This Is My America
Dear Martin meets Just Mercy in this unflinching yet uplifting YA novel that explores the racist injustices in the American justice system.Every week, seventeen-year-old Tracy Beaumont writes letters to Innocence X, asking the organization to help her father, an innocent Black man on death row. After seven years, Tracy is running out of time—her dad has only 267 days left. Then the unthinkable happens. The police arrive in the night, and Tracy’s older brother, Jamal, goes from being a bright, promising track star to a “thug” on the run, accused of killing a white girl. Determined to save her brother, Tracy investigates what really happened between Jamal and Angela down at the Pike. But will Tracy and her family survive the uncovering of the skeletons of their Texas town’s racist history that still haunt the present?Fans of Nic Stone and Jason Reynolds won’t want to miss this provocative and gripping debut.

This Is My America Details

TitleThis Is My America
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseJul 1st, 2020
PublisherRandom House Children's Books
ISBN-139780593118788
Rating
GenreYoung Adult, Contemporary, Fiction, Realistic Fiction

This Is My America Review

  • Liz Lawson
    January 1, 1970
    In short, this book is phenomenal. Not only did the author tackle incredibly powerful, important issues of our times, she managed to do so while also writing a compulsively readable book with characters who grab you from page 1 -- who you care about and love by its end. Add it to your 2020 TBR list, or you will be missing out on one of the best reads of the year.
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  • The Artisan Geek
    January 1, 1970
    29/12/19BRUHThis cover is EVERYTHING. You can find me onYoutube | Instagram | Twitter | Tumblr | Website 29/12/19BRUHThis cover is EVERYTHING. You can find me onYoutube | Instagram | Twitter | Tumblr | Website
  • Richie Partington
    January 1, 1970
    Richie’s Picks: THIS IS MY AMERICA by Kim Johnson, Random House, July 2020, 416 p., 978-0-593-11876-4“You might be the wrong colorYou might be too poorJustice isn’t something just anyone can affordYou might not pull the triggerYou might be out in the carAnd you might get a lethal injection‘Cause we take a metaphor that far”-- Ani Difranco, “Crime for Crime” (1995)“In 2018, together we’ve exonerated nine innocent people, the most ever in the Innocence Project’s 26-year history, and helped pass 17 Richie’s Picks: THIS IS MY AMERICA by Kim Johnson, Random House, July 2020, 416 p., 978-0-593-11876-4“You might be the wrong colorYou might be too poorJustice isn’t something just anyone can affordYou might not pull the triggerYou might be out in the carAnd you might get a lethal injection‘Cause we take a metaphor that far”-- Ani Difranco, “Crime for Crime” (1995)“In 2018, together we’ve exonerated nine innocent people, the most ever in the Innocence Project’s 26-year history, and helped pass 17 wrongful conviction reforms in 14 states. After spending more than 215 years in prison combined, our clients are where they belong: home with their loved ones.”-- The Innocence Project, “2018: A Record Year in Exonerations” We occasionally hear in the news about someone--usually a black man--who has spent decades in prison but is released because of newly revealed evidence. These incidents point to the problem with executions: If the State successfully prosecutes and then executes an innocent person, nothing can subsequently be done to remedy the fatal failure of the system.“When I talk to Daddy about his case and get too hopeful, he makes me promise not to get upset because getting an appeal grows more unlikely with each day But Daddy’s also not the type to give up. He could’ve accepted a plea deal, but he said he wouldn’t admit to something he didn’t do. God would be watching over him and set him free. He believed there’d already been tragedy enough with the Davidson couple being murdered, and him and his best friend, Jackson Ridges, being blamed. Mr. Ridges was killed by the police as they tried to take him from his home. Daddy thought God wouldn’t let more pain come from that tragedy. So he pled innocent, and life without parole was off the table. It would be a death sentence if found guilty.I used to believe that what Daddy said about no more pain was true. Like the Messiah Himself would walk right through the courtroom and carry my daddy out. Now I know it’s up to us.”Tracy Beaumont’s father and Mr. Ridges, who are/were black, were entering into a business deal with Mr. Davidson, who is white, when the murders took place. The police never found the gun that killed the Davidson couple and Tracy’s father never owned a gun. Nevertheless, James Beaumont was convicted of shooting the Davidsons and has languished on death row for seven years. His time until the execution is nearly up. It’s up to seventeen year-old Tracy to figure out how to prevent her father from being put to death. If that’s not enough, Tracy’s brother Jamal is now also accused of murder. Tracy stumbled across Jamal fooling around with Angela, a white schoolmate whose official boyfriend is the redneck sheriff’s hotheaded son. Soon thereafter, Angela turns up dead and Jamal is suspected because before she died, Angela called 911 and the operator heard Angela cry out Jamal’s name.Set in coastal Texas, THIS IS MY AMERICA is a superb white-knuckle, double-murder mystery for ages 12 and up. It’s a tale of black and white in a world of white separatist hate and violence.After writing to the Innocence X project weekly for seven years, Tracy has finally persuaded the legal organization to examine her father’s case. The tension ratchets up a couple more notches when young attorney Steve Jones arrives in town and seeks to prove that James Beaumont was wrongfully convicted.Tracy has one more important interaction with issues of color: She’s long been best friends with Dean, a white boy who now longs to be more than friends. Meanwhile, there’s Quincy Ridges, son of the late Mr. Ridges. Before Quincy’s father was killed by the police, Tracy and Quincy had been inseparable childhood friends. Since the police shooting, Quincy’s relationship with Tracy has never been the same, but they retain a special connection. Tracy needs to navigate her feelings for the two boys. Can the Innocence X’s young, crackerjack lawyer Steve Jones pull off a miracle? Can Tracy’s father and brother survive their ordeals? Who really killed the Davidsons and Angela, and why?I oppose capital punishment. Even in the extreme cases of Mark David Chapman, who stole John Lennon from an entire generation, and James Earl Ray, who deprived the world of Martin Luther King, Jr., I have never wished to have the government kill murderers as a punishment for what they did. Taking a murderer’s life doesn’t bring back the murder victim. It just takes away someone else. t urge readers to consider the statistics that Kim Johnson includes in her Author’s Note:“Lynchings and capital punishment draw many comparisons as inhumane and unequal treatment largely applied on the basis of race. As of April 1, 2019, there were 2,637 inmates in prison who had been sentenced to death, across thirty-two states. African Americans make up about 13 percent of the US population, but are 42 percent of the people on death row. It’s important to acknowledge that, nationally, 95 percent of prosecutors are white…”The nightmare news stories that inspired the Black Lives Matter movement come alive in this fictional but heartbreakingly, all-too-real tale of life in Black America. As with lynching, capital punishment should have ended a long time ago. It kills me that there still aren’t enough Americans of conscience raising their voices against it.THIS IS MY AMERICA is a story that illustrates what can happen when people group themselves by skin color, look out only for their own, and shrug their shoulders at injustice. It also shows how a young person, one with sufficient persistence and tenacity, can save a life.Richie Partington, MLISRichie's Picks http://richiespicks.pbworks.comhttps://www.facebook.com/richiespicks/[email protected]
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  • Chantal Aurora
    January 1, 1970
    UpdateI GOT AN ARC!!!! I am so excited to read this. Original pre review The cover is so beautiful! this sounds so intriguing.
  • johely (bookrokosmos)
    January 1, 1970
    WHY IS NO ONE TALKING ABOUT THIS! I saw this on netgalley and requested it so fast lol. And that cover is beautiful yo!!
  • Katelyn
    January 1, 1970
    One of my most anticipated releases and it did not disappoint!For the past seven years Tracy Beaumont has written a letter to Innocence X, begging the non profit organization to look into her father's case. Her father has been wrongfully convicted of a double murder and has been sentenced to death. Tracy’s father now has less than a year before the prison kills him. One day the police show up looking for Jamal (Tracy’s older brother). This was wonderful. At times I was truly shocked. This book m One of my most anticipated releases and it did not disappoint!For the past seven years Tracy Beaumont has written a letter to Innocence X, begging the non profit organization to look into her father's case. Her father has been wrongfully convicted of a double murder and has been sentenced to death. Tracy’s father now has less than a year before the prison kills him. One day the police show up looking for Jamal (Tracy’s older brother). This was wonderful. At times I was truly shocked. This book made me so mad at times due to the racism. As a black girl, I can relate to this. It’s truly sad to see the flaws in the justice system and the corrupt police officers. It's very sad to see police who serve to protect but kill people of color for no reason or put them in jail and make evidence to make the person of color look guilty. They do it because they are scared of people of color and every time someone gets put in jail, they are getting paid for it.I loved everything about this. True emotions were shown throughout. I loved every character in their own way and hated some characters for a good reason. All characters were developed and the pacing was great. This also took unexpected turns that I was not expecting. This was an easy 5 star for me, kept me engaged the whole time, and was not predictable at all.Unfortunately people of color live in fear every time we are pulled over. Racism is one of the one things I wish didn't exist. I see no point in it. It does not prove anything but your true character. The world would definitely be a better place without it. I will definitely be pre ordering a copy to put on my shelves!Thank you so much to Netgalley & Random house Children’s for an opportunity to read this
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  • Laura Gardner
    January 1, 1970
    ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️/5 for THIS IS MY AMERICA by debut author @kcjohnsonwrites ; thanks to @getunderlined for sharing this ARC with me when I shamelessly begged. Out July 28!...Justice and injustice, #blacklivesmatter, an innocent man on death row, racism. THIS IS MY AMERICA is YA at its best. It’s being marketed as DEAR MARTIN meets JUST MERCY and I agree 💯. This book is 🔥 and I can already think of 10+ students who will love it. ...Tracy Beaumont has been writing Innocence X once a week for 7 years to g ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️/5 for THIS IS MY AMERICA by debut author @kcjohnsonwrites ; thanks to @getunderlined for sharing this ARC with me when I shamelessly begged. Out July 28!...Justice and injustice, #blacklivesmatter, an innocent man on death row, racism. THIS IS MY AMERICA is YA at its best. It’s being marketed as DEAR MARTIN meets JUST MERCY and I agree 💯. This book is 🔥 and I can already think of 10+ students who will love it. ...Tracy Beaumont has been writing Innocence X once a week for 7 years to get help for her father, an innocent man on death row. Time is running out. Then her track star, college-bound brother is accused of a crime he didn’t commit and Tracy must investigate what really happened. As Tracy uncovers the truth of what happened, she discovers secrets about her town’s racist past. ...Couldn’t put it down. Mostly for high schools, but middle schools that circulate ALL AMERICAN BOYS, THE HATE U GIVE, etc will want to have a copy!... #middleschoollibrarian #middleschoollibrary #library #librarian #futurereadylibs #iteachlibrary #bookstagrammer #bookstagram #librariesofinstagram #librariansofinstagram #librariesfollowlibraries #librarylife #librarianlife #schoollibrarian #middlegrade #middlegradebooks #iteach #librarylove #booksbooksbooks #amreading #bibliophile #schoollibrariansrock #bookreview #bookrecommendation #igreads #malibrary #msla #mediaspecialist
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  • Michelle
    January 1, 1970
    Wow. This one was a powerhouse of a teen novel. I loved the focus on the family of a wrongly accused man (and young man) and how unflinching this was about racism and the "justice" system. I also loved the connection to one of my favorite books, Just Mercy, and Bryan Stevenson. If I have any criticism, it's that justice rarely happens so quickly in the cases of the wrongly accused. But this is a really good book, IMO better than Dear Martin and right up there in the stratosphere of excellence ne Wow. This one was a powerhouse of a teen novel. I loved the focus on the family of a wrongly accused man (and young man) and how unflinching this was about racism and the "justice" system. I also loved the connection to one of my favorite books, Just Mercy, and Bryan Stevenson. If I have any criticism, it's that justice rarely happens so quickly in the cases of the wrongly accused. But this is a really good book, IMO better than Dear Martin and right up there in the stratosphere of excellence near The Hate U Give. Thanks so, so much to NetGalley and the publisher for this ARC.
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  • Amy
    January 1, 1970
    Many thanks to NetGalley and the publisher for providing me with a DRC of this title for review. All opinions are my own.This book was amazing. It brings race and justice system inequalities to the forefront while also having a compulsively readable story with characters you so desperately root for throughout. Tracy has been writing letters to Innocence X (a non-profit organization that conducts appeals on death row cases) for years. Her father has been on death row for 7 years and now, the coun Many thanks to NetGalley and the publisher for providing me with a DRC of this title for review. All opinions are my own.This book was amazing. It brings race and justice system inequalities to the forefront while also having a compulsively readable story with characters you so desperately root for throughout. Tracy has been writing letters to Innocence X (a non-profit organization that conducts appeals on death row cases) for years. Her father has been on death row for 7 years and now, the countdown is on. Because in less than 280 days, he will be executed. Before that can happen though, Tracy needs them to take on her dad's case. Then he can be freed. He can come home. And life can go back to some sort of normal. But then tragedy strikes again. When one of Tracy's white classmates is found murdered, suspicion immediately turns to Tracy's brother Jamal, a promising track athlete and star student. Everyone seems to forget that about him though as public opinion rushes to condemn him. Jamal runs from home the night the police come, so Tracy has to find some way to prove his innocence while also finding a way to bring her father home. Highly recommend. This is a first purchase type of book for all collections serving YA readers.
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  • Kaya
    January 1, 1970
    There will never be a time we don't need more books tackling racism and the oppression of the justice system, and this one sounds like it'll be especially good. Also, the cover is beautiful!
  • Lauren
    January 1, 1970
    Kim Johnson’s This Is My America is a searing look into the racial inequality and injustice that continues to permeate modern society. For the past seven years, Tracy Beaumont has written a weekly letter to Innocence X, begging the organization to help exonerate her father, who was wrongly convicted of a double murder charge and sentenced to death. With less than a year left to save her father, the unthinkable happens: the police show up looking for her older brother, Jamal. Afraid that he’ll sh Kim Johnson’s This Is My America is a searing look into the racial inequality and injustice that continues to permeate modern society. For the past seven years, Tracy Beaumont has written a weekly letter to Innocence X, begging the organization to help exonerate her father, who was wrongly convicted of a double murder charge and sentenced to death. With less than a year left to save her father, the unthinkable happens: the police show up looking for her older brother, Jamal. Afraid that he’ll share the same fate as his father, Jamal is on the run, and Tracy is working against the clock to unearth what happened in order to save her brother. As the racist underpinnings of their small town are unearthed, she’ll realize there’s more at stake than she initially suspected. In my opinion, this should be required reading in all schools. Not only does Johnson deftly address the very pertinent and timely issue of racial inequality in the criminal justice system, but she shows us the myriad ways that Black people have to navigate a world that is designed to uphold white supremacy. We see the microaggressions, the implicit biases, the overt acts of racism, all through the lens of a 17-year-old girl who is as strong as she is soft. We need more female protagonists, especially Black female protagonists. And we need more stories that humanize the struggle that Black people face daily. (We shouldn’t have to have it all spelled out for us, but history has shown us that we do.)Johnson creates relatable characters who you feel a kinship with. The reader has a vested interest in how everything plays out. I found Tracy’s journey especially compelling, as she’s navigating some pretty heavy, adult stuff in congruence with a lot of teenage stuff. Her friendships with both Dean and Quincy are also interesting, complicated, and beautiful. I love the sense of family that she creates with the Beaumonts. They’re there for each other every step of the way, never wavering, never doubting. To me, this is a must-read; an important read; a life-changing read. I received an ARC of This Is My America from NetGalley and Random House Children’s in exchange for my honest review.
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  • MACKENZIE J
    January 1, 1970
    This Is My America by Kim Johnson is a 5⭐ read. Releasing on July 28th, 2020 with similar themes of The Hate You Give(review coming soon) and Dear Martin, This Is My America centers around a girl named Tracy who has a father on death row for a double murder he did not commit convicted on just his race and history is repeating itself for her brother Jamal. Track star, good student, and upstanding citizen of his town, Jamal is still depicted as a thug on media news outlets as hes on the run for a This Is My America by Kim Johnson is a 5⭐ read. Releasing on July 28th, 2020 with similar themes of The Hate You Give(review coming soon) and Dear Martin, This Is My America centers around a girl named Tracy who has a father on death row for a double murder he did not commit convicted on just his race and history is repeating itself for her brother Jamal. Track star, good student, and upstanding citizen of his town, Jamal is still depicted as a thug on media news outlets as hes on the run for a heinous crime he did not commit. Tracy goes deep in to proving her fathers innocence before his 250 days left are up and proving her brothers innocence uncovering underground white supremacy groups, police cover ups, and how sometimes the people you grew up with arent the people you thought they were. I loved this and all the little messages ingrained. I read this in 4 hours, I couldnt stop reading, I simply had to know what was going to happen next. Its been a while since a book has done that. I loved all the characters. If you loved Dear Martin definitely pick this one up.
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  • Catherine
    January 1, 1970
    I really enjoyed this novel despite being unsure about it at first. It’s been compared to Dear Martin (which I loved) and the narrative style reminded me of The Hate U Give (which I loved). It starts out slow though and that’s why I was kind of unsure about it at first. I’d say I was about 1/3 of the way in before I felt like it had fully grabbed my attention. Once it grabbed my attention, it really took off and I had a hard time putting it down. I liked how stories across decades were interwove I really enjoyed this novel despite being unsure about it at first. It’s been compared to Dear Martin (which I loved) and the narrative style reminded me of The Hate U Give (which I loved). It starts out slow though and that’s why I was kind of unsure about it at first. I’d say I was about 1/3 of the way in before I felt like it had fully grabbed my attention. Once it grabbed my attention, it really took off and I had a hard time putting it down. I liked how stories across decades were interwoven to create one climactic ending. Thank you NetGalley and Random House for this ARC.
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  • Kelly McWilliams
    January 1, 1970
    I had the honor of reading an early copy of This Is My America--it absolutely blew me away. Tracy's journey gripped me from the very first chapter, and Johnson never flinches in this hard look at the systemic racism inherent in the American justice system. I hope every teenager finds their way to this stunning novel this summer. A must read.
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  • Neha Thakkar
    January 1, 1970
    I sat in on a panel for Ibram X. Kendi and Jason Reynolds remix of Stamped and then stayed up until 11:15 to finish this book. Amazing characters and parallels to current events. It wasn’t a fairy tale ending, but brought hope in uncertain times, along with reminding the reader that we have a responsibility to our communities to be better.
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  • Sacha
    January 1, 1970
    Thanks to NetGalley and the publisher for this arc, which I received in exchange for an honest review. I will post that review - which will be excellent - upon publication.
  • Andee
    January 1, 1970
    Thank you NetGalley for this ARC. Did you read Just Mercy? Read This Is My America.Did you read Stamped? Read This Is My AmericaDid you read The Hate U Give? Read This Is My America. Didn't read either? Read This Is My AmericaI'm a huge Just Mercy fan, so I could see where this fictional tale was headed from the beginning and it did not disappoint. Tracy's father is on death row for a murder he didn't commit and soon, Tracy's brother is on the run for the same reason. Tracy's letters to Innocent Thank you NetGalley for this ARC. Did you read Just Mercy? Read This Is My America.Did you read Stamped? Read This Is My AmericaDid you read The Hate U Give? Read This Is My America. Didn't read either? Read This Is My AmericaI'm a huge Just Mercy fan, so I could see where this fictional tale was headed from the beginning and it did not disappoint. Tracy's father is on death row for a murder he didn't commit and soon, Tracy's brother is on the run for the same reason. Tracy's letters to Innocent X seem to fall on deaf ears until finally, she is heard.The relationships in this book are real and Tracys advocacy is to be admired. I'm sad the release date is in July - I'd love for my students to be reading this now. But like all good things, I can wait. This will be part our school library, my classroom library, and my personal library. Recommended for grades 6+
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  • Angela Branham
    January 1, 1970
    Riveting, realistic portrayal of a black family's battle against injustice with the police, the court system and within their own community. This novel mirrors the US Court System's own tragic history, continuing to struggle with a plethora of injustices and wrongful convictions that need to be overturned AND, most importantly, stopped from happening in the first place.
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  • Sarah M
    January 1, 1970
    This is really a 4.5 instead of a 4 star read. I would first like to thank the publisher for sending me this eARC to review! There were so many shocking twists and turns in this book. Once the action began, which happened relatively quickly, the pacing of the book really picked up and made it difficult to put the book down. Tracy Beaumont is such an inspiring character. It’s so empowering to read a character around my age who looks like me, standing up against the injustice and racism in her lif This is really a 4.5 instead of a 4 star read. I would first like to thank the publisher for sending me this eARC to review! There were so many shocking twists and turns in this book. Once the action began, which happened relatively quickly, the pacing of the book really picked up and made it difficult to put the book down. Tracy Beaumont is such an inspiring character. It’s so empowering to read a character around my age who looks like me, standing up against the injustice and racism in her life. I think what prevented me from giving this book 5 stars was the almost, kind of love triangle situation. I don’t think it really added anything to the story and it felt like a distraction from the heavier aspects of the book, rather than something that came about organically. Other than that small aspect, I really enjoyed this book and I think it’s a book that should be read and talked about a lot, similar to the discourse around Angie Thomas’s The Hate U Give.
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  • Alexa Hamilton
    January 1, 1970
    Tracy's life and emotions about her dad on death row are so palpable. Sometimes, at the beginning, they feel almost young even though she's a junior in high school. But then you remember how long her father has been away for and how that must feel, and everything works. This story really manages to tie together a number of story lines in a way that doesn't feel crowded. It feels like real life in a small town with historical race issues. I loved that this book was also a mystery. That wasn't cle Tracy's life and emotions about her dad on death row are so palpable. Sometimes, at the beginning, they feel almost young even though she's a junior in high school. But then you remember how long her father has been away for and how that must feel, and everything works. This story really manages to tie together a number of story lines in a way that doesn't feel crowded. It feels like real life in a small town with historical race issues. I loved that this book was also a mystery. That wasn't clear when I started but I love a good mystery, and this does not disappoint. This is such a fantastic book for 2020 that will resonate with a lot of people. It's YA, with mature themes like love, sex, lynching, the death penalty, etc. but I think it can be read by mature middle schoolers as well who are just beginning to learn about the intricacies of the world around them. The author's note at the end is really illuminating as well.
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  • Kevin
    January 1, 1970
    Lucky enough to receive an ARC! What a journey of emotions. As a reader, it was thrilling to be Tracy’s co-pilot as she sought justice for her father on death row...all while navigating the later suspicion of her brothers involvement in a murder and the uncovering of her towns racist past/present. With how heavy the stakes were, I could feel the pressure of how calibrated each decision this high school student/daughter/sister/friend needed to be. Tracy’s decisions mattered! And, they affected ev Lucky enough to receive an ARC! What a journey of emotions. As a reader, it was thrilling to be Tracy’s co-pilot as she sought justice for her father on death row...all while navigating the later suspicion of her brothers involvement in a murder and the uncovering of her towns racist past/present. With how heavy the stakes were, I could feel the pressure of how calibrated each decision this high school student/daughter/sister/friend needed to be. Tracy’s decisions mattered! And, they affected everyone she cared about. She fought with her head and her heart. Tracy’s reality had me hoping for the best but bracing for the worst. This story was very well written and needed to be told!
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  • Jenny Bravo
    January 1, 1970
    Thank you to Netgalley for e-arc in exchange for an honest review.I am still in shock. This was an amazing, poignant, necessary read. As a woman of color, this spoke volumes. I could feel all of Tracy's hurt while reading. It was a painful yet beautiful read. My heart is hurting and I need everyone to pick this up ASAP. This is a book that I made sure to speak about to everyone I know while I was going through it. POWERFUL.
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  • Dai Guerra
    January 1, 1970
    The reality for Black people is that the America that they live in is not the same America that others know. The reality is that their America looks completely different and at a young age they learn what it means to be Black and live in America. This is the story that Tracy Beaumont wants you to know, she wants you to recognize the difference in the America that her and her family is being forced to grow up in. This is a beautifully written book that tackles difficult issues that Black people s The reality for Black people is that the America that they live in is not the same America that others know. The reality is that their America looks completely different and at a young age they learn what it means to be Black and live in America. This is the story that Tracy Beaumont wants you to know, she wants you to recognize the difference in the America that her and her family is being forced to grow up in. This is a beautifully written book that tackles difficult issues that Black people still face all over the U.S. There were moments that I had to put this book down to really take in the impact of a scene or to really let something sit with me. I cried along with Tracy and her family at the moments they were able to breathe a sigh of relief and also at the times where they were living in fear. What I like about this book is that it is real and the author isn't afraid to bring up topics that are important. You get to see the real time feelings of not only Tracy but her younger sister, Corinne who was born after her dad was in jail and is watching her brother be chased by the police. You get to see as Tracy's friend, Dean, struggles with his mother's racism and his own thoughts surrounding what is happening. This is one of my favorite scenes as Dean struggles with his privilege and his inherent bias towards black people, while Tracy doesn't comfort him and allows him to sit in his feelings. You not only see Tracy's father doing jail time on death row for something he didn't do but you also see her brother trying to prove his innocence. You see how easy it is for the police to pin these crimes on Tracy's family with no proof and how it cost the life of one Black man as he tries to claim he's innocent. You watch as Tracy tries to continue on with her life and everyone around her tries to keep her from getting in trouble. You watch her struggle with not being able to just be silent about the injustice that her family and community has been and is being put through. Something else that I enjoyed that this book showed was the race relations between black people and white people. We saw these relations through Tracy's friendship with Dean, and his mother's reactions towards Tracy after her father was sent to jail. I really enjoy reading as Tracy and Dean's relationship develops and Tracy struggles with what it would mean for her to date Dean. We also saw these relations through Jamal's relationship with Angela and how that relationship ultimately causes Jamal to be in trouble while Angela's boyfriend doesn't get questioned at all. I recommend this book to those of you who enjoy Nic Stone's Dear Martin or Angie Thomas's The Hate U Give. This is a must read book for all and is a great way to show young adults the reality of what being Black in America means. I would highly recommend this book to white people who are looking for something to help them understand what Black people go through on a regular basis.
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  • Dai Guerra
    January 1, 1970
    The reality for Black people is that the America that they live in is not the same America that others know. The reality is that their America looks completely different and at a young age they learn what it means to be Black and live in America. This is the story that Tracy Beaumont wants you to know, she wants you to recognize the difference in the America that her and her family is being forced to grow up in. This is a beautifully written book that tackles difficult issues that Black people s The reality for Black people is that the America that they live in is not the same America that others know. The reality is that their America looks completely different and at a young age they learn what it means to be Black and live in America. This is the story that Tracy Beaumont wants you to know, she wants you to recognize the difference in the America that her and her family is being forced to grow up in. This is a beautifully written book that tackles difficult issues that Black people still face all over the U.S. There were moments that I had to put this book down to really take in the impact of a scene or to really let something sit with me. I cried along with Tracy and her family at the moments they were able to breathe a sigh of relief and also at the times where they were living in fear. What I like about this book is that it is real and the author isn't afraid to bring up topics that are important. You get to see the real time feelings of not only Tracy but her younger sister, Corinne who was born after her dad was in jail and is watching her brother be chased by the police. You get to see as Tracy's friend, Dean, struggles with his mother's racism and his own thoughts surrounding what is happening. This is one of my favorite scenes as Dean struggles with his privilege and his inherent bias towards black people, while Tracy doesn't comfort him and allows him to sit in his feelings. You not only see Tracy's father doing jail time on death row for something he didn't do but you also see her brother trying to prove his innocence. You see how easy it is for the police to pin these crimes on Tracy's family with no proof and how it cost the life of one Black man as he tries to claim he's innocent. You watch as Tracy tries to continue on with her life and everyone around her tries to keep her from getting in trouble. You watch her struggle with not being able to just be silent about the injustice that her family and community has been and is being put through. Something else that I enjoyed that this book showed was the race relations between black people and white people. We saw these relations through Tracy's friendship with Dean, and his mother's reactions towards Tracy after her father was sent to jail. I really enjoy reading as Tracy and Dean's relationship develops and Tracy struggles with what it would mean for her to date Dean. We also saw these relations through Jamal's relationship with Angela and how that relationship ultimately causes Jamal to be in trouble while Angela's boyfriend doesn't get questioned at all. I recommend this book to those of you who enjoy Nic Stone's Dear Martin or Angie Thomas's The Hate U Give. This is a must read book for all and is a great way to show young adults the reality of what being Black in America means. I would highly recommend this book to white people who are looking for something to help them understand what Black people go through on a regular basis.
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  • Claire Olivia
    January 1, 1970
    4.5 starsThis is a truly exceptional book that deserves to be widely read. It reminded me of THE HATE U GIVE in theme and tone. The characters are the best part, I think. Tracy's father was kind and compassionate, and you could see that from his interactions with his family. Her relationship with her brother was realistic, from the way they fight and the way they care for each other. Her younger sister could have been fleshed out more, and I don't feel that Tracy's relationship with Dean was eve 4.5 starsThis is a truly exceptional book that deserves to be widely read. It reminded me of THE HATE U GIVE in theme and tone. The characters are the best part, I think. Tracy's father was kind and compassionate, and you could see that from his interactions with his family. Her relationship with her brother was realistic, from the way they fight and the way they care for each other. Her younger sister could have been fleshed out more, and I don't feel that Tracy's relationship with Dean was ever fully resolved. There is a love triangle in this book, and I love the person she ends up with, they are adorable together.The things I didn't like so much is that the middle kinda reads like a murder mystery and I don't know how realistic that actually is for real-life crime cases. Tracy was poking around the murder scene and it got kind of repetitive at that point. The author's note is quite educational and important. I'm already checking out some of the resources she mentioned to learn more about justice in the prison/trial system.All in all, an important read that I think will be successful and hopefully win the awards it deserves.*Thank you to NetGalley for providing me with an ARC in exchange for an honest review.*
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  • Cece Beckman
    January 1, 1970
    Thank you to Randomhouse Books for Young Readers for a digital Advance Copy Powerful. Johnson’s writing is like a microscope, closely scrutinizing the inequities of the criminal justice system.Cecelia Beckman, Sheaf & InkJohnson has done something incredible in her narrative. She provides a realistic lens of what it means to be Black in America. Her writing is exceptional. Johnson does not shy away from the truth. Her novel explores in detail the terror and horrific realities teens and families Thank you to Randomhouse Books for Young Readers for a digital Advance Copy Powerful. Johnson’s writing is like a microscope, closely scrutinizing the inequities of the criminal justice system.Cecelia Beckman, Sheaf & InkJohnson has done something incredible in her narrative. She provides a realistic lens of what it means to be Black in America. Her writing is exceptional. Johnson does not shy away from the truth. Her novel explores in detail the terror and horrific realities teens and families of color experience in their day-to-day lives. Emphasizing the ostracizing treatment towards families with members in the prison system. There are many reasons why this novel is notably relevant and timely, particularly in the Black Lives Matter movement. Johnson provides a Black protagonist, a family who struggles with discrimination, racism and police brutality. Through all this, the Beaumont’s still manage to stay strong and determined to envision a better world.Monumental. A story that everyone should read, and then again. Make sure to read this book.You can read a full review on my website www.sheafandink.com
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  • Sylvia
    January 1, 1970
    In this gripping and compelling story, Tracy Beaumont has spent the past seven years writing to Innocence X, a death penalty legal aid society to help exonerate her father who is on death row, wrongly-convicted of a double murder he did not commit. Things get complicated fast when her brother is implicated in a shocking murder of a her white classmate. With her family facing increasing ostracism, Tracy takes matters into her own hands to investigate the murder, uncovering dark secrets of her tow In this gripping and compelling story, Tracy Beaumont has spent the past seven years writing to Innocence X, a death penalty legal aid society to help exonerate her father who is on death row, wrongly-convicted of a double murder he did not commit. Things get complicated fast when her brother is implicated in a shocking murder of a her white classmate. With her family facing increasing ostracism, Tracy takes matters into her own hands to investigate the murder, uncovering dark secrets of her town's past and present. While the novel touches on serious issues facing America: racism in the criminal justice system, Black Lives Matter, and the white supremacy movement, it does so in an engrossing story with fully fleshed characters and a gamut of relationships (friendships, romance, family), while also intriguing the reader with the mystery.
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  • Sylvia
    January 1, 1970
    In this gripping and compelling story, Tracy Beaumont has spent the past seven years writing to Innocence X, a death penalty legal aid society to help exonerate her father who is on death row, wrongly-convicted of a double murder he did not commit. Things get complicated fast when her brother is implicated in a shocking murder of a her white classmate. With her family facing increasing ostracism, Tracy takes matters into her own hands to investigate the murder and uncovers dark secrets of her to In this gripping and compelling story, Tracy Beaumont has spent the past seven years writing to Innocence X, a death penalty legal aid society to help exonerate her father who is on death row, wrongly-convicted of a double murder he did not commit. Things get complicated fast when her brother is implicated in a shocking murder of a her white classmate. With her family facing increasing ostracism, Tracy takes matters into her own hands to investigate the murder and uncovers dark secrets of her town's past and present. While the novel touches on serious issues facing America: racism in the criminal justice system, Black Lives Matter, and the white supremacy movement, it does so in an engrossing story with fully fleshed characters and a gamut of relationships (friendships, romance, family), while also intriguing the reader with the mystery.
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  • SUE HOBSON
    January 1, 1970
    I loved this book! First of all the cover is beautiful, which is what initially drew me to taking a look about what it was about. This is a YA Novel, about racism and social injustices. A story about a teenage girl who writes the Innocence X project for 7 years to try and get her dad exonerated of a crime he did not commit. When the police show up at her house to question her brother Jamal in a crime, the horror begins again. This was a couldn't put down book for me. One of the best books I've I loved this book! First of all the cover is beautiful, which is what initially drew me to taking a look about what it was about. This is a YA Novel, about racism and social injustices. A story about a teenage girl who writes the Innocence X project for 7 years to try and get her dad exonerated of a crime he did not commit. When the police show up at her house to question her brother Jamal in a crime, the horror begins again. This was a couldn't put down book for me. One of the best books I've read this year. This is great for young adults and adults alike. I received an ARC for an honest review from NetGalley. Check this out when it hits the shelves on July 28th. You won't be disappointed!
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  • Chari
    January 1, 1970
    I received an advance copy in exchange for an honest review. Tracy's dad is in prison for a crime he didn't commit. Tracy has tried to get the attention of Innocence X for years by writing frequent letters. With just 9 months to go until his execution, Tracy is pulling out all of the stops to try to get her dad's case reviewed. Then, Jamal, Tracy's track star brother is accused of killing his white girlfriend and is now on the run. Innocence X comes to town and agrees to take the case while nego I received an advance copy in exchange for an honest review. Tracy's dad is in prison for a crime he didn't commit. Tracy has tried to get the attention of Innocence X for years by writing frequent letters. With just 9 months to go until his execution, Tracy is pulling out all of the stops to try to get her dad's case reviewed. Then, Jamal, Tracy's track star brother is accused of killing his white girlfriend and is now on the run. Innocence X comes to town and agrees to take the case while negotiating a solution to Jamal's problem as well. It highlights problems with our justice system, racism, and family dynamics. #thisismyamerica #netgalley
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