The Roxy Letters
Meet Roxy. She’s a sometimes vegan, always broke artist with a heart the size of Texas and an ex living in her spare bedroom. Her life is messy, but with the help of a few good friends and by the grace of the goddess Venus she’ll discover that good sex, true love, and her life’s purpose are all closer than she realizes.Bridget Jones penned a diary; Roxy writes letters. Specifically: she writes letters to her hapless, rent-avoidant ex-boyfriend—and current roommate—Everett. This charming and funny twenty-something is under-employed (and under-romanced), and she’s decidedly fed up with the indignities she endures as a deli maid at Whole Foods (the original), and the dismaying speed at which her beloved Austin is becoming corporatized. When a new Lululemon pops up at the intersection of Sixth and Lamar where the old Waterloo Video used to be, Roxy can stay silent no longer. As her letters to Everett become less about overdue rent and more about the state of her life, Roxy realizes she’s ready to be the heroine of her own story. She decides to team up with her two best friends to save Austin—and rescue Roxy’s love life—in whatever way they can. But can this spunky, unforgettable millennial keep Austin weird, avoid arrest, and find romance—and even creative inspiration—in the process?

The Roxy Letters Details

TitleThe Roxy Letters
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseApr 7th, 2020
PublisherSimon Schuster
ISBN-139781982121433
Rating
GenreFiction, Contemporary, Womens Fiction, Chick Lit

The Roxy Letters Review

  • Miranda Reads
    January 1, 1970
    Oops, I did it again...aka here's another tierlist video ranking all my January Books. Now that you know where this one stands, check out the video to see the rest!The Written Review: Stop complaining. Stop being so wishy-washy. You want power? Take it. Roxy - a quasi-vegan, dog-loving perpetually broke artist - has hit yet another stumbling block (could it actually be rock bottom??).She's quickly running out of money and desperately needs someone to rent her spare bedroom. ...it's Oops, I did it again...aka here's another tierlist video ranking all my January Books. Now that you know where this one stands, check out the video to see the rest!The Written Review: Stop complaining. Stop being so wishy-washy. You want power? Take it. Roxy - a quasi-vegan, dog-loving perpetually broke artist - has hit yet another stumbling block (could it actually be rock bottom??).She's quickly running out of money and desperately needs someone to rent her spare bedroom. ...it's important for you know once and for all that I will not be getting back together with you. And along comes Everett - her ex-boyfriend who also is a bit down on his luck and is willing to help her out.And so begins Roxy's letters - sometimes hilarious, often wildly inappropriate and always unique. The reader follows along as Roxy loses (and perhaps finds?) herself in the ever-changing world.So.Sooooo.Sooooooooooo.I think this one had a lot of potential, but it just wasn't my style.The format was interesting - though often the line between letters and an normal narration seemed to blur, but I would say that it worked (for the most part).The storyline was certainly unique - Roxy's antics were rather funny at first...but it just didn't last for me.She was thirty years old but perpetually acted like she was sixteen to nineteen (many of the letters to her ex-boyfriend reminisced about her favorite purple merman sex toy...)I was amused by it for a while but then...it just started to get a little old. It began to wear on me when she made (yet another) bad decision or did something (yet again) that was wildly inappropriate.Plus she would just blurt out the most cringe-worthy statements. "I was so busy shaving my legs, trimming my giant power triangle, and vacuuming up dog hair, I forgot to eat dinner." And that's not even getting into the weird sex cult that took up so much of this book's page space. To put it frank it was...squidgy and just got more TMI as the book went on.I think perhaps if I was more in the mood for this...maybe I would have enjoyed it more? I think someone who really has a crude sense of humor and doesn't mind copious (and I mean copious) sex talk, it could work.Though, on a side note - I absolutely LOVED Artemis and Anna (Roxy's two down-to-earth friends) - they almost made the book worth it for me! If the book just had the two of them in it - 5 stars all the way.A huge thank you to Mimi from Goodreads for sending me a free copy in exchange for an honest review!All quotes come from an uncorrected proof and are subject to change upon publication.YouTube | Blog | Instagram | Twitter | Snapchat @miranda.reads
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  • Tucker
    January 1, 1970
    Many thanks to INSERT for sending me a copy in exchange for an honest review Dear Everett If I could describe this book in one word, it would be sigh. A very long, relatively annoyed sigh. When I requested this book, it was because the publishers seemed to be putting so much faith in its potential success. Also, because of the cover and because it was compared to Whered You Go Bernadette Unfortunately, this book was very not Whered You Go Bernadette-y. Mostly, because Whered You Go Bernadette Many thanks to INSERT for sending me a copy in exchange for an honest review Dear Everett… If I could describe this book in one word, it would be “sigh”. A very long, relatively annoyed sigh. When I requested this book, it was because the publishers seemed to be putting so much faith in its potential success. Also, because of the cover and because it was compared to Where’d You Go Bernadette Unfortunately, this book was very not Where’d You Go Bernadette-y. Mostly, because Where’d You Go Bernadette was a raw, passionate story about mental illness, love, and motherhood whereas this… was a smoking mess. I absolutely hated the main character, Roxy. She was entitled, annoying, and quite stupid. At first, I thought those would all be character flaws she would overcome by the end of the novel but I slowly realized that they seemed to be implied as a positive part of her personality. The only character I was actually kind of interested in and cared about was Everett, the recipient of Roxy’s letters but because the book was told in 100% Roxy Letters, we were never able to really see him. On the note of the letters… It was an interesting style to employ but it wasn’t done very well. This style CAN be done well (like The Screwtape Letters) but it wasn’t because there were no letters responding or from other characters. I was literally trapped inside Roxy’s annoying mind for the entire book. Bottom Line:Rating - [2 Stars]Age Rating - [ R ]Content Screening (Mild Spoilers)Educational Value (0/0)Positive Messages (1/5) - [Endurance]Violence (0/0)Sex (4/5) - [Sexual themes, Constant discussion of sex, Innuendos]Language (4/5) - [F**k, sh*t, d*mn]Drinking/Drugs (4/5) - [Alcohol consumption, Drug selling]Publication Date: April 7th, 2020Publisher: Simon & SchusterGenre: Contemporary/Fiction----------------------that didn't go well... review to come----------------------[11/16/19] - thanks to my sister for helping me take this picture!----------------------i requested this from S & S because:-It was compared to Where'd You Go Bernadette-The cover is beautiful-According to Edelweiss+, the first print run is going to be 150K. For those of you who don't speak publicity, that's a huge amount of copies➵ Another buddy read with the amazing Miranda from Miranda Reads| Goodreads | Blog | Twitch | Pinterest | Reddit | LinkedIn |
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  • Bridgett
    January 1, 1970
    AVAILABLE APRIL 7thUh...this was no Bridget Jones's Diary.Yes, both Bridget and Roxy are quirky, but where Bridget was quick, precise, and hilarious...Roxy is long, rambling, and sometimes mildly amusing. Roxy enjoys writing letters to her ex-boyfriend, who, for a short portion of the story, is also living in her guest bedroom. In those letters, she writes about her veganism; her lack of action between the sheets; her merman vibrator; her tweaker meth-head neighbors; her hatred of big AVAILABLE APRIL 7thUh...this was no Bridget Jones's Diary.Yes, both Bridget and Roxy are quirky, but where Bridget was quick, precise, and hilarious...Roxy is long, rambling, and sometimes mildly amusing. Roxy enjoys writing letters to her ex-boyfriend, who, for a short portion of the story, is also living in her guest bedroom. In those letters, she writes about her veganism; her lack of action between the sheets; her merman vibrator; her tweaker meth-head neighbors; her hatred of big corporations (including Lululemon); her deli job at Whole Foods; her "furballs," (a miniature Dachshund named Roscoe and a cat named Charlize Theron); her experience with a sex cult (which was cringe-worthy); her boss, Dirty Steve; her love for Patrick, the beer guy at Whole Foods; and her inability, as an artist, to paint. Unfortunately, the letters are so long, the chapters are never-ending. By the time I was nearly 40% through the book, I'd only gotten through four chapters. Roxy is a fun character, but the sole utilization of letters to tell her story simply didn't work. There was also a story line, which I thought for sure would play a part at the conclusion of the novel, but instead, completely disappeared. So odd.The Roxy Letters is a cutesy story and would probably be perfect as a light, easy beach read...but if you're expecting another Bridget Jones, you'll be disappointed. 2.5 starsMany thanks to the publisher for my review copy.
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  • Theresa Alan
    January 1, 1970
    I didnt like the first couple chapters of this book because the narrator is writing letters to her ex-boyfriend who has moved in with her, and it took me some getting used to this style. Im so glad I stuck with it because I FELL IN LOVE WITH THIS NOVEL.The narrator, Roxy, is a vegan who works at the original Whole Foods in Austin, TX. Austin is where she grew up, and she hates the way its changing, including the influx of people and corporate (instead of local) businesses that have been taking I didn’t like the first couple chapters of this book because the narrator is writing letters to her ex-boyfriend who has moved in with her, and it took me some getting used to this style. I’m so glad I stuck with it because I FELL IN LOVE WITH THIS NOVEL.The narrator, Roxy, is a vegan who works at the original Whole Foods in Austin, TX. Austin is where she grew up, and she hates the way it’s changing, including the influx of people and corporate (instead of local) businesses that have been taking over. She’s an artist who can’t create art since her heart was broken, and she’s broke thanks to her animals’ endless medical bills and low-wage job. Cleary, nothing is going her way. Her strong friendships with women, her misguided forays into relationships with men, her love of her furballs (a dog, Roscoe, and a cat named Charlize Theron), help her ultimately get out of her rut, but naturally she has many misadventures along the way. I will caution you that there was one portion of the book that made my eyes go wide and think, “oh, I really hope that’s not a real thing but I’m not going to Google it because that will be in my search history for eternity.” But the very fact this activity is so out there was an important part of her relationship with ex, Everett, and her own growth and change. I recommend this novel, you just have to get used to Roxy writing letters that are never returned, very often because she never puts them on the table for Everett to find. Thanks to NetGalley for the opportunity to read this book, which RELEASES APRIL 7, 2020.
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  • Kelly (and the Book Boar)
    January 1, 1970
    Find all of my reviews at: http://52bookminimum.blogspot.com/3.5 StarsOh Roxy. With all of your goddess and Venus and grrrrrl (and not like the grrrrrrl lemme tell you but like every time a female was referenced) talk I should have really wanted to punch you in the face. But dangnabbit you made me laugh so I was able to simply chalk it up to . . . . . I requested The Roxy Letters because it was compared to Bridget Jones' Diary. In case you arent familiar with how I operate . . . . Despite Find all of my reviews at: http://52bookminimum.blogspot.com/3.5 StarsOh Roxy. With all of your “goddess” and “Venus” and “grrrrrl” (and not like the “grrrrrrl lemme tell you” but like every time a female was referenced) talk I should have really wanted to punch you in the face. But dangnabbit you made me laugh so I was able to simply chalk it up to . . . . . I requested The Roxy Letters because it was compared to Bridget Jones' Diary. In case you aren’t familiar with how I operate . . . . Despite most of the “if you liked, then you’ll loooooove” comparisons completely missing the mark, I never learn my lesson and fall for that trick almost every time. (I also request nearly every book with a house on the cover or the mere hint that it will be about some sort of hillbilly criminal element, but that doesn’t apply here so we’ll save that discussion for another occasion.) The shout-out to my darling Bridget is actually not a terrible one here (I have no idea why my other pal Bernadette was thrown in because huh? wha????) as the “letters” Roxy pens to her ex-boyfriend Everett are actually more “Dear Diary” style since she delivers very few of them. And as I mentioned above, her antics often made me chuckle. From attempting to take down the “man” (a/k/a Lululemon), to finding herself possibly joining some sort of fingerbanging sex cult, to dating 30-year-old skateboarding manboys, to battling the tweakers and the mobile meth lab parked next door, to becoming a better friend, to maybe growing up – all while attempting to . . . . . Roxy could certainly be pegged as a millennial Bridget. I wish I had the capability of slooooooooowing down rather than plowing through books or reading more than one thing at a time because I think I would have enjoyed this even more in smaller doses. Not to say I didn’t enjoy it, because 3.5 Stars obviously means I did. Rounding down because of a spoilery issue at the end regarding Roxy’s decisions on dating. ACTUAL SPOILER AHEAD – DO NOT CLICK IF YOU DON’T WANT TO KNOW. (view spoiler)[The one thing Roxy made pretty clear throughout the entire story was that she wasn’t fond of children. There was absolutely ZERO reason for her to feel bad about saying no to a date with someone who had kids. While I understand that one date does not equate marriage/step-parenting/etc., I also understand why she wouldn’t even want to waste her time and risk the potential of catching feelings for someone she couldn’t see herself with for the long-term. There is NOTHING selfish about a woman (a) not wanting to have children or (b) not wanting to co-parent someone else’s. (hide spoiler)] ARC provided by NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. Thank you, NetGalley!
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  • Nursebookie
    January 1, 1970
    For Roxy, adulting is the hardest thing she had ever had to do. Her heart is in the right place and I loved reading about her road to self-discovery, and the growing pains in her personal and professional life. Luckily, she is surrounded with supportive friends and bestowed positivity by the goddess Venus, Roxy may overcome this bump in the road in her life. Oh my goddess, please help her because Roxy was a complete disaster at 28 years old. In this book, Roxy writes letters to her ex-boyfriends For Roxy, adulting is the hardest thing she had ever had to do. Her heart is in the right place and I loved reading about her road to self-discovery, and the growing pains in her personal and professional life. Luckily, she is surrounded with supportive friends and bestowed positivity by the goddess Venus, Roxy may overcome this bump in the road in her life. “Oh my goddess”, please help her because Roxy was a complete disaster at 28 years old. In this book, Roxy writes letters to her ex-boyfriends and roommate Everett. The letters never reach Everett as she writes to him openly about her life as a struggling artist while also working as a deli maid at the original Whole Foods in Austin, TX. Initially, the letters were about collecting the rent, and slowly progresses to more of a self-introspection about her life and life choices. I loved the progression of the story and how Roxy truly is full of goodness and heart. I felt for her and I felt my own feelings about Roxy also progressed from, “oh my goddess what is she doing” to “yassss finally something is going right”!This book was a light hearted and sexy read. I did both the book and audio which was narrated so amazingly by Jayme Mattler. Jayme brought Roxy’s character to life and what a fun read this was for me.
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  • Nursebookie
    January 1, 1970
    For Roxy, adulting was the hardest thing she had ever had to do. Her heart was in the right place and I loved reading about her road to self-discovery, and the growing pains in her personal and professional life. Luckily, surrounded by supportive friends and bestowed positivity by the goddess Venus, Roxy may overcome this bump in the road in her life. Oh my goddess, please help her because Roxy was a complete disaster at 28 years old. In this book, Roxy writes letters to her ex-boyfriends and For Roxy, adulting was the hardest thing she had ever had to do. Her heart was in the right place and I loved reading about her road to self-discovery, and the growing pains in her personal and professional life. Luckily, surrounded by supportive friends and bestowed positivity by the goddess Venus, Roxy may overcome this bump in the road in her life. “Oh my goddess”, please help her because Roxy was a complete disaster at 28 years old. In this book, Roxy writes letters to her ex-boyfriends and roommate Everett. The letters never reach Everett as she writes to him openly about her life as a struggling artist while also working as a deli maid at the original Whole Foods in Austin, TX. Initially, the letters were about collecting the rent, and slowly progresses to more of a self-introspection about her life and life choices. I loved the progression of the story and how Roxy truly was full of goodness and heart. I felt for her and I felt my own feelings about Roxy also progressed from, “oh my goddess what is she doing” to “yassss finally something is going right”!This book was a light hearted and sexy read. I did both the book and audio which was narrated so amazingly by Jayme Mattler. Jayme brought Roxy’s character to life and what a fun read this was for me.
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  • ABookwormWithWine
    January 1, 1970
    The Roxy Letters by Mary Pauline Lowry was a very fun and very refreshing read that I think would make an excellent palate cleanser in between heavier reads.I listened to almost all of The Roxy Letters on audio and I absolutely loved the narrator, Jayme Mattler. She made the perfect Roxy and I enjoyed the book even more because of that! There's a little bit of romance, but this book is mostly about being a woman and kicking ass while trying to find your place in life and love. I really enjoyed The Roxy Letters by Mary Pauline Lowry was a very fun and very refreshing read that I think would make an excellent palate cleanser in between heavier reads.I listened to almost all of The Roxy Letters on audio and I absolutely loved the narrator, Jayme Mattler. She made the perfect Roxy and I enjoyed the book even more because of that! There's a little bit of romance, but this book is mostly about being a woman and kicking ass while trying to find your place in life and love. I really enjoyed the letter format although I did think it was a little weird at first since Everett doesn't actually see most of them. But I quickly got over that and really liked the format overall. I think it makes the book more concise which was fine with me although I almost wished it would just never end. The Roxy Letters made me laugh countless times and I loved Roxy as our leading lady. There are times that will make you cringe, and other times that will make you remember girl power does exist. It's also not completely fluff which I appreciated. The Roxy Letters does touch on mental illness and addiction which gave it some depth and I liked how it was handled.Song/s the book brought to mind: One Girl Revolution by SuperchickFinal Thought: You just want to be Roxy's friend and that's something else I loved about The Roxy Letters. There are a lot of great characters, but Roxy was my favorite. This book is witty and just a nice, lighter read. There's a tiny bit of steam but nothing too crazy which was right in my wheelhouse. If you want a light read that's awesome on audio I highly recommend picking up a copy (or audiobook!) of The Roxy Letters. I will certainly be looking forward to reading all of Mary Pauline Lowry's books as they come out and I'm very happy I got the opportunity to read/listen to this book! Thank you to Libro.fm and the publisher for both my advance listening copy and advance review copy. All opinions and thoughts are my own.
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  • Theresa
    January 1, 1970
    Thank you, Netgalley and Simon & Schuster for sending me a digital ARC, in exchange for an honest review.I absolutely loved "The Roxy Letters" by Mary Pauline Lowry. Roxy is like an American version of Bridget Jones. At first, I wasn't sure about the writing structure, (the story is told in unsent letters she writes to her ex-boyfriend and current roommate, Everett.) but it quickly became a favorite after 30 pages or so. The writing and dialogue are hilarious. There wasn't a chapter (or page Thank you, Netgalley and Simon & Schuster for sending me a digital ARC, in exchange for an honest review.I absolutely loved "The Roxy Letters" by Mary Pauline Lowry. Roxy is like an American version of Bridget Jones. At first, I wasn't sure about the writing structure, (the story is told in unsent letters she writes to her ex-boyfriend and current roommate, Everett.) but it quickly became a favorite after 30 pages or so. The writing and dialogue are hilarious. There wasn't a chapter (or page for that matter) that didn't give me a belly laugh. It's a total hoot. The only negative I can say is there's an abundance of exclamation points. THERE'S. A. LOT! But to be fair, it's part of the book's charm. Roxy is a 28-year old Austin native who works as a deli maid at Whole Foods. She hates her job but is devoted to her hometown roots until a Lululemon opens in her neighborhood. Roxy is sickened by it to the point where she plans to stage a protest. She is worried Austin is losing all its weird, quirky charm by having so many high-end stores pop up on every corner. With the help of her co-worker, Annie, and a new impulsive friend, Artemis - Roxy will do whatever she can to save her beloved city from gentrification. Roxy is also a struggling artist and nursing a broken heart. I liked how honest this book was when it came to sexuality. It doesn't shy away from uncomfortable situations. Roxy is an obsessive person but I found her so relatable. She's the kind of character you root for. She's sassy, loyal, accident-prone, and endearing. Even though this is considered chick-lit (I hate that sexist term), I didn't think it was cliché-ridden or predictable. You think the story is going to go a certain way and it totally does the unexpected. Ultimately, the overall message of "The Roxy Letters" is about a young woman's journey at overcoming her insecurities and rediscovering her creative potential. Release date: April 7, 2020
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  • Larry H
    January 1, 1970
    The Roxy Letters is a cute, quirky, epistolary novel.Roxys life has hit a rough patch. Her financial situation is bleak, her love life is nonexistent, her job as a deli maid at Whole Foods (the original) is dissatisfying and often in jeopardy, and as an artist, she has no motivation to create. Its gotten so bad that shes allowed her ex-boyfriend Everett to move in with her, so she can get some extra income she needs to get out of debt.The thing is, Everett isnt that good with paying rent on The Roxy Letters is a cute, quirky, epistolary novel.Roxy’s life has hit a rough patch. Her financial situation is bleak, her love life is nonexistent, her job as a “deli maid” at Whole Foods (the original) is dissatisfying and often in jeopardy, and as an artist, she has no motivation to create. It’s gotten so bad that she’s allowed her ex-boyfriend Everett to move in with her, so she can get some extra income she needs to get out of debt.The thing is, Everett isn’t that good with paying rent on time, or observing boundaries, so Roxy starts writing him letters, to remind him of his obligations and set some rules for their cohabitation (don’t come into her bedroom if the door is closed, don’t eat her food). And he also isn't around all that much, which defeats some of the purpose of why Roxy wanted him there in the first place.But little by little, these letters become less about the rent and more Roxy’s way of reflecting her feelings—envy of one of her best friends, whose career is taking off while hers is stagnating; worry that she won’t find romance (or even sex); and frustration that her beloved city of Austin is becoming more commercial. (The biggest slap in her face is when a Lululemon opens where an old video store used to be.)While she continues to write letters to Everett, they become more of a de-facto diary than actual correspondence. And as her life changes, the tone of the letters change as well, reflecting Roxy’s search for romance, better employment, artistic inspiration, and ultimate fulfillment.This is a cute, light, wacky book. It would definitely be a good change of pace between heavier reads.I liked this but didn’t love it. Sometimes the epistolary structure works (try Julie Schumacher’s Dear Committee Members ) and sometimes it doesn’t work as effectively. I felt like I would’ve liked to have gotten to know Roxy a little better and the letters kept her at a bit of a distance, but her voice is certainly unique!Still, despite my issues, this was a fun, quick read.Check out my list of the best books I read in 2019 at https://itseithersadnessoreuphoria.blogspot.com/2020/01/the-best-books-i-read-in-2019.html. Check out my list of the best books of the decade at https://itseithersadnessoreuphoria.blogspot.com/2020/01/my-favorite-books-of-decade.html.See all of my reviews at itseithersadnessoreuphoria.blogspot.com.Follow me on Instagram at https://www.instagram.com/the.bookishworld.of.yrralh/.
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  • Chelsey
    January 1, 1970
    Roxy is a 28 year-old, struggling artist in Austin, Texas working at the deli counter of a the flagship Whole Foods. She is passionate and vocal about her feminist and animal rights beliefs and the preservation of local Austin culture. Written in the form of letters to her ex boyfriend, we travel with Roxy on a wild and fairly strange mission for self-growth and -discovery. Overall, I didnt really enjoy this one. The drama and immature characters felt very YA-esque and I really didnt like Roxy. Roxy is a 28 year-old, struggling artist in Austin, Texas working at the deli counter of a the flagship Whole Foods. She is passionate and vocal about her feminist and animal rights beliefs and the preservation of local Austin culture. Written in the form of letters to her ex boyfriend, we travel with Roxy on a wild and fairly strange mission for self-growth and -discovery. Overall, I didn’t really enjoy this one. The drama and immature characters felt very YA-esque and I really didn’t like Roxy. The women and the writing was hypersexualized, the characters were generally selfish, and there were way too many convenient coincidences connecting the love interests. In the end, it came together better than I expected so I went with 2.5 rounded up.
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  • ✨ A ✨
    January 1, 1970
    Thank you to libro.fm for providing me with this ALC in exchange for an honest review
  • Laura • lauralovestoread
    January 1, 1970
    The Roxy Letters was everything I hoped it would be! It was such a fun, quirky read, and I adored main character Roxy so much. From her hilarious antics of working as the Deli Maid at Whole Foods to her burgeoning friendship with eccentric Artemis. There were so many laugh out loud moments.. including Princess and her Pea.. the sushi..and the pink python panties.Loved it and it definitely made me escape the past few days!*thank you to Simon & Schuster and author for the gifted copy. All The Roxy Letters was everything I hoped it would be! It was such a fun, quirky read, and I adored main character Roxy so much. From her hilarious antics of working as the Deli Maid at Whole Foods to her burgeoning friendship with eccentric Artemis. There were so many laugh out loud moments.. including Princess and her Pea.. the sushi..and the pink python panties.Loved it and it definitely made me escape the past few days!*thank you to Simon & Schuster and author for the gifted copy. All opinions are my own
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  • Kristi
    January 1, 1970
    I really enjoyed The Roxy Letters and I both listened to it and read it, all in the space of two days; thanks to the kindness of Simon & Schuster and Libro FM. At the beginning, I found Roxy to be a tad annoying and a bit self-absorbed but as the story moves on, Roxy develops insight; its refreshing to see how her letters begin to change from the beginning to the end. Im happy I was able to listen to this along with reading because it was an all-together different experience. The cadence and I really enjoyed The Roxy Letters and I both listened to it and read it, all in the space of two days; thanks to the kindness of Simon & Schuster and Libro FM. At the beginning, I found Roxy to be a tad annoying and a bit self-absorbed but as the story moves on, Roxy develops insight; it’s refreshing to see how her letters begin to change from the beginning to the end. I’m happy I was able to listen to this along with reading because it was an all-together different experience. The cadence and inflection of the narrators’ voice really changed the way I looked at Roxy. Was she stuck in her own self-induced stagnation? Working the same job in the deli at Whole Foods because she wasn’t driven to change or was it because life had just happened in a succession of the same misguided efforts at happiness that seemed to blend in to years. The Roxy Letters is a story of one woman’s journey to self-discovery and is fully centered around Roxy writing letters to Everett, her ex-boyfriend who is now a roommate out of necessity. She uses these letters to communicate her grievances with him but soon they become a therapeutic outlet against everything that’s going wrong in her world. Focusing on the injustices of the world and her town of Austin, Texas. There are many comical moments, some sad, and some that address a lot of the problems in todays world. A fun read and a wonderful audiobook. Adapting to the format of Roxy’s letter writing is the biggest hurdle, once done, it’s a very enjoyable read!
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  • Suzanne thebookblondie
    January 1, 1970
    The Roxy Letters by Mary Pauline Lowry (#17 in 2020)Thank you to @librofm and @simonandschuster for my advanced copy! PUB DATE: April 7th, 2020Roxy, a 28 year old, under-employed artist from Austin, Texas, is caught up in the everyday nonsense of her job at Wholefoods and the pining over her "one that got away." Roxy begins to grow sick of the corporatization of her city as she notices a new Lululemon storefront in place of the old Waterloo Video store, and she pours her energy into a plan to The Roxy Letters by Mary Pauline Lowry (#17 in 2020)Thank you to @librofm and @simonandschuster for my advanced copy! PUB DATE: April 7th, 2020Roxy, a 28 year old, under-employed artist from Austin, Texas, is caught up in the everyday nonsense of her job at Wholefoods and the pining over her "one that got away." Roxy begins to grow sick of the corporatization of her city as she notices a new Lululemon storefront in place of the old Waterloo Video store, and she pours her energy into a plan to take down the fancy athleisure franchise."Oh my GODDESS!" This plot is formatted as a series of letters from Roxy to her live-in ex-boyfriend, Everett. In the beginning, Roxy's letters seem shallow and consist of details about her daily life and her request for Everett to pay the rent he owes. Roxy gossips about her coworkers at Wholefoods and her single lady lifestyle, but she also subtly suggests that she feels lonely in her quest to find the perfect guy. Gradually, however, Roxy's letters become more introspective as her life seemingly falls apart (mostly first world problems, let's be real), and she starts to hide the letters to Everett in her most secret of dresser drawers. Roxy's letters become less of a means of communication with Everett and more of a therapeutic journaling process for herself.Roxy is truly Next Level Basic (shoutout to @stassischroeder ) between her sometimes-veganism, her obsession with the goddess, Venus, her ex-boyfriend who still lives in her apartment, and her always-sassy personality. Roxy also possesses that Bridget Jones quality in the letters she writes and how she pours her heart out to Everett, or rather, herself. I'm pretty sure Roxy is one of my real-life friends, and if she's not already, we totally could be. This might be my new favorite audiobook thanks to Jayme Mattler. Mattler's voice gives such a personable quality to Roxy, one that makes you feel as though you're listening to your best friend's millennial trials and tribulations. In between all of the weird thrillers and dramatic historical fiction I've read recently, The Roxy Letters was a pleasant and comical breath of fresh air. 4 stars ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️
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  • Susan Kennedy
    January 1, 1970
    I really wasnt sure about this one most of the way through. It was very different from anything I have read as far as how it was written. It is a series of letters written to the main protagonists ex-boyfriend. I found it a really odd format, but the further I read, the better it seemed to get. I still think it was odd, but it wasnt bad. I loved the characters from the Venus loving protagonist to the bi-polar friend. It was entertaining and there were definitely spots that made me laugh out I really wasn’t sure about this one most of the way through. It was very different from anything I have read as far as how it was written. It is a series of letters written to the main protagonists ex-boyfriend. I found it a really odd format, but the further I read, the better it seemed to get. I still think it was odd, but it wasn’t bad. I loved the characters from the Venus loving protagonist to the bi-polar friend. It was entertaining and there were definitely spots that made me laugh out loud. The language really got to me though. I know it doesn’t bother a lot of people, but I really hate the ‘F’ bomb being dropped all the time or someone using the ‘C’ word. I just feel like there are so many better ways to communicate than using bad language. I feel it lessens the conversation or the text. So, I found that annoying, but overall the story was entertaining and fun.So, there you have it. A fun read that took me a bit to get into because of the format. Overall, it was pretty good. It would have been even better without the foul language, but that is just me.
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  • Kate Vocke (bookapotamus)
    January 1, 1970
    Did you ever feel like maybe you shouldnt read a book, because you wouldnt relate to the main character?I kinda thought - oh, this chick, she doesnt sound like someone I can identify with. Ive been there: young, trying to find my way in life and love, and definitely dont want to go back to that place. But then I met Roxy.❤I started reading the physical book first and then I switched to audio cause I needed to hear Roxy tell her story, in her own voice. I cringed, I covered my ears, and I may or Did you ever feel like maybe you shouldn’t read a book, because you wouldn’t relate to the main character?⁣⁣⁣⁣I kinda thought - oh, this chick, she doesn’t sound like someone I can identify with. I’ve been there: young, trying to find my way in life and love, and definitely don’t want to go back to that place. ⁣⁣⁣⁣But then I met Roxy.⁣⁣❤️⁣⁣I started reading the physical book first and then I switched to audio cause I needed to hear Roxy tell her story, in her own voice. I cringed, I covered my ears, and I may or may not have laughed so hard that wine came out my nose. ⁣⁣⁣⁣I forgive you Roxy for the wasted wine.⁣⁣🍷⁣⁣And Mary Pauline Lowry is hilarious. I’m sure you’ve seen her around in some of my favorite book friends' stories lately on Instagram - answering questions while drinking excessive amounts of alcohol and laying naked in her bathtub drowning in a pile of her books. ⁣⁣⁣⁣I can’t wait to see what she comes up with next. Because in the end - Roxy is just trying to figure sh*t out… and aren’t we all just trying to do that? And what could be more relatable than that?!⁣⁣
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  • Laura Peden
    January 1, 1970
    The Roxy Letters is like R rated Chick Lit. Its feministic & humorous without the cliches & fluff, tackling subjects like mental illness & addiction. Audiobook is 🔥too. The Roxy Letters is like R rated Chick Lit. It’s feministic & humorous without the cliches & fluff, tackling subjects like mental illness & addiction. Audiobook is 🔥too.
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  • Simon & Schuster Goodreads
    January 1, 1970
    This is the perfect novel to take your mind off stressful things! You'll laugh, you'll blush, you'll wish you had a Roxy in your life (and, perhaps, that you lived in Austin with her!)
  • Dana
    January 1, 1970
    Dear Everett, I encourage anyone that gets their hands on this diary upon its April 7th release, to refrain from consuming food/drink or placing themselves in a quiet setting while reading. While this is not a suggested read for those easily offended by colorful language, it IS a total laugh fest for those that dont mind it at all. Humor aside, one will find that within these pages is a story of finding ones place in the world, friendships, the many facets of love, mental health awareness, and Dear Everett, I encourage anyone that gets their hands on this “diary” upon its April 7th release, to refrain from consuming food/drink or placing themselves in a quiet setting while reading. While this is not a suggested read for those easily offended by colorful language, it IS a total laugh fest for those that don’t mind it at all. Humor aside, one will find that within these pages is a story of finding one’s place in the world, friendships, the many facets of love, mental health awareness, and ultimately the biggest lesson of all…that everyone deserves a chance. Whether you are a wiener dog lover, whole foods consumer, Lulu lemon wearer, Venus worshiper or anything in between, I can promise that you will fall in love with me. Happily, Roxyp.s. I really should not be compared to Bridget Jones or Bernadette…..I am so much better.*Thank you to Simon & Schuster for the Advance Reader Copy.
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  • Kyra Leseberg (Roots & Reads)
    January 1, 1970
    DNF at 45%Twenty-something Roxy is a sometimes vegan living in Austin, Texas with a messy love life and a job behind the Whole Foods deli counter that barely covers her mortgage.Struggling financially, she makes the decision to allow her ex-boyfriend Everett to move in and pay rent.Through a series of letters that Roxy writes to the mostly absent Everett to whine about his late rent and (for reasons unknown) keep him updated on her daily life, readers learn of Roxy's cringe-worthy attempts at DNF at 45%Twenty-something Roxy is a sometimes vegan living in Austin, Texas with a messy love life and a job behind the Whole Foods deli counter that barely covers her mortgage.Struggling financially, she makes the decision to allow her ex-boyfriend Everett to move in and pay rent.Through a series of letters that Roxy writes to the mostly absent Everett to whine about his late rent and (for reasons unknown) keep him updated on her daily life, readers learn of Roxy's cringe-worthy attempts at romance, her hatred for Lululemon and her meth cooking neighbors, and annoyance that Everett appears to have joined some sort of sex cult.Does this sound eccentric and charming?  Like a rom-com you'd like to watch with girlfriends?  Yes, that's what I thought, too. But the delivery was absolutely annoying in my opinion.  This character is writing long letters to her ex-boyfriend (who is never around and is obviously using her for a cheap place to stay) explaining her embarrassing sexual encounters, crush on a drummer, new friendships, and plot to take down Lululemon.  It's trying too hard to be funny and relatable.It was cringe-inducing by the 10% mark and as I approached 30% it had turned into a hate read so I admittedly gave up at the half-way mark.  I just didn't care to know any more about Roxy or what happened to her or why in the hell she was still writing letters to her ex.I think my dislike for the book is a combination of things, including the format and the attempt to make Roxy a flawed but relatable character.  I love a charmingly quirky character but didn't find that in Roxy unfortunately.Thanks to Simon & Schuster and NetGalley for providing an ARC in exchange for my honest review.  The Roxy Letters is scheduled for release on April 7, 2020.For more reviews, visit www.rootsandreads.wordpress.com
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  • Ashlee Bree
    January 1, 1970
    Epistolary novels tend to be hit or miss for me because of how theyre structured, depending on how successful they are at grasping then preserving my interest within their style limitations. This one tottered over the line of diverting mediocrity, in my opinion. It was neither bad nor great. I liked it but wasnt wholly engaged. I say that because, while I found some of Roxys foot-in-mouth quirks and fingerbanging commentary to be amusing not to mention tacitly vulgar, absurd, and endearing in Epistolary novels tend to be hit or miss for me because of how they’re structured, depending on how successful they are at grasping then preserving my interest within their style limitations. This one tottered over the line of diverting mediocrity, in my opinion. It was neither bad nor great. I liked it but wasn’t wholly engaged. I say that because, while I found some of Roxy’s foot-in-mouth quirks and “fingerbanging” commentary to be amusing not to mention tacitly vulgar, absurd, and endearing in places, all of which helped to highlight her witty shenanigan-riddled nature in spades, I felt the plot suffered a bit by sticking exclusively to one-way letters to her ex-boyfriend, Everett. I suppose I wanted more than what I received stylistically, you know? What I mean by that is I think I would’ve liked to see her start with letters only to then branch off into other mediums (email drafts, phone notes, unsaved documents, etc.) because it would’ve broken the chain of monotony, thereby adding a kind of modern day technological normalcy and suspense for the readers. It would’ve added something extra. Something more unique. Also, by the halfway point, her continuing to write unsent narratives to her ex, whom she hardly interacted with throughout the book anyway, grew to be a bit tedious. The love interest subplot felt rushed and underdeveloped as well. It didn’t spark much of a reaction from me because their connection was bland. Or perhaps unremarkable is the better word? Utterly forgettable.Despite that, I found Roxy to be an amiable, spirited character. She’s cut from a similar mold as Bridget Jones and Anne Shirley, meaning she’s constantly hurtling herself from one Austin-sized scrape into the next without realizing it until it’s too late. That allowed for a decent amount of comedy and familiarity. (view spoiler)[For instance, the vegan bologna-ing of a meth van incident reminded me a little of Lorelai and Rory devil egging Jess’s car on Gilmore Girls. And don’t get me started on the “Girls Run the World” pasty dance protest in front of Lululemon. (hide spoiler)] Hilarious!Although I took issue with certain elements of this book, I must admit her character as well as her peculiar circle of Whole Foods friends and colleagues grew on me by the end. Roxy is essentially Millennial Disaster incarnate so I think a lot of people can relate or, you know - laugh - at her “gotta get my shit together” conflicts. I know I sure did.For those of you who like or are not averse to raunchy humor, to screwball behavior of many variations, then I’d say this is worth a read. In fact, it’ll probably make you feel that your own life is much more “together” than you think it is right now. Much thanks to NetGalley for providing me with this ARC!
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  • Ashley readwithash
    January 1, 1970
    This book is hilarious, lighthearted, heartwarming and so cute! Roxy is underemployed, sexually frustrated, uninspired and overall just needing a change. Bridget Joness Diary meets Whered you go, Bernadette in this novel about a Whole Foods employee who aspires to be an artist and joins forces with her two best friends to make Austin, TX more shop local friendly! When Roxy decides to take action, she does whatever she can to stay spunky, avoid arrest, discover her sexual life, find her true love This book is hilarious, lighthearted, heartwarming and so cute! Roxy is underemployed, sexually frustrated, uninspired and overall just needing a change. Bridget Jones’s Diary meets Where’d you go, Bernadette in this novel about a Whole Foods employee who aspires to be an artist and joins forces with her two best friends to make Austin, TX more ‘shop local’ friendly! When Roxy decides to take action, she does whatever she can to stay spunky, avoid arrest, discover her sexual life, find her true love and her perhaps her purpose in life! ••This book was such a great break for me from serious books! Roxy is so funny and I literally laughed out loud at so many parts! I met the author @marypaulinelowry at the #simonschusterselects event and she is so sweet! I loved hearing her heart behind this book, something that people would escape in but also move us towards change and shopping local. Thank you for writing such a fun book Mary Pauline and it was a joy meeting you! 💛
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  • Ema
    January 1, 1970
    This was exactly the novel I needed to turn my brain off for NaNoWriMo.
  • Melissa
    January 1, 1970
    If you'd asked me during the first half, I'd have told you this wasn't a book I was going to like, but the second half surprised me and made me really appreciate Roxy and her story. Told in the form of letters to an ex-boyfriend, this story was one filled with humor, heart and growth. I enjoyed seeing Roxy grow up, develop some deeper connections and get out of her own way. I enjoyed the absurd humor and Roxy's quirkiness. I loved that this book tackled some very real and meaningful topics, like If you'd asked me during the first half, I'd have told you this wasn't a book I was going to like, but the second half surprised me and made me really appreciate Roxy and her story. Told in the form of letters to an ex-boyfriend, this story was one filled with humor, heart and growth. I enjoyed seeing Roxy grow up, develop some deeper connections and get out of her own way. I enjoyed the absurd humor and Roxy's quirkiness. I loved that this book tackled some very real and meaningful topics, like addiction and mental health, but in a lighter way.I would recommend this one to anyone who needs some laughs and is willing to keep going on a read they aren't quite sure is for them.I received advanced listening and reading copies in exchange for my honest review.
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  • Kristin (Always With a Book)
    January 1, 1970
    A fun, quirky book that will have you laughing and forgetting everything else for a while.Full review up on blog: http://alwayswithabook.blogspot.com/2...
  • Morelia (Strandedinbooks)
    January 1, 1970
    Oh Roxy, how I love thee... You remind me so much of myself with your underemployment, your bad choice (luck?) in men, bad choices in general, and your trying to get a handle on that emotional maturity. *deep sigh* And yet, despite all of that, or because of ityes, BECAUSE of itI freaking adore you woman. You, your panty-eating dachshund, and that Venus-praying, kombucha-drinking soul. You complete me. You give me hope. Venus bless you with those orgasms sans 15 minute timer.*cw: mention of Oh Roxy, how I love thee... You remind me so much of myself with your underemployment, your bad choice (luck?) in men, bad choices in general, and your trying to get a handle on that emotional maturity. *deep sigh* And yet, despite all of that, or because of it—yes, BECAUSE of it—I freaking adore you woman. You, your panty-eating dachshund, and that Venus-praying, kombucha-drinking soul. You complete me. You give me hope. Venus bless you with those orgasms sans 15 minute timer.*cw: mention of attempted suicide, mental illness
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  • Mo
    January 1, 1970
    Roxy tells customers to f**k off, dabbles in the fine art of blackmail, pilfers food from her employer (not only for herself, but also for her favorite customers), fantasizes about some hot guy nibbling her sweet-and-sour peach, and generally says f**k quite often. What a charmer! Obviously, I do not care for the main character, but that is not my biggest problem with the book. I really dislike the fact that Roxy uses her letters to tell the recipient things he should already know (like the Roxy tells customers to f**k off, dabbles in the fine art of blackmail, pilfers food from her employer (not only for herself, but also for her favorite customers), fantasizes about some hot guy nibbling her sweet-and-sour peach, and generally says f**k quite often. What a charmer! Obviously, I do not care for the main character, but that is not my biggest problem with the book. I really dislike the fact that Roxy uses her letters to tell the recipient things he should already know (like the names of his dogs). I read the first chapter, then bailed. I received a free copy of this book in exchange for my honest review. My thanks (and apologies) to the author, the publisher and NetGalley.
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  • Craig Fehrman
    January 1, 1970
    I got to spend some time on the road with Mary when we were both promoting our books. She's an amazing person, and she's written an amazing book. This book is funny and fast-paced, and it really makes its letter-writing structure work. But the stuff I'll always remember are the characters--with maybe the best character being the setting, of Austin, Texas. That's where Mary's from, and her novel is a love letter to hometowns, indie culture, and rom coms (emphasis on com!). This is a great read, I got to spend some time on the road with Mary when we were both promoting our books. She's an amazing person, and she's written an amazing book. This book is funny and fast-paced, and it really makes its letter-writing structure work. But the stuff I'll always remember are the characters--with maybe the best character being the setting, of Austin, Texas. That's where Mary's from, and her novel is a love letter to hometowns, indie culture, and rom coms (emphasis on com!). This is a great read, and you will finish it in a good mood and with a desire to make the world a better place.
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  • Basic B's Guide
    January 1, 1970
    Grab a bottle of #Kombucha, throw out your favorite pair of #Lululemons (jk!) and settle in for a unique, quirky and sometimes quite sexual 2020 read! The Roxy Letters is a debut and not out April 2020. I had fun buddy reading this with some #bookfriends this past week and I cant wait to hear what you think. Fans of Whered you go Bernadette will appreciate this one but again I caution that it can be X rated at times. Grab a bottle of #Kombucha, throw out your favorite pair of #Lululemons (jk!) and settle in for a unique, quirky and sometimes quite sexual 2020 read! The Roxy Letters is a debut and not out April 2020. I had fun buddy reading this with some #bookfriends this past week and I can’t wait to hear what you think. Fans of Where’d you go Bernadette will appreciate this one but again I caution that it can be X rated at times.
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