Walk the Wire (Amos Decker #6)
Amos Decker -- the FBI consultant with a perfect memory -- returns to solve a gruesome murder in a booming North Dakota oil town in the newest thriller in David Baldacci's #1 New York Times bestselling Memory Man series. When Amos Decker and his FBI colleague Alex Jamison are called to London, North Dakota, they instantly sense that the thriving fracking town is ripe for trouble. The promise of a second gold rush has attracted an onslaught of newcomers all hoping for a windfall, and the community is growing faster than houses can be built. The sudden boom has also brought a slew of problems with it, including drugs, property crimes, prostitution -- and now murder.Decker and Jamison are ordered to investigate the death of a young woman named Irene Cramer, whose body was expertly autopsied and then dumped in the open -- which is only the beginning of the oddities surrounding the case. As Decker and Jamison dig into Irene's life, they are shocked to discover that the woman who walked the streets by night as a prostitute was a teacher for a local religious sect by day -- a sect operating on land once owned by a mysterious government facility that looms over the entire community.London is a town replete with ruthless business owners, shady government officials, and religious outsiders, all determined to keep their secrets from coming out. When other murders occur, Decker will need all of his extraordinary memory and detective skills, and the assistance of a surprising ally, to root out a killer and the forces behind Cramer's death. . . before the boom town explodes.

Walk the Wire (Amos Decker #6) Details

TitleWalk the Wire (Amos Decker #6)
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseApr 21st, 2020
PublisherGrand Central Publishing
Rating
GenreMystery, Fiction, Thriller, Audiobook, Crime, Suspense, Mystery Thriller, Detective, Adult, Spy Thriller, Espionage

Walk the Wire (Amos Decker #6) Review

  • Paromjit
    January 1, 1970
    David Baldacci's latest addition to the terrific Amos Decker series is a particularly twisted and complex thriller, with the appearance of other series favourites, the assassins Will Robie and Jessica Riel. Decker and his partner, Alex Jamison of the FBI are sent to the North Dakota Badlands, to the fracking for oil boom and bust town of London, currently experiencing an extraordinary boom. The body of school teacher at the closed community of Anabaptists, Irene Cramer, has been discovered by a David Baldacci's latest addition to the terrific Amos Decker series is a particularly twisted and complex thriller, with the appearance of other series favourites, the assassins Will Robie and Jessica Riel. Decker and his partner, Alex Jamison of the FBI are sent to the North Dakota Badlands, to the fracking for oil boom and bust town of London, currently experiencing an extraordinary boom. The body of school teacher at the closed community of Anabaptists, Irene Cramer, has been discovered by a local hunting tracker, oddly the body shows all the signs of having undergone a post-mortem. Surprisingly, Decker and Jamison are not given given any reasons as to why Cramer's murder is of interest, but they soon learn that Cramer operated below the radar as a streetwalker, as they work with the local cop, Joe Kelly.London has a military Air Force Station, conducting radar operations, that employs security contractors, Vector, and two of the town's wealthiest rival businessmen benefiting from the growth of incoming workers for the fracking industry, Hugh Dawson and Stuart McClellan. Having not kept in touch with his two sisters, Decker is shocked to find his brother in law, Stan Baker, in London, working in the fracking industry, in the throes of an amicable divorce from Renee. In a thrilling and fast paced narrative, there are several intricate threads that put Decker in severe danger, and when a attempt on his life almost succeeds, he finds he has been assigned high level protection and assistance that is to prove critically important. It takes Decker some time to unpick the several different plots that together have a sky high body count in London that involve corrupt politicians, mercenaries hired by global players, and a morass of local intrigue.Baldacci is a skilled and expert thriller writer with well plotted explosive storylines that are packed with suspense and tension, as he illustrates here. He does his research too, I particularly appreciated the details he provided of how the fracking industry works. He continues to develop the character of his central protagonist, Amos, who inches closer to becoming closer to his family, something that has eluded him with the trauma of the loss of his wife and daughter. He begins to show an interest in the personal lives of others, such as that of Alex Jamison, until now his sole survival strategy to handle his haunting circumstances has been work, nothing else. This is a great, entertaining, intense and complicated thriller which I thoroughly enjoyed reading. Many thanks to Pan Macmillan for an ARC.
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  • Matt
    January 1, 1970
    David Baldacci is back with another of his powerhouse Amos Decker novels, which never ceases to impress. Decker and his team are sent to the small community of London, North Dakota to investigate the murder of a woman. Her skull has been hacked open and her brain removed, as well as the evisceration of her stomach. Decker cannot make much sense of it, but soon learns that the victim was the teacher on a religious colony just outside of town. When not teaching the minds of tomorrow, she was enter David Baldacci is back with another of his powerhouse Amos Decker novels, which never ceases to impress. Decker and his team are sent to the small community of London, North Dakota to investigate the murder of a woman. Her skull has been hacked open and her brain removed, as well as the evisceration of her stomach. Decker cannot make much sense of it, but soon learns that the victim was the teacher on a religious colony just outside of town. When not teaching the minds of tomorrow, she was entertaining the men of the community with her sexual prowess, which is another angle that Decker feels might play a part in her death. London is not the bucolic town it might seem, as a military installation appears to be quite busy on the outskirts, something that Decker learns is related to satellite monitoring. However, something seems off and so the investigation turns in that direction, as odd vehicles appear and planes are in the vicinity at odd hours. While Decker pushes forward, there are some who seem to take offence to this and he lands in a spot of trouble. Just when things get at their most tense, a mysterious figure shows up to cast some light on the situation and save Decker’s hide. More bodies turn up, some mysterious suicides and others outright murders. It would seem there is more to this small town than meets the eye, something some within the US Army want to keep secret. While Decker wants to find the killer, there are bigger fish to fry. Why, then, would someone like Will Robie be here and how will that impact the case? A great piece with some strong cross-over elements to one of Baldacci’s other series. Recommended to fans of his work, as well as the reader who needs a little thrill put back into their day!I love a story that pulls me in from the opening pages and does not let up. Baldacci does that here from the outset, with his strong mix of characters. That the story was set in North Dakota only added to things for me, as I grew up a few hours away, over the Canadian border. As always, Amos Decker is a wonderful protagonist and his way of thinking keeps me on my toes throughout. His thought process and somewhat rational way of coming to some conclusions makes the story all the better, keeping the reader wanting more. There was definitely a softer side that emerged in this piece, as Decker connects with siblings from his past. Might there be a turn towards the more amenable side of this rock-hard man? The others who emerge in this piece help to complement Decker’s work, as well as keep the action moving. Will Robie’s cross-over appearance here left me wondering if Baldacci wanted to bring one of his past protagonists back, seeing as there have been some new projects taking precedence. Decker and Robie work well together and the race to the answer is found with their teaming up. The story was strong, as usual, and the plot kept evolving throughout, with twists that Baldacci explains to those who pay attention. I am happy to see some cross-over work and would be keen to see if Baldacci tries it again, as it seemed seamless to me. Now to wait for the next book, which is always the hardest part.Kudos, Mr. Baldacci, for another great Amos Decker instalment. I love how creative you can be, given the opportunity.Love/hate the review? An ever-growing collection of others appears at: http://pecheyponderings.wordpress.com/A Book for All Seasons, a different sort of Book Challenge: https://www.goodreads.com/group/show/...
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  • Mandy White
    January 1, 1970
    Have you met Amos Decker? If not why not? Go and pick up The Memory Man, Book 1 right now and you will see why he is one of my favourite fictional characters. He is a character like now other, with his special abilities and background - but I will not spoil that for you. Get into this series and you will find out for yourself.Walk The Wire is book 6 featuring Decker and Jamison and I could not wait to read it. They are sent to a town called London in North Dakota when the autopsied boy of Irene Have you met Amos Decker? If not why not? Go and pick up The Memory Man, Book 1 right now and you will see why he is one of my favourite fictional characters. He is a character like now other, with his special abilities and background - but I will not spoil that for you. Get into this series and you will find out for yourself.Walk The Wire is book 6 featuring Decker and Jamison and I could not wait to read it. They are sent to a town called London in North Dakota when the autopsied boy of Irene Cramer is discovered by a hunter. Her name raises a flag on the FBI system, but they do not know why. It is the start of an action packed story where the bullets fly and the body count rises. This fracking town is a busy one, with not only the oil people but a secret military complex. Who would want Irene, a teacher, dead? And why was her body cut up and sewn back together. The more Alex and Amos look into it the more complicated it gets. The ending was surprising and clever.The drama never stops in a David Baldacci book and walk The Wire is no exception. It really is a brilliant series and long time fans of David's are in for a treat with some familiar faces making an appearance in this book. High recommend you start at the beginning with Amos, you need to truly understand him as a man.Thank you to Macmillan Australia for my advanced copy of this book to read. All opinions are my own and are in no way biased.
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  • Mean Drake
    January 1, 1970
    Can't believe the 4 and 5 star reviews. This one took me 2 weeks to finish. The plot was thin enough to need a very high body count. The high body count itself wasn't enough to pull the story for the required number of pages.(view spoiler)[ So characters from another series, Will Robie and Jessica Reel with Blue Man had to be roped in to fire a few large guns. (hide spoiler)] Multiple cross plots made a mess and the aim seemed to be to fill pages that's all.All in all, even though I enjoyed all Can't believe the 4 and 5 star reviews. This one took me 2 weeks to finish. The plot was thin enough to need a very high body count. The high body count itself wasn't enough to pull the story for the required number of pages.(view spoiler)[ So characters from another series, Will Robie and Jessica Reel with Blue Man had to be roped in to fire a few large guns. (hide spoiler)] Multiple cross plots made a mess and the aim seemed to be to fill pages that's all.All in all, even though I enjoyed all previous Amos Decker books, you can safely give this one a pass.
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  • Phrynne
    January 1, 1970
    This was typical Baldacci entertainment, non stop action, an amazing body count and so much going on it was hard to keep up with it all. In fact if you asked me to explain exactly what happened I would probably get it wrong. I do know I enjoyed it though.Amos Decker is always good value, although the author seems to be softening his character a little which may not be a good thing. I like his alternative thinking, his abruptness and especially his synesthesia. It makes him stand out from the ple This was typical Baldacci entertainment, non stop action, an amazing body count and so much going on it was hard to keep up with it all. In fact if you asked me to explain exactly what happened I would probably get it wrong. I do know I enjoyed it though.Amos Decker is always good value, although the author seems to be softening his character a little which may not be a good thing. I like his alternative thinking, his abruptness and especially his synesthesia. It makes him stand out from the plethora of special agents, detectives and P.I.s out there in all those murder mysteries and thrillers.Baldacci made an interesting move in this book by sharing a large part of the action with a character from another of his series, Will Robie. I saw someone comment that it may have been a sales technique to introduce his other series to new readers. Well, if so, it worked for me. I have not read any of the Will Robie series and I have to put that right asap! At least I have something else to read while I wait for the next Amos Decker:)
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  • John Rumery
    January 1, 1970
    I’ve enjoyed all the Amos Decker books. Up till now. This was a mess. Probably the most convoluted, implausible story I have read in a long time. It was like throwing a Scooby-Doo mystery and an x-Files episode into a blender then pouring it out. Why does success (previous books in series) always end up with mediocrity after a few years?
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  • Tim
    January 1, 1970
    Amos Decker is a diminishing character, as is possibly author Baldacci. 1 of 10 stars
  • Louise Wilson
    January 1, 1970
    Amos Decker #6Amos Decker is a former FBI Agent. Along with his partner Alex Jamison, they are investigating the murder of Irene Cramer. Her body had bee mutilated. Helping to assist the investigation is two CIA assassins, Will Robe and Jessica Riel. The four of them together must try and defeat the perpetrators before anymore murders take place. The plotline is complex, intriguing and relevant today. The pace is fast in this twist filled story. It's a tense and gripping page turner. With the de Amos Decker #6Amos Decker is a former FBI Agent. Along with his partner Alex Jamison, they are investigating the murder of Irene Cramer. Her body had bee mutilated. Helping to assist the investigation is two CIA assassins, Will Robe and Jessica Riel. The four of them together must try and defeat the perpetrators before anymore murders take place. The plotline is complex, intriguing and relevant today. The pace is fast in this twist filled story. It's a tense and gripping page turner. With the death toll rising, Deker and Jamison seem to be running around in circles. I like Amos Decker and his perfect recollection of everything. As always, even though it seemed impossible, all the loose ends were tied up. This book could be read as a standalone but it's always best to read a series in the order they were written in. I do recommend this book. I would like to thank NetGalley, Pan Macmillan and the author David Baldacci for my ARC in exchange for an honest review.
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  • K.J. McGillick
    January 1, 1970
    OutstandingAmos Decker is my favorite character and to have Will Robie show up was an added treat. I learned a lot about fraking which also a plus. Great plots good twists and turns satisfactory ending
  • Carolyn
    January 1, 1970
    3.5 Stars. This is the 6th book in the Adam Decker(Memory Man) series. I read the previous 5 with much enjoyment. This one didn’t appeal to me as much. This works well as a stand-alone, but those unfamiliar with the series should read at least the first book to learn about Decker’s unique abilities. Adam Decker suffered a serious head injury at the start of playing pro- football.When he regained consciousness he was a changed man. He was diagnosed with hyperthymesia (perfect recall) which rende 3.5 Stars. This is the 6th book in the Adam Decker(Memory Man) series. I read the previous 5 with much enjoyment. This one didn’t appeal to me as much. This works well as a stand-alone, but those unfamiliar with the series should read at least the first book to learn about Decker’s unique abilities. Adam Decker suffered a serious head injury at the start of playing pro- football.When he regained consciousness he was a changed man. He was diagnosed with hyperthymesia (perfect recall) which renders one unable to forget anything they have seen, heard or read, and also with synesthesia where colours are seen in relation to people, places or numbers. These are very rare but actual brain conditions. He also lost empathy and some social skills. These disorders were upsetting to him, but his heightened memory was put to good use when he joined his hometown police force. Attempting to lead as normal a life as possible, he married and was the devoted father of a young girl. One evening, he returned home to find his wife, daughter and brother-in-law brutally murdered. Adam Decker went into decline. He lived on the streets, was dirty and shabby, grew a scraggly beard, and gained considerable weight. He was determined to pull himself together and returned to work to find his family's killer. I found Walk the Wire slow-moving at first. The action didn't really pick up until a character new to me, entered the plot. This was Will Robie, a skilled assassin, secretly hired by the government to eliminate persons threatening the country. My first thought that he would be the perfect candidate for an action series of his own. Not being familiar with David Baldacci’s other books, I was pleased to learn that Robie already was the protagonist in his own thrillers. Decker’s synesthesia seems to be declining. He is showing interest and feelings for others, and has made a connection with his brother and plans to visit his sisters after avoiding them. He seems to be gradually emerging from his time as a dour loner. It was difficult to know whether his super memory is normalizing. This investigation relied on his intelligence, bravery, and rational thinking and the only examples of his recall were in relation to remarks he heard recently. He will still be a terrific detective, but I fear not as intriguing a character. Decker now works as a consultant for the FBI. He is called to the boomtown of London, North Dakota, along with his partner, Alex Jamison. The town has seen hard times but now wealth from oil is bringing in newcomers as well as an upswing in crime. The town is dominated by adjacent oilfields, a religious community and a mysterious compound that was once a military base. It was built for the supposed purpose of using radar to track satellites and any incoming missiles and then sold to Vector, a security company. They have been called upon to investigate the murder of Irene Cramer. Her body had been dumped in a field, her head and body expertly autopsied, and it was later found that her intestines and stomach had been sliced open. Cramer had been a popular school teacher in the religious sect but at night she worked as an escort, mainly with men from the oil fields. I learned more about fracking for oil than I ever wanted to know. This interfered with the flow of the story for me. Who was Irene Cramer and why was she killed? There were two separate plots here with only minimal connection. There was an obsessive deadly love story. Murders and suspected suicides were piling up. Then there was the former military base which was not as it seemed, with secret use by government authority in the 1950s. Now very strange things are happening, again under the auspices of the government. Planes and helicopters have been seen landing and ambulances taking bodies away. There is a vast conspiracy, and mercenaries will kill to keep its secrets. Robie and his partner, Jessica Beel, have been sent to discover what is going on at the military base and to protect Decker. There is a race to solve the mysteries before an impending catastrophe destroys the area. Intense action escalated later in the book with much excitement and plenty of head-spinning surprises, danger and thrills.
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  • Louise Wilson
    January 1, 1970
    Amos Decker #6Amos Decker is a former FBI Agent. Along with his partner Alex Jamison, theynare investigating the murder of Irene Cramer. Her body had been mutilated. Helping to assist the investigation is teo CIA assassins, Will Robe and Jessica Riel. The four of them together must try and defeat the perpetrators before anymore murders take place.The plotline is complex, intriguing and relevant today. The pace is fast in this twist filled story. It's a tense and gripping page turner. With thende Amos Decker #6Amos Decker is a former FBI Agent. Along with his partner Alex Jamison, theynare investigating the murder of Irene Cramer. Her body had been mutilated. Helping to assist the investigation is teo CIA assassins, Will Robe and Jessica Riel. The four of them together must try and defeat the perpetrators before anymore murders take place.The plotline is complex, intriguing and relevant today. The pace is fast in this twist filled story. It's a tense and gripping page turner. With thendea5h toll rising, Deker and Jamison seem to be running round in circles. I like Amos Deker and his perfect recollection of everything. As always, even though it seemed impossible, the loose ends are all tied up. This book could be read as a standalone but it's always best to read a series in the order they were written in. I do recommend this book.
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  • Sherri
    January 1, 1970
    First, this wasn’t really an Amos Decker book. It was just a mystery. The book contained very little of Decker’s trademark quirks, which is why I have loved the previous books in the series. Second, once again, too many characters and too many names in general! Wow! Last, not only were there way to many characters, but Mr. Baldacci would refer to them by their first name and then their last name and back to their first name ... all on the same page. He would set up a scene with 5 people in a roo First, this wasn’t really an Amos Decker book. It was just a mystery. The book contained very little of Decker’s trademark quirks, which is why I have loved the previous books in the series. Second, once again, too many characters and too many names in general! Wow! Last, not only were there way to many characters, but Mr. Baldacci would refer to them by their first name and then their last name and back to their first name ... all on the same page. He would set up a scene with 5 people in a room and then also be referring to several other additional characters. It was impossible to keep up with the dialogue while also trying to remember who was who!
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  • Sandra L. Sorensen
    January 1, 1970
    Love BaldacciBut I didn’t love this book. Too many story lines going. The entrance of Robbie kept me going for awhile, but, there were big holes in the flow, and the integrity of the story was ruined by the uncharacteristic procedure lapses made by the main character, Decker. I feel like the author was playing a game of switch-up, or how many story lines can you fit in one book.PS: I’m never going to North Dakota.
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  • Sandi Griffith
    January 1, 1970
    terribleHard to follow and dull. It is nothing like his other books. The writing style is not even the same.
  • Jim
    January 1, 1970
    The sixth book in the Amos Decker series finds our protagonist in London. The one in North Dakota. He and his partner, Alex Jamison, are sent there when the body of a woman is discovered. Irene Cramer was expertly autopsied and then her body was left out in the open. When Decker asks his boss why they are being sent to investigate a local murder he runs into a brick wall. Cramer's name apparently set off alarms at the FBI but no one is telling Decker or Alex why.Cramer was a teacher at a school The sixth book in the Amos Decker series finds our protagonist in London. The one in North Dakota. He and his partner, Alex Jamison, are sent there when the body of a woman is discovered. Irene Cramer was expertly autopsied and then her body was left out in the open. When Decker asks his boss why they are being sent to investigate a local murder he runs into a brick wall. Cramer's name apparently set off alarms at the FBI but no one is telling Decker or Alex why.Cramer was a teacher at a school for a local religious sect. At night she was walking the streets seemingly as a prostitute. London is in the midst of a booming economy. The boom is the result of oil and fracking. With the booming economy comes a host of problems. Alcohol, drugs, fights, shady business deals and now murder. In addition to the oil workers and the religious sect there is a mysterious government facility. A former Air Force installation now guarded by private contractors. To sum up you have a small town with ruthless business leaders, a mysterious government facility, and a religious sect all determined to keep their secrets. It isn't long before there are other murders.Amos Decker and Alex Jamison are joined by characters from another series by David Baldacci. Will Robie and Jessica Reel show up just in time. Even Blue Man stops by. Readers of the Robie and Reel series know they are government assassins with the CIA. So why would the CIA be involved in a domestic issue? Good question. It seems that in the small town of London, North Dakota there is not only fracking but terrorists and WMD's.Bringing in Robie and Reel does not really add anything to the Memory Man series other than perhaps reader interest. Perhaps the author was trying to make readers of this series aware of the Robie and Reel series. Or vice versa. As other readers have indicated I did not find this entry in the series one of the better stories. It was a bit convoluted and hard to believe. It was actually two different stories. I enjoy the characters and it was entertaining. It just wasn't a page turner that kept me up and wondering what was next or whodunit.
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  • Neecy
    January 1, 1970
    This was NOT an Amos Decker book. I love the Amos Decker series. Always look forward to these books. However, I almost stopped reading this book several times. It really didn’t pick up until page 200 (kindle at 48%). These books always grab my attention and I can’t put them down. I’ve taken the last two with me each time I’ve went on vacation because I knew they would be perfect beach reads and I just flew through them. This one just didn’t have the “wow” factor that the other books have had. I This was NOT an Amos Decker book. I love the Amos Decker series. Always look forward to these books. However, I almost stopped reading this book several times. It really didn’t pick up until page 200 (kindle at 48%). These books always grab my attention and I can’t put them down. I’ve taken the last two with me each time I’ve went on vacation because I knew they would be perfect beach reads and I just flew through them. This one just didn’t have the “wow” factor that the other books have had. I felt like there were two separate stories being told simultaneously. A lot of back and forth. I found myself re-reading paragraphs because I couldn’t focus on the story. Also, if you like all of the characters in the other books, you will be disappointed because there’s a couple new characters that have a large role in this book and none of the series favorites are in this book (they have very small, insignificant mentions). Overall my least favorite in this series. And that is saying a lot because I recommend this series to everyone. Took me two weeks to finish this book. Such an incredible disappointment. *Where is Decker? He was totally off his game. And where were his trademark quirks? *What happened to Jamison? She can’t seem to figure anything out on her own. *This is basically a Will Robie book with a smidgen of Amos Decker.
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  • Rachel
    January 1, 1970
    The memory man is one of my favorite characters. I felt book # 5 was mediocre and disappointing. I looked forward to Book 6 and expected an explosive recovery. The book kept me intrigued and interested. However, I felt there were two plot lines that were mashed up and thrown into one book. The crossover with Robie was a nice addition. In my opinion, had Baldacci separated the conjoined plots into two books, he would have had two spectacular books. Walk the Wire was a good read, but not an extrao The memory man is one of my favorite characters. I felt book # 5 was mediocre and disappointing. I looked forward to Book 6 and expected an explosive recovery. The book kept me intrigued and interested. However, I felt there were two plot lines that were mashed up and thrown into one book. The crossover with Robie was a nice addition. In my opinion, had Baldacci separated the conjoined plots into two books, he would have had two spectacular books. Walk the Wire was a good read, but not an extraordinary read. The crossover with Robie was a nice addition. The book had too much going on and neither plot was given the justice deserved to make tremendous story lines.
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  • Matt
    January 1, 1970
    I am a big Baldacci fan and buy all his books. That said I have been disappointed in the last few Baldacci books.In my opinion I have grown tired of the “heroes” being able to escape or fight off extreme odds over and over again. To me I wouldn’t be surprised if they made a sniper rifle out of rolled up newspaper, duct tape and an aerosol can. It really makes me wonder if the person writing the current books is actually the same author that wrote the earlier works?I won’t buy future Baldacci boo I am a big Baldacci fan and buy all his books. That said I have been disappointed in the last few Baldacci books.In my opinion I have grown tired of the “heroes” being able to escape or fight off extreme odds over and over again. To me I wouldn’t be surprised if they made a sniper rifle out of rolled up newspaper, duct tape and an aerosol can. It really makes me wonder if the person writing the current books is actually the same author that wrote the earlier works?I won’t buy future Baldacci books, I may check one out of the library, that way I have no money invested if I quit reading, I can return it.Disappointed.
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  • Scott
    January 1, 1970
    Three of my favorite mystery/crime fiction writers are Michael Connelly, Lee Child and David Baldacci. There are very few books by any of those authors that I haven’t enjoyed. This continues to be the case for me with Baldacci’s new book, “Walk the Wire” which is his sixth outing featuring Amos Decker, and more often referred to as the Memory Man. Due to a life-changing head injury during a football game, Decker has perfect memory and cannot forget a thing. Along with his partner, Alex Jamison, Three of my favorite mystery/crime fiction writers are Michael Connelly, Lee Child and David Baldacci. There are very few books by any of those authors that I haven’t enjoyed. This continues to be the case for me with Baldacci’s new book, “Walk the Wire” which is his sixth outing featuring Amos Decker, and more often referred to as the Memory Man. Due to a life-changing head injury during a football game, Decker has perfect memory and cannot forget a thing. Along with his partner, Alex Jamison, they are two of the best civilian investigators the FBI has on its team. The new outing begins with Decker and Alex being sent to London, North Dakota, home of the fracking business - drilling down into the earth with water, sand and chemicals at high pressure to release gas and oil. The industry is enjoying a second boom period, attracting all kinds of newcomers hoping for a windfall, causing the community to grow faster than housing and supporting businesses can be built. Other problems have increased quickly, including drugs, crime, and prostitution. And now murder brings the Memory Man to town. Decker and Alex are called in to investigate the murder of Irene Cramer, who was found by a lone hunter in the badlands while tracking a wolf. What makes her death so different is the post-mortem autopsied already performed on her body, as well as her identity setting off alarms in the FBI headquarters. However, Decker and Alex are kept in the dark regarding who Irene was and why she was in London. As they investigate, it doesn’t take them long to discover there are many strange things going on in London. The more they find out about Cramer is confusing and conflicting. She was working during the day as a teacher for a religious farming sect located outside of town by an Air Force base. At night, it seemed that she was secretly working as a companion to the working miners. When Decker and Alex visit the religious sect leaders, they discover more secrets and sordid history. When they try to visit the Air Force base, they receive no help and are pretty much sent away from what seems like a mysterious run facility. Then there’s the two families that run the town – one that owns the fracking businesses and one that runs all of the housing and supporting businesses – who have a sordid and darkly intertwined history that seems to be spilling into the middle of their investigation work. It doesn’t take log for another murder and a disappearance to occur and things move toward a deadly discovery that could have large scale impacts… I am finding myself basking in the afterglow of enjoyment of another solid Baldacci outing. There are few constants in life, but one of the few I can look forward to is having two David Baldacci novels to read each year. He has been like clockwork the past several years. Twice a year – in May and November – he publishes a new book that I have already reserved at my local library. My excitement level and anticipation are always at peak level, knowing my reading experience will be an exhilarating roller coaster ride. As expected, this Decker adventure moves along at a fast pace, moving from information gathering scene to another in staccato fashion. This time there are more violent, life-threatening scenes for Decker than in previous novels, but hat only adds to the mystery and suspense. Baldacci has his winning formula down and demonstrates it well with multi-faceted characters, frontier style western town settings, and a strongly layered clues throughout the story. And when the mystery eventually reveals itself towards the end, it is a well-developed climax that provides several surprises, including a surprising crossover appearance of three of Baldacci’s other popular characters that work well with Decker and Alex. I won’t give away their identities to spoil anything, but they work well together, contrast nicely with each other, and even help each other to grow. In my opinion, one of Baldacci’s greatest strengths as a writer is his uncanny ability to wrap a plot together in such a strong manner where the mystery, suspense, and clues are revealed one at a time like peeling away the layers of an onion. For example, as Amos diligently investigates Cramer’s murder, interviews people of interest, and converts clues into information, the underlying tension builds from a steady, building boil to a fulfilling and pleasing outcome. For an author that produces two books a year, he consistently delivers intricate plotting and pacing. Each character introduced is unique and their own, and the interactions between them and Decker flow with a rhythm almost lyrical in nature. Amos Decker is one of my favorite Baldacci characters. His unique skills are balanced by his lack of physical strength and social acumen. Although he contributes to the betterment of society, he is a person who learning, growing, and fighting to overcome his own challenges and weaknesses. IN this outing, Baldacci spends more time on Decker’s relationships with his family and moves his character forward in his personal development. Decker is full of conflict and someday I hope he will see Jamison as potentially more than just a work partner. Overall, it’s an enjoyable journey for readers to solve the mystery before Decker does while experiencing their own personal journey. In my case, I think I damaged a brain cell or two trying to beat him to the resolution. If you haven’t tried reading Baldacci, this is an excellent series to start with. Give Memory Man a try… You won’t regret it…
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  • CONNIE ELLIOTT
    January 1, 1970
    TrainwreckI have read and loved all the memory man books. I can't believe David Baldacci even wrote this. It is a hot mess. Convoluted ridiculous plot which makes no sense. But the worst thing is that Amos Decker has been turned into a cutout character with none of his original personality and appeal. Don't waste your money.
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  • Monnie
    January 1, 1970
    There are way too many reasons I love this series to mention, but - almost lifelong Ohio resident that I am - I'll confirm that one is "Memory Man" Amos Decker's connection to the Buckeye State: Not only did he graduate from THE Ohio State University, but he was signed by my favorite NFL team, the Cleveland Browns. The latter was, alas, a career-ender - on his very first play of his very first professional game, he was injured so badly that he could play no more. That experience did, however, le There are way too many reasons I love this series to mention, but - almost lifelong Ohio resident that I am - I'll confirm that one is "Memory Man" Amos Decker's connection to the Buckeye State: Not only did he graduate from THE Ohio State University, but he was signed by my favorite NFL team, the Cleveland Browns. The latter was, alas, a career-ender - on his very first play of his very first professional game, he was injured so badly that he could play no more. That experience did, however, leave him with hyperthymesia, which causes him to remember every detail of every single day (whether he wants to or not) as well as synesthia abilities - associating colors with people and objects. Now an investigator, he and his FBI colleague Alex Jamison go where they're sent; in this instance, it's remote London, North Dakota, where the rich Bakken oil field has put the fracking industry in boom mode. They're here to investigate the apparent murder of a young woman named Irene Cramer, whose body was dumped in an open area and, inexplicably, had been autopsied. Neither Amos nor Alex has any idea why Irene is important to the FBI powers-that-be, but they do learn that by day she was a teacher at a religious community near the fracking operations (and near a secretive government facility that claims to be watching the skies for possible nuclear invasion). After the sun went down, it appears that Irene supplemented her income as a lady of the night.Nothing, though, is as it seems; Amos and Alex spend a goodly amount of time looking into all three operations - fracking, the government facility and the religious group - trying to determine who Irene really was, why she was murdered and whether any or all of the three operations are connected in any way. It doesn't take long for the investigation to turn deadly, though, and therein came an exciting surprise - the appearance of three other familiar characters from a different (and another favorite) series. From that point on, the pace picks up fast, making for edge-of-seat action the rest of the way. Yeah, I know it's highly unlikely that an author will kill off a major character in a popular series (this is the sixth Decker installment). That said, from my perspective it's a credit to any author who can make me worry that it really could happen - and I admit to holding my breath more than once in this one. Great job!
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  • Adah Udechukwu
    January 1, 1970
    Walk the Wire is a perfect thriller. The novel had a lot of worthwhile moving pieces. I am normally able to predict the identity of the killer halfway through a thriller novel but Walk the Wire put all my predictions in the dustbin. The novel was compelling from start to finish.
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  • Gary
    January 1, 1970
    This is the 6th book in the Amos Decker series by author David Baldacci.Amos Decker is no ordinary person and due to a football injury caused by a severe head trauma now has one of the most exceptional brains in the world. His injury left him with total recall, hence the memory man.Amos Decker and his FBI colleague Alex Jamison are back on a case, this time in North Dakota when they are told to investigate the death of Irene Cramer whose body was autopsied and abandoned.On investigation they dis This is the 6th book in the Amos Decker series by author David Baldacci.Amos Decker is no ordinary person and due to a football injury caused by a severe head trauma now has one of the most exceptional brains in the world. His injury left him with total recall, hence the memory man.Amos Decker and his FBI colleague Alex Jamison are back on a case, this time in North Dakota when they are told to investigate the death of Irene Cramer whose body was autopsied and abandoned.On investigation they discover Cramer was a prostitute by night and a teacher for a local religious sect by day. The sect operating on land once owned by a mysterious government facility that looms over the entire community. Further murders follow and Decker's memory and skills are pushed to the limits.This is an excellent series and would recommend that readers start from the very beginning with 'Memory man' to get the full experience. Great plots with excellent characters that grow and grow. This series is so well written and achieves an high standard consistently.
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  • Skip
    January 1, 1970
    Amos Decker and his FBI partner Alex Jamison are sent to London, North Dakota to investigate the suspicious death of a young woman. No explanation as to why she matters is provided. The victim was a sectarian teacher for a local religious cult, who entertained men regularly. Amos and Alex and the local cop cannot find a motive, but Amos runs into his brother-in-law, who is managing a fracking operation in this prospering town. There is also a mysterious government facility nearby, manned by a co Amos Decker and his FBI partner Alex Jamison are sent to London, North Dakota to investigate the suspicious death of a young woman. No explanation as to why she matters is provided. The victim was a sectarian teacher for a local religious cult, who entertained men regularly. Amos and Alex and the local cop cannot find a motive, but Amos runs into his brother-in-law, who is managing a fracking operation in this prospering town. There is also a mysterious government facility nearby, manned by a contractor, which is dedicated to air defense despite another similar facility in North Dakota. As always, Amos is relentless is the pursuit of justice, especially when other townspeople start dying and disappearing. Amos is attacked by a pseudo-military force only to be rescued by (view spoiler)[ Will Robie (hide spoiler)], a Baldacci character from another series. There are lots of suspects and lots of secrets in London. Amos saves the day literally just in time, with a major assist from his brother-in-law, and once this line of inquiry is resolved, he is able to solve the murder mysteries in short order.
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  • Mojo Shivers
    January 1, 1970
    Great story. This novel was almost Christie-esque—very Murder on the Orient Express. But instead of multiple murders with the same motive, this was multiple mysteries with almost no bearing to each other muddling up the solution to each of them.With mysteries the reader’s natural inclination is to think every clue is connected to the “bigger story,” that there’s some grand solution that ties all the twists together. But this book with its two military cover-ups, and multiple staged suicides and Great story. This novel was almost Christie-esque—very Murder on the Orient Express. But instead of multiple murders with the same motive, this was multiple mysteries with almost no bearing to each other muddling up the solution to each of them.With mysteries the reader’s natural inclination is to think every clue is connected to the “bigger story,” that there’s some grand solution that ties all the twists together. But this book with its two military cover-ups, and multiple staged suicides and murders just goes to show you how delightfully twisted a book can be when you have three unrelated cases all happening in the span of a week’s time.I thought for sure I was going to get this madcap explanation to how it all ties together, but the fact they didn’t tie actually made for a better novel. It was a great twist and absolutely fooled, which is all I ever ask of a mystery. I want to be stumped and then still have the solution be obvious in hindsight.I also liked having everyone’s favorite tag team of government assassins provide back-up. Now all we need is to bring the best CID investigator John Puller and the unflappable National Park Ranger and we’ll have the Baldacci dream team assembled in one place.
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  • Jacqui
    January 1, 1970
    I love this series but not so much this one. Not a lot of his memory strengths. Plot seemed a bit disjointed. I like having Will Robie join them. A little bit of politics but not too bad (though I don't need to be lectured in my fiction). I'm not sure if I'll keep reading this series. Anyone else?
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  • Kay
    January 1, 1970
    Oh the suspense. Started good with a body and a wolf hunter. As a reader I tried to see how all the clues fit together until I found out at the end, a let down. Guest stars made it exciting like old friends came to visit.
  • Jeremy Lenzi
    January 1, 1970
    If I ever tell you I’m buying another Baldacci book, please kick me in the stones. He is just flat out going through the motions, and that’s shameful.
  • Elaine Tomasso
    January 1, 1970
    I would like to thank Netgalley and Pan Macmillan for an advance copy of Walk The Wire, the sixth novel to feature FBI consultant Amos Decker.Decker and his partner, FBI agent Alex Jamison are sent to investigate the murder of Irene Cramer, whose body was found by a hunter near London, North Dakota. She appears to have been autopsied but that doesn’t explain the FBI presence. Decker and Jameson aren’t getting answers but there appears to be more to London than a simple oil fracking town.I thorou I would like to thank Netgalley and Pan Macmillan for an advance copy of Walk The Wire, the sixth novel to feature FBI consultant Amos Decker.Decker and his partner, FBI agent Alex Jamison are sent to investigate the murder of Irene Cramer, whose body was found by a hunter near London, North Dakota. She appears to have been autopsied but that doesn’t explain the FBI presence. Decker and Jameson aren’t getting answers but there appears to be more to London than a simple oil fracking town.I thoroughly enjoyed Walk The Wire which is an exhilarating romp through the Badlands. It held my attention from start to finish as I breathlessly followed a non stop plot and its many twists and turns. It is told exclusively from Decker’s point of view so the reader can dive right in and quickly get engrossed. There is no resemblance to reality but who cares when the bullets fly, the bodies mount up and Decker’s devious mind saves the day? It’s fun and highly entertaining. Where to start? Well, apart from the murder and the local infighting and power struggles there are two separate conspiracy theories involving the military-industrial complex and the appearance of well recognised characters from other series. It’s all going on. I also learned far more about fracking than I ever wanted to know. The solution to the original murder, relegated to last place after all the other excitement, is clever and unexpected. Mr Baldacci must revel in conceiving his plots and he has outdone himself with this one.I like Amos Decker. He has an amazing ability to see clearly in his investigations although all the outside noise slows him down in this novel. He has a couple of well documented mental issues due to a long ago concussion but they seem to be fading in emphasis as the series progresses and his character evolves. Walk The Wire is a good read that I have no hesitation in recommending.
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  • Jenny Jo Weir
    January 1, 1970
    I love this series so much! This one is just as awesome as the others. Amos is one of my favorite characters and I love the continuation of his journey as well as each case that need solving. I can't wait for the next one and am already looking forward to it.
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