Coronavirus
What is the coronavirus, and why is everyone talking about it?Engagingly illustrated by Axel Scheffler, this approachable and timely book helps answer these questions and many more, providing children aged 5-10 and their parents with clear and accessible explanations about the coronavirus and its effects - both from a health perspective and the impact it has on a family’s day-to-day life.With input from expert consultant Professor Graham Medley of the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, as well as advice from teachers and child psychologists, this is a practical and informative resource to help explain the changes we are currently all experiencing

Coronavirus Details

TitleCoronavirus
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseApr 13th, 2020
Publisher Nosy Crow
Rating
GenreNonfiction, Childrens, Picture Books, Science, Health

Coronavirus Review

  • Cecily
    January 1, 1970
    This review is to highlight the existence of a free picture book for parents and carers of young children, who want to explain the pandemic in a calm, practical, and factual way.It's primarily aimed at 5 to 9 year olds, but will be useful outside that range. It includes answers to:• What is the coronavirus?• How do you catch the coronavirus?• What happens if you catch the coronavirus?• Why are people worried about catching the coronavirus?• Is there a cure for the coronavirus?• Why are some plac This review is to highlight the existence of a free picture book for parents and carers of young children, who want to explain the pandemic in a calm, practical, and factual way.It's primarily aimed at 5 to 9 year olds, but will be useful outside that range. It includes answers to:• What is the coronavirus?• How do you catch the coronavirus?• What happens if you catch the coronavirus?• Why are people worried about catching the coronavirus?• Is there a cure for the coronavirus?• Why are some places we normally go to closed?• What can I do to help?• What’s going to happen next?It also tackles the emotions of boredom, sadness, anger, and anxiety in a realistic way, with suggestions of how to cope.My only slight criticism is that although it explains the importance of handwashing, it doesn't really describe or illustrate a thorough technique. CredentialsIt was produced quickly, and free (no one was paid, though you can donate) by a team including Axel Scheffler (illustrator of The Gruffalo) and Professor Graham Medley of the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, some head teachers and a child psychologist.Get it hereYou can read it online (note the Full Screen option) or download it from nosycrow.com HERE.The BBC has an interview with illustrator Axel Scheffler about the book, HERE.And if your child would prefer more of a fantasy story around the facts, or you want a wide range of languages other than English, see the WHO's My Hero is You - How Kids Can Fight Covid-19, which I reviewed HERE. But note it's a story about flying round the world and only distancing by one metre!Happy ending...
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  • Donna Backshall
    January 1, 1970
    This fantastic book is available for free download in the US at https://stayhome.candlewick.com/. I recommend this for everyone who has kids with questions, or who just wants to read a little about how disease spreads. This is an important time for the world, and getting straight the basics of what's going will go a long way toward helping and healing.I especially love this simple explanation of vaccines:"A vaccine is a special medicine that is usually injected into your body while you are healt This fantastic book is available for free download in the US at https://stayhome.candlewick.com/. I recommend this for everyone who has kids with questions, or who just wants to read a little about how disease spreads. This is an important time for the world, and getting straight the basics of what's going will go a long way toward helping and healing.I especially love this simple explanation of vaccines:"A vaccine is a special medicine that is usually injected into your body while you are healthy. Inside the medicine are weak or dead virus germs. The antibodies in your blood can practice killing these germs, so that if you catch that virus, they can start fighting the live virus germs faster."
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  • Kerri
    January 1, 1970
    While this is aimed at helping to explain Coronavirus/Covid-19 to children, I have to say I found it pretty helpful as well. It covers all the main points that feel important to know, and the illustrations are lovely. Nosy Crow is one of my favourite publishers, and I was so pleased to see they had put this together! It's free, and well worth reading.https://nosycrow.com/blog/released-to... While this is aimed at helping to explain Coronavirus/Covid-19 to children, I have to say I found it pretty helpful as well. It covers all the main points that feel important to know, and the illustrations are lovely. Nosy Crow is one of my favourite publishers, and I was so pleased to see they had put this together! It's free, and well worth reading.https://nosycrow.com/blog/released-to...
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  • Somia
    January 1, 1970
    This freebie is good for kids and adults alike. Simple and clear language ensures kids will be clear on why it's important to stay home and wash their hands. The team who produced this make it clear that there are still alot more questions than answers, but in no way is the tone of the book bleak. Illustrations are well done.
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  • Skip
    January 1, 1970
    A nicely illustrated and informative book written for children about the coronavirus. Very balanced presentation, not dumbed down, nor scary. Available for free download from publisher, Nosy Crow. Commendable.
  • Abigail
    January 1, 1970
    "There’s a new word you might have heard. You might hear people talking about it or you might hear it on the news. This word is the reason that you’re not going to school." And so begins this brand new book for children about today's global hot topic: Coronavirus. Co-written by Elizabeth Jenner, Kate Wilson and Nia Roberts, and illustrated by Axel Scheffler, the book was created in consultation with Professor Graham Medley, and addresses the science behind Coronavirus/Covid-19. The book explores "There’s a new word you might have heard. You might hear people talking about it or you might hear it on the news. This word is the reason that you’re not going to school." And so begins this brand new book for children about today's global hot topic: Coronavirus. Co-written by Elizabeth Jenner, Kate Wilson and Nia Roberts, and illustrated by Axel Scheffler, the book was created in consultation with Professor Graham Medley, and addresses the science behind Coronavirus/Covid-19. The book explores what a coronavirus is, how it can be caught, what can be done when it is, and what scientists are trying to do, when it comes to finding a cure for this new kind of coronavirus. The book also explores the social side of the issue, discussing what it is like to be at home with one's family all of the time, and what children can do to help. The conclusion - that "one day this strange time will be over," and that we will have gotten through it together - emphasizes our communal response to this crisis, and leaves readers with a feeling of hope. The back matter includes resources providing more information...Released digitally by the British publisher Nosy Crow, Coronavirus: A Book for Children can be found online for free, at the following link:https://nosycrow.com/wp-content/uploa...It provides a much-needed and very useful reading experience for any child - or the adults in their lives - with questions about the Coronavirus/Covid-19. The text here is simple, easily understood, and completely matter-of-fact, offering the truth (mention is made of the fact that some people who get sick can die) in a gentle, non-sensational way. The accompanying artwork from Axel Scheffler, famed as the illustrator of so many popular children's books, including Julia Donaldson's The Gruffalo , is humorous and engaging. Kudos to Nosy Crow for creating this book! The back matter pertains mostly to British children, but the information in the main part of the book will have relevance for children all over the world. Highly recommended!
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  • Raymond
    January 1, 1970
    I saw this was a free ebook on Apple Books and decided to check it out. Even though its geared to kids, I think adults will find it helpful as well. Its very clear and concise and I actually learned a few things from it.
  • Sharah McConville
    January 1, 1970
    A great way to explain the Corona Virus and how it's affecting the world at the moment. It's aimed at kids but I think it's great for all ages. Thanks to Nosy Crow publishers for producing this book for free.
  • Robin_R
    January 1, 1970
    Excellent information! The facts presented for young people in a clear, easy to understand, without condescending manner! Someone should read it aloud to the president!
  • Nuruddin Azri
    January 1, 1970
    Great initiative. Cute. Every country need to do this too even for the adult one as a number of us didn't know that the virus stay on our hand and spread when we touch our nose and mouth. That's why we must sneeze on our elbow, not on our palms.
  • Kim
    January 1, 1970
    This a free book at the date of this review that holistically covers the biological, psychological, and social aspects of Covid-19 at this time for the older elementary and middle school age audience. An older audience will find it useful too. It has illustrations on every page that reinforces the information.
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  • Heidi
    January 1, 1970
    Well done. The book answer many of the most basic questions about the coronavirus that children might want to know in a straight-forward, calm manner. Where we don't have answers, the authors make that clear. The advice about what children can do during these difficult times is helpful.
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  • Dario
    January 1, 1970
    I like Axel Scheffer's illustrations, so when I found out he made a free ebook for children about Covid-19 I knew I had to check it out.Aside from the colourful and tender illustrations Scheffer is known for, this was an informative read about the virus. Even if it's aimed at children the language comes across pleasantly enough for it to be enjoyed by adults as well.It gives relevant information without anxiously scare-mongering as well, which is a big plus.
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  • Shaunterria
    January 1, 1970
    This is a free download of an EXCELLENT book for children (and adults) about COVID-19, it explains what's happening in in accessible language that is nonthreatening. Recommended read for everyone.
  • Felicity Terry
    January 1, 1970
    As you may well know I don't as a rule do online reading but given as it is available free to charge for anyone to read on screen or print out (though the publishers, Nosy Crow, would like to encourage readers, should they feel in a position to do so, to make a donation to NHS Charities Together which amongst other things aims to support staff and volunteers caring for Covid-19 patients at https://www.nhscharitiestogether.co.uk ) I had Mr T print me off a copy.• What is the coronavirus?• How do As you may well know I don't as a rule do online reading but given as it is available free to charge for anyone to read on screen or print out (though the publishers, Nosy Crow, would like to encourage readers, should they feel in a position to do so, to make a donation to NHS Charities Together which amongst other things aims to support staff and volunteers caring for Covid-19 patients at https://www.nhscharitiestogether.co.uk ) I had Mr T print me off a copy.• What is the coronavirus?• How do you catch the coronavirus?• What happens if you catch the coronavirus?• Why are people worried about catching the coronavirus?• Is there a cure for the coronavirus?• Why are some places we normally go to closed?• What can I do to help?• What’s going to happen next?Currently a time when the world can seem a scary place and not just to us adults. This carefully worded book explaining the Coronavirus to primary aged school children is a wonderful resource that answers the above questions in a way that is easily understood.Illustrated by Axel Scheffler (who many of you will recognise as the illustrator of many children's books including, amongst others, Julia Donaldson's The Gruffalo) and with input from a Professor of Infectious Disease Modelling and a NHS Clinical Psychologist specialising in Child and Adolescent Mental Health and Neurodevelopment to say nothing of the head teachers of several primary schools. Not only does Coronavirus: A Book for Children offer some explanations as to just what this virus is and how it spreads etc, it's also quite empowering in so much as it offers some ways as to how children might be of help ... something that can be of great importance and, yes, comfort to children who are feeling powerless.SUMMED UP IN A SENTENCE ... An invaluable resource; perfect for those unsure as how to answer young children's questions about the Coronavirus.
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  • Catherine
    January 1, 1970
    Author: Elizabeth Jenner, Kate Wilson and Nia Roberts (Consultant: Prf. Graham Medley)Illustrator: Axel SchefflerAge Recommendation: 5-10 years oldArt Style: Sparse Hand colouredTopic/ Theme: CoronavirusSetting: Everywhere and nowhereThis is very much a book of it's time. In weeks it will be unnecessary and only of use to academics and researchers. But I can see the point of it. Children are exposed as we are, the change is likely harder on them than it is on adults because so little is being do Author: Elizabeth Jenner, Kate Wilson and Nia Roberts (Consultant: Prf. Graham Medley)Illustrator: Axel SchefflerAge Recommendation: 5-10 years oldArt Style: Sparse Hand colouredTopic/ Theme: CoronavirusSetting: Everywhere and nowhereThis is very much a book of it's time. In weeks it will be unnecessary and only of use to academics and researchers. But I can see the point of it. Children are exposed as we are, the change is likely harder on them than it is on adults because so little is being done to provide information to them on their level. This is one attempt to do that. I'm not quite sure it hits its mark. It is wordy and the illustrations sparse. While I think the point was for it to be able to be read anywhere with ease there isn't enough diversity in the illustrations for that to be achievable. It is an American book and calling it anything else is an insult to the intelligence of parents and educators. That said it does answer the questions it asks. Namely• What is the coronavirus?• How do you catch the coronavirus?• What happens if you catch the coronavirus?• Why are people worried about catching the coronavirus?• Is there a cure for the coronavirus?• Why are some places we normally go to closed?• What can I do to help?• What’s going to happen next?And these questions are answered in such a way that it probably isn't a bad book for all young people. A good launching pad so to speak.This is not a book that you need to pay for the authors have made this book freely available in PDF format through the publisher's website.
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  • Tim
    January 1, 1970
    This came to my attention through a recommendation from Donna Backshall. It’s an illustrated downloadable (for free) children’s book, originally from England, but recently made available in the US. Certainly it’s meant to be read by both children and their caregivers, and could easily lead to productive discussions. In simple, engaging language the authors explore the nature of Covid-19 itself (it’s one of many variants of Coronavirus, which itself is a virus, all explained briefly), how it’s t This came to my attention through a recommendation from Donna Backshall. It’s an illustrated downloadable (for free) children’s book, originally from England, but recently made available in the US. Certainly it’s meant to be read by both children and their caregivers, and could easily lead to productive discussions. In simple, engaging language the authors explore the nature of Covid-19 itself (it’s one of many variants of Coronavirus, which itself is a virus, all explained briefly), how it’s transmitted, what its symptoms and effects are (including death), what populations are most vulnerable, what antibodies are, and the nature of vaccine. It also describes the normal feelings children will have (fear, anxiety, anger about not being able to see family and friends, boredom, concern about how long this pandemic will go on, etc.) The illustrations are colorful and depict diversity of children, older people, and medical personnel. Thanks to Donna for posting her review and making us all aware of it. I would recommend this little work highly. Here’s the link: https://stayhome.candlewick.com/
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  • Karol
    January 1, 1970
    According to news.sky.com "In just the first 24 hours the digital book was accessed over 100,000 times directly from the publisher's website and hundreds of thousands of times further from other hosts". It has already been translated into 17 languages. WOW!!!!! This free book was totally brought together voluntarly (no was was paid for their work) by staff of publishing house Nosy Crow with expert input from a Professor, two headteachers and a child. The wonderful Illustration are by Alix Scheff According to news.sky.com "In just the first 24 hours the digital book was accessed over 100,000 times directly from the publisher's website and hundreds of thousands of times further from other hosts". It has already been translated into 17 languages. WOW!!!!! This free book was totally brought together voluntarly (no was was paid for their work) by staff of publishing house Nosy Crow with expert input from a Professor, two headteachers and a child. The wonderful Illustration are by Alix Scheffler. It is geared for 5-9 year olds but it's a great book for all.
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  • Meg
    January 1, 1970
    I really appreciate this book, which was swiftly written/illustrated/published in response to the COVID-19 pandemic of 2020. I'd really recommend this read for older children (ages 8-12), paired with a family discussion to address questions, fears, or concerns. The topic is unavoidable these days, so I do think that reading material geared toward children like this is helpful. This book is well-done, with extra resources at the back. Though information is changing rapidly on this topic, the book I really appreciate this book, which was swiftly written/illustrated/published in response to the COVID-19 pandemic of 2020. I'd really recommend this read for older children (ages 8-12), paired with a family discussion to address questions, fears, or concerns. The topic is unavoidable these days, so I do think that reading material geared toward children like this is helpful. This book is well-done, with extra resources at the back. Though information is changing rapidly on this topic, the book is general enough to explain things at an age-appropriate level, accurately.
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  • Marie
    January 1, 1970
    I thought this book was very informative! I believe that this book with help children to understand Coronavirus! I love most of the books by Nosy Crow! Great job! I will definitely recommend this book to others especially those with children!
  • Mrs Deborah Evans
    January 1, 1970
    Informative in simple languageA good simple factual read that children can understand easily and not be frightened as to what is happening in the world today
  • Mjspice
    January 1, 1970
    #StayHome #StaySafe everyone
  • Leah
    January 1, 1970
    Straightforward and informative (albeit a little clunky). Inclusive illustrations.
  • Pascale
    January 1, 1970
    I read the French translation of this book.
  • claire martin
    January 1, 1970
    Fantastic book to explain this crazy situation we're in to children
  • Renee
    January 1, 1970
    Brilliant for kidsThis book explains the coronavirus in a non-scary way, yet still gives accurate information to inform kids what, how and why viruses are affecting our life right now. Highly recommended for all kids and their parents.
  • Rachel
    January 1, 1970
    Perfect for kids and adults.
  • LEAH CASSIDY
    January 1, 1970
    Brilliant for all agesGreat explanationEasy to understand and will be great for future generations to reflect back on a difficult time in history.
  • Lynn
    January 1, 1970
    A very nice free picture book to describe the coronavirus to kids from K-2 grade. It’s a very nice straightforward story book. I would definitely use this book.
  • Alex Shrugged
    January 1, 1970
    I gave this audiobook and extra star because I think children would enjoy it more than I did. Also, I am giving the authors (and the narrator) some slack because they rushed this short audiobook out to help the public. They said that no one was paid for producing this audiobook. As of this writing (2020-04-30), this audiobook is also being offered FREE for a limited time on stories.audible.com. (Click Here.) I also found it for purchase on Audible.com for ZERO dollars. That means "free" to me.Th I gave this audiobook and extra star because I think children would enjoy it more than I did. Also, I am giving the authors (and the narrator) some slack because they rushed this short audiobook out to help the public. They said that no one was paid for producing this audiobook. As of this writing (2020-04-30), this audiobook is also being offered FREE for a limited time on stories.audible.com. (Click Here.) I also found it for purchase on Audible.com for ZERO dollars. That means "free" to me.This is an audiobook (17 minutes) aimed at a United Kingdom audience. The narrator has an English accent, but he is perfectly comprehensible. I caught only one English vs American usage difference. That is, using the term "bin" to mean "trash can" when the narrator advised to use a tissue when sneezing and then throw the tissue "into a bin." Given all of that, the narration was very good and the information was limited to a elementary school level which I consider good. My only complaint was that COVID-19 was used only once (or maybe twice). The rest of the time the term "Coronavirus" was used. That was done probably to keep the explanation simple. After all... a simple cold is a coronavirus too. But in this current environment, the term "Coronavirus" is considered equivalent to COVID-19. Whether it will remain so by next year, who can tell?The word "snot" was used. The various voices were a little silly, but considering how quickly this audiobook was produced, it is a minor complaint.The main message after explaining what the disease is, is to ask children to try to get along with their siblings and to help their parents. In other words, BE GOOD.Remember, this audiobook is aimed at children. It is not a complete explanation. At the end the book also asks for donations to be made to the NIH (National Institutes of Health) which is the main medical organization for implementing social medicine in the UK. Overall, I'm happy with this audiobook. I'd be happy to listen to it again with children in the car.
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