Across the Winding River
A woman unlocks the mystery of her father’s wartime past in a moving novel about secrets, sacrifice, and the power of love by the bestselling author of Daughters of the Night Sky.Beth Cohen wants to make the most of the months she has left with her elderly father, Max. His only request of his daughter is to go through the long-forgotten box of memorabilia from his days as a medic on the western front. Then, among his wartime souvenirs, Beth finds a photograph of her father with an adoring and beautiful stranger—a photograph worth a thousand questions.It was 1944 when Max was drawn into the underground resistance by the fearless German wife of a Nazi officer. Together, she and Max were willing to risk everything for what they believed was right. Ahead of them lay a dangerous romance, a dream of escape, and a destiny over which neither had control.But Max isn’t alone in his haunting remembrances of war. In a nearby private care home is a fragile German-born woman with her own past to share. Only when the two women meet does Beth realize how much more to her father there is to know, all the ways in which his heart still breaks, and the closure he needs to heal it.

Across the Winding River Details

TitleAcross the Winding River
Author
ReleaseAug 1st, 2020
PublisherBrilliance Audio
ISBN-139781799747765
Rating
GenreHistorical, Historical Fiction, Fiction, War, World War II, Business, Amazon, Novels, Literary Fiction, Literature, 20th Century, Adult

Across the Winding River Review

  • Karren Sandercock
    January 1, 1970
    Beth Cohen’s dad Max is 90 and living in an aged care home and one day he asked his daughter to find a box containing his mementos from his time serving as a medic during WW II. Of course she has a look at the contents of the box and she discovers a photo of her dad with a pretty pregnant woman and the lady isn’t her mother?1944 Max finished his dental training; he decided to serve his country and joined the army as a medic. While stationed in Germany he met a young married woman called Margaret Beth Cohen’s dad Max is 90 and living in an aged care home and one day he asked his daughter to find a box containing his mementos from his time serving as a medic during WW II. Of course she has a look at the contents of the box and she discovers a photo of her dad with a pretty pregnant woman and the lady isn’t her mother?1944 Max finished his dental training; he decided to serve his country and joined the army as a medic. While stationed in Germany he met a young married woman called Margarethe, they had a very short romantic relationship, after the war ended he tried to find her, he couldn’t, he had no idea what happened to Metta and her baby. Older Max had one wish; he would like Beth to find out what happened to Metta and her baby. After 60 years Beth doesn’t like her chances of finding them and her dad doesn’t even know her last name.Johanna Patterson is Metta’s older sister, during WW II engineer in Germany she designed and flew planes. Post war Germany was a mess, people lost contact with each other during the chaos and it was difficult to find someone missing. Both Max and Johanna separately spent over two years trying to find Margarethe and they had no luck eventually they had no choice and moved on with their lives. All three main characters stories are connected, you have Max who knows his time is running out and he wants closure. Beth has recently divorced and wants to make the most of her time that she has left with her dad and let him rest in peace knowing what happened to his first love Metta. Johanna has married again; she no longer lives in Germany and after 60 years still wants to find her beloved sister.Across The Winding River's plot is based around Max, Metta’s and Johanna’s experiences during WW II; it’s a gripping dual timeline story about war, love, loss, sacrifice, destiny, persistence and finding closure. I enjoyed really enjoyed the book, four stars from me, I will share my review on Goodreads, NetGalley, Twitter, Australian Amazon, Kobo and my blog. https://karrenreadsbooks.blogspot.com/
    more
  • Gina
    January 1, 1970
    I won this book in a Goodreads giveaway, and I would like to take a moment to thank the publisher and the author for allowing me the opportunity to read this book and leave an unbiased review.Now that I have the particulars out of the way - I am happy to say that this is one fantastic book. I loved it, start to finish.Loosely based on fact, this story deftly weaves the connection between three separate point of views, and three timelines - and it never gets confusion. Instead, it's like a finely I won this book in a Goodreads giveaway, and I would like to take a moment to thank the publisher and the author for allowing me the opportunity to read this book and leave an unbiased review.Now that I have the particulars out of the way - I am happy to say that this is one fantastic book. I loved it, start to finish.Loosely based on fact, this story deftly weaves the connection between three separate point of views, and three timelines - and it never gets confusion. Instead, it's like a finely woven piece of cloth that never frays or disappoints.One of the best characters is also one of the main characters whose name is Max. In the current time Max is about 90 years old. The book includes his reflections of his time many years prior, when he was an American Jewish dentist who became a medic in WWII, some 60 years ago.While in Germany, Max meets and falls for Margerethe. A resistance fighter, something about her draws Max and the two fall in love.Due to Aimie K. Ruynan's amazing writing ability, you will be transported in time back to WWII in Germany. You will feel every single emotion available to mankind, and it will leave you with very deep feelings.In the current time, Max has asked his daughter Beth to retrieve something from storage - a box filled with items he wants to see one more time. Like many veterans, what Max went through during the War is something he does not speak about. However, Max has kept in touch with the friends he made during the war - people who know what went on and they share the heartaches and triumphs when they speak with each other.We learn that Max joined the war after his beloved mother gave him her blessing to do so following the news that her family in Latvia, and so Max's life is changed forever.A great author, and a great read.
    more
  • Erin
    January 1, 1970
    Find this and other reviews at: https://historicalfictionreader.blogs...I can’t remember what I expected going into Aimie K. Runyan’s Across the Winding River, but the novel surpassed my expectations and surprised me in a variety of ways.I am a historical fiction reader and usually appreciate the historical storylines of dual narratives more than the modern ones. Across the Winding River, however, proved an exception thanks to the emotional arc Runyan gifted Beth. The vulnerability she exudes pu Find this and other reviews at: https://historicalfictionreader.blogs...I can’t remember what I expected going into Aimie K. Runyan’s Across the Winding River, but the novel surpassed my expectations and surprised me in a variety of ways.I am a historical fiction reader and usually appreciate the historical storylines of dual narratives more than the modern ones. Across the Winding River, however, proved an exception thanks to the emotional arc Runyan gifted Beth. The vulnerability she exudes pulls on the heartstrings and resonates with an authenticity I’ve rarely seen in my reading. The thought and care Runyan crafted in this story gave it something special, a fact which balanced my natural appreciation for the war era elements of the narrative.Johanna also captured my attention. She is a strong and engaging character in her own right, but what impressed me was Runyan’s ability to avoid repetition. The author tackled women in wartime aviation in her 2018 release, Daughters of the Night Sky. Runyan’s admiration for this groundbreaking generation is obvious, but her ability to channel her esteem into another facet of their accomplishments so completely protected the individuality of both Johanna and Katya, even in the eyes of those familiar with her earlier work.I’d be remiss in my commentary if I failed to mention Max. Some might overlook his arc alongside Beth and Johanna, but the resilience he exhibits despite circumstance and his natural affability is truly extraordinary. There is a sort of innocence lost element to his experiences and I liked how Runyan chose to illustrate a man who was forever marked by his journey but refused to be broken by it.Finally, I want to note Metta’s contribution to the narrative. Her story plays out in the background of the novel and while I liked what she represents for each of the narrators, I can’t deny falling in love with what she symbolizes on the larger scale. The intangibility of her voice is a beautiful ode the stories the war obscured, and I found Runyan’s acknowledgment of that reality heart-wrenchingly beautiful.
    more
  • Alayne Emmett
    January 1, 1970
    I loved this book, it was wonderful to read. I just couldn’t put it down. The chapters were short and split into different time lines, present day and 1942, 1944. It was interesting and at times sad. It was the first book I’ve read by this author but, I have already downloaded more of her books from kindle unlimited. A book you can lose yourself in.
    more
  • Sharon Huether
    January 1, 1970
    Beth Cohen's father Max a WWII veteran living in a nursing home. What Beth knew of her fathers past was in the old photos he had in a box. There was a photo of him and a blond German woman...a mystery woman . Beth wanted to know more.As the story unfolds there is a time line form 1944-1945 to the present day. It's hard for her father to talk of this mystery woman. There was a child one the way. After the war he had tried to find her and the child , but with no success.Max meets a woman at the nu Beth Cohen's father Max a WWII veteran living in a nursing home. What Beth knew of her fathers past was in the old photos he had in a box. There was a photo of him and a blond German woman...a mystery woman . Beth wanted to know more.As the story unfolds there is a time line form 1944-1945 to the present day. It's hard for her father to talk of this mystery woman. There was a child one the way. After the war he had tried to find her and the child , but with no success.Max meets a woman at the nursing home, a Mrs. Patterson. During their conversation she told Max about her missing sister in Germany. This woman Metta was one and the same...the one he was looking for.Through more searching , the child was found; now an adult David Bauer. Beth had a brother When David came to the United States and Met Max. He looked so much like Max when Max was youngerFinally Max was at peace finding his son.I won this free book from Goodreads First reads.
    more
  • Kayla - Idlewildreads
    January 1, 1970
    Thank you Lake Union Publishing and Netgalley for the free review copy. Opinions are my own. This is a beautiful story about love and courage. Across the Winding River is a multi POV/timeline WWII Historical Fiction that takes us from San Diego to Germany. It follows Beth in present day, trying to learn more about her father, Max, in the few months they have left together. Max is finally ready to share the secrets he has held onto since the war. We’re also introduced to Johanna, a German woman t Thank you Lake Union Publishing and Netgalley for the free review copy. Opinions are my own. This is a beautiful story about love and courage. Across the Winding River is a multi POV/timeline WWII Historical Fiction that takes us from San Diego to Germany. It follows Beth in present day, trying to learn more about her father, Max, in the few months they have left together. Max is finally ready to share the secrets he has held onto since the war. We’re also introduced to Johanna, a German woman trapped in a regime she wants no part in.⁣What worked for me: I loved the story, the characters, and the setting. I enjoyed all of the POVs equally, which is rare! I always appreciate WWII stories that have perspectives from both Germans and non-Germans. Across the Winding River is heartbreaking, but beautiful and redemptive.⁣What didn’t work for me: Parts of the story were a bit rushed or a little too convenient. It didn’t take away from my overall enjoyment though. Reading the author’s note at the end also made me appreciate those parts of the story more.4+ stars - I really liked it and look forward to reading more of this author’s books. I’d recommend reading this as a hardcopy as there are multiple timelines that skip around a bit and I would’ve preferred to easily turn back to reference where in the story we were at.
    more
  • Susan Peterson
    January 1, 1970
    This book is absolutely breathtaking. Aimie Runyan has woven together the stories of four compelling characters in a way that is extremely touching. There is something so special about the books Aimie writes, giving us a strong sense of history along with equally strong feelings of family and love. This book gives us the juxtaposition of the people of Germany, torn between their quest to save their beloved Fatherland and their distrust and dismay as Hitler is unleashed on the world. This novel i This book is absolutely breathtaking. Aimie Runyan has woven together the stories of four compelling characters in a way that is extremely touching. There is something so special about the books Aimie writes, giving us a strong sense of history along with equally strong feelings of family and love. This book gives us the juxtaposition of the people of Germany, torn between their quest to save their beloved Fatherland and their distrust and dismay as Hitler is unleashed on the world. This novel is also the story of a young man’s love for a woman, a love that haunts him even as an older man, and the search by his devoted daughter to being her father peace. There is risk and danger and heroism in this story, but there is also devotion, loyalty and the heartfelt connections. I’ve been following Aimie’s career as an author since her debut, and with her fifth book she has cemented herself among the best of historical fiction novelists.
    more
  • Carla Suto
    January 1, 1970
    ACROSS THE WINDING RIVER by Aimie K. Runyan is a beautifully-written and touching novel of love, loss, sacrifice and survival that captivated me from beginning to end. Told in multiple timelines and from the perspectives of three different characters, it is set mainly in Germany during World War II and then later, in San Diego in 2007. Beth Cohen is trying to make the most of the short time she has left with her ninety-year-old father, Max. Although he has said little over the decades of his exp ACROSS THE WINDING RIVER by Aimie K. Runyan is a beautifully-written and touching novel of love, loss, sacrifice and survival that captivated me from beginning to end. Told in multiple timelines and from the perspectives of three different characters, it is set mainly in Germany during World War II and then later, in San Diego in 2007. Beth Cohen is trying to make the most of the short time she has left with her ninety-year-old father, Max. Although he has said little over the decades of his experience as a medic in World War II, he now wishes to go through a box of wartime memorabilia with Beth before he passes. As they peruse the contents of the box, Beth finds a startling photograph of her father with a beautiful young and pregnant woman whom he clearly adores. Who is the woman and what was their relationship in the past? Once Max has revealed his story, Beth is led into a worldwide search for the woman and child in the photo. German-born Johanna also has haunting memories of the past during the war. For the past sixty years, she has searched desperately for her missing sister, who was pregnant when she disappeared near the end of the war. The emotional stories of Max and Johanna flow seamlessly into Beth’s quest to help find closure for her father. The characters are wonderfully-portrayed and the pace of the story was perfect. I truly enjoyed this compelling story and highly recommend it. Thank you to the author, publisher and NetGalley for the chance to read an early copy.
    more
  • Sarah 🌺 Books in Their Natural Habitat
    January 1, 1970
    Across the Winding River is a beautifully woven story of Beth, her father Max, and the stories our parents don’t always tell us. Beth’s father Max is aging and has asked her to go through his box from the past. To Beth’s surprise, there is a photograph of a young woman and her father… a young woman that Beth doesn’t recognize. While she doesn’t want to bring it up, she also wants to know who this woman is. What path this question may take her down, she doesn’t know.This story is told from both B Across the Winding River is a beautifully woven story of Beth, her father Max, and the stories our parents don’t always tell us. Beth’s father Max is aging and has asked her to go through his box from the past. To Beth’s surprise, there is a photograph of a young woman and her father… a young woman that Beth doesn’t recognize. While she doesn’t want to bring it up, she also wants to know who this woman is. What path this question may take her down, she doesn’t know.This story is told from both Beth’s and Max’s perspectives to give a then-and-now story line. The past and present are smoothly woven together in a a touching and emotional way. I found myself completely caught up in their journeys. I was so emotionally invested in these characters by the end, that I found myself at the point of tears as everything came together… and fell apart. And as my parents and grandparents age, I found myself understanding Beth to her core.If you are looking for a beautifully emotional book that has skillfully interwoven the past and present with deep characters, I highly recommend giving Across the Winding River a read!Thank you to the author, Aimie K. Runyan, for providing a copy of this beautiful book. I have voluntarily read the book and the opinions expressed are my own.
    more
  • Jessica Foster
    January 1, 1970
    A beautiful story of love and loss set against the backdrop of WWII. The book flowed well and while there was a bit of mystery involved, I didn't have that anxiety that I usually have while reading this type of historical fiction.
  • Annette
    January 1, 1970
    This book was so good! I loved it!!❤️❤️It’s told by three people and set during WW2. Beth is helping her Dad go through his box of memorabilia and finds a picture of him and a blond haired girl. So begins their quest looking for that girl. This book was hard to put down and towards the end I found myself almost in tearsDefinitely recommend!! Thanks to Netgalley and the publisher for the early copy
    more
  • Karen Levay
    January 1, 1970
    I enjoyed the story a lot and had a real emotional reaction at times. The real thing that took away from the plot are several events that just seem unrealistic. If I put them aside, then I’d rate this book a good 4.
  • Jamie Jack
    January 1, 1970
    Some Knee-Jerk Reactions and Questionable Medical IssueI have some issues with this book, but let me talk about story basics and the good parts first.This World War II/contemporary story contains three strands that interweave and sometimes touch. It is one of those novels that has long flashbacks with a contemporary framework that pulls it all together. In an unusual move, there are two past strands, and they begin at slightly different times, one just before all-out world war and one when the w Some Knee-Jerk Reactions and Questionable Medical IssueI have some issues with this book, but let me talk about story basics and the good parts first.This World War II/contemporary story contains three strands that interweave and sometimes touch. It is one of those novels that has long flashbacks with a contemporary framework that pulls it all together. In an unusual move, there are two past strands, and they begin at slightly different times, one just before all-out world war and one when the war is well underway. In 2007, Beth’s father is 90 years old and dying. One of his wishes is to go through his memorabilia box from World War II with her, something he had never done when she was growing up. A photo of him with a pretty, pregnant young German woman raises more questions than answers—for both Beth and Max. He never knew what happened to the woman or the child, and he wants closure before the end. We see flashbacks from Max’s perspective as well as through the eyes of the sister of the woman in the photograph. It takes a while for these storylines to dovetail and provide answers, but the author writes with heart and the book delivers on the feels in all the separate strands of the storyline. You can't help but want Max to find closure before his passing, even though it will be a difficult road no matter how it all eventually shakes out. I do have some small quibbles, though. Some of what is written does feel like knee-jerk reactions to the horrors of Nazism rather than the nuanced, personalized reactions that would truly make the time come alive, seeing the complex issues that arose for different people, but the story is still written artfully. Also, as an RN, I cannot believe that a doctor would give a man prognosis based on blood pressure and liver tests! Good doctors shy away from prognoses in general, and a few blood tests and other bad numbers certainly do not equate to a certain amount of time being left in a person's life, even if he is 90 years old! I did feel at times, too, that this story had too much telling rather than showing, which I am never a fan of. There's a reason why there's an adage in writing that authors are supposed to “show, not tell.” It makes for more emotional immediacy as we get wrapped up living the story through the characters. This can't happen when we are just told. All in all, though, this was a compelling read.I received a free copy of this book, but that did not affect my review.My book blog: https://www.readingfanaticreviews.com
    more
  • Janie
    January 1, 1970
    A story of courage and love in dark times. Aimie Runyan's writing has never been so strong, her prose so compelling. The more dramatic action is set in the WW2 timeline and could easily have overshadowed the present-day story, but Runyan's tender narrative of a daughter facing her father's final years delivers more than enough emotional punch to balance out the drama.
    more
  • Samantha
    January 1, 1970
    Where do I begin? Do I start by highlighting how the author made me so invested in all of her characters, that I was absolutely rooting for every single one? Or how about I talk about the state of my nerves after they were constantly on end with all of the risks these characters took in order to do what was right? What about the tears I shed for the fate of most of the cast? Or how about all of it.I get it. A significant amount of historical fiction revolves around World War II these days. But I Where do I begin? Do I start by highlighting how the author made me so invested in all of her characters, that I was absolutely rooting for every single one? Or how about I talk about the state of my nerves after they were constantly on end with all of the risks these characters took in order to do what was right? What about the tears I shed for the fate of most of the cast? Or how about all of it.I get it. A significant amount of historical fiction revolves around World War II these days. But I just can't seem to find a way to get sick of it. Perhaps it's because it would be a rare day indeed, to find someone who doesn't agree that Hitler and his Nazi's were the villains, and that they were, by and far, on the wrong side of history. It's scarce and refreshing, in this day and age, to find something so unanimously agreed upon.But all of that aside, Runyan could have written these characters into any story and I would have been fully invested. Max was so charming, kind and wonderful. Beth adored her parents and her definition of a fun night in was SO relatable. Johanna and Metta were fierce, intelligent, brave women. Even all of the "B" characters wriggled their way into my heart.So just trust me on this one. As soon as this book is released... Pick it up, read the first page, become entirely invested, and enjoy. You're welcome.
    more
  • The Lit Bitch
    January 1, 1970
    4.5 stars I have been dying to get my hands on all of Aimie Runyan’s books since I first saw Daughter’s of the Night Sky a couple of years ago. There are always so many books and so little time—am I right?Well this year I wasn’t going to miss out on one of her books so when I saw that she had a new one coming out, I put it on my calendar so that I wouldn’t miss out!Reading this book was such a treat and I couldn’t be more excited to share a review if I tried! I now need all of her books and can’ 4.5 stars I have been dying to get my hands on all of Aimie Runyan’s books since I first saw Daughter’s of the Night Sky a couple of years ago. There are always so many books and so little time—am I right?Well this year I wasn’t going to miss out on one of her books so when I saw that she had a new one coming out, I put it on my calendar so that I wouldn’t miss out!Reading this book was such a treat and I couldn’t be more excited to share a review if I tried! I now need all of her books and can’t wait to see what else she has up her sleeve in the future!This is (mostly) a duel timeline story with a modern plot and a historical plot which converge as the story comes together. In this book there are three storylines but the concept is the same.I know that some people feel that this is one of the most over used story telling styles but I LOVE IT! As a long time fan of historical fiction, I never get tired of this approach and in this book it worked so well and hooked me right away. It’s easy to forget that our parents or grandparents had lives before us right? They had heart break and romances and abandoned dreams that they probably never talk about with us which is why the duel storyline always appeals to me and in this book it’s what drew me in when Beth found that picture of her father.While that might have hooked me, there was plenty that kept me reading and engaged in the story. As I mentioned before, there are three different narratives happening so this is a book that you want to pay attention to. I know there were a couple of times when I had to stop and make sure I was orientated in the narrative before going on but for the most part it was easy enough to follow but readers will want to make sure they are focused on the timeline to some degree.Each of the characters were unique and well developed with strong traits and stories. I never felt bored or not invested in any of their stories. The pace of the novel was also great and it easily held my attention. I ended up going with a 4.5 star rating since I loved the book but at times had to stop and make sure I was orientated in the narratives happening.See my full review here
    more
  • Julia
    January 1, 1970
    I loved Aimie K. Runyan's DAUGHTERS OF THE NIGHT SKY and GIRLS ON THE LINE, and so I was excited to get her latest book as an ARC. While I liked ACROSS THE WINDING RIVER, I didn't love it like those other two.Runyan tries some new things in her latest book. She tells the story in three points of view, with these three characters' lives intersecting. Two take place in WWII Germany and the other in 2007 San Diego. I didn't think this book flowed as well as her others and there were things that wer I loved Aimie K. Runyan's DAUGHTERS OF THE NIGHT SKY and GIRLS ON THE LINE, and so I was excited to get her latest book as an ARC. While I liked ACROSS THE WINDING RIVER, I didn't love it like those other two.Runyan tries some new things in her latest book. She tells the story in three points of view, with these three characters' lives intersecting. Two take place in WWII Germany and the other in 2007 San Diego. I didn't think this book flowed as well as her others and there were things that were just way too convenient. For example, when Joanna's plane was shot down, she crash landed right in the exact place that her sister was. And as Max, who is at the end of his life in 2007, searches for Metta and their child, he discovers that Metta's sister, Joanna, miraculously lives in San Diego, not too far away. Then there was one thing that bugged me the whole time. Beth, Max's daughter, is the main character for the 2007 timeline. Max is ninety years old. He married Rebecca in 1947, as the reader eventually discovers. Rebecca had a previous abusive husband that killed her unborn child and made it difficult to her to conceive. But Beth, in 2007, seems to only be in her late 30s. This means that Rebecca must have been in her 40s or 50s when she had Beth. How in the world did that happen?Finally, there's the vague, generic title: ACROSS THE WINDING RIVER. Did I miss something? The sections that took place in the midst of battle in Germany were mainly in a forest. Maybe there was a river, but I don't remember. I don't like when books have these kind of forgettable titles that don't connect with the story. Alas, I feel bad that I can't give this a glowing review like Runyan's other books. I think the author tried to do some different things, but it didn't work as well as her previous books.
    more
  • Susan
    January 1, 1970
    4.5 starsI have had Aimie K. Runyan's books on my radar for awhile, and am so glad I placed one of her books at the top of my TBR. I adore her desire to tribute the everyday courageous men/women during wartime who performed unknown acts of heroism. Across the Winding River is told through three points of view, two with interweaving timelines. I found this to be an effective tool in slowly revealing the secrets of the past, as Beth helps her father search for loved ones lost during WWII. The stro 4.5 starsI have had Aimie K. Runyan's books on my radar for awhile, and am so glad I placed one of her books at the top of my TBR. I adore her desire to tribute the everyday courageous men/women during wartime who performed unknown acts of heroism. Across the Winding River is told through three points of view, two with interweaving timelines. I found this to be an effective tool in slowly revealing the secrets of the past, as Beth helps her father search for loved ones lost during WWII. The strongest of the characters did not have her own storyline, yet her acts of courage were skillfully told through the other narratives, symbolic of the true unsung heroes and heroines acts of the past. This is a wonderful story of family, love and sacrifice. I received a complimentary copy of this book from the author/publisher and was not required to write a review. All opinions expressed are mine.
    more
  • Mandie Hines
    January 1, 1970
    Historical fiction is not a genre I normally read, but I was so pleasantly surprised by this book. So much so that I now think I'll have to go in search of some more historical fiction. I really enjoyed the three timelines that ran and interlaced through this book. Two of the timelines are in close proximity to each other, so I had to check the dates occasionally to make sure I kept the timelines straight, but that was very simple to do since the dates are posted at the top of each chapter. I ap Historical fiction is not a genre I normally read, but I was so pleasantly surprised by this book. So much so that I now think I'll have to go in search of some more historical fiction. I really enjoyed the three timelines that ran and interlaced through this book. Two of the timelines are in close proximity to each other, so I had to check the dates occasionally to make sure I kept the timelines straight, but that was very simple to do since the dates are posted at the top of each chapter. I appreciated the chapter lengths, they're nice and short and contributed to the pacing of the story as it unfolded. There were parts where I had a feeling of where the characters' paths would cross, which allowed me to feel very clever, while other revelations were well hidden until just shortly before they were revealed. Those two aspects provided a nice balance of feeling I understood the intent of the author while leaving a hint of surprise. I also enjoyed the depth of the characters and the different aspects of their personalities as they were revealed.
    more
  • Harris B
    January 1, 1970
    A Moving WWII NovelI chose this rating because I was moved to tears as I read the final chapter. I think Metta's ability to move between the lines with her husband remaining unaware of her resistance activities is too far stretched to be believable. But if that is excused, everything hangs together. Max's development as a caring person is done very well. I'd recommend the book to anyone who enjoys WWII novels. It's also a good book for showing strong women. The scenes in Hurtgen forest were part A Moving WWII NovelI chose this rating because I was moved to tears as I read the final chapter. I think Metta's ability to move between the lines with her husband remaining unaware of her resistance activities is too far stretched to be believable. But if that is excused, everything hangs together. Max's development as a caring person is done very well. I'd recommend the book to anyone who enjoys WWII novels. It's also a good book for showing strong women. The scenes in Hurtgen forest were particularly meaningful because my father-in-law was captured in the Battle of the Bulge. The absence of any reference to the Battle of the Bulge is an omission in the narrative.
    more
  • Joyce T. Enderle
    January 1, 1970
    Another WWII delightful story to entertain my 85 yrs. I was 5 when War began and 10 when it ended. My beloved Grandfather so enjoyed reading the New Orleans Times Picyune to me after supper each evening. He thought highly of FDR and Churchill. I enjoy historical novels.I'm have been to Germany many times. Spent one month in Bade-Baden in Black Forest. Had lunch in The Secret Garden of Germany. This story brought back wonderful memories. Berlin is my favorite City in Germany.
    more
  • D. Jane Akins
    January 1, 1970
    The first book in a while that didn’t allow me to take breaks to play games.Although I sometimes had to scroll back to verify dates in the Johanna and Max portions, the book’s unique way of telling three stories at once while winding a fourth character throughput was adroitly accomplished. Then to bring all the stories together in such an uplifting way was very satisfying. I would recommend reading the Authors Notes at the end, too, as they impart interesting information on how the stories came The first book in a while that didn’t allow me to take breaks to play games.Although I sometimes had to scroll back to verify dates in the Johanna and Max portions, the book’s unique way of telling three stories at once while winding a fourth character throughput was adroitly accomplished. Then to bring all the stories together in such an uplifting way was very satisfying. I would recommend reading the Authors Notes at the end, too, as they impart interesting information on how the stories came about. Definitely a book worth reading if you like historical fiction.
    more
  • Steve McNeil
    January 1, 1970
    Interesting readI read this book in a day as I couldn't put the book down. I loved the characters, history and how the pieces all fit together. My Dad was in WWII and I'm just learning more about him and his actions as a 20-21 year old that helped them win the war. This book helped me imagine what living through all of this might of been like for the actives and the medics at the time.
    more
  • Janilyn Kocher
    January 1, 1970
    Runyan provides a complete long read. Beth has lost her mother and her father is in declining health. He asks her to retrieve his WWII box and she discovers a picture of him and another woman. The hunt is on for her father's lost love and her unknown sibling. I liked the family search part the best. I even liked the flashbacks from 2007 to WWII. It was an emotionally satisfying read. Thanks to NetGalley and Lake Union Press for the ARC in exchange for my honest review.
    more
  • Stephanie Symons
    January 1, 1970
    A riveting taleI stayed up all night reading this. The focus of the book is three perspectives. WWII and its aftermath. A former medic served in Germany and fell in love with a member of the resistance. Her sister was a scientist and pilot. Some of the characters were loyal to Hitler. After the war the medic was unable to find is pregnant lover. Years later his daughter discovers photos that reveal him with a pregnant woman. Coincidentally, a local woman from Germany was searching for her sister A riveting taleI stayed up all night reading this. The focus of the book is three perspectives. WWII and its aftermath. A former medic served in Germany and fell in love with a member of the resistance. Her sister was a scientist and pilot. Some of the characters were loyal to Hitler. After the war the medic was unable to find is pregnant lover. Years later his daughter discovers photos that reveal him with a pregnant woman. Coincidentally, a local woman from Germany was searching for her sister. All these tales ultimately intersect.
    more
  • Kameryn Rome
    January 1, 1970
    Was a wonderful book. I really enjoyed reading the book and could not put it down. I read it in two days. I love how the author intertwined the lives of the different characters and told their back story and current story. I also found it an interesting historical book that really showed what was going on during WWII. Would like to find other books like this to read. Would love to see a movie from this book.
    more
  • Erin
    January 1, 1970
    ReviewThis was a remarkable book.The story was so interesting and it kept me wanting to read more. The characters were complex and believable. I will definitely read more by this author.
  • Di Worley
    January 1, 1970
    FantasticA complex story, but nonetheless very involving and I felt so invested in all of the characters across all of the timelines. A story about family, love and loyalty, that I would heartily recommend
  • Jerrie Tacia
    January 1, 1970
    Well craftedThree parallel stories that merge into one. Enjoyable read with interesting characters that are believable. Can easily imagine a sequel to delve into the new family relationships and love interests.
  • Piper Bayard
    January 1, 1970
    A beautiful read. Across the Winding River is a story of love, courage, and sacrifice as it traces the journeys of three people who are bound together across time. It is a story of people who lose each other and are found again. Aimie K. Runyan's prose is outstanding. Her command of language succinctly translates into fresh imagery that delights and satisfies and is never overworked. I look forward to reading more books by this author.
    more
Write a review