The Order (Gabriel Allon #20)
From Daniel Silva, author of the #1 New York Times bestsellers The New Girl and The Other Woman, comes a stunning new action-packed thriller of high stakes international intrigue featuring the enigmatic art restorer and master spy Gabriel Allon.Master of the spy thriller Silva has entertained readers with twenty-two thoughtful and gripping suspense novels featuring a diverse cast of compelling characters and ingenious plots that have taken them around the globe and back—from the United States to Europe, Russia to the Middle East.He returns with another blockbuster—a powerhouse novel that showcases his outstanding skill and brilliant imagination, destined to be a must read for both his multitudes of fans and growing legions of converts.

The Order (Gabriel Allon #20) Details

TitleThe Order (Gabriel Allon #20)
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseJul 14th, 2020
PublisherHarper
ISBN-139780062834843
Rating
GenreFiction, Thriller, Suspense, Spy Thriller, Espionage

The Order (Gabriel Allon #20) Review

  • David Putnam
    January 1, 1970
    Yikes. I came late to Silva and really loved his last five books (that’s where I started). I looked forward to this one and bought the hardcover the day it came out. Those five earlier books were spy thrillers where the conflict was set very quickly with an inciting event that had international repercussions/implications. Great stuff. The conflict in The Order isn’t set for a hundred pages and even then, it’s a soft one. This book reads more like a locked-room murder mystery which had I been exp Yikes. I came late to Silva and really loved his last five books (that’s where I started). I looked forward to this one and bought the hardcover the day it came out. Those five earlier books were spy thrillers where the conflict was set very quickly with an inciting event that had international repercussions/implications. Great stuff. The conflict in The Order isn’t set for a hundred pages and even then, it’s a soft one. This book reads more like a locked-room murder mystery which had I been expecting one I might’ve enjoyed it more. The Pope dies in his room that has a guard outside the door. The first hundred pages is deciding if he’d been murdered. That’s a locked-room mystery if you ask me and not the spy thriller I’d been expecting. Even in a locked-room murder, the body hits the floor pretty early to set the stage. I have found books work best for me are the ones where the conflict is set right up front, a contract with the reader that says, “this is what I’m going to show you, come take this ride with me.” I will definitely buy his next book and hopefully Mr. Silva will go back to form.David Putnam author of the Bruno Johnson series.
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  • The Real Book Spy
    January 1, 1970
    Daniel Silva once again reminds readers why he’s one of the most gifted novelists of our time with his latest must-read thriller, The Order.It was supposed to be a vacation. A badly needed, week-long trip to relax and recharge. And after years of dedicated service that has no doubt taken a major toll on him and his family, nobody needed it more than Gabriel Allon, the master art restorer turned Israeli assassin who’s now halfway into his first term as chief of the Office.However, just one day in Daniel Silva once again reminds readers why he’s one of the most gifted novelists of our time with his latest must-read thriller, The Order.It was supposed to be a vacation. A badly needed, week-long trip to relax and recharge. And after years of dedicated service that has no doubt taken a major toll on him and his family, nobody needed it more than Gabriel Allon, the master art restorer turned Israeli assassin who’s now halfway into his first term as chief of the Office.However, just one day into his holiday—a covert trip to Venice with his family, arranged by his wife, Chiara—an old friend urgently requests Gabriel’s help.Pope Paul VII has died. News reports suggest the leader of the Catholic church passed away from a massive heart attack that occurred while he was praying in his favorite chapel. But Archbishop Luigi Donati, the Holy Father’s loyal private secretary, suspects there might just be more to the story than anyone else is letting on, and in order to find out for sure, he sends for Gabriel Allon. Though it turns out that Pope Paul VII did indeed suffer from heart disease, making a fatal heart attack possible (if not probable), Donati offers Gabriel several other tidbits that were not reported by the media. For starters, Donati explains that the Holy Father passed away on the one night that he was absent from the Pope’s side each week. Likewise, other oddities arise too: like a missing member of the Swiss Guard who had stood post outside the papal apartments that night, and a letter that Pope Paul VII had been writing just before his death, intended for Gabriel himself, which has since gone missing.But the real mystery, however, surrounds the Holy Father’s reasons for visiting . . . Continue reading this review here: https://therealbookspy.com/2020/07/05...
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  • Eve (Between The Bookends)
    January 1, 1970
    Forgot how much I love books like this! Enjoyed this one a lot. I'll definitely be checking out the other books in this series!
  • Anna Amato
    January 1, 1970
    I received a complimentary copy of The Order with the understanding that I would review it honestly and honestly and without too many spoilers is what I promise. The Pope dies. That is not a spoiler! That is the reason for everything else that transpires. Conveniently Gabriel Allon is on a much needed vacation from The Office in Venice which was covertly planned by his beautiful wife Chiara. The plan and we all know about the best laid plans is for him to spend time relaxing, restoring famous ma I received a complimentary copy of The Order with the understanding that I would review it honestly and honestly and without too many spoilers is what I promise. The Pope dies. That is not a spoiler! That is the reason for everything else that transpires. Conveniently Gabriel Allon is on a much needed vacation from The Office in Venice which was covertly planned by his beautiful wife Chiara. The plan and we all know about the best laid plans is for him to spend time relaxing, restoring famous masters and enjoying his family in the city he loves. But he's in Italy at the same time the Pope whom he also loves, and saved from terrorists, dies. Or was he murdered? And Why? And that's where those best laid plans go awry or shall we say flushed.There transpires the usual cloak and dagger and Gabriel being pulled into an investigation that he tries to avoid. This time his wife is there with him. And since she's a former Office trained agent and watcher who also has a history degree and knows how to use a gun so who better to help. Of course they can't do this alone and with the help of the Pope's trusted Secretary Luigi Donati and the usual cast and characters of Rome and The Office he is able to track down the truth about the death or was it murder? Instead of the politics of Washington, Russia and the UK (and believe me that's a relief because we can always catch up with that on CNN and that world famous journalist) this is about the politics of The Holy Catholic Church which has a 2000 year history of politics and cover-ups and murders to uncover dating back to the first murder; i.e. Jesus Christ. And The Holy Mother Church and all the right wing Popes who will do anything to ensure that they continue in power and that another upstart like The Accidental Pope does not assume the Papacy. They, of course, have powerful political pawns in other European countries who are depending on them to right the ship, no pun intended there, and to keep it 'right'. Germany, Italy, France all have politicians who play into this and there's money involved. Big money of course and the people who believe that the right must prevail and religion be damned; they will do anything to ensure that they take the Papacy through bribery and ensure that the countries of Europe return to the policies of their idol; Adolf Hitler. Neo-Nazism never dies; it just hides. As we used to say in the US in 1970's 'power corrupts; absolutely power corrupts absolutely'.Of course, there is a book to find. A lost gospel so to speak that the Right has to keep hidden because it would show them for the power hungry, right wing anti-Semites that they are. They've managed with the help of The Order to keep it hidden until The Accidental Pope discovers it with the help of someone like me who has a foot in both Catholicism and Judaism. Because I grew up hearing the stories of Italy and Facism and corruption of the Church and knowing that sometimes Jews hid in plain sight, this story made so much sense to me. It was logical as well as thrilling. Find the book, find the true story of that first murder and you have a chance to end the hatred and right the wrongs of history. Silva does that while keeping you on the edge of your seat. If you've never read any of the series you can still read The Order; there are enough references to the backgrounds of all the players without getting bogged down in minutiae and boring long time readers. Personally, I'm fond of the Easter Eggs that he drops in there. The 'famous journalist', the names of people the author loves (Nicholas in one form or another because that's his son's name). My favorite writing tool the author uses is repetition of phrases. They are always meaningful, well placed and definitely never overdone. In addition to finding the lost book (gospel?) and the murderer? Gabriel Allon, who at heart is a yenta and a restorer of souls as well as Old Masters finds a way into a love triangle and a way to restore at least one soul to its rightful place. Not everyone gets to be a Pope.This one is my absolute favorite in the Gabriel Allon series.
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  • Jim A
    January 1, 1970
    Another totally entertaining weekend spent with Daniel Silva's character Gabriel Allon. The usual cast of Allon cohorts play a minor role in this one while Allon's friend Archbishop Donatti plays a major role.The final chapters are a mix of both, some twists and some predictability. Twenty thrillers into the Allon series and I'm still not bored with the character. Speaks well for Silva's writing ability. This one is about the search for a religious text, the subject matter going back to the days Another totally entertaining weekend spent with Daniel Silva's character Gabriel Allon. The usual cast of Allon cohorts play a minor role in this one while Allon's friend Archbishop Donatti plays a major role.The final chapters are a mix of both, some twists and some predictability. Twenty thrillers into the Allon series and I'm still not bored with the character. Speaks well for Silva's writing ability. This one is about the search for a religious text, the subject matter going back to the days of Pontius Pilate and the crucifixion of Christ. Silva did a lot of research on this one. Contains both fact and fiction. I spent a lot of time moving between the novel and Google, checking several items of interest. Fact or fiction?
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  • Germaine
    January 1, 1970
    Very political but very tame even boring in parts too much religion. Bring back Allon of old. MR Silva seems to he resting on his past books knowing we will buy. Very disappointing and disappointed with this book.
  • Donna Gropper
    January 1, 1970
    Another wonderful Gabriel Allon book from Daniel Silva! This 20th book of the series starts with the death of the sitting pope at the Vatican, and some irregularities about the death noticed by the pope’s private secretary. Simultaneously in Israel the wife of Gabriel Allon, head of Israeli intelligence has gone to extraordinary lengths to engineer a vacation with the family for her hard-working husband. Their destination is Venice to visit her parents and spend some time in Italy – her home cou Another wonderful Gabriel Allon book from Daniel Silva! This 20th book of the series starts with the death of the sitting pope at the Vatican, and some irregularities about the death noticed by the pope’s private secretary. Simultaneously in Israel the wife of Gabriel Allon, head of Israeli intelligence has gone to extraordinary lengths to engineer a vacation with the family for her hard-working husband. Their destination is Venice to visit her parents and spend some time in Italy – her home country and a place where Gabriel lived and worked for years.In a previous book in the series Gabriel saved the life of the pope and is a good friend of both the pope who has died and his private secretary Luigi Donati. Once Gabriel and his family arrive in Italy, hang onto your hats! Gabriel is drawn into investigating the circumstances surrounding the pope’s death. This trail leads to some very rich and powerful bad guys with a world-changing agenda. The mission is very personal to Gabriel in several ways, so there goes the vacation! Gabriel calls in the team from Israel to help, and we’re off on an adventure as only Daniel Silva can write one. I have to stop reading every now and again because the situation is so edgy it makes me nervous. After a few minutes I’m reading again eager to see what happens next. The answer is a lot, plus a surprise that I didn’t see coming at all!The book also has a subplot about what Gabriel’s life might look like after he retires. Sounds lovely and calm – why do I doubt that? I received a free copy of this book from the publisher in return for an honest review. That said, I love the book, and have purchased a signed copy for my home library, and also ordered the eBook version.
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  • Lucy Krb
    January 1, 1970
    The waiting, always the waiting. – That is something every fan of Daniel Silva can relate to. As always, it has been worth it. One cannot simply put the book down, trust me, I've tried and ended up reading till the end until 3:30am.Daniel Silva knows how to write a book packed with history interspersed by twisting turns and nerve wrecking moments. There is never a dull moment only interlude before something that will stop you in your tracks and makes you think. The moment you open the book, you' The waiting, always the waiting. – That is something every fan of Daniel Silva can relate to. As always, it has been worth it. One cannot simply put the book down, trust me, I've tried and ended up reading till the end until 3:30am.Daniel Silva knows how to write a book packed with history interspersed by twisting turns and nerve wrecking moments. There is never a dull moment only interlude before something that will stop you in your tracks and makes you think. The moment you open the book, you're transported to Gabriel Allon’s world. It truly feels like you're standing by his side trying to find out if the Pope was really murdered while staying ahead of the Order of St. Helena and its members plotting against Gabriel and trying to prevent him accomplishing his mission. Conclave has to begin so Gabriel has limited time. But then again, when he doesn't? There is a reason his old team’s name is Barak after all. To think at the beginning Chiara had a daring idea to pack the entire family, indulging Gabriel and take them for much needed holidays. Who would have guessed it won't work out, right?
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  • Matt
    January 1, 1970
    Another spellbinding story from Silva’s masterful pen. I was disappointed, though, to see his Dan Brown-esque dismissal of the historicity of the Gospel accounts. In the author’s note he writes:“Christians who believe in biblical inerrancy will no doubt take issue with my description of who the evangelists were and how their Gospels came to be written. Most biblical scholars would not.”I do hope Silva and readers of this novel will be intellectually honest enough to engage other scholarly—and, i Another spellbinding story from Silva’s masterful pen. I was disappointed, though, to see his Dan Brown-esque dismissal of the historicity of the Gospel accounts. In the author’s note he writes:“Christians who believe in biblical inerrancy will no doubt take issue with my description of who the evangelists were and how their Gospels came to be written. Most biblical scholars would not.”I do hope Silva and readers of this novel will be intellectually honest enough to engage other scholarly—and, in my estimation, more historically careful—perspectives. I suggest starting with Michael J. Kruger’s work (“The Question of Canon,” “Canon Revisited,” etc.).
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  • Mizmahlia
    January 1, 1970
    I won an advance copy of this by being subscribed to Mr. Silva’s e-mail list, and I’m not being paid or compensated in any way for this review.I’ve been a fan of this series for about 12 years now, and somehow, each book kept getting better. “The Order” is no exception. It hooked me from the get-go, and I was hooked until I reached the end. (And what an ending!!) I was pleasantly surprised to see such a large presence by my favorite supporting characters, Archbishop Donati. I love his character I won an advance copy of this by being subscribed to Mr. Silva’s e-mail list, and I’m not being paid or compensated in any way for this review.I’ve been a fan of this series for about 12 years now, and somehow, each book kept getting better. “The Order” is no exception. It hooked me from the get-go, and I was hooked until I reached the end. (And what an ending!!) I was pleasantly surprised to see such a large presence by my favorite supporting characters, Archbishop Donati. I love his character so much and it’s always a joy to see him. And it was such a delight when the other “regulars” all showed up as well, as it always is. All in all, if you’re a fan of Gabriel and his crew, you’re gonna love this book so much.
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  • Rebecca Tuttle Baldwin
    January 1, 1970
    A thoughtful addition to the series and to today’s issuesI have loved both the history & intricate plots these books provide. It would be hard to fully appreciate some of the more recent ones without having read more of the initial books. And unlike a lot of the reviews of this current book, I don’t see the author as being ‘politically correct’—a lot of people of many faiths would like to believe their version is the only correct one. I like to think there are many paths to the summits of mounta A thoughtful addition to the series and to today’s issuesI have loved both the history & intricate plots these books provide. It would be hard to fully appreciate some of the more recent ones without having read more of the initial books. And unlike a lot of the reviews of this current book, I don’t see the author as being ‘politically correct’—a lot of people of many faiths would like to believe their version is the only correct one. I like to think there are many paths to the summits of mountains depending on where one starts. Good read!
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  • Anshul Punetha
    January 1, 1970
    An Allon Story with a DifferenceMr Silva presents a refreshing different aspect from the life of the legendary spy master. A deliberately measured pace, a cameo by the team, and a much richer afterward - one with echoes of history and current affairs, makes this book a good read. It's good to see Mr Silva not leaning on too much flashback. Not the thrill a minute nerve wracking thriller, but a gentle stroll down history, mythology and religion and perhaps a preview of the next leg of Gabriel All An Allon Story with a DifferenceMr Silva presents a refreshing different aspect from the life of the legendary spy master. A deliberately measured pace, a cameo by the team, and a much richer afterward - one with echoes of history and current affairs, makes this book a good read. It's good to see Mr Silva not leaning on too much flashback. Not the thrill a minute nerve wracking thriller, but a gentle stroll down history, mythology and religion and perhaps a preview of the next leg of Gabriel Allon's adventures.
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  • Daniel Kincaid
    January 1, 1970
    It was supposed to be a vacation for Gabriel Allon and his family. One week, that's all, after a life-long service for his country. However, life always finds a way to interfere. Allon is called by a friend to look into the mysterious death of Pope Paul VII. Everyone thinks it may have been his weak heart that just gave in, but his personal assistant believes otherwise. Reluctantly, Allon agrees, as he too senses that something is amiss, especially when a young Swiss Guard mysteriously disappear It was supposed to be a vacation for Gabriel Allon and his family. One week, that's all, after a life-long service for his country. However, life always finds a way to interfere. Allon is called by a friend to look into the mysterious death of Pope Paul VII. Everyone thinks it may have been his weak heart that just gave in, but his personal assistant believes otherwise. Reluctantly, Allon agrees, as he too senses that something is amiss, especially when a young Swiss Guard mysteriously disappears. The simple investigation leads Allon to discover a conspiracy within the Vatican- a secret society within the Church, "The Order" who dates back into the dark days of the Nazi Party, has plans to take over the Church completely and over Europe, lending their support to extreme right-wing political parties so they could take power as well. Their goal? To rid Europe of Islam and the Jews in order to restore Christianity to its rightful place. But this is just the tip of the iceberg, because Allon must not only stop The Order, but he must finds a lost book, The Gospel of Pilate- a book The Order would do anything to keep secret and eventually destroy- even kill anyone who will stand in their way, because the book holds a secret, one so powerful it ha the potential to destroy Christianity completely, and perhaps even change the course of history itself.Gripping, entertaining, thought-provoking, intelligent- Daniel Silva proves, yet again, why he is truly the master of the spy-thriller. He has woven ever so intelligently actual current events with historical events into a frightening conspiracy ever so intelligently, while not forgetting to entertain his readers. Allon, as usual a man of principal, of thought and feelings, finds himself thrust into events, uses intelligence and grey matter to solve this case, while also trying to save the souls of the people he care about, and maybe even do some historical justice. Cast of characters and depiction of places is done, as usual, to the nth degree, as is the historical references. It is clear Silva has done his research- as is evident in his afterward, but it's also stunning and wonderful how he has turned his research into a gripping suspenseful tale. The historical accuracy here is nothing short of amazing.Silva is also not afraid to pose serious questions in this novel- he explores the nature of racism, antisemitism, hate in general, and tries to understand why human society always finds itself battling one another, hating, even killing, slaughtering one another. Seems like we never truly learn from the pat, as as current global events shows, we seem to fall into the same frightening, dark patterns yet again, with right-wing groups seizing more and more power. Of course, there isn't any definitive answer. No matter how much you study the events that lead to WWII, no one can truly understand how a maddening, crazy hate swept over an entire society that was supposed to be civilized, yet became so monstrous. Silva isn't trying to solve this particular mystery, but he does try and understand it in this novel, without taking the foot of the gas or the flare from the story. The more I read the works of Daniel Silva, the more I appreciate and like him. He's humane, intelligent, intellectual, with a crisp, mesmerizing writing style, real characters, and gripping spy-thriller tales. And the latest in the Gabriel Allon series in another amazing story not to be missed. If you still haven't read his books, then what are you waiting for, eh? Just pick up one of his books, even the latest entry. You really won't be disappointed.Five stars!
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  • Darcy
    January 1, 1970
    This one was fun to read. I think part of that might be because Gabriel was on "vacation" for most of the book, he was with friends and things weren't so dire. Yes there were times that the past popped up and Gabriel was a little maudlin, but his friends were there to push him out of the mood.Gabriel has interesting friends, friends from all walks of life. I found it interesting how this time around he's back with his Catholic friends, one who was the Pope and another who is close to the Pope. T This one was fun to read. I think part of that might be because Gabriel was on "vacation" for most of the book, he was with friends and things weren't so dire. Yes there were times that the past popped up and Gabriel was a little maudlin, but his friends were there to push him out of the mood.Gabriel has interesting friends, friends from all walks of life. I found it interesting how this time around he's back with his Catholic friends, one who was the Pope and another who is close to the Pope. Things got sticky fast and Gabriel's friends needed his special skill set to help them figure things out. I really liked how things ended, that the good guys will get to make some changes, that Gabriel can see what his life could be like during retirement. It gives me hope that maybe someday he can be at peace.
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  • Bookreporter.com Mystery & Thriller
    January 1, 1970
    Just when you think that one of the best spy-thriller writers of our time can’t top himself, along comes Daniel Silva with the showstopper, THE ORDER.Pope Paul VII has died suddenly under suspicious circumstances in his private quarters in the Vatican. Earlier that evening, he was writing at his study desk and mentioned to his private secretary, Archbishop Luigi Donati, as he was leaving that he had an important personal letter that he wanted Donati to deliver to Gabriel Allon. The director of I Just when you think that one of the best spy-thriller writers of our time can’t top himself, along comes Daniel Silva with the showstopper, THE ORDER.Pope Paul VII has died suddenly under suspicious circumstances in his private quarters in the Vatican. Earlier that evening, he was writing at his study desk and mentioned to his private secretary, Archbishop Luigi Donati, as he was leaving that he had an important personal letter that he wanted Donati to deliver to Gabriel Allon. The director of Israeli intelligence, Gabriel had become friends with the pope and Donati as allies in world affairs.When Donati receives an urgent call to return immediately to the Vatican, he rushes back to find a cadre of highly placed papal staff standing around the body of the pope. He is on his bed, still dressed in his soutane, hands clasped prayerfully around his rosary. Donati searches for and finds no sign of the letter that the pope had been writing concerning a newly discovered rare book. He immediately calls Gabriel with the news that the pope is dead, and circumstances point to foul play. Gabriel abruptly leaves Tel Aviv on the pretense of a vacation with his family at his wife’s hometown of Venice and meets with Donati.Upheavals in the Roman Catholic Church date back to the fourth century, the first time that a written history of Christianity appears, but not since 1981 had there been an attempt to assassinate a pope. Any suspicion in the death of a sitting pope must be handled with great delicacy and secrecy. But who among the Vatican staff could Donati trust? Growing unrest among a group of European priests belonging to a right-wing secret society known as the Order of St. Helena becomes the prime target of the investigation.The centuries-old tradition known as the conclave will commence within the prescribed number of days when the selected cardinals will convene to elect a new pope. Donati convinces Gabriel that he suspects a plot to elect enough bishops and archbishops swayed by the dogmas of the Order to lead the Church down a path not seen since World War II. Part two of the book is titled "Ecce Homo," which is Latin for "Behold the Man" (lest you’ve forgotten your Nietzsche), and begins what is perhaps Silva’s most meticulously researched work. Not only is the novel a page-turning thriller, it could serve as the theological and civics instruction I paid only enough attention to in school to barely maintain my grade point average.Silva states in his foreword that Pope Paul VII is a fictitious figure who has appeared in prior novels and that the missing rare book does not exist. THE ORDER not only is framed around the search for the truth about the demise of a murdered prelate, but also is a fascinating history of the uneasy relationship between Christians and Jews. You will learn much and as a bonus be thoroughly entertained.As the media is overloaded with nothing but doom and gloom as the pandemic plus an upcoming presidential election flood the airwaves, how can a work of this stature be brought to the attention of the public? Talk shows? Book signings at major stores? Gone. Kaput. If there was a rooftop from which to shout it, I would grab a megaphone and yell, "GET THIS BOOK!" This absorbing read offers intrigue, but more than that, it is a remarkable historical treasure, reminiscent of James Michener and Herman Wouk --- all at just over 400 pages. THE ORDER is the standout novel of the year, despite being overshadowed by current events.My advice: Turn off the TV and bury your nose in this book. You will feel much better for having done so.Reviewed by Roz Shea
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  • Stephen Lake
    January 1, 1970
    A good deal less boilerplate in this Allon novel than in the previous several. That was refreshing. It did feel like Silva has found a fresh arc for Gabriel and Chiara’s narrative, and by extension, for the Office. It is a welcome development in the series. Also, I appreciate how much Gabriel’s friendships were the canvas upon which the story was painted. Those friendships endured both spectacular loss and gain in The Order...but could portend ominous things going forward in the series, as Gabri A good deal less boilerplate in this Allon novel than in the previous several. That was refreshing. It did feel like Silva has found a fresh arc for Gabriel and Chiara’s narrative, and by extension, for the Office. It is a welcome development in the series. Also, I appreciate how much Gabriel’s friendships were the canvas upon which the story was painted. Those friendships endured both spectacular loss and gain in The Order...but could portend ominous things going forward in the series, as Gabriel’s past could catch up with him and those whom he loves in most unwelcome ways. The Order lays out Gabriel’s exit plan from the Office—a plan hatched mainly by Chiara, though Gabriel seems to buy in. I’m looking forward to Gabriel retiring, because we all know he won’t really retire! Rather, he will be chased by his past and will chase down anyone who hurts those whom he loves—which you know is going to happen.Now for the disappointing and annoying bits...The vast right wing, anti-Semitic conspiracy to seize the papacy was entertaining but laughable...as was Silva’s grasp of biblical scholarship. Daniel Silva failed to name Dan Brown in the credits, but he should have. Seriously, if all you have as sources are Crossan and Ehrman, then you’re buying into a predictable, revisionist narrative that is NOT the dominant view amongst scholars. But it’s not just biased. The storyline and lots of dialogue are as virulently anti-Christian as its villains are anti-Semitic. That’s sad for me as a Christian to say, because I’ve enjoyed Silva’s pro-Jewish slant and the fact that Allon and his team are great Israeli heros. This, however, was just a giant axe grind of a read and it’s a real shame. (Mind you: I love reading atheist and non-Christian authors. I do not need my faith reaffirmed in the novels I read. I just don’t appreciate it being clumsily trashed. Silva writes about Christianity as if he were a teenager who comes across revisionist biblical criticism for the first time and now thinks he is “enlightened”—which by the way, IS the backstory on Bart Ehrman.) Normally, when Silva takes us into the shadowy geo-political world of spies and assassins, he is a surer, more believable guide. In The Order it feels like we are being led by a member of Antifa or a commenter on Daily Kos. Have 3+ years of Trump and his evangelical apologists radicalized Silva that much?Oh, speaking of the man...I cannot forget: early in the book we get a ridiculous description of the right wing authoritarian prime minister of Italy that sounds exactly like Trump...and not lost on me is the irony that Trump is himself a caricature of that old Italian buffoon, Mussolini. Irksome and deplorable bits aside...The Order was an entertaining page turner about a figure—Gabriel Allon and his merry band of spies—whose exploits I always enjoy!
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  • Joe Lucia
    January 1, 1970
    I plowed through this in less than 24 hours (as I typically do with all of Silva's new releases), and I have to say...I'm somewhat disappointed. All of the ingredients for success are here - Gabriel Allon, religious intrigue, a shadowy cabal. But the elements really just don't mesh well together. The shadowy cabal is essentially dealt with at the end of the second act, though a character that has been spoken of somewhat often (but hasn't been fleshed out) pops up in act three. The election of th I plowed through this in less than 24 hours (as I typically do with all of Silva's new releases), and I have to say...I'm somewhat disappointed. All of the ingredients for success are here - Gabriel Allon, religious intrigue, a shadowy cabal. But the elements really just don't mesh well together. The shadowy cabal is essentially dealt with at the end of the second act, though a character that has been spoken of somewhat often (but hasn't been fleshed out) pops up in act three. The election of the new pope seems very Angels and Demons-esque to me, and he isn't much of a factor in the book's brief fourth act.As for the book's religious intrigue, it peters out somewhat quickly, given that the gospel in question wasn't actually retrieved until the very end of the story. We also never really got a good (or any?) explanation of the mysterious priest who provides information about the gospel to various characters (and given that this series has never really taken a dive into mysticism or anything along those lines, that sure would be a cop out).Perhaps most disappointing at all, Gabriel's Israeli intelligence dream team is barely featured! They show up in the second act, and once that's taken care of, they don't return. Given how central a role they've played in many of the other books in the series, I was quite dismayed at their usage in this one.However, none of this is to say this is a *bad* book, it's merely disappointing by the quite high standards Silva has set. If this was written by a different author, in a different series, my overall score would probably be higher and my criticisms wouldn't be as sharp. I wasn't shocked to see a step back after the ridiculous standards set by The Other Woman and The New Girl, and am hoping that the next book in the series is able to come close to matching that level of tension and storytelling.
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  • Rich
    January 1, 1970
    Bot this was a hard book to give a rating to lol. It kept going around in circles in my head as I read this book lol. I have read all 2o books lol. For starters this is not a typical Allon book. It is light and much leaner than recent books more like a earlier book in the series. I think it is the only book where his former boss is not mentioned thank god lol. His agency and his key support group played a very small part in this book it was mainly him and a friend from other books in the series. Bot this was a hard book to give a rating to lol. It kept going around in circles in my head as I read this book lol. I have read all 2o books lol. For starters this is not a typical Allon book. It is light and much leaner than recent books more like a earlier book in the series. I think it is the only book where his former boss is not mentioned thank god lol. His agency and his key support group played a very small part in this book it was mainly him and a friend from other books in the series. I was also glad to see his own personal religous and political views were kept out of the book for the most part-3 or 4 books ago he was getting some severe back lash for that and I was in that group. i was almost ready to give up on the series. Like I said this book is a lot leaner and has a quick pace to it. There is not a lot of your typical intense action that comes with this series-very low key. If this was my first book in the series I might have found it boring. I always say read a series in its proper order. I saw a couple of complaints where the book was bogged down in religion too much.I kind of agree with this-there was a about a 15 page section wow where I did not need lol. I will say it was a nice read and flowed well. The story was pretty good but not a normal story for this series. I gave it 4.0 stars on the dot, it was good enough to get that. I am looking forward to the next book in the series. This book also started the forshadowing in a big way of Allon retiring. I would like to see him have to deal with a bad Jewish/ Israel person or a double agent Jewish / Israel person .I am not sure he as the balls for that lol. I do say go ahead and give this book a big spin you will not be let down especially if you are a fan of the series.
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  • Foxglove
    January 1, 1970
    Daniel Silva is one of my favorite writers, but this book wasn't his best. It felt like a retread of the Confessor, and the supernatural element wasn't really helpful in a series that is normally so grounded in reality. Of course, Gabriel being 69 and head of Mossad and running around without bodyguards, getting into gun battles, is stretching reality. The plot moves quickly, especially as compared to The Other Woman and the New Girl which were longer and more in-depth. It's a good plot, with tw Daniel Silva is one of my favorite writers, but this book wasn't his best. It felt like a retread of the Confessor, and the supernatural element wasn't really helpful in a series that is normally so grounded in reality. Of course, Gabriel being 69 and head of Mossad and running around without bodyguards, getting into gun battles, is stretching reality. The plot moves quickly, especially as compared to The Other Woman and the New Girl which were longer and more in-depth. It's a good plot, with twists and turns, although I did find it predictable. One thing that bothered me was this is his third major murderous Catholic secret conspiracy cabal, which is really offensive and hurtful to Catholics (I'm agnostic Jewish). I have no problem talking about people like Bishop Alois Hudal, which is a historical fact. However connecting it to a church today that is painted to be seen as being filled with right-wing fascist sympathizers who are willing to murder to achieve power once is unfair, and casts an unfair mark on 1 billion people. As much as Silva defends the church and says Gabriel wouldn't want to live in a world without it, and has people like Luchassi and Donati, the fact remains this is the third secret society that goes around killing people, trying to achieve power and kill Jews, and it feels too close to the Protocols of the Elders of Zion for Catholics. The conspiracy theories and cabals don't create specific villains as much make all Catholics seem violent, hypocritical, power-hungry and dangerous, which is unfair. I hope Silva will drop this trope, because his writing is as good as ever. I just want him to break fresh ground.
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  • Rfwidmar
    January 1, 1970
    The Order“The Order” is the 20th book in the Daniel Silva – Gabriel Allon novels. The stories keep getting better and better. The plot does not disappoint, based on history and meticulous research. Silva returns to a story starting with Pope Paul VII, a character seen in 3 previous novels.A shadowy Catholic society, the European far right, an apocryphal gospel, election of a new pope are the major ingredients in this Italian potpouri.Gabriel, on vacation in Venice, senses an out-of-place spark o The Order“The Order” is the 20th book in the Daniel Silva – Gabriel Allon novels. The stories keep getting better and better. The plot does not disappoint, based on history and meticulous research. Silva returns to a story starting with Pope Paul VII, a character seen in 3 previous novels.A shadowy Catholic society, the European far right, an apocryphal gospel, election of a new pope are the major ingredients in this Italian potpouri.Gabriel, on vacation in Venice, senses an out-of-place spark of untruth, nurses its flame, and turns it into a roaring inferno of intrigue across Europe, the Vatican, and 2,000 years of the truth of the Crucifixion.Silva’s novels make one skip lunches, read far into the night, read anywhere while waiting – eagerly awaiting the next page and chapter. The endings are always total or partial surprises. This one is a gem.Best of all, his “author’s notes” at the end leave the reader with the sense of research and history that went into the writing of the story. The book naturally leads the reader to do additional research into history both past and present.“The Order”, as the book jacket says, “confirms yet again that Daniel Silva is his generation’s finest writer of suspense and international intrigue.” God bless Gabriel Allon and his family.Bob & Grace Widmar
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  • Emily
    January 1, 1970
    "The Order" is the 20th installment of the Gabriel Allon series. This one is a bit of a departure from past books. The story starts with the Allon family undertaking a family vacation, and these parts were funny. Naturally the family vacation is interrupted by the death of a Pope in suspicious circumstances and the request of Luigi Donati to have a little look see. Allon and Donati are soon on the track of a far right religious order who are engineering the take over of Western Europe and the Ro "The Order" is the 20th installment of the Gabriel Allon series. This one is a bit of a departure from past books. The story starts with the Allon family undertaking a family vacation, and these parts were funny. Naturally the family vacation is interrupted by the death of a Pope in suspicious circumstances and the request of Luigi Donati to have a little look see. Allon and Donati are soon on the track of a far right religious order who are engineering the take over of Western Europe and the Roman Catholic Church. Why? Because of nine words the Pontius Pilate may or may not have made the crowd shout.The story line itself wasn't my favorite. The characters and the humorous banter, the fast pace, and the richness of the settings made up for it. There is very little of Allon's team involved in the story line, but the team does make an appearance. Shamron doesn't feature in the novel, except through some background for new readers to the series. However, Eli Lavon figures into the story in a huge way... it was a wonderful and cathartic part to the plot. There is mention of life for Gabriel post "Office"... I'm hoping that's some wishful thinking and we get at least a few more books before Gabirel's "retirement". "The Order" can also be recommended as a stand alone read, or as a decent introduction to the series.
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  • Diana Nhuch
    January 1, 1970
    I was lucky enough to receive an advanced copy of Daniel Silva's latest thriller, The Order. I've been a fan of spy-thriller stories for many years. If you can call a spy-thriller important, then this book, by this author, might be the most important spy-thriller ever written. His hero, Gabriel Allon, can't even have a quiet vacation with his family! The Pope dies, under suspicious circumstances. As Gabriel is vacationing in Italy, the Pope's loyal secretary, Father Donati, asks for Gabriel's he I was lucky enough to receive an advanced copy of Daniel Silva's latest thriller, The Order. I've been a fan of spy-thriller stories for many years. If you can call a spy-thriller important, then this book, by this author, might be the most important spy-thriller ever written. His hero, Gabriel Allon, can't even have a quiet vacation with his family! The Pope dies, under suspicious circumstances. As Gabriel is vacationing in Italy, the Pope's loyal secretary, Father Donati, asks for Gabriel's help.The Order, deals with the oldest hatred in the world; one that has lasted over two millennia--the hatred of the Jews, and Church's role in it.Daniel Silva courageously takes our blindfold off, revealing the Church's doctrine, and our eyes land precisely where the responsibility for this hatred lies, and that exists still today. As only a master can, he accomplishes all that while he succeeds in entertaining us at the same time!This is a book that the whole world should read. Afterwards, take a long look in the mirror and into to your own soul to see what you may find.Bravo!!!
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  • John Bradford
    January 1, 1970
    Perhaps the best summation of the "The Order" comes from the author himself in the acknowledgement section of the book where he credits his wife who served as a sounding board while he worked through a "complex plot" that involves "....the murder of a pope, the discovery of a long-suppressed gospel, and a conspiracy by the far right to seize control of the Roman Catholic Church." This is definitely an edge-of-your-seat thriller that is both thought-provoking and entertaining. At its heart lies t Perhaps the best summation of the "The Order" comes from the author himself in the acknowledgement section of the book where he credits his wife who served as a sounding board while he worked through a "complex plot" that involves "....the murder of a pope, the discovery of a long-suppressed gospel, and a conspiracy by the far right to seize control of the Roman Catholic Church." This is definitely an edge-of-your-seat thriller that is both thought-provoking and entertaining. At its heart lies the discord that exists between Christians and Jews over the responsibility for the crucifixion of Jesus Christ and while the author freely admits the parts he made up, his point about the current rise of anti-Semitism is well made in this very engaging work of fiction; not meaning to be flip, he's saying here we go again. He also iterates the scholastic truths about the discrepancies found in the gospels and how these discrepancies and centuries-old misunderstandings have led to so much bloodshed and murder against those of the Jewish faith. As I wrote earlier, this "complex plot" is both entertaining and thought-provoking...my favorite recipe for a good book.
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  • Kristine
    January 1, 1970
    Having read every single one of the books in this series, I couldn't wait to start this new one. As usual, I alternated between listening and reading and I have absolutely no problem with George Guidall as the narrator. But, I did have a couple of issues with this latest installment. Having followed Gabriel since the very beginning, I really have come to respect him and am so happy to see him at this point in his life with Chiara and the twins. I know that in his position now with Israeli Intell Having read every single one of the books in this series, I couldn't wait to start this new one. As usual, I alternated between listening and reading and I have absolutely no problem with George Guidall as the narrator. But, I did have a couple of issues with this latest installment. Having followed Gabriel since the very beginning, I really have come to respect him and am so happy to see him at this point in his life with Chiara and the twins. I know that in his position now with Israeli Intelligence, things cannot still be as crazy as they have been in the past and he is getting older. I think where this lost me was that it went too in depth into facts - facts regarding historic church documents and facts regarding religion. It was not the quick reading adventure that I've come to expect. While the plot was interesting and we had bits of excitement, they were few and far between. Will that stop me from reading the next book? Absolutely not. But, I just hope that we can get back to a little bit of the Gabriel Allon that we have come to love.
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  • Karen
    January 1, 1970
    I have read every Gabriel Allon book. Most are fun and usually relevant. International spy thrillers are my escape from reality. This book, unfortunately, was just short of boring. I'm not sure why Silva went away from the typical high-stakes and unpredictable drama that has characterized the series to date, perhaps to appease a public tired of the same villains, but it does not work. In fact, the story was so predictable that I was certain I was missing a huge plot twist. Nope. You can skip thi I have read every Gabriel Allon book. Most are fun and usually relevant. International spy thrillers are my escape from reality. This book, unfortunately, was just short of boring. I'm not sure why Silva went away from the typical high-stakes and unpredictable drama that has characterized the series to date, perhaps to appease a public tired of the same villains, but it does not work. In fact, the story was so predictable that I was certain I was missing a huge plot twist. Nope. You can skip this one and not miss a beat as nothing substantive really changes about the underlying story or characters. Another 2020 disappointment!A caveat: If you are unaware of the Church’s long history of anti-semitism, the political ascendancy of nationalism and resurgence of violent anti-semitism in Europe, or the many scandals of the Catholic Church, you will learn something from the book. Just be certain to read the Afterword to sort fact from fiction.
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  • Darius Ostrowski
    January 1, 1970
    Well, I went through this Gabriel Allon book pretty quickly, it's good to see Mr. Silva step away from the repetitive past few thrillers (not that this one is completely new ground).With the suspicious death of the Pope, his private secretary realizes that a letter he was writing to Gabriel Allon has vanished, along with the Swiss guard who was on duty that night. Allon happens to be vacationing in Venice, so off he goes to match wits with another secret Catholic society trying to take over the Well, I went through this Gabriel Allon book pretty quickly, it's good to see Mr. Silva step away from the repetitive past few thrillers (not that this one is completely new ground).With the suspicious death of the Pope, his private secretary realizes that a letter he was writing to Gabriel Allon has vanished, along with the Swiss guard who was on duty that night. Allon happens to be vacationing in Venice, so off he goes to match wits with another secret Catholic society trying to take over the world. Anti-semitism, anti-immigrant far right politicians, Church cardinals being bribed, German industrialists with hidden Nazi ties, and a missing apocryphal gospel by Pontius Pilate - it's all there.A tad predictable, a tad preachy, a tad repetitive, but overall a fun read, much more fun than the last 3-4 books. And we get to see how Allon might be spending his retirement...
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  • Maureen
    January 1, 1970
    I am only sad that I have to wait another year to go on an adventure with Gabriel Allon and friends. The Order was interesting, exciting, and timely. I started reading the Gabriel Allon series while I writing my dissertation - everytime I felt I needed or deserved a break from writing I would read another installment. I gobbled up those books (and yes, I did finish the dissertation). Gabriel, Chiara, and the twins go to Venice to visit Chiara's parents. While there, the Pope, an old friend of Ga I am only sad that I have to wait another year to go on an adventure with Gabriel Allon and friends. The Order was interesting, exciting, and timely. I started reading the Gabriel Allon series while I writing my dissertation - everytime I felt I needed or deserved a break from writing I would read another installment. I gobbled up those books (and yes, I did finish the dissertation). Gabriel, Chiara, and the twins go to Venice to visit Chiara's parents. While there, the Pope, an old friend of Gabriel's dies and his personal secretary enlists Gabriel's help in finding out what happened. Silva weaves a credible and interesting tale that touches upon tension in the Roman Catholic church between the conservative and liberal factions, immigration of refugees into Europe, and the rise of populist leaders. A pandemic is also mentioned. I completely and thoroughly enjoyed this book.
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  • Pamela
    January 1, 1970
    An excellent thriller by an author new to me and, naturally, I've ended up starting at the end rather than the beginning. However, they seem to stand alone pretty well since there is enough background information given to fill in the back story. Here, the major characters are Gabriel Allon, head of Israeli intelligence, his wife Chiara, and his friend Luigi Donati. They are up against the right-wing, mysterious Order of St. Helena as they attempt to take control of the Roman Catholic Church by r An excellent thriller by an author new to me and, naturally, I've ended up starting at the end rather than the beginning. However, they seem to stand alone pretty well since there is enough background information given to fill in the back story. Here, the major characters are Gabriel Allon, head of Israeli intelligence, his wife Chiara, and his friend Luigi Donati. They are up against the right-wing, mysterious Order of St. Helena as they attempt to take control of the Roman Catholic Church by rigging the election of the new Pope. They have murdered the previous Pope, of course.Even though the plot is a little hackneyed, Silva handles it beautifully and sticks with maintaining a thriller and avoids endless preaching on the horrors of the Church. This is a taut fast-paced thriller with well developed and engaging characters both heroes and villains.
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  • Rohit
    January 1, 1970
    I'm a big Gabriel Allon fan. I was eagerly waiting for this book. When it finally came out, I was very excited. And now after finishing my the book, I feel a little disappointed. I can think of two reasons. First, I had very high expectations from this book. Maybe I should have kept my expectations a little low? Second, while I was almost 90 pages through the book, I could see where the story was heading and could tell how the rest of the plot would unfold. I missed that plot-and-twists-gripping I'm a big Gabriel Allon fan. I was eagerly waiting for this book. When it finally came out, I was very excited. And now after finishing my the book, I feel a little disappointed. I can think of two reasons. First, I had very high expectations from this book. Maybe I should have kept my expectations a little low? Second, while I was almost 90 pages through the book, I could see where the story was heading and could tell how the rest of the plot would unfold. I missed that plot-and-twists-gripping-me feeling. This could be because maybe I've finally figured out how the author works with the plot for Gabriel Allon and I think it has now become a little repetitive. I finished the book in three sittings. I didn't enjoy it as much as I would have loved to.
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  • Allie
    January 1, 1970
    I’m so disappointed in the choice of this story line. I can’t believe that after 19 books of high speed thrill, beautifully mixed in with culture and art, the author has decided to pursue what seems like false historical fiction. What happened to Gabriel Allon chasing down bad guys and being less bound to play by rules than some American counterparts? If I wanted to read Religious Historical fiction, I would have purchased a Jerry Jenkins book instead. In addition, since book 19 ended with somew I’m so disappointed in the choice of this story line. I can’t believe that after 19 books of high speed thrill, beautifully mixed in with culture and art, the author has decided to pursue what seems like false historical fiction. What happened to Gabriel Allon chasing down bad guys and being less bound to play by rules than some American counterparts? If I wanted to read Religious Historical fiction, I would have purchased a Jerry Jenkins book instead. In addition, since book 19 ended with somewhat of a cliff hanger it would have been really nice if Mr. Silva had tied up some loose ends. I understand that this book isn’t a sequel but the transition from book 19 to 20, without so much of a sentence addressing what happened after the Saudi King was presumably murdered in book 19, left me wishing for more.
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