Fair Warning (Jack McEvoy, #3; Harry Bosch Universe, #33)
The hero of The Poet and The Scarecrow is back in the new thriller from #1 New York Times bestselling author Michael Connelly. Jack McEvoy, the journalist who never backs down, tracks a serial killer who has been operating completely under the radar--until now. Veteran reporter Jack McEvoy has taken down killers before, but when a woman he had a one-night stand with is murdered in a particularly brutal way, McEvoy realizes he might be facing a criminal mind unlike any he's ever encountered.McEvoy investigates---against the warnings of the police and his own editor---and makes a shocking discovery that connects the crime to other mysterious deaths across the country. But his inquiry hits a snag when he himself becomes a suspect.As he races to clear his name, McEvoy's findings point to a serial killer working under the radar of law enforcement for years, and using personal data shared by the victims themselves to select and hunt his targets.Called "the Raymond Chandler of this generation" (Associated Press), Michael Connelly once again delivers an unputdownable thriller that reveals a predator operating from the darkest corners of human nature---and one man courageous and determined enough to stand in his way.

Fair Warning (Jack McEvoy, #3; Harry Bosch Universe, #33) Details

TitleFair Warning (Jack McEvoy, #3; Harry Bosch Universe, #33)
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseMay 26th, 2020
PublisherLittle, Brown and Company
ISBN-139780316539425
Rating
GenreMystery, Fiction, Thriller, Crime

Fair Warning (Jack McEvoy, #3; Harry Bosch Universe, #33) Review

  • Paromjit
    January 1, 1970
    Michael Connelly resurrects his veteran reporter, Jack McEvoy, for this gripping crime thriller. Jack is now working for Fair Warning, a non-profit consumer protection news website run by Myron Levin, which actually exists in reality. The story focuses on the complexities and terrifying possibilities that having an all too unregulated genetic analytics industry with its lack of governmental oversight, the responsibility of which falls under the remit of the FDA, poses to society. Jack is shocked Michael Connelly resurrects his veteran reporter, Jack McEvoy, for this gripping crime thriller. Jack is now working for Fair Warning, a non-profit consumer protection news website run by Myron Levin, which actually exists in reality. The story focuses on the complexities and terrifying possibilities that having an all too unregulated genetic analytics industry with its lack of governmental oversight, the responsibility of which falls under the remit of the FDA, poses to society. Jack is shocked when he finds himself a suspect for the murder of Tina Portrero, a woman who had picked him at his local bar for a one night stand a year ago. Tina had been killed by Atlanto-Occipital Dislocation, where her neck is twisted so hard that her spine is severed, an unusual way of murdering anyone. The LAPD detectives Mattson and Sakai treat Jack harshly, taking his DNA for elimination purposes, and on discovering Jack is investigating Tina's murder, respond by issuing threats, severe harassment, and arrest. It turns out that TIna had been cyber stalked, been creeped out by meeting a strange man in a bar who appeared to know far too much about her, and had recently found out she had a half sister on submitting her DNA to the cheapest private DNA testing company, GT23. GT23 openly sold on the DNA analysis of their clients for huge profits to a myriad of customers, ostensibly anonymously, but acknowledging that there was a possibility their systems and security may not foolproof, to ensure they avoid liability. Jack reconnects with the love of his life, Rachel Walling, former FBI special agent and profiler, a relationship with a long history of hope and hurt, but which he just cannot help sabotaging. Jack, a fellow reporter and Rachel find there are other women in the country who had been killed with the same MO, pointing to the existence of a dangerous serial killer called The Shrike.Connelly writes of the rise in misogyny and the high numbers of men in Incel groups, driven by their hatred of women to denigrate and abuse, act violently and even murder, here illegally accessing DNA information that includes the identification of a specific gene associated with addictions. This is a thrillingly entertaining crime read, touching on issues that need to have stricter governmental oversight and monitoring, and with a suitably flawed, driven and charismatic protagonist in Jack, a man for whom death had once been his beat, only to discover that it still is when Tina is killed. Connelly can be relied on for his intricate and complex plotting, and riveting storylines full of suspense of tension. Many thanks to Orion for an ARC.
    more
  • Liz
    January 1, 1970
    Michael Connelly does one of the best jobs I know in getting a story going quickly and getting the reader invested. His stories just flow. This one is no exception. Jack McEvoy is an investigative reporter. He’s initially questioned when a woman he had a previous one night stand with is murdered. Then he discovers other murders across the country with similar methods of death and an odd similarity. Each murder victim had recently had their DNA done by a small profiling company. A profiling compa Michael Connelly does one of the best jobs I know in getting a story going quickly and getting the reader invested. His stories just flow. This one is no exception. Jack McEvoy is an investigative reporter. He’s initially questioned when a woman he had a previous one night stand with is murdered. Then he discovers other murders across the country with similar methods of death and an odd similarity. Each murder victim had recently had their DNA done by a small profiling company. A profiling company that makes its real money by selling the DNA to other outfits. The story is engaging and will put the fear of God into anyone who’s had their DNA tested. It was an interesting twist to have a reporter as the main character instead of a detective. In fact, there are some interesting playoffs between the reporter and the police and FBI. What’s really scary is that the lack of oversight for the genetics testing business is real. I read the prior two books in the McEvoy series so long ago I don’t remember them. So, it totally works to read as a stand-alone. My thanks to netgalley and Little, Brown for an advance copy of this book.
    more
  • Mandy White
    January 1, 1970
    Jack McEvoy is back and I am loving it!! It is no secret that Michael Connelly is my favourite author ever and to have a new Jack McEvoy book come out is such a thrill. The Poet is one of my favourite books so I was so happy to have Jack back in my life again. And it did not disappoint one bit. I read this along side another die hard Connelly fan and we both wanted to both devour and savor it. It has been a while since we caught up with Jack so there was some catching up to do.Jack is now workin Jack McEvoy is back and I am loving it!! It is no secret that Michael Connelly is my favourite author ever and to have a new Jack McEvoy book come out is such a thrill. The Poet is one of my favourite books so I was so happy to have Jack back in my life again. And it did not disappoint one bit. I read this along side another die hard Connelly fan and we both wanted to both devour and savor it. It has been a while since we caught up with Jack so there was some catching up to do.Jack is now working for Fair Warning, a non profit consumer protection news website. He is a journalist who cares about his stories and the people that he writes about. On arriving home one night he is met by 2 LAPD police officers. A woman, Tina Portrero has been murdered, brutally. Her neck was twisted so hard that her spine has been severed. Jack had a one night stand with Tina a year ago and is being questioned in relation to the murder. The victim had confided to friends that she was being cyber stalked.LAPD come down hard on Jack and he senses that there is a story here. He reaches out to Rachael Walling, his former girlfriend and work colleague. She now has her own business after being dismissed from the FBI. Their relationship ended badly, but Jack knows that Rachael will not be able to resist this case. They soon find that there have been other women murdered in the same way and find a link that they all used a DNA family search company, GT23 looking for unknown members of their families.Of course this is where it gets interesting and dangerous. Jack and Rachel work alongside Jack's Fair Warning colleague Emily and uncover links to a serial killer. The DNA aspect of the story was interesting and frustrating, knowing that it was all based on fact. These days it is easy to see this sort of thing happening and it is scary!As soon as I picked this book up I was completely invested in the story and characters. I love the way that Michael Connelly writes, you feel as if you are in LA going on this investigation with the characters. Jack and Rachel's relationship is bumpy as always. They need each other more than they know and are both as stubborn as each other. I look forward to more Jack McEvoy books now Mr Connelly - please!!!Thank you so much to Allen and Unwin for my advanced copy of this book to read.
    more
  • Andrew Smith
    January 1, 1970
    In a break from writing novels involving his cop characters Harry Bosch and Renee Ballard, Connelly has chosen to reacquaint readers with crime reporter Jack McEvoy. In the 1990’s The Poet brought Jack to life and became one of the writer’s most successful books. After one more standalone book, The Scarecrow, we’ve only seen Jack in cameo roles in Bosch and lawyer Mickey Haller novels, so it feels like a welcome return for MC’s most autobiographical character. McEvoy is now scratching out a li In a break from writing novels involving his cop characters Harry Bosch and Renee Ballard, Connelly has chosen to reacquaint readers with crime reporter Jack McEvoy. In the 1990’s The Poet brought Jack to life and became one of the writer’s most successful books. After one more standalone book, The Scarecrow, we’ve only seen Jack in cameo roles in Bosch and lawyer Mickey Haller novels, so it feels like a welcome return for MC’s most autobiographical character. McEvoy is now scratching out a living working for a consumer protection news site called Fair Warning. Funding for the site is dependant on donors and the small team share a sparse office in what was once a retail site in Studio City, Los Angeles. It seems a far cry from the days Jack was covering the crime beat for the L.A. Times. But when a girl he’d met in a bar and had a one night stand with meets a brutal end the police come knocking on his door. It’s an unpleasant experience and one that spurs him to to do some digging of his own into the case. Neither the police or his own boss are happy about this but soon he thinks he’s found a link to a number of other murders with a similar M.O. All of Connelly’s lead characters have a strong moral compass driving them to seek the truth, to do the right thing, but I believe McEvoy to be the most self centred. Here, he wants to identify the killer and as a result get him (yes, they know it’s a man) brought to justice but really his main aim is to get the story – and this leads him to a moral quandary: does he hand over all his information to the police which might expedite capture and arrest or is it more important to get the story out first to ensure he’s credited with the scoop (and in his own mind warned the public of this killer at large)? His natural inclination is to pursue the latter course but in enlisting the help of his ex-girlfriend Rachel Walling, a former FBI agent, to assist him in his investigations it starts to become clear that she might not be fully attuned to this approach.I really enjoyed the dynamics between the people ostensibly on the same side here: the cops, Jack, Rachel and also a teammate of Jack’s who he is forced to accept help from. They do want the same thing but each in a slightly different way and therefore tensions are ever present. In addition the the major goal of ensuring the capture of a serial killer each in this group also wants something else from this investigation. It makes for some terrific interaction and is an added source of unease amongst this group who have been somewhat reluctantly pushed together.In addition to this being yet another top notch thriller from the modern master of crime fiction writing, I also managed to learn a good deal of interesting facts about an online subculture I was totally unaware of, to consider ethical questions regarding the use of DNA and to wonder once more just how people get intwined in the mysterious underworld of the dark web. Yes, Mr Connelly has done it yet again, it’s another brilliant offering that kept me glued to the very last page.My sincere thanks to Orion Publishing Group and NetGalley for supplying a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review.
    more
  • Ceecee
    January 1, 1970
    Jack McEvoy is a journalist reporting for Fair Warning a real life news website which reports on consumer protection issues. Jack is interviewed by LAPD Detectives Mattson and Sakai over the murder of Tina Portrero who Jack had hooked up with once over a year ago. The manner of her murder is unusual, requires significant strength and partly because he is being treated as a person of interest and partly because of unjust treatment by the detectives, Jack decides to investigate too. He discovers t Jack McEvoy is a journalist reporting for Fair Warning a real life news website which reports on consumer protection issues. Jack is interviewed by LAPD Detectives Mattson and Sakai over the murder of Tina Portrero who Jack had hooked up with once over a year ago. The manner of her murder is unusual, requires significant strength and partly because he is being treated as a person of interest and partly because of unjust treatment by the detectives, Jack decides to investigate too. He discovers the same MO in murders of women in different states. Further investigation reveals that all the women used a cheap DNA site, GT23 for profiling in order to search for lost family members. Jack also discovers that all the women had addictions of some kind. Jack and his colleagues investigation reveals a dangerous serial killer known as The Shrike. The story is told from several perspectives but principally Jacks. I really enjoyed the elements that relate to the DNA research as it raises very relevant issues about the security of this data and where it may end up. There is little to no oversight by government agencies. The killer breaches security to search for a specific gene which leads him to his victims - genetic research is a burgeoning field and the author rightly draws attention to concerns over potential misuse. Another interesting area is the incel element (involuntary celibates) who use the dark web to spew their misogynistic filth - I’ve read a number of books lately that draw attention to this. Much of the plot is very intelligent, well researched and extremely interesting and there are sections that are exciting especially the finale. I like the characters and Jack in particular but they are all easy to imagine. My only negative in what is an overwhelming good thriller is the slightly pedantic style at times. For instance, I’m not actually very bothered what route Jack takes through LA to get to his sources, I don’t know the city so it means little! This causes some unevenness in pace which takes away the focus from a very substantial and clever plot. Overall, despite the above reservation I enjoyed this very much. It’s a good thriller with interesting characters, a solid plot and relevant theme which should appeal to fans. Many thanks to NetGalley and Orion for the ARC.
    more
  • Susan Johnson
    January 1, 1970
    Michael Connelly is an excellent writer who keeps writing books that draw you in the moment you start to the very end. Jack McEvoy is a seasoned reporter who has knocked around before he settles down in a small Web based news writing operation that specializes in consumer affairs. Things are going OK for him until two policemen manhandle him in an investigation of a murdered woman he had a one night stand with a year ago. Jack is angry and starts searching for who really murdered her. His inves Michael Connelly is an excellent writer who keeps writing books that draw you in the moment you start to the very end. Jack McEvoy is a seasoned reporter who has knocked around before he settles down in a small Web based news writing operation that specializes in consumer affairs. Things are going OK for him until two policemen manhandle him in an investigation of a murdered woman he had a one night stand with a year ago. Jack is angry and starts searching for who really murdered her. His investigation leads him to a DNA testing company with really low rates, into a pedophile ring and finally on the trail of a ruthless killer. His characters are done well and are likable. The reader roots for them. The story is interesting and has many twists and turns. The ending really took me by surprise. You have to have confidence to write it and Connolly has certainly earned that. It's a great way to spend some time. Thanks to NetGalley for a copy of this ARC in exchange for a fair review.
    more
  • Gary
    January 1, 1970
    Michael Connelly is my favourite author and I couldn't wait to start this book. I have always loved the Harry Bosch series of books but strangely enough my favourite Connelly novel is 'The Poet' which featured Jack McEvoy so I was keen to read another one with him as the lead. Jack McEvoy is a senior investigative reporter who has an history of tackling killers, so when he is questioned by Police concerning the murder of one of his ex dates his interest is piqued. McEvoy is considered a suspect Michael Connelly is my favourite author and I couldn't wait to start this book. I have always loved the Harry Bosch series of books but strangely enough my favourite Connelly novel is 'The Poet' which featured Jack McEvoy so I was keen to read another one with him as the lead. Jack McEvoy is a senior investigative reporter who has an history of tackling killers, so when he is questioned by Police concerning the murder of one of his ex dates his interest is piqued. McEvoy is considered a suspect and he wants to clear his name and uncover the real truth behind the killing.Michael Connelly is a master of his trade and his writing is superb, great characters, well planned plots and in depth knowledge of the subject. This is another exciting read that once again I found impossible to put down. This book can easily be read as a stand alone but would suggest you read many more by this author.I would like to thank both Net Galley and Orion Publishing Group for supplying a copy of this novel in exchange for an honest review.
    more
  • Sam Quixote
    January 1, 1970
    A serial killer murders women by internally decapitating them from behind earning him the name The Shrike after the bird who has a similar MO. When his latest vic turns out to be a recent one-night stand of reporter Jack McEvoy’s, making him a person of interest, Jack becomes involved in the murder investigation. Can Jack uncover who The Shrike is, find out why he’s doing what he’s doing and stop him before he kills again? Michael Connelly’s previous Jack McEvoy novel The Scarecrow is still one A serial killer murders women by internally decapitating them from behind earning him the name The Shrike after the bird who has a similar MO. When his latest vic turns out to be a recent one-night stand of reporter Jack McEvoy’s, making him a person of interest, Jack becomes involved in the murder investigation. Can Jack uncover who The Shrike is, find out why he’s doing what he’s doing and stop him before he kills again? Michael Connelly’s previous Jack McEvoy novel The Scarecrow is still one of my favourite of his books but I wouldn’t say Fair Warning is as good as that one - though it’s better than The Poet, the first McEvoy book. What really made The Scarecrow stand out was the killer whose identity was compelling and terrifying - I can still remember the character and I read that book nearly a decade ago! In comparison, The Shrike is a paper-thin villain that we never really get to know in the least. (view spoiler)[Even at the end Connelly fails to deliver anything noteworthy about the character, giving the reader a cop-out nothing in place of something. He’s an incel! As if that explains everything. (hide spoiler)] It’s very unsatisfying. (view spoiler)[It doesn’t even make sense because he beds the victims before he kills them so he’s not involuntarily celibate - he has had sex and could have regular sex and a normal relationship if he wanted. So he’s voluntarily single? He just hates women - you could argue that also describes incels but their namesake simply doesn’t apply to The Shrike. See, there’s some interesting psychological territory Connelly could have explored if he’d tried a bit more. Also, that detail at the end - a damaged spine from probable childhood abuse - is just lazy shorthand. (hide spoiler)]Not that any of the characters are that memorable, especially the main characters Jack McEvoy and Rachel Walling, who’re basically Connelly’s stock capable professionals that appear in all of his books. About the only difference is that Jack will occasionally lose his cool and go off on one, like he does in the geneticist’s lab, which are rare exciting character moments. But it’s also not a dull narrative either. Jack investigates at a breezy clip and the story develops well: we find out more about The Shrike’s victims, who he might be working with, other shady characters involved, Jack is always getting harassed either by the police or others, then the bodies start piling up. Connelly writes it all in his usual competent, if sometimes long-winded, style. He’s skilful at putting across complex procedures and esoteric jargon in a way that doesn’t distract too much from the more compelling, lurid aspects of the story that most readers want to get to, as well as highlighting valid points like the lack of oversight and protection of personal data in the burgeoning field of consumer genetics. The flipside of that is that the prose sometimes reads like Connelly’s talking down to a complete idiot, painstakingly explaining obvious acronyms after they appear in conversation (“44 YOA” = 44 years of age, AOD as Atlanto-Occipital Dislocation, the Shrike’s method of killing, mere paragraphs are having pasted a Wikipedia article on the cause of death!), having the main character frequently reminding you why they’re doing what they’re doing, all of which becomes tedious. Does his audience really have that short attention spans and struggle to follow a plot only slightly more complex than canned soup instructions? The ending is also plain confusing and contrived. (view spoiler)[The Shrike got away with it - why would he risk it all just to come back and kill McEvoy? His targets were women, not some reporter he barely knew and who couldn’t touch him. It didn’t make any sense and seemed only to be there so there could be a happy ending to the story - Jack beat the bad guy again, even if the bad guy didn’t need to return from Florida to California just to get killed. Stupid! (hide spoiler)]Fair Warning is a fairly standard crime thriller by Michael Connelly’s slick standards that’s none too onerous to read either on a technical or story level. It has its flaws and it’s largely forgettable but it’s not bad either being by turns nearly gripping and thuddingly blah and settling for inoffensively agreeable most of the time. Still, if you haven’t read it, I recommend checking out The Scarecrow over this one instead.
    more
  • Lou
    January 1, 1970
    Fair Warning is the third instalment to feature journalist/investigative reporter Jack McEvoy and this time the events take place in New York despite Jack being Los Angeles-based. Each thriller works as a standalone perfectly and I am so pleased Connolly has decided to resurrect this two-book series that ceased way back in 2009. Jack is now working investigating the shady dealings of companies for a website that champions consumer rights known as Fair Warning. As a Veteran reporter Jack has take Fair Warning is the third instalment to feature journalist/investigative reporter Jack McEvoy and this time the events take place in New York despite Jack being Los Angeles-based. Each thriller works as a standalone perfectly and I am so pleased Connolly has decided to resurrect this two-book series that ceased way back in 2009. Jack is now working investigating the shady dealings of companies for a website that champions consumer rights known as Fair Warning. As a Veteran reporter Jack has taken down killers before, but when a woman he had a one-night stand with is murdered in a particularly brutal way, McEvoy realizes he might be facing a criminal mind unlike any he's ever encountered. Jack investigates--against the warnings of the police and his own editor--and makes a shocking discovery that connects the crime to other mysterious deaths across the country. Undetected by law enforcement, a vicious killer has been hunting women, using genetic data to select and stalk his targets. Uncovering the murkiest corners of the dark web, Jack races to find and protect the last source who can lead him to his quarry. But the killer has already chosen his next target, and he's ready to strike.This is up there with Connelly's best thrillers to date and is crafted to within an inch of perfection, is completely compulsive and palpably tense from the get-go. It becomes engrossing from early on with the original and intelligently woven plot gripping you with a fascinating motive that highlights the dangerous nature of DNA and genetics in this modern world where information is knowledge and a commodity to sell to the highest bidder. Ancestry sites particularly have the possibility of being misused when people are entering such private information as their DNA; not everyone has good intentions. The discussion about lack of government oversight in this incredibly sensitive area is interesting as it is shockingly non-existent so it's only a matter of time before something potentially catastrophic occurs in real life. This is such a unique thriller and I found myself racing through it in a single nail-biting sitting. McEvoy is a bit of an anarchist and breaks rules regularly but it does seem as though this is for the right reasons. A thoroughly entertaining, danger-filled and high stakes adventure from a masterful storyteller. Highly recommended. Many thanks to Orion for an ARC.
    more
  • Matt
    January 1, 1970
    Dusting off one of his older protagonists, Michael Connelly presents a new piece about gritty journalist Jack McEvoy. Now working for a consumer protection news site, Fair Warning, McEvoy is visited by the LAPD about the recent murder of woman he knew in passing. The manner of death, an internal decapitation, piques McEvoy’s interest, but there is also a stalking angle that leads the reporter to think he can tie things to the site. While poking around, McEvoy learns that there have been other ca Dusting off one of his older protagonists, Michael Connelly presents a new piece about gritty journalist Jack McEvoy. Now working for a consumer protection news site, Fair Warning, McEvoy is visited by the LAPD about the recent murder of woman he knew in passing. The manner of death, an internal decapitation, piques McEvoy’s interest, but there is also a stalking angle that leads the reporter to think he can tie things to the site. While poking around, McEvoy learns that there have been other cases in which young women have died in a similar manner, leading him to wonder if there is a killer on the loose. Another commonality happens to be that all these women used an inexpensive DNA testing company, one with less than rigorous standards in the field of information sharing. Working alongside a former FBI agent and another investigative reporter, McEvoy begins to see a troubling pattern, as a killer deemed The Shrike is targeting these women for some supposed marker in their DNA. With no clear pattern, McEvoy must be careful, so as not to scare the killer off, but also work with the authorities to ensure his ultimate capture. Connelly develops the essence of a great thriller from the angle of an investigative reporter, a refreshing perspective indeed. Recommended to those who love thrillers in all forms, as well as the reader who is a fan of Michael Connelly’s work.I recently read a piece of non-fiction penned by the author about his time as an investigative reporter, finding it quite imaginative and full of wonderful cases. I know Michael Connelly has used many of the stories he covered on the crime beat when writing his countless novels, but this is only the third piece in which his protagonist plays the role of journalist. Connelly brings Jack McEvoy back with much to prove, having risen to fame through his past two major cases that spawned blockbuster books. McEvoy has moved to the less exciting work of protecting consumers through his work on Fair Warning, but still takes it quite seriously. He has all the tools to be a stellar journalist and uses his sources effectively, though nothing can prepare him for some of the people that will emerge in this story. Other characters provide wonderful depth to the story, both in the world of investigations and that of DNA technology. Connelly uses them effectively to push the plot along and keep the narrative moving in various directions. The story worked well, honing in on McEvoy’s work as he tries to uncover something while staying in his lane, with some offshoot chapters that provide the reader with needed perspectives to offer a complete story. The plot builds throughout, coming to a head as this killer, The Shrike, is developed and the rationale becomes clear to all. While I do love some of the central Connelly series, this one still has life in it, something that I hope the author does not forget when writing projects cross his desk.Kudos, Mr. Connelly, for another winner in your intertwined series. I cannot wait to see what else is coming, as I know some of your other long-forgotten characters are back in print soon!Love/hate the review? An ever-growing collection of others appears at: http://pecheyponderings.wordpress.com/A Book for All Seasons, a different sort of Book Challenge: https://www.goodreads.com/group/show/...
    more
  • Rich
    January 1, 1970
    A very solid book from Michael Connelly boy can he write and he has one more book coming out this year yes. If he is not the best fiction writer in the world who is ????? It has been a long time since we have heard from Jack and I feel the same way as others who have read this book, if one character is his alter-ego it is jack. I believe this book starts with fastest bang that he has ever written. A very good story and original you will see copycats of the main idea. All the characters in the bo A very solid book from Michael Connelly boy can he write and he has one more book coming out this year yes. If he is not the best fiction writer in the world who is ????? It has been a long time since we have heard from Jack and I feel the same way as others who have read this book, if one character is his alter-ego it is jack. I believe this book starts with fastest bang that he has ever written. A very good story and original you will see copycats of the main idea. All the characters in the book were very good what a surprise and very strong dialogue. It was nice to see his old flame back Rachel Wahling. A blast from the past.I can not say for certain since It has been a while since I read Jacks other books that there are three scenes past the opening in this book with the bad guy that you do not see in a normal Harry book. It works but not sure if he should have done it-it works. I think harry is being aged out and this character will be taking his place just a gut feeling. My only complaint and it is a small one can any of his characters have a strong happy relationship lol-but there might be a third chance at the end of this one-. It made my favorite shelf give it a spin
    more
  • Liz Barnsley
    January 1, 1970
    I adore Jack McEvoy, I do believe he's my favourite of the Bosch world characters and The Poet remains my favourite Connelly novel to date although of course I adore them all.Fair Warning was utterly perfect as a reading experience, cleverly crafted, beautifully written as ever and sent me spiralling back down into Jack's world where I spent a very happy if edgy few hours. A reconnection with Rachel, a return to the crime stories Jack is known for, police harassment, suspected in a murder, it's I adore Jack McEvoy, I do believe he's my favourite of the Bosch world characters and The Poet remains my favourite Connelly novel to date although of course I adore them all.Fair Warning was utterly perfect as a reading experience, cleverly crafted, beautifully written as ever and sent me spiralling back down into Jack's world where I spent a very happy if edgy few hours. A reconnection with Rachel, a return to the crime stories Jack is known for, police harassment, suspected in a murder, it's all going on for Jack in Fair Warning which hits the ground running and doesn't let up.The central themes of genetics, government oversight, privacy and personal responsibility are beautifully embedded into the narrative creating a thought provoking and eye opening set of challenges to the readers thinking. All the while telling a riveting and intense story that you simply can't put down.If Connelly isn't one of the best authors in the world right now I'll eat my hat. Don't worry it's a chocolate hat.Highly recommended.
    more
  • Carole Anne
    January 1, 1970
    Subject is so relevant today. ✅ Technology is scary and there are some dudes out there who unwittingly facilitate dark minds.. simply for the challenge of being better than.. The Best! OMG 😱 But what the hell happened to Jack? he’s somehow turned on us people! He’s gone from being the strong, solid character he was portrayed as in the author’s previous books to an unethical Whinger! So much so that I simply can’t be bothered to read any more of this new revised version of Jack so there goes the Subject is so relevant today. ✅ Technology is scary and there are some dudes out there who unwittingly facilitate dark minds.. simply for the challenge of being better than.. The Best! OMG 😱 But what the hell happened to Jack? he’s somehow turned on us people! He’s gone from being the strong, solid character he was portrayed as in the author’s previous books to an unethical Whinger! So much so that I simply can’t be bothered to read any more of this new revised version of Jack so there goes the purchase of The Poet Collection!The beginning was a slow burning repetitious slog I had to remind myself... keep reading, this is a Michael Connelly book! NB. Fair Warning is a real Company it’s mentioned at the end by the author. It seems to be an excellent watchdog, well worth a visit and a Donation. 👍🏻
    more
  • Brenda
    January 1, 1970
    Michael Connelly wrote The Poet in 1996 and The Scarecrow in 2009. I read them both in 2012. So, 11 years later for Mr. Connelly and 8 years later for me, we have Fair Warning. Believe it or not, I remember Jack McEvoy and Rachel Waller after all this time. I don’t think I could tell you about the plots of the previous books off the top of my head, though. For that reason, I think this book could be read as a stand-alone, but there’s history in the two previous books that you might not want to d Michael Connelly wrote The Poet in 1996 and The Scarecrow in 2009. I read them both in 2012. So, 11 years later for Mr. Connelly and 8 years later for me, we have Fair Warning. Believe it or not, I remember Jack McEvoy and Rachel Waller after all this time. I don’t think I could tell you about the plots of the previous books off the top of my head, though. For that reason, I think this book could be read as a stand-alone, but there’s history in the two previous books that you might not want to deprive yourself of.This was a fantastic addition to the series. It’s just as exciting and tension-filled as a Harry Bosch book. The premise is unique and original as far as I know, and scary. I also see more books featuring Jack McEvoy in the future, and I eagerly await them.
    more
  • Donna Hines
    January 1, 1970
    Selling women out? Women being targeted via DNA profiling? Dark Web Activity and Research Labs facilitating the score for men wishing to do harm towards women sexually!!I've read several books by Michael in the past and while I don't read them in order or by series I have been totally floored by this novel in particular.The way this one starts with a murder, the severity of those murdered women, the risky behaviors leading up to it all was just outstanding writing and superb imagination!Imagine Selling women out? Women being targeted via DNA profiling? Dark Web Activity and Research Labs facilitating the score for men wishing to do harm towards women sexually!!I've read several books by Michael in the past and while I don't read them in order or by series I have been totally floored by this novel in particular.The way this one starts with a murder, the severity of those murdered women, the risky behaviors leading up to it all was just outstanding writing and superb imagination!Imagine if you will a one night stand with a veteran journalist and reporter turning into a murder?Ok, now imagine if you will that journalist refusing to back down while going against everyone in his inner circle including the P.D. and his own editor to solve the case!The killer is ready and willing to strike again and at this point Jack is running out of time.Jack doesn't just want to talk about murders, he craves them, he wants to be in this game for the long haul.The Shrike is one nasty individual but could he have played a role and in what capacity is the better question?That ending-holy smokes- it left me breathless...what more can one say other than I didn't see it coming and it appears nobody else did either for all intense purposes both literally and figuratively.A great new read that I was honored to have received an early copy in exchange for this honest review.
    more
  • Fred
    January 1, 1970
    This series uses the main character as, Jack McEvoy, the “journalist”.I like the books with Harry Bosch better.
  • Mysticpt
    January 1, 1970
    I was really looking forward to this one as I needed a break from the good but sameness of the Bosch and Ballard personalities and stories. This one features Jack from the Poet and the Scarecrow novels. the story is a good one featuring a plot involving DNA anonymity and the ethics and quagmires that can result when used for evil purposes. The story takes a while to find momentum and the villain is not as well developed as the Poet or the Scarecrow but it was a quick enjoyable read. I must say t I was really looking forward to this one as I needed a break from the good but sameness of the Bosch and Ballard personalities and stories. This one features Jack from the Poet and the Scarecrow novels. the story is a good one featuring a plot involving DNA anonymity and the ethics and quagmires that can result when used for evil purposes. The story takes a while to find momentum and the villain is not as well developed as the Poet or the Scarecrow but it was a quick enjoyable read. I must say the ending left me with a few questions as it just didn't seem to make that much sense but maybe that's just me. It was good to see Jack again and hopefully we will see him sooner rather than later in another book. Also maybe Connelly will resurrect some other characters from the past, Cassie anyone?
    more
  • Laura
    January 1, 1970
    A really nice return of Jack McEvoy, the character from The Poet and The Scarecrow. In this novel, Jack is ten years out from success, working as a journalist for a consumer watchdog website. He gets involved in a murder case as a person of interest, which leads him in a whole other direction, chasing after a possible serial killer. Connelly can do no wrong.
    more
  • Elaine Tomasso
    January 1, 1970
    I would like to thank Netgalley and Orion Publishing Group for an advance copy of Fair Warning, the third novel to feature Los Angeles reporter Jack McEvoy.Jack is now working for a consumer website, Fair Warning, when he is interviewed by RHD detectives in relation to the murder of a woman, Tina Portrero, whom he had a one night stand with in the past. Her manner of death intrigues him So, despite being a suspect, he decides to investigate. What he discovers pushes him to investigate much furth I would like to thank Netgalley and Orion Publishing Group for an advance copy of Fair Warning, the third novel to feature Los Angeles reporter Jack McEvoy.Jack is now working for a consumer website, Fair Warning, when he is interviewed by RHD detectives in relation to the murder of a woman, Tina Portrero, whom he had a one night stand with in the past. Her manner of death intrigues him So, despite being a suspect, he decides to investigate. What he discovers pushes him to investigate much further.I enjoyed Fair Warning which is a tense, ingenious thriller with a modern slant. It is mostly told from Jack McEvoy’s point of view with contributions from other characters as required. This is good and bad. It adds to the mystery as the reader tries to work out where these characters fit in and what their motive is, but it is a bit distracting when the reader is wanting to concentrate on McEvoy’s narrative. Fortunately it all comes together and soon becomes an enthralling read.As I said, the novel has a modern slant that involves the way DNA submitted to ancestry sites can be put to illegal use. Maybe not illegal as the novel also explores the lack of oversight of this industry, i.e. none. Much of the technical detail Involved is boring and longwinded, hence 4 and not 5 stars, but the conclusions drawn are downright scary, especially in this increasingly factionalised society. I think Mr Connelly deserves praise for conceiving a new angle on the serial killer genre and executing it well. I didn’t overly take to this latest incarnation of Jack McEvoy, but he might always have been as selfish and impulsive as he is now as it’s so long since I read his previous outings. It’s a poor look for a man in his fifties. Fortunately he has a couple of smart, professional women around him to keep him right.Fair Warning is a good read that I have no hesitation in recommending.
    more
  • Rach
    January 1, 1970
    Jack is now working for a consumer website, Fair Warning which is run by Myron Levin. It actual exists in real life. Jack is questioned by the police over the death of Tina Portrero, whose death was caused by Atlanto-Occipital Dislocation. Jack and Tina had a one night stand in the past. The police think she was murdered by someone who had been cyber stalking her and then proceeded to meet her in the bar. Jack decides to investigate her death and starts to find similar cases were women have died Jack is now working for a consumer website, Fair Warning which is run by Myron Levin. It actual exists in real life. Jack is questioned by the police over the death of Tina Portrero, whose death was caused by Atlanto-Occipital Dislocation. Jack and Tina had a one night stand in the past. The police think she was murdered by someone who had been cyber stalking her and then proceeded to meet her in the bar. Jack decides to investigate her death and starts to find similar cases were women have died of Atlanto-Occipital Dislocation and they have all used a certain DNA site. This is another excellent book by a Michael Connelly. This book takes into the world of DNA . How it can be used for good e.g. to find a criminal, find a family member but can also for the wrong intention. It is was really interesting reading all about the world of DNA and shows the research Michael Connelly has done for this book. Jack is at his best when he is investigating and proves this again in this book. Overall another great thriller/crime book by Michael Connelly and really makes you think what your DNA can be used for. I received a ARC from Netgalley and Orion Publishing Group for an objection review.
    more
  • Maxine
    January 1, 1970
    Reporter Jack McElvoy is working for FairWarning, a consumer advocacy blog site when he becomes a suspect in the murder of a woman he once had a one night stand with. Despite warnings from both the police and his editor to leave it alone and let them handle it, he starts investigating on his own. He quickly discovers more victims with only one thing in common besides the method of killing - they all sent their DNA to the same cheap testing site. McElvoy soon finds himself entangled not only in t Reporter Jack McElvoy is working for FairWarning, a consumer advocacy blog site when he becomes a suspect in the murder of a woman he once had a one night stand with. Despite warnings from both the police and his editor to leave it alone and let them handle it, he starts investigating on his own. He quickly discovers more victims with only one thing in common besides the method of killing - they all sent their DNA to the same cheap testing site. McElvoy soon finds himself entangled not only in the realities of the unregulated DNA testing market but also deep in the dark web and the misogynistic cult of incels.Fair Warning is the third entry in the Jack McElvoy series by author Michael Connelly and it shows why he is considered one of the best because it's one hell of a thrill ride. The writing is tight and the plot is both electrifying and scary - Connelly takes the reader through the unregulated area of DNA testing and, if you ever considered getting your DNA tested, trust me, this will put paid to that idea. Like pretty much all of Connelly's novels, once started, it's unputdownable. In fact, it cost me a night of sleep but it was so worth it. Although there are references to the events of earlier books as well as the return of an old love, even if you haven't read the others, this works well as a standalone. But, really, if this is your first in the McElvoy series, I recommend reading them all - you'll thank me later.Thanks to Netgalley and Little, Brown and Company for the opportunity to read this book in exchange for an honest review
    more
  • Susanne Gulde
    January 1, 1970
    I received a digital review copy from the publisher through Edelweiss. This book is scheduled to be published May 26, 2020.Michael Connelly is one of my favorite authors and I loved reading this book. I enjoyed the plot, the pace, and the characters, and I like the way Connelly's characters are woven throughout his books."The Poet" was the first Michael Connelly book I read, more than 20 years ago. Since then I think I've read every novel Mr. Connelly has written. I didn't realize how much I mis I received a digital review copy from the publisher through Edelweiss. This book is scheduled to be published May 26, 2020.Michael Connelly is one of my favorite authors and I loved reading this book. I enjoyed the plot, the pace, and the characters, and I like the way Connelly's characters are woven throughout his books."The Poet" was the first Michael Connelly book I read, more than 20 years ago. Since then I think I've read every novel Mr. Connelly has written. I didn't realize how much I missed Jack McEvoy until I lost myself in this book. Is it possible I love Jack McEvoy more than I love Harry Bosch? It's possible.
    more
  • Mike
    January 1, 1970
    When it comes to writing mysteries and thrillers and so many try, Michael Connelly is in a class by himself. His plot lines are totally original, his characters complex but human, and the story develops at pace. Fair Warning is no different...a great read, don't miss it.
    more
  • Peter
    January 1, 1970
    Fair Warning (2020) is the third in Michael Connelly's Jack McEvoy series. It's an interesting, but not compelling, police procedural that begins with a fellow who calls himself "The Shrike" killing his one-night stand at her apartment. (Connelly describes a shrike as a bird that kills its prey by breaking its neck, Wikipedia says that it impales its prey on its beak). I give this 4 stars, but its really like 3.5 rounded up.The backdrop in this story is the question of the legitimacy of DNA as a Fair Warning (2020) is the third in Michael Connelly's Jack McEvoy series. It's an interesting, but not compelling, police procedural that begins with a fellow who calls himself "The Shrike" killing his one-night stand at her apartment. (Connelly describes a shrike as a bird that kills its prey by breaking its neck, Wikipedia says that it impales its prey on its beak). I give this 4 stars, but its really like 3.5 rounded up.The backdrop in this story is the question of the legitimacy of DNA as a method of identifying evildoers. When DNA handled properly it is usually a slam-dunk method, but its credibility depends on the chain of possession from crime site to technician to lab to police possession to court; this chain can be corrupted. The problem that this book focuses on is that gene-scanning companies sell their data to research organizations; you can buy genetic information for people with a specific gene and possibly connect it to its source's name. The FTC is supposed to regulate the sales and privacy of DNA, but it had transferred the responsibility to the FDC, which was doing nothing: sales are effectively unregulated: nobody audits the companies to ensure that use of DNA is consistent with federal laws and guidelines. In this book, the Shrike is buying genetic information and the identities of women with the gene DRD4 ("Dirty 4"), a gene associated with risk-taking (like meeting strange men in bars). Jack McEvoy is a reporter for FairWatch, a consumer-protection ezine. McEvoy is interviewed by LAPD Detectives Mattson and Sakai about the murder of Christina ("Tina") Portrero. According to one of her friend, Tina often went home with men she found in bars. The friend also reports that Tina had said she was being cyber-stalked by a man she had met in a bar. Somehow Jack's name came up. Jack confirms that he had met Tina in a bar a year earlier and had a one-night stand with her, but he says he never "stalked" her and that they never saw each other again after that night. The cops' ears visibly perk up and they ask him to take a DNA swab. He agrees.Jack decides there is a story in this murder—not the murder itself, that's not on the FairWatch watch, but the consumer privacy aspects of both DNA and cyberstalking. So he calls Tina's friend who had talked with the police to get info on the stalking. She thinks his call is suspicious and reports it back to the cops. They order him not to "harass" her. She later claims falsely that someone (she thinks Jack) was continuing to "harass" her. The cops arrest Jack. The case is obvious harassment and is quickly dismissed, but it's clear these two cops—particularly Detective Mattson—are out to get Jack.Jack continues to investigate Tina's murder. It was an unusual death—someone had broken her neck by giving her head a U-turn; its called an "atlanto-occipital decapitation." Jack also finds that just before her murder Tina had sent her DNA to GT23, a genealogical analysis business. Jack searches the records for any deaths of a similar nature of women who had sent their DNA to G23. Four names come back: all four died of broken necks in suspicious circumstances after sending DNA to GT23!What's happening is that the Shrike and his group of incels is using GT23-generated DNA to target women whom they classify as "easy" and, therefore, deserving of death. The chase is on.
    more
  • David Highton
    January 1, 1970
    Pre-ordered and sent to my Kindle this morning - a great novel from Connelly is the third featuring investigative journalist Jack McEvoy, who unearths a serial killer while looking at the murder of a one night stand woman he met a year earlier. Brilliant narrative with two endings - one to the fast moving search for the killer, and two, the follow-up.
    more
  • Deborah
    January 1, 1970
    We first met journalist Jack McEvoy in The Poet (published in 1996), one of the first books I read by Michael Connelly. Jack reappeared in The Scarecrow (2009) but he's been kinda quiet ever since. (Though I know there was a crossover or two with Harry Bosch.)I've actually got very vivid memories of reading The Poet (which is rare given I read a lot of books that are quite similar, AND it was a long time ago) so was keen to be reintroduced to Jack (all of these years later) in Connelly's new rel We first met journalist Jack McEvoy in The Poet (published in 1996), one of the first books I read by Michael Connelly. Jack reappeared in The Scarecrow (2009) but he's been kinda quiet ever since. (Though I know there was a crossover or two with Harry Bosch.)I've actually got very vivid memories of reading The Poet (which is rare given I read a lot of books that are quite similar, AND it was a long time ago) so was keen to be reintroduced to Jack (all of these years later) in Connelly's new release, Fair Warning.As the book opens Jack's working for Fair Warning, an online consumer watchdog news site. He seems kinda contented and sufficiently enthused by his job, though realising some of his best work (including his two novels) are long behind him.Jack becomes personally embroiled in a murder because he briefly dated the victim over a year before her death. Her murder is a long way from the briefs they take on at Fair Warning, but he soon finds similar deaths and a link between the dead women.For reasons unknown I dislike books with a corporate espionage focus. Perhaps white-collar crime just doesn't do it for me.This has some reference to the Food & Drug Administration (FDA), FTC and business shenanigans, but it's actually far more nuanced than the usual big 'pharma' out-to-screw-the-system (along with the hapless 'little guys') scenario.It may be a bit of a spoiler (though comes up pretty quickly),but I'll mention that the concept of genomic testing was actually quite interesting and the lack of regulation in the industry is somewhat scary.I mean... who knew DNA given willingly (for family heritage testing and the like) can then be on-sold. And on-sold again. I mean, I'm all for research but.... as we're shown here, there are some cowboys out there. Not to mention psychopathic serial killers.I love Connelly's lead characters and find them accessible and relatable (I'm a fan of Harry Bosch and Renee Ballard in particular). Here I liked Jack's relationship with his boss (based on a real life character, Myron) and his colleague Emily. In fact I really appreciated that Connelly was honest about Jack's antipathy towards handing over / sharing his story with Emily, while at the same time recognising the pair have different strengths.I also liked that Jack is in his 50s and Myron is - in some ways - a contemporary as much as a boss and so their relationship and Myron's editorial authority over Jack is quite nuanced. I'm not entirely sure Jack (along with Connelly's best known creation Bosch), is ageing completely in sync with the rest of us but I'm glad he's no longer a spring chicken and wonder if that reflects Connelly's view on life.Like most of Connelly's novels, Fair Warning is fast-paced. It's intriguing rather than twisty but very very addictive. It features clever and contemporary themes and crimes, and I appreciate that Connelly seems to respect the intelligence of his readers, giving us fodder requiring some cogitation.Finally, I loved that Connelly doesn't tie everything up too neatly at the end. He leaves us with some unanswered questions and again found myself intrigued rather than feeling any lack of closure.It seems almost certain there'll be another in this series and though it makes me sound impatient and demanding.... I bloody hope we don't have to wait more than a decade for it!Fair Warning by Michael Connelly will be published in Australia by Allen & Unwin and available from 26 May 2020.I received a copy of this book from the publisher for review purposes.  Read my review here: https://www.debbish.com/books-literat...
    more
  • Denise
    January 1, 1970
    Here's a question -- have you done one of those DNA/Ancestry tracing kits? This thriller explores the dangers that lurk underneath their promise of anonymity. Is your personal information safe? What if someone was able to trace you through your gene sample -- someone who was looking for specific characteristics -- specifically the DRD4 gene. This is a gene that might identify people who exhibit high-risk behaviors and addictions. Journalist Jack McEvoy works for an Internet news site called "Fai Here's a question -- have you done one of those DNA/Ancestry tracing kits? This thriller explores the dangers that lurk underneath their promise of anonymity. Is your personal information safe? What if someone was able to trace you through your gene sample -- someone who was looking for specific characteristics -- specifically the DRD4 gene. This is a gene that might identify people who exhibit high-risk behaviors and addictions. Journalist Jack McEvoy works for an Internet news site called "FairWarning" and usually investigates situations that affect consumers. When he's questioned by the LAPD about the homicide of a woman he had a one-night-stand with, he becomes interested due to the way she was killed. He senses there might be a story and finds that the victim also had told a friend that she had been a victim of cyberstalking. Jack sets out to learn all he can about Tina Portero and soon finds himself down the rabbit hole. Soon he has information about four similar deaths and all of the women had turned their DNA over to a company known as GT23. All of them seem to be the work of one person -- The Shrike.This was great writing and lots of action with details galore. Although two other books by this author feature Jack McEvoy, this worked fine as a standalone. (I'm pretty sure I read THE POET and also THE SCARECROW but so long ago I can't really remember.) The reader is immediately drawn into the story and the well-drawn characters are believable as the narrative continues relentlessly to the climax. Who is the elusive Shrike and where will he strike next? The really scary stuff within actually has to do with the concern about the DNA that so many willingly put in an envelope and mail to these companies. For, you see, government oversight of the DNA analytics industry is a bit lax. Another interesting aspect of this novel is that, even though this book is a work of fiction, the news site "FairWarning" actually exists and does watchdog reporting as described. The science is real. The dangers are real. Thank you to NetGalley and Little, Brown and Company for this e-book ARC to read, review and recommend. I'm eager to revisit books by this author and look forward to future work.
    more
  • RachelW (BamaGal)
    January 1, 1970
    First off, I enjoyed the fact that the consumer watchdog website FairWarning and its editor were real. It injected some immediacy and realism to plotline that was otherwise a bit uneven.It’s been a long time since the last Jack McEvoy book came out, making it a little hard pulling together the pieces of his backstory in my mind. This was really more of a reboot to the series than a continuation, anyway. Jack’s circumstances have come down in the world. He’s still a reporter, but not in a crime b First off, I enjoyed the fact that the consumer watchdog website FairWarning and its editor were real. It injected some immediacy and realism to plotline that was otherwise a bit uneven.It’s been a long time since the last Jack McEvoy book came out, making it a little hard pulling together the pieces of his backstory in my mind. This was really more of a reboot to the series than a continuation, anyway. Jack’s circumstances have come down in the world. He’s still a reporter, but not in a crime beat...until an intriguing case about a DNA based serial killer drops in his lap. I enjoyed the story, but had a little trouble connecting with it, and Jack. He’s a reporter, who are not my favorite people or subject matter. Rachel Walling is back in this one, she’s bounced all over the Harry Bosch universe for many years. As with the Renee Ballard series, it’s quite possible this series will interact with Harry at some point. I’ve been with Harry for nearly 30 years now, and we’ve grown old together. I’ve been with him even longer than Jack Reacher or Lucas Davenport.It was an entertaining read, if not a truly great one. The ending, however, created a change in direction for the books. It opened up some fascinating possibilities for Jack and the future of this series that I find myself looking forward to.
    more
  • Bookreporter.com Mystery & Thriller
    January 1, 1970
    It has been a while, to say the least. Journalist Jack McEvoy was introduced by Michael Connelly in THE POET almost a quarter-century ago. He was supposed to be a one-off character but returned in THE SCARECROW, which was published in 2009. All but forgotten, and undeservedly so, the announcement that McEvoy would reappear in FAIR WARNING was greeted with joy by longtime Connelly readers, who will find that their prayers have been answered and their patience more than rewarded.Given Connelly’s l It has been a while, to say the least. Journalist Jack McEvoy was introduced by Michael Connelly in THE POET almost a quarter-century ago. He was supposed to be a one-off character but returned in THE SCARECROW, which was published in 2009. All but forgotten, and undeservedly so, the announcement that McEvoy would reappear in FAIR WARNING was greeted with joy by longtime Connelly readers, who will find that their prayers have been answered and their patience more than rewarded.Given Connelly’s long and extensive background as a reporter, it is not surprising that McEvoy is so accurately drawn. While much has changed on the surface since his debut, the nuts and bolts of successful and honest investigative reporting has stayed the same, and McEvoy embodies these qualities. In this new outing, he is working as an investigative reporter for FairWarning, a website that investigates and reports consumer fraud. Small but mighty, it has quite a reach and a sterling reputation. Given that it does not hide behind a paywall, it relies on no-strings-attached fundraising to obtain great cupfuls of money to stay in operation.Accordingly, McEvoy finds himself in the position of making a bit of a stretch to his editor when he comes across an extremely clever killer who is preying upon women by making their very intentional deaths appear to be accidents. We learn, well before him, that the culprit refers to himself as The Shrike and is cutting quite a wide swath in pursuit of his victims. McEvoy works the case from the other direction, finding what seems to be an initially tenuous consumer issue in an industry that has grown by leaps and bounds over the past several years. The issue --- and I am being oblique here because I don’t want to give away the game that Connelly so intricately and wonderfully constructs --- is one that in our real world we either ignore or occasionally welcome, which is surprising considering the privacy concerns it entails.McEvoy gets to the heart of the matter and exposes it while painstakingly chasing down the identity of the anonymous killer, even as he eventually finds himself in the sights of The Shrike, who, in the end, is much closer to him than he suspects. It’s a wild ride in spots, so much so the final quarter of FAIR WARNING should come with its own “fasten seat belts” warning.Connelly will never be accused of having a strong literary style, but as a storyteller he is second to none. This talent is possibly eclipsed by his ability to develop and refine primary characters such as McEvoy, whose default nature tends to be mildly abrasive and prickly, especially with his friends and colleagues. It is interesting that he has a great deal of self-awareness and often hits the reset button by apologizing and starting over.McEvoy is realistic, so much so that when one reads the passages where he is front and center, it seems as if we are in the room with him. Given that Connelly leaves the reader, and his protagonist, hanging on a secondary issue at the end of the book, I hope that we see him back again in another full-length novel…and much sooner than later.Reviewed by Joe Hartlaub
    more
  • Rob Twinem
    January 1, 1970
    Wow….just finished, and what a fantastic read and possibly one of the best books written by Mr Connelly. Jack McEvoy, you Connelly devotees will remember him from The Poet when he was a crime reporter and his brother died in an apparent suicide, and what an andreniline ride that was. Now Jack a man in his 50’s and working for an online “defender of consumer rights” site called Fair Warning, is back and hot on the heels of a killer who uses a bizarre, brutally painful, and unusual way to destroy Wow….just finished, and what a fantastic read and possibly one of the best books written by Mr Connelly. Jack McEvoy, you Connelly devotees will remember him from The Poet when he was a crime reporter and his brother died in an apparent suicide, and what an andreniline ride that was. Now Jack a man in his 50’s and working for an online “defender of consumer rights” site called Fair Warning, is back and hot on the heels of a killer who uses a bizarre, brutally painful, and unusual way to destroy his victims….atlanto-occipital dislocation (AOD) This is a form of internal decapitation where the spine is separated from the skull. When the body of Christina Portrero is discovered, and Jack’s DNA is identified he becomes a suspect. Now I’m not going to destroy the plot by telling you that Jack did not of course commit the murder, but as he does a little digging he soon discovers that there are a number of similar deaths that appear to be related…..yep the word that we crime readers adore...wait for it….a “serial killer” is on the loose! Hold on for the ride, and I can honestly tell you that this book moves with an unrelenting pace, forget everything...put the cat out, cancel the milkman, switch off the telly, unplug that bloody phone, and just do what we all do naturally….read. We enter the world of DNA, supply and demand, seller and purchaser and of course shady trading on the darknet. Jack once again finds himself working alongside ex FBI agent Rachel Walling, hoping to ignite that old flame of passion, and entice the delectable Rachel back to his lonely single man flat!. There are false leads, a super (nasty villain) and a well researched intelligent story, just waiting to be consumed by MC’s hungry and adoring fans!After some 25 years as one of the leaders in American crime fiction, Michael Connelly shows no signs of waning, the writing is taut, fresh, no wasted words or descriptions, simply great storytelling….if you only read one crime novel this year, this is it...many many thanks to the good people at netgalley for a gratis copy in exchange for an honest review and that is what I have written….Highly, highly recommended.
    more
Write a review