Not My Blue Review

  • T
    January 1, 1970
    This book was my Amazons First Reads choice for May. I downloaded it May 1 and finished it the same day. I had read Girl in the Woods so I recognized the authors name. I was intrigued by the synopsis as I recall thinking the end of GitW seemed a little vague.I was somewhat incredulous of the lifestyle of Aspen and Justin described in this book. She was young and seemed rather immature; he was about ten years older but had an unconventional outlook on life. Turns out they both had major events This book was my Amazon’s First Reads choice for May. I downloaded it May 1 and finished it the same day. I had read Girl in the Woods so I recognized the author’s name. I was intrigued by the synopsis as I recall thinking the end of GitW seemed a little vague.I was somewhat incredulous of the lifestyle of Aspen and Justin described in this book. She was young and seemed rather immature; he was about ten years older but had an unconventional outlook on life. Turns out they both had major events earlier in their lives that resulted in behaviors and outlooks that were not mainstream (my words for lack of a better description). One day, Justin disappears. I enjoyed reading about Aspen’s efforts to find him and understand what happened. I also appreciated that she shared what she learned about herself and her relationships with her and Justin’s families. Lastly, I found it amazing that while all of this was going on, she was trying to meet the obligations of her book contract to finish writing Girl in the Woods.p.s. Long ago, I had the same conversation with friends re "Your blue is not my blue".
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  • Melanie
    January 1, 1970
    I had a bit of a love/hate thing going on with the author's previous memoir, but it still riveted me. and then I got to the end and discovered this beautiful love affair ended abruptly with her husband's disappearance into thin air, and I really wanted more of THAT story. So when I learned Matis was writing that very story, I couldn't wait to read it. and I devoured this one in one day. Her writing, and she, have matured, and it's largely quite beautiful and compelling. I love her descriptive I had a bit of a love/hate thing going on with the author's previous memoir, but it still riveted me. and then I got to the end and discovered this beautiful love affair ended abruptly with her husband's disappearance into thin air, and I really wanted more of THAT story. So when I learned Matis was writing that very story, I couldn't wait to read it. and I devoured this one in one day. Her writing, and she, have matured, and it's largely quite beautiful and compelling. I love her descriptive prose, and her use of color imagery is kind of magickal. Everything in her world, even at its bleakest, was turquoise and twilight purple and sea blue and rose-grey. I see the world in all its shades of blue (and green and gold and copper) too, color is immersive and vital to my world view, so I responded keenly to that. I also truly appreciated how much she grew over the course of the story, and how raw and honest she is, fully admitting her faults and flaws and naivete. It's hard to let your metaphorical veins bleed all over the page; she does it fearlessly. And she does her very best to tell this story, and she does it beautifully, but of course, at the heart, the central mystery remains. She tells us all she can about Justin's ghosting, she delves into the reasons and the backgrounds and her own personal responsibilities and his past as much as she's able. And the mystery isn't that he left, or even why, because, tho sad, it happens every single day. The true mystery for me is HOW someone can leave the way he did. What gives someone the utter, outrageous temerity to just disappear? To cause those who love you the most all that pain and fear and apparently not care? To finally pop up in a casual email with no explanation but a kind of self righteous indignation that the one left behind might be angry? And I'd love to know when he decided to turn into a ghost...was it planned out before, or did he attend their friend's funeral and then just think: nope, can't do it, not going back? And nope, not gonna call, not gonna explain, not gonna care about the devastation I leave behind. Who DOES that? I need a book from Justin Matis, but it's unlikely that will ever happen. I wonder at Aspen's strength to go on and finish this book in the midst of all of this. Despite some forays into drinking too much and sleeping around to numb the pain, she still managed to get a book written. It's kind of astonishing, really. Anyway. I devoured this book, and I wound up liking the author far more this time around than the last book. And though some terrible things happened to her, she has, in many ways, had a very charmed life. Becoming a writer in NYC was a dream of mine since I was 8; didn't happen. So living vicariously thru her, in her little turquoise apartment on MacDougal Street was kind of lovely. I look very forward to whatever Matis does next.
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  • Beverly A Peirce
    January 1, 1970
    Good readingI liked the fact that it was like real life. Life goes on and we can do it with strong people around us.
  • Katherina
    January 1, 1970
    Got me out of a Reading Slump I read and loved this authors first book, Girl in the Woods, and was left wanting to hear more when the story endedwhat happened with her relationship? What happened in her life after that hike? Since January, I had been in a slump, reading book after book and not really enjoying any of them. I was very excited when I found out Aspen Matis book was coming out early and I finally got out of the slump! I really loved this book and found it very relatable. It covers Got me out of a Reading Slump I read and loved this author’s first book, “Girl in the Woods,” and was left wanting to hear more when the story ended—what happened with her relationship? What happened in her life after that hike? Since January, I had been in a slump, reading book after book and not really enjoying any of them. I was very excited when I found out Aspen Matis’ book was coming out early and I finally got out of the slump! I really loved this book and found it very relatable. It covers the ending of a relationship when, while in the moment, you felt like everything was great and the relationship was steady. I think many people can relate to feeling blind-sighted to a relationship ending and wondering where things went wrong. This was also a book of self-discovery—figuring out what is important to you and who you are as a person. I think we all deal with that, particularly in our 20s and early 30s. I really enjoy reading memoirs because they represent real life and the reality that we are all flawed and most of the time there isn’t a dramatic reason to why a relationship ends and life doesn’t end in this happily ever after way that I feel like a lot of fiction books tend to end. I think as we read more and more fiction books and watch more and more movies, sometimes we are left expecting more drama, but usually real life is more subtle than that. I also really enjoyed the uniqueness of hearing about the writing process an author goes through as well as the process and struggles to get there, as the author is writing her “Girl in the Woods” book during this period in her life. I really enjoy the writing style of the author, using enough details to set up a scene and really understanding her thoughts and feelings, but not adding too much detail where it could become boring. The title of the book, “Your Blue is Not my Blue,” was very clever and comes out of a conversation she has with her husband. Overall, I was disappointed when this book came to an end and hope she has more interesting things happening in her life to write another one!
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  • Karen
    January 1, 1970
    Aspen meets Justin while on her famous trek from Mexico to Canada, detailed in her first memoir Girl in the Woods. Falling in love at 19, she is excited to share her life with this handsome, mysterious man 10 years her senior, who literally saved her life in the woods. Quickly accepted by his family, the newlyweds explore the hills he grew up in and beatnik scene of Northern California. A bit naive, Aspen doesnt think to ask questions regarding their finances or future plans. She is enjoying her Aspen meets Justin while on her famous trek from Mexico to Canada, detailed in her first memoir Girl in the Woods. Falling in love at 19, she is excited to share her life with this handsome, mysterious man 10 years her senior, who literally saved her life in the woods. Quickly accepted by his family, the newlyweds explore the hills he grew up in and beatnik scene of Northern California. A bit naive, Aspen doesn’t think to ask questions regarding their finances or future plans. She is enjoying her newfound adult freedom, letting the days easily arrange themselves with Justin leading the way. The couple soon finds themselves in NYC so Aspen can return to college and focus on her writing career. Slowly their wandering thru-hiker existence is filled with school and writing responsibilities along with exorbitant rent to pay. As Aspen’s world expands, Justin’s free spirit begins to fade. A few years later, on a dark November morning Justin leaves to attend a friends funeral - and disappears. Aspen is left alone to pick up the shattered pieces of her young life. This honest, expressive memoir is heartbreaking and beautiful. I thoroughly enjoyed reading Aspen’s descriptive scenery and adventurous spirit as she deciphers the true definition of love.
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  • Elizabeth
    January 1, 1970
    This isnt the worst book Ive ever read, but its possibly my most hated. I cant remember ever reading a book with a more selfish, immature character, and its even more depressing to know shes a real person. Its like she watched the show Girls and created a character even those girls would hate. Every line of writing includes several unnecessary adjectives that make following her point really difficult. The gist of the story is this: Aspen is trying to find her way in life after a massive solo This isn’t the worst book I’ve ever read, but it’s possibly my most hated. I can’t remember ever reading a book with a more selfish, immature character, and it’s even more depressing to know she’s a real person. It’s like she watched the show Girls and created a character even those girls would hate. Every line of writing includes several unnecessary adjectives that make following her point really difficult. The gist of the story is this: Aspen is trying to find her way in life after a massive solo hike where she met the love of her life. Her partner refuses to work, encourages her estrangement from her family, plans her life for her (moving her to Ny, completing her college applications) and telling her he doesn’t plan to ever get a job again. They both look down on anyone living a traditional life, both treat their families terribly (for no identifiable reason), and have no self awareness of their enormous privilege. Aspen is regularly rewarded- a book deal, a possible movie deal, an email from Lena Durham- but spends much of the book wasting her gifts - by stealing, drinking, blowing off her deadlines, etc. I can’t think of any character I’ve rooted for less than Aspen. I kept wanting her to fail, mostly because she so clearly didn’t appreciate any of her good fortunes.
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  • Rachel
    January 1, 1970
    Well written, but boringI applaud the author for revealing her pain . That said, the book could have been 100 pages shorter. Girl suffers trauma, enters horribly codependent relationship to cope with trauma, loses her ability to function when said codependent relationship ends, spends very little time searching for husband, writes a book, spends lots of time unable to purchase groceries or put in her contacts or really do anything without someone telling her what to do, then recovers. All within Well written, but boringI applaud the author for revealing her pain . That said, the book could have been 100 pages shorter. Girl suffers trauma, enters horribly codependent relationship to cope with trauma, loses her ability to function when said codependent relationship ends, spends very little time searching for husband, writes a book, spends lots of time unable to purchase groceries or put in her contacts or really do anything without someone telling her what to do, then recovers. All within a span of just a few years. The synopsis hinted at some deep secret as to why her husband disappeared, and this is what drew me to choose the book. Instead, after flipping through the pages looking for a shocking reveal, I found nothing other than immature persons incapable of relationships.Again, a well written book, but page after page of nothing had me flipping pages wishing it was over.
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  • Gina
    January 1, 1970
    It feels wrong to crap on someones memoir...but this book and her telling just didnt do it for me. The premise was excellent. But its filled with flowery, over the top descriptions of everything. And so much of me just kept thinking, have you NO ONE in your life to talk to who is a real human? Your husband youve known for a few months before marriage never tells you what he does for money or what he formerly did for a living, and you accept it? You never consider your family (including the It feels wrong to crap on someone’s memoir...but this book and her telling just didn’t do it for me. The premise was excellent. But it’s filled with flowery, over the top descriptions of everything. And so much of me just kept thinking, have you NO ONE in your life to talk to who is a real human? Your husband you’ve known for a few months before marriage never tells you what he does for money or what he formerly did for a living, and you accept it? You never consider your family (including the siblings you thank at the end but never once mention in your story) to ask for help, or advice? You trace it back to a ski coach in high school when you feel ripped off and decide to run away? Jesus, did you ever have any disappointments as a kid? Lose a game or have anything that wasn’t fair? I only hope she left out major parts of her life to make this book more concise, because she seemed like a naïve teenager, even through her divorce.
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  • Jourdan
    January 1, 1970
    This book... what even to say. It just kept going. It was like a combination of stream of consciousness, fever dreams, and excerpts from teenage diaries. I started out thinking this was the setup and it would eventually become more coherent; alas, it did not. I give it two stars because I was baffled by it the whole time but I did finish it, so thats something.Also a weird example truth being stranger than fiction. I didnt know it was a memoir and all the stuff about L*** D****** felt super fake This book... what even to say. It just kept going. It was like a combination of stream of consciousness, fever dreams, and excerpts from teenage diaries. I started out thinking this was the setup and it would eventually become more coherent; alas, it did not. I give it two stars because I was baffled by it the whole time but I did finish it, so that’s something.Also a weird example truth being stranger than fiction. I didn’t know it was a memoir and all the stuff about L*** D****** felt super fake and OTT, but hey.ETAI wrote the above at 3am and while it still stands, here is my review after a few hours’ sleep:this book was so weird. figuring out it was non-fiction was a moment; I definitely would have interpreted it very differently had I realized that early on. (I see now that it says memoir on the front but I read the kindle edition) my guess is that people who read her first book will get a lot out of this!
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  • Rachel
    January 1, 1970
    This author seems incapable of writing about any event in her life without adding a bunch of unneeded fluff description. For example she writes about her parents taking her to an apple store to buy her a new phone. "So with two hours to kill before the concert, they took me to an Apple store in a bucolic New Hampshire village powdered with a shimmering coat of early snow."Telling us that the town was bucolic and covered with a shimmering coat of early snow, does not make your errand to the This author seems incapable of writing about any event in her life without adding a bunch of unneeded fluff description. For example she writes about her parents taking her to an apple store to buy her a new phone. "So with two hours to kill before the concert, they took me to an Apple store in a bucolic New Hampshire village powdered with a shimmering coat of early snow."Telling us that the town was bucolic and covered with a shimmering coat of early snow, does not make your errand to the freaking Apple store interesting or relevant to anything happening in this story. So little is actually revealed about any other character's motivations, interests or personality. Descriptions about how the snow in NYC smelled of cinnamon made me laugh at loud. NYC smells like piss most of the time. Cause there are so many people living in the street and they piss there. Cause there are people in this world with real problems.
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  • Jessica
    January 1, 1970
    Moving Account of Becoming...Aspen Matis shares her painful, personal journey of becoming a writer. After a devastating sexual assault at 19, she leaves college to hike in the wilderness. Along the trail, she meets other hikers who help her, including the kind, gentle, charismatic man who becomes her friend, mentor, hiking companion, lover, and eventually her husband. Together, they drift from one idyllic adventure to another, as they explore the beauty and majesty of the wilderness, until he Moving Account of Becoming...Aspen Matis shares her painful, personal journey of becoming a writer. After a devastating sexual assault at 19, she leaves college to hike in the wilderness. Along the trail, she meets other hikers who help her, including the kind, gentle, charismatic man who becomes her friend, mentor, hiking companion, lover, and eventually her husband. Together, they drift from one idyllic adventure to another, as they explore the beauty and majesty of the wilderness, until he finally leads her to NYC to help her realize her dreams of becoming a professional writer. This book documents the painful process of writing and publishing her first book, its impact on her personal life, the bittersweet unraveling of her marriage, and how she survived the ordeal.
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  • Carolyn Russett
    January 1, 1970
    i've decided that maybe memoirs are not my type of book to read. While I appreciate the difficulties in life that many encounter and how they get themselves through it, this one did nothing for me. I felt the author was definitely immature (which created a lot of her issues), spoiled, self entitled. Her husband for his age was not much better. Why EVER would an escort service be the first way you would look to make money and not expect they would want something in return. This book could have i've decided that maybe memoirs are not my type of book to read. While I appreciate the difficulties in life that many encounter and how they get themselves through it, this one did nothing for me. I felt the author was definitely immature (which created a lot of her issues), spoiled, self entitled. Her husband for his age was not much better. Why EVER would an escort service be the first way you would look to make money and not expect they would want something in return. This book could have been a lot shorter. I was a third through and felt like I should be almost done. I will say though that it was well written. The author does indeed do well with descriptions and making her writing flow.Just not for me
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  • Kristi Lamont
    January 1, 1970
    This was an extremely well-written book that I wound up completely loathing by the time I finished it. Because, somewhere along the way, it hit me the our author was a very spoiled, very entitled, very self-pitying person who wanted us to think she had grown/matured emotionally.Reader? She hadn't.Her boyfriend/husband? No better. Ah, well. It was very interesting in parts and I enjoyed it for a while, and I got it as Kindle First Read or whatever we're calling such these days, so only time was This was an extremely well-written book that I wound up completely loathing by the time I finished it. Because, somewhere along the way, it hit me the our author was a very spoiled, very entitled, very self-pitying person who wanted us to think she had grown/matured emotionally.Reader? She hadn't.Her boyfriend/husband? No better. Ah, well. It was very interesting in parts and I enjoyed it for a while, and I got it as Kindle First Read or whatever we're calling such these days, so only time was spent. Five stars for the writing, 1 for the conceit of the whole thing, which means 3 trending down. Hard down.
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  • Diane Secchiaroli
    January 1, 1970
    An autobiography by Aspen Matis detailing her removal from society following her rape at college by hiking the Pacific Crest Trail from Mexico to British Columbia. She meets her soon to be husband halfway along the trail. After three comfortable years of marriage Justin disappears. This is a story of relationship, grief, discovery, anger and finding oneself. The descriptions of the hike and surrounding countryside wherever they are ( Colorado, Geogia, etc) and the characters they meet are An autobiography by Aspen Matis detailing her removal from society following her rape at college by hiking the Pacific Crest Trail from Mexico to British Columbia. She meets her soon to be husband halfway along the trail. After three comfortable years of marriage Justin disappears. This is a story of relationship, grief, discovery, anger and finding oneself. The descriptions of the hike and surrounding countryside wherever they are ( Colorado, Geogia, etc) and the characters they meet are interesting.
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  • irene m oleary
    January 1, 1970
    The first third of this book had me bored. Everything was described in such flowery detail. Not until her husband disappeared did it become mildly interesting. Now maybe it's because I'm older, but if my husband who I loved dearly disappeared, I would be searching for him all over the place. Having said that, would any sane woman marry a man who told her he did not want to work? Yes, he did everything he could to make her successful so she could support him. This book could have been cut down in The first third of this book had me bored. Everything was described in such flowery detail. Not until her husband disappeared did it become mildly interesting. Now maybe it's because I'm older, but if my husband who I loved dearly disappeared, I would be searching for him all over the place. Having said that, would any sane woman marry a man who told her he did not want to work? Yes, he did everything he could to make her successful so she could support him. This book could have been cut down in length and I'm not so sure I would have enjoyed it even if it had.
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  • Lisa Davis
    January 1, 1970
    If you like books about spoiled, privileged young women who think the world revolves around them and who expect to be supported financially and emotionally by their parents, in-laws, and spouse without giving anything in return just because they are so, so very special, then this is the book for you. If you prefer memoirs where the author has actually reflected on her past, gained insight and grown as a human then I would suggest you skip this one. Im actually angry that this was published and If you like books about spoiled, privileged young women who think the world revolves around them and who expect to be supported financially and emotionally by their parents, in-laws, and spouse without giving anything in return just because they are so, so very special, then this is the book for you. If you prefer memoirs where the author has actually reflected on her past, gained insight and grown as a human then I would suggest you skip this one. I’m actually angry that this was published and disappointed in myself that I finished it.
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  • Theresa Thompson
    January 1, 1970
    The author is good at writing but uses way too many words to describe things for my taste.Where this is her story I was left with alot of questions on how someone could just walk out of your life with not a word and leave her to pick up pieces. How she never once really said that her husband was as selfish as they come she called it immaturity on his part . I feel she really gave him an out. I was waiting for the redemption on his part but it never came. But it held my interest for the most The author is good at writing but uses way too many words to describe things for my taste.Where this is her story I was left with alot of questions on how someone could just walk out of your life with not a word and leave her to pick up pieces. How she never once really said that her husband was as selfish as they come she called it immaturity on his part . I feel she really gave him an out. I was waiting for the redemption on his part but it never came. But it held my interest for the most part.
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  • Michelle
    January 1, 1970
    This was kind of like watching a train wreck happen. There was no deep and hidden reason why her husband left her; no mystery solved (which was drew me into the book in the first place). Two immature strangers got married and it didnt work out. Lots of me, me, me, but I do appreciate that I havent experienced the trauma she has and Im glad she finally figured out her parents were good people. That said, I did enjoy reading it, but afterwards, it was kind of a what just happened moment. This was kind of like watching a train wreck happen. There was no deep and hidden reason why her husband left her; no mystery solved (which was drew me into the book in the first place). Two immature strangers got married and it didn’t work out. Lots of me, me, me, but I do appreciate that I haven’t experienced the trauma she has and I’m glad she finally figured out her parents were good people. That said, I did enjoy reading it, but afterwards, it was kind of a what just happened moment.
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  • Sue Dawson
    January 1, 1970
    I don't like to be critical of others, and she certainly has more talent than I. I liked the plot... it felt sincere. I just personally didn't like her style of writing. It was just so WORDY! I almost put it down after the first chapter but I finished the book by skimming every page for a few relevant phrases or words.
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  • Kim Cruickshank
    January 1, 1970
    Hard to put downA bit overbearing at times with over wordy descriptions. But still a great read. When someone just walks away from you, your life is consumed by doubts, questions,sadness. The author journeyed through her stages of grief honestly and bravely,stumbling and falling at times but always moving forward. I liked that.
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  • Leigh Swain Tilman
    January 1, 1970
    Self-indulgent, self-absorbed, overwritten. So many words for such a dull, self-obsessed life. I dont know that Ive ever disliked anyone more after having read their story. Unless you are interested in just how fascinating and artistic the author finds herself, you should look elsewhere for your next read. Self-indulgent, self-absorbed, overwritten. So many words for such a dull, self-obsessed life. I don’t know that I’ve ever disliked anyone more after having read their story. Unless you are interested in just how fascinating and artistic the author finds herself, you should look elsewhere for your next read.
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  • Amelia
    January 1, 1970
    I love memoirs, but I did not love this memoir. I feel mean saying that. This one felt self-indulgent, and this authors use of adjectives and adverbs is overwhelming at times, making some descriptions lush but overwrought and hard to read. There were some interesting and universal insights on the authors part, but overall I just felt a bit irritated by her story. I love memoirs, but I did not love this memoir. I feel mean saying that. This one felt self-indulgent, and this author’s use of adjectives and adverbs is overwhelming at times, making some descriptions lush but overwrought and hard to read. There were some interesting and universal insights on the author’s part, but overall I just felt a bit irritated by her story.
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  • Daniel Jordan
    January 1, 1970
    I tore through this book!Simultaneously mysterious and atmospheric, Matis brought me into her world through every page. Her raw candor was refreshing and bold introspection was both confronting and healing for me. I highly recommend this book for anyone who's dealt with adversity or has a passion buried deep inside, waiting to be unlocked.
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  • Debbie Decker
    January 1, 1970
    NopeI wanted to love this book but the writing is flowery, florid. I mean really, " the sky was a pale pink slipper of God"? There's more where that came from. Struggling to finish the book, I just kept wondering how she got published. Really, half of this book is about writing her first book. Just no.
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  • Jess Ferguson
    January 1, 1970
    Aspen Matis has a true writing gift; each paragraph is beautifully written. This book felt more honest and open than her first memoir, reaching a level of self-sufficiency and independence only created by her willingness to look deep inside herself and accept the challenge of growth toward maturity in herself and in each of her relationships.
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  • Deb
    January 1, 1970
    BeautifulWasn't sure if this book would be for me, but I was quickly engrossed by her words written so poetically. There were rimes in the story I was yelling at her for not doing this or for doing that. But then she surprised me with the perfect life lesson to sum it all up. Well done. One of my favorites this year.
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  • Amanda Preston
    January 1, 1970
    I get lost inside Aspen's writing in the best way. The way she captured the beauty around her brought me into her world and was truly mesmerizing. I'm so glad she boldly alchemized her suffering and adversity into this inspiring memoir.
  • Holly Kaplan
    January 1, 1970
    A very drawn out memoir of two immature individuals who meet, fall in love, get bored and then one of them leaves. You have to care about someone to enjoy a book. I just kept feeling bad for everyone involved with this couple.
  • Nancy J. Lach
    January 1, 1970
    This was an interesting read. While Im not a fan of flowery, adjective laden writing, this was an exception. I did sometimes bypass short beautiful passages though. I should have jotted down some of the beautiful language to savour later. Mesmerizing at times! This was an interesting read. While I’m not a fan of flowery, adjective laden writing, this was an exception. I did sometimes bypass short beautiful passages though. I should have jotted down some of the beautiful language to savour later. Mesmerizing at times!
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  • Tejas Janet
    January 1, 1970
    A beautifully moving story of personal transformation and growth. Sometimes the language, more so in the early chapters, was on the flowery side. But the writing grows more powerful and transcendent with each chapter.
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