Avatar (Avatar: The Last Airbender, #6)
Aang faces a decision from which there is no return!When Aang, Katara, Sokka, and Toph return to Earthen Fire Industries--the factory owned by Toph's father--Aang is surprised when their arrival is met with a cold shoulder. As soon as the team is asked for help at a business council meeting, the reason for the slight becomes clear: a massive bender-versus-non-bender conflict has gripped the town and is threatening to turn violent. In order to heal the divide and save the town, Aang and the team will all face tough decisions about power and identity that could tear them apart.Written by Faith Erin Hicks (The Adventures of Superhero Girl, The Nameless City) and drawn by Peter Wartman (Stonebreaker), in collaboration with Avatar: The Last Airbender creators Michael Dante DiMartino and Bryan Konietzko, this is the ultimate continuation of Avatar!Collects Avatar: The Last Airbender - Imbalance parts 1-3 (ATLA volumes 16-18).

Avatar (Avatar: The Last Airbender, #6) Details

TitleAvatar (Avatar: The Last Airbender, #6)
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseJun 16th, 2020
PublisherDark Horse Books
ISBN-139781506708126
Rating
GenreSequential Art, Comics, Graphic Novels, Fantasy

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Avatar (Avatar: The Last Airbender, #6) Review

  • Silk ♛
    January 1, 1970
    book 17 out of 75 graphic novel"That's a terrible name!"I'm sorry, I just had to put that Sokka quote. This sixth installment in graphic novel continuation of the "Avatar: The Last Airbender" TV show was very good. The TV show is arguably the best TV show to ever be made and these graphic novels have not disappointed. This was no exception. I really enjoyed seeing how much our gang had developed and how they were continuing their quest in bringing peace to the world. I loved seeing Sokka's hu book 17 out of 75 graphic novel"That's a terrible name!"I'm sorry, I just had to put that Sokka quote. This sixth installment in graphic novel continuation of the "Avatar: The Last Airbender" TV show was very good. The TV show is arguably the best TV show to ever be made and these graphic novels have not disappointed. This was no exception. I really enjoyed seeing how much our gang had developed and how they were continuing their quest in bringing peace to the world. I loved seeing Sokka's humor and wits, as always. I wish we'd gotten to see Zuko a little bit as well, but that's only because he's one of my favorite characters. But in terms of new characters, I absolutely loved Ru. She was so nice and sweet.For fans of the show, who's your favorite character? Mine is definitely Suki, I love how badass she is, even though she isn't a bender. And of course I love Zuko and Uncle Iroh.➼ 4 stars
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  • Aidan
    January 1, 1970
    Admittedly, the new art took some getting used to!
  • Elena
    January 1, 1970
    What.happened.to.the.ART.STYLE?! It took two volumes to get used to this new style, and although I very much prefer the old one I can admit that this style represents better how grown up they are and their expressions are very similar at times to the original animation.Plot wise, this comic feels so much closer to the events in Legend of Korra... Which is both really cool and at the same time terrifying because I do not want Aang's journey to ever end. Still, seeing the nods to everything that w What.happened.to.the.ART.STYLE?! It took two volumes to get used to this new style, and although I very much prefer the old one I can admit that this style represents better how grown up they are and their expressions are very similar at times to the original animation.Plot wise, this comic feels so much closer to the events in Legend of Korra... Which is both really cool and at the same time terrifying because I do not want Aang's journey to ever end. Still, seeing the nods to everything that will come to pass in Korra is great, and although the story here was dragging a bit at times seeing Team Avatar mature is a gift.
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  • Joana Veríssimo
    January 1, 1970
    This was really GOOD!!!It was so GREAT to see Suki again, and I LOVE her being so important and teaching everyone the chi-block technique Also really love the debate about taking someone ability to bend, it's so interesting how these characters feel things and their decisionsReally loved this and clear recommendation for any "Avatar: The Last Airbender" fans :D
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  • Jesse Fitzgerald
    January 1, 1970
    The adventures of Team Avatar continue with a new creative team consisting of author Faith Erin Hicks and illustrator Peter Wartman. They expand upon what Gene Luen Yang established from The Rift by returning to Earthen Fire Industries. Aang and his friends are astonished that the village with one factory has expanded into the bustling Cranefish Town. A sweeping overhead illustration of this coastal city immediately signifies this spot as the future site of Republic City from The Legend of Korra The adventures of Team Avatar continue with a new creative team consisting of author Faith Erin Hicks and illustrator Peter Wartman. They expand upon what Gene Luen Yang established from The Rift by returning to Earthen Fire Industries. Aang and his friends are astonished that the village with one factory has expanded into the bustling Cranefish Town. A sweeping overhead illustration of this coastal city immediately signifies this spot as the future site of Republic City from The Legend of Korra. In keeping with that foreshadowing, we also get a glimpse of the island that will one day become Air Temple Island. The main focus of the narrative, however, is the intensifying resentment between benders and non-benders. TLOK fans, of course, know that this will evolve into the Equalist Revolution, a militant uprising of non-benders who sought to overthrow what they saw as an oppressive bending regime. In Imbalance, we see that non-benders are gaining more economic power thanks to the wider use of machines that enables them to work the same jobs as benders, often with greater efficiency. This, unfortunately, causes many benders to lose their jobs and turn to criminal enterprises. Imbalance establishes some interesting developments and does nail the personalities of these beloved characters. However, its exploration of these social issues lacks the same nuance and subtlety of previous Avatar content. To be fair, Avatar has never been the most subtle of the fantasy genre, but Imbalance is extremely heavy-handed in its dialogue and exposition, to the point where it practically spells out how we are supposed to think. Even Gilak from North and South had more nuance than Liling, the villain of Imbalance. Liling is the earthbender owner of one of the town's major factories and has an agenda to drive the non-benders out of the area. We learn later in Part 3 what her motivation is for doing this, and while it is understandable, that is the most intrigue her character has throughout this graphic novel. From the moment she's introduced, you know she's trouble. For example, her hair is messy, with long strands partially covering her face. Even her earthbending daughter Yaling has this alfalfa strand sticking up. Only her non-bending daughter Ru has groomed hair. Do you see what I'm conveying here? It's such an obvious visual depiction of who is corrupt in this family. Despite its lackluster villain, Imbalance does a better job handling its heroes. I especially loved the return of Suki. She has become even more formidable thanks to her new chi-blocking skills. She has a moment with Ru that was reminiscent of Gandalf advising Frodo in The Lord of the Rings. Another conversation I enjoyed was one between Aang and Katara about the state of the town and the uncertain future. It was a touching moment and reflects on how mature these characters have become. Toph and Sokka are as great as ever, and I enjoyed the little Easter Egg when Sokka told Aang to "Do the thing!" Finally, my last favorite moment was Aang's ethical dilemma of whether or not to strip Liling of her bending. Toph suggests this idea as a solution for the bender violence, but Katara fears that such a strong response will have negative repercussions. I thought the novel handled this matter fairly well. One gripe I often hear about Imbalance is the new art style by Wartman. Don't get me wrong, the art in Imbalance is very good. Wartman is obviously talented, and any comic book author would be grateful to have him visualize a script. Still, I do prefer Gurihiru's art because it looked so much like that of the show. It's more crisp and vibrant. This is not a knock against Wartman; it's just my personal preference. Although I enjoy reading new stories with these great characters, Imbalance is definitely the weakest of the Avatar graphic novels. Its story is predictable and sorely lacking in nuance. Each of the previous graphic novels had a lot of memorable moments to discuss and ponder, even in the lesser installments like North and South. Such scenes are scare in Imbalance, nor does its story answer any of the fandom's major questions, making it the most forgettable arc thus far. It's not bad, just average. I hope that Hicks learns from this first book and takes more risks in the upcoming Katara and the Pirate's Silver.
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  • Rebeka
    January 1, 1970
    PRETTY ON THE NOSE FOR CURRENT EVENTS
  • Emily
    January 1, 1970
    Surprisingly timely!
  • Alyssa L.
    January 1, 1970
    *3.5 stars
  • Teo 2050
    January 1, 1970
    2020.05.14–2020.05.14Hicks FE, Konietzko B, DiMartino MD, Wartman P (Illustrations), & Hill R (Illustrations) (2019) Avatar - The Last Airbender - Imbalance 2020.05.14–2020.05.14Hicks FE, Konietzko B, DiMartino MD, Wartman P (Illustrations), & Hill R (Illustrations) (2019) Avatar - The Last Airbender - Imbalance
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  • Montse
    January 1, 1970
    Per què en este els dibuixos són més lletjos
  • Alexandra
    January 1, 1970
    Another cute story about bridging the divide and learning to adapt to new circumstances.
  • Saravanan Mani
    January 1, 1970
    Good, but the subtlety with which political issues were handled in the previous books in the series is missing. In the sense, when there is bender/non-bender conflict, there is clearly a good and a bad side, unlike previous issues where the insider/outsider, tradition/progress issues seemed more on balance. The problem is not that there are clear antagonists and protagonists, but that the perspectives themselves seem worryingly loaded and biased. I hope Hicks gets better at writing complex moral Good, but the subtlety with which political issues were handled in the previous books in the series is missing. In the sense, when there is bender/non-bender conflict, there is clearly a good and a bad side, unlike previous issues where the insider/outsider, tradition/progress issues seemed more on balance. The problem is not that there are clear antagonists and protagonists, but that the perspectives themselves seem worryingly loaded and biased. I hope Hicks gets better at writing complex moral and social issues, because I want to see this avatar story continue for as long as possible.
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  • Ag
    January 1, 1970
    I like this art style much more than that of the previous comics
  • Michael Perez
    January 1, 1970
    Pretty okay. If you liked season 1 of Korra, this is basically the same concept. I'm just not sure it covers any new area.
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