Wuhan Diary
FROM ONE OF CHINA'S MOST ACCLAIMED AND DECORATED WRITERS COMES A POWERFUL FIRST-PERSON ACCOUNT OF LIFE IN WUHAN DURING THE COVID-19 OUTBREAK.On January 25, 2020, after the central government imposed a lockdown in Wuhan, acclaimed Chinese writer Fang Fang began publishing on online diary. In the days and weeks that followed, Fang Fang's nightly postings gave voice to the fears, frustrations, anger, and hope of missions of her fellow citizens, reflecting on the psychological impact of forced isolation, the role of internet as both community lifeline and source of misinformation, and most tragically, the lives of neighbors and friends taken by the deadly virus.A fascinating eyewitness account of events as they unfold, 'WUHAN DIARY' captures the challenges of daily life as changing moods and emotions of being quarantined without reliable information. Fang Fang finds solace in small domestic comforts and is inspired by the courage of friends, health professionals and volunteers, as well as the resilience and perseverance of Wuhan's nine million residents. But, by claiming the writer's duty to record she also speaks out against social injustice, abuse of power, and other problems which impeded the response to the epidemic and gets herself embroiled in online controversies because of it.As Fang Fang documents the beginning of the global health crisis in real time, we are able to identify patterns and mistakes that many of the countries dealing with the novel coronavirus have later repeated. She reminds us that, in the face of the new virus, the plight of the citizens of Wuhan is also that of citizens everywhere. As Fang Fang writes: "The virus is the common enemy of humankind; that is a lesson for all humanity. The only way we can conquer this virus and free ourselves from its grip is for all members of humankind to work together."Blending the intimate and the epic, the profound and the quotidian, 'WUHAN DIARY' is a remarkable record of an extraordinary time.

Wuhan Diary Details

TitleWuhan Diary
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseAug 18th, 2020
PublisherHarperVia
ISBN-139780063052635
Rating
GenreNonfiction, Cultural, China, Autobiography, Memoir, Politics, Health

Wuhan Diary Review

  • Petra-X
    January 1, 1970
    Finished! The book was exactly what it said, a diary posted online every day (posts removed by the ultra-leftists - see below, when they could). Fang Fang is a major literary figure in China and she has a very large following for whom her posts were perhaps the only true despatches on the coronavirus situation. The only information that was not tainted with having to please the Party official above the reporter, and so on up the chain.The afterword by the translator, Michael Berry would have bee Finished! The book was exactly what it said, a diary posted online every day (posts removed by the ultra-leftists - see below, when they could). Fang Fang is a major literary figure in China and she has a very large following for whom her posts were perhaps the only true despatches on the coronavirus situation. The only information that was not tainted with having to please the Party official above the reporter, and so on up the chain.The afterword by the translator, Michael Berry would have been better first, as a foreword, as it gives context to the diary with it's cultural references that aren't obvious until pointed out. Wuhan Diary is really a book worth reading by the Chinese (who almost universally have slagged it off and denied the truth of it) who hopefully might actually learn that, outside of other Far Eastern countries who share the importance of 'saving face', the rest of the world respects honesty more than it does the cover-ups over disease that saving face inevitably means. Hopefully before yet another disease of Chinese origin.____________________Notes on reading It starts, the Chinese government try and cover it up. People don't know about it so they travel and catch it and travel somewhere else passing on the disease as they go. Some of them meet international travellers, some of them travel abroad themselves. The Chinese government eventually comes clean about it but it's too late to stop the spread of the infection worldwide. So that's twice they done it, SARS and Covid-19. Will the Chinese government see the light and tell the world immediately they even suspect there is another infection? How can a government that is essentially a collective dictatorship be forced to do the best for the world rather than what will benefit their own small highly privileged group? Cover-up of SARS by the Chinese gvt "Thinking back to the year of SARS, that disease began to spread in March but the government initially tried to cover it up. At the time, I had an old classmate in Guangzhou who was about to undergo a big operation. I went with a few dozen old friends from all over CHina down to Guangzhou to support her during her surgery; we all descended on the very hospital where the SARS outbreak was fiercely raging, but none of us knew at that time and none of us were wearing face masks. We all travelled there roundtrip by train. Once what was happening was finally exposed, everyone all over the country was in a state of panic."How can they be made to see that what they see as 'saving face' is what we see as making them a pariah nation? China would be regarded more positively by the world by coming clean about diseases than by covering them up and, as still continues, fudging the figures.According to worldometer.com, China has only about 88K cases in total with just 2 or 3 new ones a day. Fang Fang in early February says there was more than 70,000 then.____________________Ultra-leftists. "Anyone with an opinion that differs from their own is regarded as their enemy." That's true for more countries than China, ultra-any political convictions. The last paragraph shows that it isn't just in China that the media is utterly biased. This is what Fang Fang has to say about the havoc they create (apart from getting her blog banned, her social media profile removed and endless posts deleted)"Today there is something I want to get off my chest that has been weighing on me for a long time: Those ultra-leftists in China are responsible for causing irreparable harm to the nation and the people. All they want to do is return to the good old days of the Cultural Revolution and reverse all the Reform Era policies. Anyone with an opinion that differs from their own is regarded as their enemy. They behave like a pack of thugs, attacking anyone who fails to cooperate with them, launching wave after wave of attacks. They spray the world with their violent, hate-filled language and often resort to even more despicable tactics, so base that it almost defies understanding. But what I really just don’t understand is: How is it that they are able to publish these ridiculous things online and repeatedly turn the truth upside down, yet their posts somehow never get censored or deleted and no one ever stops them."____________________The last paragraph of this quote is quite chilling, an ever-rising ladder, or triangle, of corruption and protectionism and those at the bottom are nothing. "Over time the most talented get weeded out and those inferior managers rise to the top; meanwhile the most innovative and talented people in the field find jobs elsewhere. When you are too good, you call too much attention to yourself and get weeded out.There must be a lot of people working in media who simply use their power to get ahead. Those people would never commit the flagrant error of speaking out for the people during the Chinese New Year, of all times! What is it, then, that they should be doing during the start of the Chinese New Year? Everyone in the media knows this! The people are nothing in their eyes; all they need to worry about is making their superiors happy, because they are the only ones who can protect their status—but that has absolutely nothing to do with the needs of the people"_____________________From the author, "My daughter asked her 99-year-old grandfather what his secret to a long life was. His response: “Eat a lot of fatty meat, don’t exercise, and be sure to curse out anyone who deserves it.”_____________________Excerpts from the mostly negative reviews of the Wuhan Diary by people with Chinese names or living in a Chinese-language speaking country. Skin in the game! These were almost all the reviews. I left out two from friends who want to read it and one Chinese language one where I wasn't sure the Google translation made any sense. The ebook came out yesterday, so even though I prefer print, I couldn't wait...""One of my best friends who's currently working/living in China begs to differ from Fang fang's opinions" Apparently coffee shops are open....2. "the book is about a lie in wuhan, its author FangFang combines her friends'news(not real).... if the reality, please read the newspapers and choose the fair self-media"3. "I hope there will be something comprehensive to tell the World awhat had happen in Wuhan and how Chinese government dealt with the enemy of all mankind instead of this biased book."4. "I do not think that the translation's doing the book justice. Fang Fang has a simplicity and unique Chinese humor in her writing that are lost from translation, which make the book less sincere." Something to bear in mind.5. "It's a shame and sad that Fang Fang couldn't publish the Chinese version"6. "Biased version"7. "it's been attacked elsewhere on the basis that it slanders the reputation of the party, that it is based on rumors, or because her criticisms of local officials..."8. "Full of rumors, shame on her."9. "The voices of China are too limited, one person's voice is too strong."
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  • Erica Hu
    January 1, 1970
    The title speaks for itself –– a diary. To those who lash out on this book and denouncing it for being biased, read it like you read a diary. A diary is a momento, a piece of oral history. You don’t read Voices from Chernobyl and expect to understand a comprehensive, objective, deductive research paper with all facts about the nuclear disaster. You read a diary to hear a voice, to learn about perspectives not fit for traditional journalism. Fang Fang’s diary is one of the tiny puzzles that make The title speaks for itself –– a diary. To those who lash out on this book and denouncing it for being biased, read it like you read a diary. A diary is a momento, a piece of oral history. You don’t read Voices from Chernobyl and expect to understand a comprehensive, objective, deductive research paper with all facts about the nuclear disaster. You read a diary to hear a voice, to learn about perspectives not fit for traditional journalism. Fang Fang’s diary is one of the tiny puzzles that make up the big picture. Read critically and respect the author’s vantage point.Everyone has the right to reflect on their own thoughts, obtain information, and document history from their microcosmic point of view. Less nationalistic sentiments entangled when you review Fang Fang’s book, please.I also admit that the quality of her writing in this book is quite mediocre.
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  • Radiantflux
    January 1, 1970
    50th book for 2020.Although somewhat repetitive, an excellent resource for both understanding day-to-day life in Wuhan under lockdown, as well as the Chinese government's response.Note: Many negative reviews on Goodreads are a result of a concerted effort by Chinese government trolls, which should make you want to read this even more.4-stars.
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  • Tara
    January 1, 1970
    I don’t know about you, but all these 1 star reviews just make me want to read it more. Preordering now.
  • Owlseyes
    January 1, 1970
    https://www.scmp.com/news/china/polit... https://www.scmp.com/news/china/polit...
  • Cong Han
    January 1, 1970
    It's a shame and sad that Fang Fang couldn't publish the Chinese version.
  • Lee
    January 1, 1970
    It's unfair to describe such a biased situation in Wuhan. There were some real stories, but not all complete. The author has just written what she wants to write. There were more good things happened there-a little girl recovering from surfing the coronavirus said she thanked the all medical workers for Wuhan people; the nurses led patients dance to cheer them up… I hope there will be something comprehensive to tell the World what had happen in Wuhan and how Chinese government dealt with the ene It's unfair to describe such a biased situation in Wuhan. There were some real stories, but not all complete. The author has just written what she wants to write. There were more good things happened there-a little girl recovering from surfing the coronavirus said she thanked the all medical workers for Wuhan people; the nurses led patients dance to cheer them up… I hope there will be something comprehensive to tell the World what had happen in Wuhan and how Chinese government dealt with the enemy of all mankind instead of this biased book.
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  • Luna Qiu
    January 1, 1970
    First thing first: if you are only reading this book for the sake of getting more dirt on the CCP, then you are coming to the wrong place. Granted, this book is biased, but this is because the book is written from the perspective of an average Wuhan citizen who witnessed the entirety of the Chinese government's dealing from her humble perspective, plus a few interviews that she has done with some medical authorities. She is not a professional reporter, nor does she have access to all inside info First thing first: if you are only reading this book for the sake of getting more dirt on the CCP, then you are coming to the wrong place. Granted, this book is biased, but this is because the book is written from the perspective of an average Wuhan citizen who witnessed the entirety of the Chinese government's dealing from her humble perspective, plus a few interviews that she has done with some medical authorities. She is not a professional reporter, nor does she have access to all inside information regarding to China's coronavirus situation. Bear in mind that this is a DIARY, as one of the comments written above me has pointed out, and it is impossible for the writer to give an extensive narrative on this matter. Also, I would like to point out that this piece of writing was heavily censored and criticized by the pro-CCP people in China solely because Fang Fang calls for the public to hold the government accountable for their actions (which is actually the main point of this book, mentioned at the end of many chapters), which further proves that this book is in no way a political propaganda defending the CCP.I read the Mandarin version of the book and a few excerpts of the English translation. Frankly, I do not think that the translation's doing the book justice. Fang Fang has a simplicity and unique Chinese humor in her writing that are lost from translation, which make the book less sincere. This is why I am giving the book four stars. But otherwise I think this is a wonderful and honest book. Her most amazing talent, I think, is that she uses everyday events to convey the emotion of the masses. For example, she notes that at one point people's emotions become numb from losing so many loved ones to coronavirus (almost every one knows someone who died from the virus) to the point that people can't even cry anymore. Instead, they channel their fury to cursing the incompetent government both online and offline. This is actually a brilliant way of criticizing the lack of freedom of speech in the Chinese society. The people of Wuhan has obviously realized this when the death toll in the city soared, all because the provincial government and the so-called "experts" attempt to cover up the severity of the disease from public. On the other hand, Fang Fang brings up the memes that Chinese people created online, as well as the heart-warming support within individual communities/neighborhoods to show optimism and stamina that the Chinese people displayed during this time of crisis, which make the situation more bearable. As I have said before, this diary is a honest narrative, providing us a glimpse into Wuhan during its lockdown. The writing is not perfect (understandable, since it's all written online with little furnishing), but the raw emotions that it conveys make this book worth a read. It's also interesting to see how many more Chinese people are beginning to realize the importance of freedom of speech through this incident, and are brave enough to speak up, to encourage each other, and to criticize the authority for its wrongdoings. This is a valuable lesson that both the CCP and the Chinese people need to learn, because we can't afford another pandemic like this again. Hopefully, after this incident, the Chinese people can finally earn their freedom of speech (or at least a bit more).
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  • Peter Tillman
    January 1, 1970
    Good review of Fang Fang's book by Dwight Garner, my wife's fave NYT reviewer: https://www.nytimes.com/2020/05/15/bo...Excerpt:"This is an important and dignified book that nonetheless, in this adept translation by Michael Barry, has its share of dead space and repetition. “Wuhan Diary” would have been twice as good at half the length. It’s a bit easier to praise, as Tom Wolfe said of the William Shawn-era New Yorker, than it is to read. Still, the urgency of this account is impossible to deny.T Good review of Fang Fang's book by Dwight Garner, my wife's fave NYT reviewer: https://www.nytimes.com/2020/05/15/bo...Excerpt:"This is an important and dignified book that nonetheless, in this adept translation by Michael Barry, has its share of dead space and repetition. “Wuhan Diary” would have been twice as good at half the length. It’s a bit easier to praise, as Tom Wolfe said of the William Shawn-era New Yorker, than it is to read. Still, the urgency of this account is impossible to deny.This book is most scorching in Fang Fang’s calls to hold to account the leaders who downgraded and minimized the virus, wasting nearly three weeks and allowing it to seep into the world at large. She rallies around this topic like Henry V pacing the floorboards before the Battle of Agincourt. She may live meekly during the lockdown, but she writes bold sentences.She wants Chinese culture to change, for people to be more willing to admit error, to stand up and take blame."Well, good luck with that, under the current regime. Probably won't read -- but might skim, once the library is open again. It is interesting, and sad, to read the invective hurled at the author by locals, many young, who apparently don't want to face reality. Old, old story...
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  • Night Owl
    January 1, 1970
    A diary was written by a CCP high official retiree who quarantined in the bedroom for more than two months, based on highly repeated catchphrases like “I heard from a doctor friend”, "one of my friends texted me that", "a journalist friend secretly told me"... It's fine if it were posted in the Whatapp Group chat for gossip juice, but a book happened in such short notice with ready-to-read translated English and Germany editions? Let alone certain rumors got fact-checked by netizens in China bef A diary was written by a CCP high official retiree who quarantined in the bedroom for more than two months, based on highly repeated catchphrases like “I heard from a doctor friend”, "one of my friends texted me that", "a journalist friend secretly told me"... It's fine if it were posted in the Whatapp Group chat for gossip juice, but a book happened in such short notice with ready-to-read translated English and Germany editions? Let alone certain rumors got fact-checked by netizens in China before the punishment of her book like a Southen city nurse who volunteered in Wuhan died 3 times in her book (Chinese, English and Germany edition), yet turns out to be still ALIVE but fainted due to another physical disease. This poor nurse's colleagues and family spoke publicly for an apology. A bit cruel to host an international online funeral for somebody who's just sick not dead, isn't it? Kinda feel insulted to see it be recommended on Goodreads in the first place. A watched pot never boils, I'd rather hold a couple of months to see how things/facts settled down. I lean on the latest scientific reports made by Cambridge University, Nature, the Lancet etc with less biased prejudice nor overdosed politicization at this moment. In the meanwhile, one of my best friends who's currently working/living in China begs to differ from Fang fang's opinions. In case you're wondering, he's a British caucasian who has never been brainwashed by any political organizations. Feedback from him who's experienced the process of containing the COVID-19 turns to be quite the opposite. With the ultimate goal of saving more lives, yes, certain strict rules were complimented, such as compulsory home isolation, mask-wearing, and temperature checking basically everywhere you go. He's able to go out for a coffee with friends now, better than herd immunity in any possible ways. Hope more solidarity and kindness to help the human race put an end to the stressful and deadly menace. Rather than focus on some sort of biased political schemes.
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  • Ning Gu
    January 1, 1970
    the book is about a lie in wuhan, its author FangFang combines her friends'news(not real) and the suspicion of the GOV, and builds the lie in wuhan. So if read the book, readers should know what you want to know in wuhan, if the reality, please read the newspapers and choose the fair self-media. In my eyes , the book reflects the some OUT-OF-TIMEs in china is lack of understanding about the reality, and distort the truth. And have to say that the literarary world in china looks a bit depraved, j the book is about a lie in wuhan, its author FangFang combines her friends'news(not real) and the suspicion of the GOV, and builds the lie in wuhan. So if read the book, readers should know what you want to know in wuhan, if the reality, please read the newspapers and choose the fair self-media. In my eyes , the book reflects the some OUT-OF-TIMEs in china is lack of understanding about the reality, and distort the truth. And have to say that the literarary world in china looks a bit depraved, just writes some books which about a ugly and unreal society, and the western world may don't like them but can gain a sense of "superiority". so you can't read Anne Diary to know the real WW2,you should read histroy like “Year Zero: A History of 1945”.
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  • Amanda
    January 1, 1970
    This was a very raw and heart wrenching account of life in Wuhan during the recent lock down to contain the Covid-19 virus. Fang Fang is beyond courageous when she cries out for justice: “as a Wuhan citizen who has been quarantined here for two months, as someone who has personally experienced and witnessed this tragedy that befell Wuhan, we have a responsibility and a duty to seek justice for those wronged souls. Whoever made mistakes and whoever is responsible, those are the people who should This was a very raw and heart wrenching account of life in Wuhan during the recent lock down to contain the Covid-19 virus. Fang Fang is beyond courageous when she cries out for justice: “as a Wuhan citizen who has been quarantined here for two months, as someone who has personally experienced and witnessed this tragedy that befell Wuhan, we have a responsibility and a duty to seek justice for those wronged souls. Whoever made mistakes and whoever is responsible, those are the people who should carry this burden. If we abandon the search for justice, if we forget what has happened here during these days, if we one day can no longer even remember Chang Kai’s final words, then, my fellow Wuhan people, you will be carrying a much heavier burden than this disaster; you will also be carrying the burden of shame. And the burden of forgetting.”It is very sad to know that she is being attacked by ultra nationalists and internet trolls for trying to share with the world what it was like for the people of Wuhan who so admirably sacrificed themselves so that the virus could be contained. No one should be harassed or victimised for trying to share their personal experiences, for trying to tell the truth as they know it. I hope that the world can learn from accounts such as hers and work together to fight the virus together.
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  • Kalisha Buckhanon
    January 1, 1970
    Brave, outstanding, non-conscientious, salvaging. Wuhan Diary will be studied for its reflection of insurgent life energy and documentation of a human mind in flux in the ranks of Iris Murdoch's Jackson's Dilemma, Joan Didion's Year of Magical Thinking and Sonali Deraniyagala's Wave.
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  • 晓明 韩
    January 1, 1970
    biased view
  • Shadowwalker
    January 1, 1970
    full of rumors, shame on her.
  • K
    January 1, 1970
    Have read the whole thing in Fangfang's original language (Chinese) because "oh it is such an amazing story" media's been talking about and I happened to be able to read Chinese as one of my chosen languages to study. Well, it's her freedom to write what she wants, but she might as well need to do some fact-checking before she decides to write this supposedly informative piece and publish to Western audiences, who have no idea what's going on. Her words would be taken as gospel truth outside of Have read the whole thing in Fangfang's original language (Chinese) because "oh it is such an amazing story" media's been talking about and I happened to be able to read Chinese as one of my chosen languages to study. Well, it's her freedom to write what she wants, but she might as well need to do some fact-checking before she decides to write this supposedly informative piece and publish to Western audiences, who have no idea what's going on. Her words would be taken as gospel truth outside of China... she fully knows the impact and keeps playing on words. I remain doubtful of her intentions. I actually follow her Weibo. So don't discredit me right away. She was on social media and retweeting (She doesn't use Twitter, but you get what I mean) random news articles, but has only found out some early facts when netizens shove them down her throat way after she publishes the diary. I don't know if she would make changes or add some footnotes to correct her mistakes. Hope she does so. Also, she's rich af. Has relations within CCP. Lives in a grand house. Whether or not her views represent Chinese commoners is doubtful. Readers should take into their consideration while reading this diary. So yeah, my review. I do not have these "corona-heroine-fangfang" fan lenses on, so it's just "okay". The mainstream media's blowing up it way too much, saying she's the "most acclaimed Chinese writer" when nobody's ever heard of her in or outside of China before this crisis. But apparently, it fits their agenda, and the audience love a Katniss-Everdeen-heroine story against "evil CCP" Snow, so whatever. I've got my popcorns. Fangfang's got a lot of fans in China too. Feel free to worship her work. I respect your opinion. Also #Pray4Wuhan and #Pray4theWorld. Quarantine is almost over and I am optimistic. Although I don't want to go back to school. :(
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  • K
    January 1, 1970
    When all this is over, we're going to see a lot of diaries published. This one is different - it was one of the first to be published, and it was written by a resident of Wuhan. This was not a book at first. It was a collection of diary entries written on Weibo, sometimes hours after the events she describes. The entries are sometimes repetitive, but that's what happens with diaries, or at least when writing to fill the time or as an emotional release. The author is 65 and diabetic, and she take When all this is over, we're going to see a lot of diaries published. This one is different - it was one of the first to be published, and it was written by a resident of Wuhan. This was not a book at first. It was a collection of diary entries written on Weibo, sometimes hours after the events she describes. The entries are sometimes repetitive, but that's what happens with diaries, or at least when writing to fill the time or as an emotional release. The author is 65 and diabetic, and she takes her quarantine order seriously. She records the acts of kindness and humanity by her neighbors, and she writes down stories of desperation and heartbreak - all shared on social media, and harder to verify. Wuhan is a large city, about the size of metropolitan Chicago, and seeing it completely empty and quiet is an "almost majestic” sight. Seeing the sanitation workers doing their duty is an emotional experience. There are rumors of terror and heartbreak. She hears terrible news about friends and colleagues. This is a book that's probably going to be praised more than it's read - praised because of the statements it makes, and likely because it's been attacked elsewhere on the basis that it slanders the reputation of the party, that it is based on rumors, or because her criticisms of local officials (see other reviews below). Still I wonder how many people will read it, given the emotional exhaustion of quarantine is already so deep. I think of my own relatives who are older or diabetic. When I read about events she describes in February, I thought they happened in April. The quarantine flattens out time.
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  • Night Owl
    January 1, 1970
    A diary was written by a CCP retiree who quarantined in the bedroom for more than two months, based on highly repeated catchphrases like “I heard from a doctor friend”, "one of my friends texted me that", "a journalist friend secretly informed me"... It's fine if it were posted in the Whatapp Group chat for gossip juice, but a book happened in such short notice with ready-to-read translated English and Germany editions? Let alone certain rumors got fact-checked by netizens in China before the pu A diary was written by a CCP retiree who quarantined in the bedroom for more than two months, based on highly repeated catchphrases like “I heard from a doctor friend”, "one of my friends texted me that", "a journalist friend secretly informed me"... It's fine if it were posted in the Whatapp Group chat for gossip juice, but a book happened in such short notice with ready-to-read translated English and Germany editions? Let alone certain rumors got fact-checked by netizens in China before the punishment of her book like a Southen city nurse who volunteered in Wuhan died 3 times in her book (Chinese, English and Germany edition), yet turns out to be still ALIVE but fainted due to another disease. This poor nurse's colleagues and family spoke publicly for an apology. Too bad you're gonna miss that part in the book. A bit cruel to host an international funeral for somebody who's just sick rather than dead, isn't it? Kinda feel insulted to see it be recommended on Goodreads in the first place. A watched pot never boils, I'd rather hold a couple of months to see how things/facts settled down. I lean on the latest scientific reports made by Cambridge University, Nature, The Lancet etc with less biased prejudice nor overdosed politicization at this moment. In the meanwhile, one of my best friends who's currently working/living in China begs to differ from Fang fang's opinions. In case you're wondering, he's a British caucasian who has never been brainwashed by any political organizations. Feedback from him who's experienced the process of containing the COVID-19 turns to be quite the opposite. With the ultimate goal of saving more lives, yes, certain strict rules were complemented, such as compulsory home isolation, mask-wearing, and temperature checking basically everywhere you go. He's able to go out for a coffee with friends now, better than herd immunity in any possible ways. Hope more solidarity and kindness to help the human race put an end to the stressful and deadly menace. Rather than focus on some sort of biased political schemes as shown in the so called fast-food like book.
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  • teohjitkhiam
    January 1, 1970
    There are a plethora of reviewers here at Goodreads that are far more articulate & perceptive than I am, and whose generally insightful reviews that I subscribe to wholeheartedly. That being said, as Fang Fang herself would state, her voice is merely one out the countless millions that suffered through the ravages of the coronavirus during the two month lockdown of Wuhan. Yet, it must be acknowledged that she herself was at center of the storm, both figuratively & literally. Those looking for di There are a plethora of reviewers here at Goodreads that are far more articulate & perceptive than I am, and whose generally insightful reviews that I subscribe to wholeheartedly. That being said, as Fang Fang herself would state, her voice is merely one out the countless millions that suffered through the ravages of the coronavirus during the two month lockdown of Wuhan. Yet, it must be acknowledged that she herself was at center of the storm, both figuratively & literally. Those looking for dirt on the CPC or clarion calls for Western-style democracy should disabuse themselves of such notions. THIS ISN'T THAT KIND OF BOOK. Another newspaper review, noting that the book could be cut down by half & be as readable, misses the point. It's a diary. Repetitive elements - buying food, talking with neighbors, chatting online - reinforces the degree of monotony of everyday life under the lockdown.
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  • Jackie
    January 1, 1970
    Wuhan was under quarantine for corona virus for about 65 days from the end of January to the end of March and reopened when there had been zero cases for 14 days. We have been under lock down for 80 days from mid March until June 6 so far and still have many thousands of cases and people dying. We can learn a lot from Wuhan's experience though I doubt that we will. After reading this book I want to know more abut China's education system and the type of housing they have. They seem to keep very Wuhan was under quarantine for corona virus for about 65 days from the end of January to the end of March and reopened when there had been zero cases for 14 days. We have been under lock down for 80 days from mid March until June 6 so far and still have many thousands of cases and people dying. We can learn a lot from Wuhan's experience though I doubt that we will. After reading this book I want to know more abut China's education system and the type of housing they have. They seem to keep very close contact with their school friends, high school and college. And even speaking about Dorm 8. The author speaks about her classmates most of all. Also she speaks of colleagues, other writers. It seems that she lives in a building which houses mostly other literary writers. I wonder if other professions live together in similar housing blocks. The support she receives from these friends is unbelievable. We really know so little of Chinese culture.
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  • Ying_ko
    January 1, 1970
    A wonderfully informative view of what happened in Hubai, China during the original Wuhan COVID-19 outbreak. The author is a well-known woman who grew up during the Cultural Revolution. Her observations of the effect on the population from the perspective of one of the people stuck at home. She looks at the problems of the government response, the poor handling of the situation, the arrival of more competent people, the loss of life, and the reaction of some people to her comments. Sadly, her wo A wonderfully informative view of what happened in Hubai, China during the original Wuhan COVID-19 outbreak. The author is a well-known woman who grew up during the Cultural Revolution. Her observations of the effect on the population from the perspective of one of the people stuck at home. She looks at the problems of the government response, the poor handling of the situation, the arrival of more competent people, the loss of life, and the reaction of some people to her comments. Sadly, her words will sound familiar to people in the US who are being told they will not be released from lockdown until there is a vaccine is available. She looks at the economic impact of people not being able to buy food and work. I think it is impossible to read the book without shedding tears at the cost the people have suffered.
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  • Denise
    January 1, 1970
    This book started life as an online diary kept by Chinese writer Fang Fang throughout the Covid-19 lockdown imposed on Wuhan beginning in late January 2020. Chronicling life on the ground at the heart of the outbreak that has now spread around the world, she writes on everything from the difficulties of everyday routines such as shopping amid shortages, the fear and uncertainty in the face of a new disease about which little was known and less shared with the public, the spread of information an This book started life as an online diary kept by Chinese writer Fang Fang throughout the Covid-19 lockdown imposed on Wuhan beginning in late January 2020. Chronicling life on the ground at the heart of the outbreak that has now spread around the world, she writes on everything from the difficulties of everyday routines such as shopping amid shortages, the fear and uncertainty in the face of a new disease about which little was known and less shared with the public, the spread of information and misinformation as it emerges, lives lost to the virus, to criticism of the handling of the outbreak and the flood of criticism she received in return. An inportant record, and well worth the read.
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  • Wilson Huang
    January 1, 1970
    I'm a Wuhan local who stayed at home for nearly 100 days. My daughter had her 3 years' birthday at home. Me and my wife had our first quarantined valentine. We cancelled the Balkan trip that has been planned for months. Luckily we have been healthy. RIP for those who passed away. Shame for those who can't tolerate different voices.
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  • Gabriel Stein
    January 1, 1970
    Fantastic! A must read!I wish I could give this more than five stars. This is a gripping, yet factual insight from Wuhan in the midst of the original COVID-19 outbreak and lockdown. It should be on the reading list of anyone who was directly or indirectly affected by the pandemic. The attacks on the brilliant author and clearly a Chinese patriot, are abhorrent.
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  • Nadia
    January 1, 1970
    This is a product of politics dedicated to anti-Chinese-government. A biased book based on 'I heard from my friends' with her own imagination in her luxury villa, and without even going out to the frontline to hear from doctors and patients.
  • Rhonda Lomazow
    January 1, 1970
    Amazing on line diary of the pandemic in Wuhan.A day to day personal on line diary of life during isolating.Struck me how similar all our days all over the world are.The heartbreak of deaths the food services.People doing heroic acts.So intimate so eye opening,
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  • Shadowwalker
    January 1, 1970
    full of rumors, shame on her.
  • Stefani
    January 1, 1970
    Is it just me, or do all the 1 star reviews with nearly identical language make you want to read this more? It does me. I see you CCP apologists.
  • L
    January 1, 1970
    All the 1 star reviews are butt hurt nationalistic Chinamen. It's a good book and the writer should be protected.
  • Feng Zhu
    January 1, 1970
    The voices of China are too limited, one person’s voice is too strong.
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