Her Last Flight
The beloved author returns with a remarkable novel of both raw suspense and lyric beauty— the story of a lost pilot and a wartime photographer that will leave its mark on your soul. In 1947, photographer and war correspondent Janey Everett arrives at a remote surfing village on the Hawaiian island of Kauai to research a planned biography of forgotten aviation pioneer Sam Mallory, who joined the loyalist forces in the Spanish Civil War and never returned. Obsessed with Sam’s fate, Janey has tracked down Irene Lindquist, the owner of a local island-hopping airline, whom she believes might actually be the legendary Irene Foster, Mallory’s onetime student and flying partner. Foster’s disappearance during a round-the-world flight in 1937 remains one of the world’s greatest unsolved mysteries. At first, the flinty Mrs. Lindquist denies any connection to Foster. But Janey informs her that the wreck of Sam Mallory’s airplane has recently been discovered in a Spanish desert, and piece by piece, the details of Foster’s extraordinary life emerge: from the beginnings of her flying career in Southern California, to her complicated, passionate relationship with Mallory, to the collapse of her marriage to her aggressive career manager, the publishing scion George Morrow.As Irene spins her tale to its searing conclusion, Janey’s past gathers its own power. The duel between the two women takes a heartstopping turn. To whom does Mallory rightfully belong? Can we ever come to terms with the loss of those we love, and the lives we might have lived?

Her Last Flight Details

TitleHer Last Flight
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseJun 30th, 2020
PublisherWilliam Morrow
ISBN-139780062834805
Rating
GenreHistorical, Historical Fiction, Fiction

Her Last Flight Review

  • Mlpmom (Book Reviewer)
    January 1, 1970
    4.5 Beautiful Stars!This was so beautifully done with threads that were interwoven and knitted together so well that most of it I didn't even see coming. I absolutely loved the historical details about planes and those brave pilots that really laid the foundation for flight today from both women and men alike. Truly an engaging story that kept me eagerly turning the pages as each story unfolded over time. And thought this wasn't about Amelia, I can totally see the similarities in these two chara 4.5 Beautiful Stars!This was so beautifully done with threads that were interwoven and knitted together so well that most of it I didn't even see coming. I absolutely loved the historical details about planes and those brave pilots that really laid the foundation for flight today from both women and men alike. Truly an engaging story that kept me eagerly turning the pages as each story unfolded over time. And thought this wasn't about Amelia, I can totally see the similarities in these two characters and the whatifs of everything that happened on her fateful last flight.*ARC provided by the publisher in exchange for an honest review.*
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  • MicheleReader
    January 1, 1970
    Her Last Flight is Beatriz Williams at her best. It’s Williams’ signature Historical Fiction genre that she has perfected but its different than most of her other books which are focused on family relationships. This book, set in two time periods, is loosely based on the life and disappearance of Amelia Earhart. Williams clearly did a large and thorough amount of research on flight during this period. Fascinating.In 1947, Janey Everett, a photographer, is seeking to uncover the mystery of famed Her Last Flight is Beatriz Williams at her best. It’s Williams’ signature Historical Fiction genre that she has perfected but its different than most of her other books which are focused on family relationships. This book, set in two time periods, is loosely based on the life and disappearance of Amelia Earhart. Williams clearly did a large and thorough amount of research on flight during this period. Fascinating.In 1947, Janey Everett, a photographer, is seeking to uncover the mystery of famed aviator and daredevil Sam Mallory. She has been led to the location of his crashed plane downed in 1937 while he was aiding the loyalists during the Spanish Civil War. She now hopes to find Irene Foster, legendary aviatrix who was believed to have perished during a race around the world a decade before although her remains were never found. Janey believes that Irene is the key to learning the true story of Sam. Her search brings her to Hawaii and the island of Kauai where Irene Lindquist, who runs local flying tours, is revealed to be the long, lost Irene Foster. Janey and Irene develop an interesting rapport and Irene slowly opens up to her. The exciting story of how Irene and Sam meet and become a renowned flying team (and much more) is told in the form of a draft of a book Janey is starting to write. The growth of Irene and Sam’s relationship and their adventures was beautifully presented. Through the efforts of a cunning business manager, Irene emerges as a star and becomes a media sensation appearing in countless advertisements and appearing in films. She becomes perhaps the most famous woman in the world. Sam’s star fades. Both timelines are equally captivating. Janey’s story is heartbreaking and her growing relationship with Irene and her family gives the reader hope that the truth being withheld by both women will be uncovered. And once it all comes together, what an incredible and satisfying ending.This book truly has it all including two strong female characters who succeed in fields previously reserved for men. Many thanks to Edelweiss, William Morris / Harper Collins and the always incredible Beatriz Williams for the chance to read this fabulous book in advance of its June 30 publication. I have no doubt that this book will satisfy not only die-hard Williams fans but will bring her many new fans as well. Review posted on MicheleReader.com.
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  • Karren Sandercock
    January 1, 1970
    In 1947, Janey Everett is a girl who doesn’t like to be in one place for too long, she’s a busy war correspondent and talented photographer. Janey arrives in Hawaii determined to find out what happened to aviation pioneer and dare devil Sam Mallory. He was flying a plane for the loyalist forces during the Spanish Civil War, he disappeared 10 years ago and no one has seen or heard from him since. She believes the one person who might know what really happened to Sam is his ex student and co pilot In 1947, Janey Everett is a girl who doesn’t like to be in one place for too long, she’s a busy war correspondent and talented photographer. Janey arrives in Hawaii determined to find out what happened to aviation pioneer and dare devil Sam Mallory. He was flying a plane for the loyalist forces during the Spanish Civil War, he disappeared 10 years ago and no one has seen or heard from him since. She believes the one person who might know what really happened to Sam is his ex student and co pilot Irene Foster? They were much more than good friends and Irene also disappeared in 1937 during an around the world flight organized by her rich husband George Morrow and why did she marry him when she really loved Sam?Using her detective skills Janey discovers Irene Foster might be alive and now goes by the name Irene Lindquist? A female pilot who’s running a tourist business flying people around the Hawaiian Islands, she’s married and has two children. Janey is smart, she has done her research, she’s checked something’s out for herself and she has one ace up her sleeve. Despite denying she doesn’t know Sam Mallory Irene goes rather quiet when Janey mentions a plane has recently been discovered in the Spanish desert, they think its Sam’s and a skeleton was found at the scene.What are the chances of two pilots who know each other; both disappearing around the same time in unusual circumstances and maybe flying really is a dangerous occupation! Irene Lindquist has some scars on one side of her face, Janey is pretty sure that Irene Foster didn’t and it adds to the mystery.Janey and Irene are very similar they are strong minded women who worked in male dominant occupations, despite life's knock backs, difficult childhoods, both succeeded and are very determined women. As you continue to read the story it has so many twists and turns, and you really have no idea how it will end or if Irene Foster and Sam Mallory are alive?I really enjoyed reading Her Last Flight; it has everything in one incredible and interesting story, love, romance, suspense, intrigue, deception and a mystery. It’s the best book I have read this year, five big stars from me and I highly recommend reading it. I have shared my review on Edelweiss, Goodreads, Twitter, Australian Amazon, Kobo, Facebook and my blog. https://karrenreadsbooks.blogspot.com/
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  • Elizabeth of Silver's Reviews
    January 1, 1970
    HER LAST FLIGHT is another beautifully detailed book telling the story of two pilots, Irene Lindquist and Sam Mallory. It is also about Janey Everett, a war correspondent/photojournalist, who is trying to get the story of Sam Mallory out of Irene who has hidden herself from the public.The book smoothly moves back and forth between 1928 to 1947 telling the background stories of each character.The characters are likeable for the most part, and pull you into the story.HER LAST FLIGHT is a mesmeriz HER LAST FLIGHT is another beautifully detailed book telling the story of two pilots, Irene Lindquist and Sam Mallory. It is also about Janey Everett, a war correspondent/photojournalist, who is trying to get the story of Sam Mallory out of Irene who has hidden herself from the public.The book smoothly moves back and forth between 1928 to 1947 telling the background stories of each character.The characters are likeable for the most part, and pull you into the story.HER LAST FLIGHT is a mesmerizing read and difficult to put down simply because of Ms. Williams' writing style and storytelling skills.Historical fiction fans, aviation fans, and fans of Beatriz Williams will not be disappointed in this lush tale of passion, loss, and determination.This book was given to me by the publisher in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Rachel
    January 1, 1970
    Her Last Flight by Beatriz Williams is an amazing historical fiction gem that alternates between two female characters in two different timelines ( 1947ish with Janey Everett and late 1920s-1937 with Irene Foster/Lindquist).The author gives the reader insight into both strong, fierce, and fiery women in each alternating chapter and weaves an intricate and intriguing story where the reader learns all about both Irene and Janey through their upbringing, background, passions, failures, flaws, trium Her Last Flight by Beatriz Williams is an amazing historical fiction gem that alternates between two female characters in two different timelines ( 1947ish with Janey Everett and late 1920s-1937 with Irene Foster/Lindquist).The author gives the reader insight into both strong, fierce, and fiery women in each alternating chapter and weaves an intricate and intriguing story where the reader learns all about both Irene and Janey through their upbringing, background, passions, failures, flaws, triumphs, and harrowing journeys to “land” them both where they are at the culmination of their paths to the final, and stunning conclusion. Though these women seem to be very different at first, as one reads the tale impressively woven by Ms Williams, we learn that they are more similar and have far more in common by the way of the charismatic, charming, imperfect yet somehow perfect, and undeniably fascinating Sam Mallory pilot and daredevil extraordinaire. The plot (which the reader can read from the synopsis itself) is unique and fascinating. I loved learning more about planes, aerodynamics, some of the history of aviation and its progress into mainstream media during the 30s-40s. I also truly enjoyed reading the subject matter regarding the female role, introduction, and brake throughs into this male dominated field. I have a soft spot for seeing strong women that are determined to overcome the mountains and barriers to be able to access and succeed in fields that were originally “off limits” to women. This book has it all: romance, history, family, loyalty, love, gut-wrenching losses, and perseverance to overcome any obstacles. Despite their faults, I found I was drawn to Janey and Irene and actually loved them both more because of it all. I rooted for them, I shed tears, and I smiled at the amazing twist and positivity perfect ending. I was riveted to this book from page 1 all the way to the perfect end. Nothing else could have possibly fit as well as this was truly a satisfying ending. This book most definitely receives 5/5 stars. I have been a huge fan of Ms Williams from the beginning, and this latest novel did not disappoint. You will truly enjoy it!Thank NG and William Morrow/ Harper Collins for this ARC and in return I am submitting my unbiased and voluntary review and opinion. I am posting this review to my GR and Bookbub accounts immediately and will post it to my Amazon and B&N accounts upon publication. Thank you again!
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  • Christina Boodhan Juras
    January 1, 1970
    This new novel from Beatriz Williams tells the story of Jane Everett, a photojournalist who embarks upon researching and writing the story of Irene Foster, one of the first women in flight some 20 years earlier.(At first, I thought this book might have been an historical fiction about Amelia Earhart which would have been quite interesting, but this was a close second. There is a reference in the epilogue to Amelia Earhart so it may be that this story is loosely based upon her life and work).The This new novel from Beatriz Williams tells the story of Jane Everett, a photojournalist who embarks upon researching and writing the story of Irene Foster, one of the first women in flight some 20 years earlier.(At first, I thought this book might have been an historical fiction about Amelia Earhart which would have been quite interesting, but this was a close second. There is a reference in the epilogue to Amelia Earhart so it may be that this story is loosely based upon her life and work).The story is told in alternate chapters between past and present, (which I usually enjoy) and is so richly detailed in its writing that I was able to vividly picture it as I read. The story overall, while intriguing, felt contrived in some spots and fell a bit flat for me overall, until the last 100 pages of the book.The characters were well-developed. I was fascinated with Jane's character and story and her persistence to get the story out of stand-offish, aloof Irene who bordered on annoying because of it. The chance meeting between Irene and Sam and their eventual partnership in flight seemed a bit too convenient for me, but it was a good storyline.There were quite a few other characters which might have been added to create some depth to the story but were extraneous in my view. I liked the description of the background and landscape of the different countries featured throughout the story. I especially liked the description of the different flights which was not too technical so it was fairly easy to follow.  I enjoyed the details of the story overall, but some of it might have been cut down so that it could get to the point. That said, there were a few interesting twists towards the end which made me improve my initial rating from 3/5 to 4/5. In summary, if you like Beatriz Williams, you will certainly love this!
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  • Marisa
    January 1, 1970
    Holy book hangover can I give more than 5 stars?!? Loved, loved, loved. Beautifully written! Characters I’ll never forget. I love Beatriz williams and all of her books but I was absolutely blown away by this story. HER LAST FLIGHT is historical fiction, inspired by Amelia Earhart. It is not a fictionalized biography but the inspiration is there. I’ve always loved historical fiction because to me it allows me to escape my daily life fully: the year, the place everything. This book was in a word O Holy book hangover can I give more than 5 stars?!? Loved, loved, loved. Beautifully written! Characters I’ll never forget. I love Beatriz williams and all of her books but I was absolutely blown away by this story. HER LAST FLIGHT is historical fiction, inspired by Amelia Earhart. It is not a fictionalized biography but the inspiration is there. I’ve always loved historical fiction because to me it allows me to escape my daily life fully: the year, the place everything. This book was in a word OUTSTANDING. Full of love and surprises. I cried. I laughed. I fell in love with a book boyfriend. I cheered and celebrated strong women. And I gasped at many parts. This is a nearly 400 page book that flowed and you don’t want to put down because you are so invested and for me lost in the story. I loved every page and will be recommending this to EVERYONE on its release date of July 7. This book is so special. Thank you to Beatriz for sending me a signed copy (won from a giveaway she did on her page!) I am very sad I won’t be able to tell you how much this story touched me in person at Expo this year but will be keeping my eye out for a tour. The characters of Irene, Sam and Janey will stay with me forever!
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  • Bev
    January 1, 1970
    This was such a great book! I have always been fascinated by flight. I remember reading a book about Amelia Earhart when I was very young & being so engrossed in that book. Well this sure brought back those memories.Beatriz Williams does a great job in this historical novel, seamlessly covering different characters and different time lines. I really hated when I turned to the last page since I had to say goodby to the characters. This was such a great book! I have always been fascinated by flight. I remember reading a book about Amelia Earhart when I was very young & being so engrossed in that book. Well this sure brought back those memories.Beatriz Williams does a great job in this historical novel, seamlessly covering different characters and different time lines. I really hated when I turned to the last page since I had to say goodby to the characters.
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  • oohlalabooks
    January 1, 1970
    This is the first standalone of Beatriz Williams I’ve read and I am in awe!! It is well researched for aviation and the time periods of the 1930’s/1940’s. The ladies, Irene and Janey, are strong and independent! Their stories are woven together by solving the mystery of pilot Sam Mallory’s disappearance. A wonderful read! Thank you to Book Club Early Program, William Morrow, and NetGalley for this ARC. This is my honest review.
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  • Sue
    January 1, 1970
    Her Last Flight is a well researched, well written novel about the early days of female pilots. There are echoes of Amelia Earhart whose story has always intrigued me but this is a novel about fictional female pilots. The book is told in two timelines - 1928 is told by Irene Lindquist, the owner of a local island-hopping airline in Hawaii and the timeline from 1947 is told by photographer and war correspondent Janey Everett. Janey is writing a book about Sam Mallory, a famous pilot who disappear Her Last Flight is a well researched, well written novel about the early days of female pilots. There are echoes of Amelia Earhart whose story has always intrigued me but this is a novel about fictional female pilots. The book is told in two timelines - 1928 is told by Irene Lindquist, the owner of a local island-hopping airline in Hawaii and the timeline from 1947 is told by photographer and war correspondent Janey Everett. Janey is writing a book about Sam Mallory, a famous pilot who disappeared during the Spanish Civil War. From her research, Janey believes that Irene Lindquist is really legendary Irene Foster, Mallory’s onetime student and flying partner. Foster’s disappearance during a round-the-world flight in 1937 remains one of the world’s greatest unsolved mysteries. At first Irene is unwilling to talk to Janey but once Janey tells her that she's found Sam' airplane in the desert, Irene begins to tell the story of her past.This novel goes seamlessly back and forth between time periods and both stories are extremely interesting. Both Irene and Janey are strong and determined woman who have worked very hard to fulfill their dreams. I loved both characters and thought that they were both well written. The author describes both their strengths and flaws and that makes them even more real. Because of the way the story is told we learn not only about both women in their present day but also their childhoods, their families and what they had to endure to become strong women in their time periods. There are also a few surprises that are part of both stories that make the novel even more interesting. Most of the novels that I've read by Beatriz have been in compilation with other authors and after reading this excellent book, I'll be watching for more books written by her.Thanks to the publisher for a copy of this book to read and review. All opinions are my own.
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  • Erin
    January 1, 1970
    I received this book through Goodreads First Reads.A pleasant surprise, especially with the twist on (view spoiler)[Pixie being the narrator (hide spoiler)] which I had not expected but enjoyed nonetheless. I would highly recommend this novel. I received this book through Goodreads First Reads.A pleasant surprise, especially with the twist on (view spoiler)[Pixie being the narrator (hide spoiler)] which I had not expected but enjoyed nonetheless. I would highly recommend this novel.
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  • Karen M
    January 1, 1970
    I loved this book. But since this was not my first Beatriz Williams book, I fully expected to love this book. Now one point that the author made in her Author’s Note is that this is not the story of Amelia Earhart. Okay, you must forgive me if through the entire book I kept picturing Amelia Earhart. I’ve seen too many photos and read a few stories of the curly haired aviatrix to not draw my own parallels, sorry.This is a story about a strong woman who flaunted the conventional role of women as j I loved this book. But since this was not my first Beatriz Williams book, I fully expected to love this book. Now one point that the author made in her Author’s Note is that this is not the story of Amelia Earhart. Okay, you must forgive me if through the entire book I kept picturing Amelia Earhart. I’ve seen too many photos and read a few stories of the curly haired aviatrix to not draw my own parallels, sorry.This is a story about a strong woman who flaunted the conventional role of women as just wives and mothers. Well, I loved that fact especially since she didn’t denigrate women who were wives and mothers but just simply aspired to be more. Actually this statement applies to Irene and Janey both although their stories are nineteen years apart.This well-researched story is told in two time frames which as you read you will realize was vital to this book. Each chapter is clearly labeled so you never lose track of the time period in which you find yourself.The main characters of Irene, Sam and Janey are very clearly written so you truly get a feel of who these people are and how determined they all are to achieve what is important to each of them and yet they have their human failings along with all this passion. This is a five star read.I received this ARE in exchange for an honest review. Thank you to The Book Club Girls, Netgalley, HarperCollins Publishers and to the wonderful Beatriz Williams.
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  • Annissa Joy Armstrong
    January 1, 1970
    Wow!!!! This book is incredible!!The story had two main female characters in dual time lines. The story is seamless and just beautiful. It is a story of flight but so much more...love, determination, loss.I have been a fan of Beatriz Williams for a long time and this gem is her best work ever!! I was all in right from the beginning.Thank you Beatriz Williams and William Morrow for the advance copy.⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️ for sure and would be even higher if possible❤️
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  • Kasia
    January 1, 1970
    Decent read that was just too theatrical and overdramatize to be to my liking.We have two really well written women - Janey Everett and Irene Lindquist. Janey is writing a book about what happened to Sam Mallory - a famous pilot that mysteriously disappeared couple years before - and Irene, his former lover, could possibly have some information about him. The whole story takes place between 1928 and 1947 but to be honest both characters are behaving and thinking in such a modern way that it was Decent read that was just too theatrical and overdramatize to be to my liking.We have two really well written women - Janey Everett and Irene Lindquist. Janey is writing a book about what happened to Sam Mallory - a famous pilot that mysteriously disappeared couple years before - and Irene, his former lover, could possibly have some information about him. The whole story takes place between 1928 and 1947 but to be honest both characters are behaving and thinking in such a modern way that it was hard for me to put them in this time period. As a very detail oriented person I also couldn't stop noticing small flaws that were insignificant to the plot but were appearing constantly and kept me very annoyed. In example Janey is traveling with only small baggage that keeps only couple of her personal things and then suddenly she is pulling from it all chemicals needed to develop a camera film, people in 1928 are making pictures with zoom, abandoned airplane suddenly appears in a place thousand miles away, people owning two cars are described as too poor to buy a radio etc itd. The over-dramatization I mentioned earlier is also a constant companion. Because to reveal some secrets you absolutely must fly in the middle of the night to a remote island and then confess siting on a cliff facing an ocean and a moon. Just telling everything? Boring! If your lover is married and you happen to be a positive character in the book, don't worry - the wife is gonna be depicted as an emotionally unstable, alcoholic mantis that will harm her only child mafia-style just to make her husband come back - so you don't have to feel bad for her. She deserves cheating husband! Finale was so unbearably sweet that the only thing that was missing was that it didn't happen on Christmas. If you like stories where no opportunity for drama is missed - this is a book for you.
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  • Emily
    January 1, 1970
    This is the 2nd book I've read by Beatriz Williams and I am adding her to my list of authors to follow because wow can she tell a story! It felt a little slow in the beginning, but towards the middle it really started coming together. It took me a while to warm up to Janey because she seemed so cold and aloof at first, but the more I read of her backstory the more I felt I understood her personality and the choices she made. The aviation part of the story was very well researched and interesting This is the 2nd book I've read by Beatriz Williams and I am adding her to my list of authors to follow because wow can she tell a story! It felt a little slow in the beginning, but towards the middle it really started coming together. It took me a while to warm up to Janey because she seemed so cold and aloof at first, but the more I read of her backstory the more I felt I understood her personality and the choices she made. The aviation part of the story was very well researched and interesting. The story alternates between Janey's present day life + her talking about her past and explaining the events leading up to her current project, and excerpts from The Aviatrix, the book she's writing that tells us the story of Irene Foster. This does a good job of building the suspense. I just saw that the original title of this book was The Aviatrix! I think that would have been a way better title! Just my opinion. I loved the book though and I think it will be a huge hit.
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  • Karen
    January 1, 1970
    HER LAST FLIGHTBY BEATRIZ WILLIAMSHER LAST FLIGHT written by Beatriz Williams is a fantastic favorite historical novel based on Amelia Earhart's factual life as well as other early aeronautical trailblazers including the Wright Brother's and Charles Lindbergh. Irene Foster Lindquist is a composite character drawn on meticulous research to incorporate many books written about early aviation. I absolutely loved this rich and multilayered plot and the character's were all equally lovable and well d HER LAST FLIGHTBY BEATRIZ WILLIAMSHER LAST FLIGHT written by Beatriz Williams is a fantastic favorite historical novel based on Amelia Earhart's factual life as well as other early aeronautical trailblazers including the Wright Brother's and Charles Lindbergh. Irene Foster Lindquist is a composite character drawn on meticulous research to incorporate many books written about early aviation. I absolutely loved this rich and multilayered plot and the character's were all equally lovable and well drawn to be three dimensional and mesmerizing. The novel begins in the badlands of a desert in Spain in 1947 where Janey Everett acting off from a tip discovers an airplane partially covered in sand. As she climbs inside she finds the skeleton still clothed attached to a boot which she recognizes as belonging to a pilot who flew in the Spanish Republic Civil War ten years earlier. She buries the remains in a shallow grave of sand using the remnants of the airplane's propeller as a cross until this forgotten soul can receive a proper burial. She also found a leather bound journal. She herself has never before flown on an airplane and got to the crash site by riding a mule. She is a photojournalist. She reads "GM to rescue at last thank God she will live." She asks herself, Somebody came to his rescue? Then why is he dead? And who is she? There was no she, just this single man found in his airplane. No second body lies here, no female body. "Because here's what I know for certain about that pile of abandoned bones, which was once a pilot named Samuel Mallory. There was only one 'she.' Only one person in the world to make him invoke the name of God." The book alternates between chapter's of her recreating a biography about Sam Mallory and Irene Foster Lindquist with chapter heading's that are either labeled "Aviatrix by Eugenia Everett, (excerpt)" or Hanalei, Hawaii. March 1928: CaliforniaIrene only surfs at dawn, when nobody who wants to be around other people all of the time. There are some beautiful descriptions about the frigid and cold Pacific Ocean. It is here that she drove her father's old dilapidated Model T. Her father taught her how to surf when she was eleven or twelve smelling of alcohol. Now she is twenty when she meets Sam Mallory. He asks her if the kitten he found belonged to her. She says no. When she tries to start her father's ancient car it won't start. They discover together it needs a spark plug. He offers to drive her in his canary yellow car only five or six years old to his airfield where he said he worked as a pilot. Irene suddenly recognized him as the famous Sam Mallory and the famous pilot who flew in the Dole Derby who she followed his race by listening to the radio. He drove her to the airfield while she watched him fly in an exhibit. He did loops in the sky and he told her that the owners owned the airplane. He told her that he loves flying and over the course of months he taught her to fly. That it takes a sponsor such as the Publisher George Morrow to build an aircraft that after training her they would fly from California to Sydney, Australia. Hanalei, Hawaii--October 1947Janey Everett has tracked down Irene Lindquist to a remote Island in Hawaii where she correctly guesses where Irene is surfing and she ambushes her on the beach. She recognizes Irene Lindquist to be one and the same person as Irene Foster. Janey has done her research and at first Irene Lindquist tries to deny she is the former Irene Foster who was world famous for her aviator achievements. When Janey discloses that she has in her possession Sam Mallory's leather bound journal recovered at the crash site Irene Lindquist asks how she found her? Janey tells her that she never tells anybody the source of her information. Janey tells Irene over breakfast that she is there to write Sam Mallory's biography because she needs to find out what happened to him--she just needs too. It is a big secret that Irene Foster who mysteriously disappeared during an around the world flight in 1937 owns an Island hopping airline with her husband Olle and their two young blond children. The famous aviator Irene Foster was once Sam Mallory's flying partner and it is one of the world's biggest mysteries to what happened to her. Everybody on the Island's of Hawaii knows her as Irene Lindquest and they are protective of her anonymity. Irene Lindquist surprises Janey by offering her their guest cottage.Anybody that knows about Amelia Earhart and her trailblazing career of aeronautical accomplishments will recognize Irene as a factual composite character of Amelia and early famous aviator's. The plot of this novel is amazing and Beatriz Williams has clearly done meticulous research to learn about the technological insights she weaves into this outstanding novel of historical fiction peppered in with factual data of the era. I grew to love all of the character's as they are vividly portrayed in all of their three dimensional humanity. There is a nod to Ms William's publisher in the character of George Morrow. Amelia Earhart was married to GP Putnam. As both a novel within a novel this is a multilayered narrative that has a mind blowing reveal which I thoroughly appreciated because I never expected it and I never saw it coming. The reveal is purely legendary and I think it will please the reader's. I am a big fan of Beatriz William's and I certainly get the impression that she writes intelligently and that this historical novel will be enjoyed as well as educate. It is on my list of favorite's for 2020 and I look forward to owning the physical copy to add to my unforgettable personal collection.Publication Date: June 30, 2020Thank you to Net Galley, Beatriz Williams and HarperCollins--William Morrow Publishing for generously providing me with my ARC in exchange for a fair and honest review. All opinions are my own.#HerLastFlight #BeartizWilliams #HarperCollinsWilliamMorrowPublishing #NetGalley
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  • Shawn
    January 1, 1970
    4.5 stars. Another excellent book by Beatriz, who has become one of my favorite authors. I really liked both of the main characters, Janey and Irene, and the alternating narrators--Janey in "present day," and the sections of the book she was writing about the past. I also loved the kind of sub-stories about the characters' lives within the narration, like about Irene's dad and Janey's parents. I felt like it lets us get to know them better. I wanted more at the end, so I'm hoping there is anothe 4.5 stars. Another excellent book by Beatriz, who has become one of my favorite authors. I really liked both of the main characters, Janey and Irene, and the alternating narrators--Janey in "present day," and the sections of the book she was writing about the past. I also loved the kind of sub-stories about the characters' lives within the narration, like about Irene's dad and Janey's parents. I felt like it lets us get to know them better. I wanted more at the end, so I'm hoping there is another book that revisits everyone.*Thank you to William Morris Publishing/Goodreads for the free ARC
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  • Laura
    January 1, 1970
    I am a long-time Beatriz Williams fan who has read all of her books and loved each one. Her Last Flight takes place during two timelines.....this technique is the author's trademark and works well. This is the first of Ms. Williams' books that I had difficulty becoming invested in both the storylines and the characters. About halfway into the book, I became fully absorbed and could not wait to find out how the story was going to end! All in all a very good read! Thank you NetGalley and Facebooks I am a long-time Beatriz Williams fan who has read all of her books and loved each one. Her Last Flight takes place during two timelines.....this technique is the author's trademark and works well. This is the first of Ms. Williams' books that I had difficulty becoming invested in both the storylines and the characters. About halfway into the book, I became fully absorbed and could not wait to find out how the story was going to end! All in all a very good read! Thank you NetGalley and Facebooks' Book Club Girls Early Read Program for the ARC!
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  • Morgan Pearman
    January 1, 1970
    Beatriz Williams is a master at historical fiction and this book is a true gem. In Her Last Flight, Williams weaves together the stories of two strong female heroines, Irene Foster and Janey Everett, in a dual timeline alternating between the 1920s and 1940s. Williams always breathes life into her subjects in a way that makes them three dimensional. I found the subject matter (the dawn of aviation, specifically female pioneers in a male dominated field) to be especially interesting.
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  • Kristen
    January 1, 1970
    This was so good! And I usually hate historical fiction! It didn’t drag at all. It wasn’t boring. The characters were great, awesome strong women. There were a few twists and secrets uncovered throughout. A great story that kept me hooked to the very end. I will read more by this author! And I definitely recommend this one
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  • Caroline Craig David
    January 1, 1970
    I love that the author mentioned that this book started as almost a sort of biography of Amelia Earhart but turned into more of a "well what if she did survive and was staking out on an island?". It was such an interesting story to read and definitely my favorite Beatriz Williams book by far.
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  • Jenelle Rodenbaugh
    January 1, 1970
    Such a good book! The story keeps you engaged. The aviation history was interesting as I knew little about it. Just a page turner!
  • Katherine Martin
    January 1, 1970
    Wow! Williams has really done it this time. This was a very sweet read where we fall in love with 2 imperfect characters. This is my favorite from this author. The book jumps between characters and time periods. We span 1928, 1937, & 1947. We have a chapter from Janey’s perspective and then Irene’s. There are some twists in the end that I did not see coming, one of which caused me to drop my jaw for a second! The twists in this book are perfect little surprises and the story ties together very w Wow! Williams has really done it this time. This was a very sweet read where we fall in love with 2 imperfect characters. This is my favorite from this author. The book jumps between characters and time periods. We span 1928, 1937, & 1947. We have a chapter from Janey’s perspective and then Irene’s. There are some twists in the end that I did not see coming, one of which caused me to drop my jaw for a second! The twists in this book are perfect little surprises and the story ties together very well. The nature of the story makes one think of Amelia Earhart, which Williams does say is an inspiration, but this story is wholly independent. Goodreads sent me an advanced copy in exchange for my unbiased review.
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  • Michelle
    January 1, 1970
    Janey is a photojournalist and she’s currently working on a big article about Sam Mallory. Mallory was a famous pilot who disappeared about ten years earlier.Possibly his most famous flight was with a female pilot named Irene. Irene was very famous as well. There were very few women flying at the time.Nearly twenty years ago, Sam and Irene took a flight together that crashed. They spent weeks together, stranded on a beach, just them and Sam’s kitten Sandy. After they were rescued, everyone wante Janey is a photojournalist and she’s currently working on a big article about Sam Mallory. Mallory was a famous pilot who disappeared about ten years earlier.Possibly his most famous flight was with a female pilot named Irene. Irene was very famous as well. There were very few women flying at the time.Nearly twenty years ago, Sam and Irene took a flight together that crashed. They spent weeks together, stranded on a beach, just them and Sam’s kitten Sandy. After they were rescued, everyone wanted to know if something had happened between them.Janey tracks down Irene to interview her. Irene dropped out of the public eye and isn’t excited about being interviewed.But the two women seem to relate to each other in a way. I enjoyed this story. I think it felt a little slow to start. Now, personally, I was having a rough day when I started reading the book and that might have affected my ability to get into the story at first. But I mention it because if someone else has a slow start with getting into this book, I wanted them to know that the storyline and the pace picks up. I definitely liked Irene’s character the best.I got to read an early ebook edition from NetGalley. I love this author’s books and I’m so grateful that I got picked. Thank you!
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  • jsukolaol.com
    January 1, 1970
    I eagerly anticipate each new Beatriz Williams novel, and the current book, “Her Last Flight,” does not disappoint. With her unique blend of scintillating dialog, intriguing stories, and well-drawn characters filled out by nuances of gestures and facial expressions, this book is a delight to read.The narrative alternates between two perspectives--that of photojournalist Janey Everett in 1947 and two mysterious aviators, Irene Foster and Samuel Mallory, whose story begins in 1937. Everett is sear I eagerly anticipate each new Beatriz Williams novel, and the current book, “Her Last Flight,” does not disappoint. With her unique blend of scintillating dialog, intriguing stories, and well-drawn characters filled out by nuances of gestures and facial expressions, this book is a delight to read.The narrative alternates between two perspectives--that of photojournalist Janey Everett in 1947 and two mysterious aviators, Irene Foster and Samuel Mallory, whose story begins in 1937. Everett is searching for details about Samuel Mallory, who fought in the Spanish Civil War and has been missing, presumed dead since 1937. She discovers what appear to be the remains of his airplane in an isolated portion of Spain, together with a desiccated body and Samuel Mallory’s journal. Everett’s quest to find details of Foster and Mallory’s story continues with a journey to a remote island in Hawaii, where Everett makes contact with Irene Linquist, the owner of a small airline. Everett believes Irene Linquist is Sam Mallory’s missing former pupil and presumed lover, Irene Foster. In the ensuing story, Everett attempts to ferret out clues from the very private Irene Linquist. What unfolds is an intriguing story of how Irene Foster met Sam Mallory and became his pupil and fellow aviator, making a succession of famous dare-devil flying escapades across the globe. Were they lovers? Did they both perish in 1937 during the Spanish Civil War? Everett pursues these and other questions during the course of these alternating narratives. Each chapter reveals a little more about each of the three protagonists but the reader can never be sure whom to trust….
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  • Lisa
    January 1, 1970
    As a huge fan of Beatriz Williams writing, I tried everything possible to get an ARC of this book. Finally, I was successfully, and immediately started reading. To say that this is a great read is a gross understatement. “Her Last Flight” is loosely based on Amelia Earhart. There are obvious physical similarities and story parallels which add depth and excitement to the story by being familiar, yet new to the reader. That being said, Irene Foster’s story is her own and is told brilliantly. Irene As a huge fan of Beatriz Williams writing, I tried everything possible to get an ARC of this book. Finally, I was successfully, and immediately started reading. To say that this is a great read is a gross understatement. “Her Last Flight” is loosely based on Amelia Earhart. There are obvious physical similarities and story parallels which add depth and excitement to the story by being familiar, yet new to the reader. That being said, Irene Foster’s story is her own and is told brilliantly. Irene Foster meets pilot Sam Mallory on a California beach after a morning of surfing. Irene’s car won’t start, and they both conclude that it is a bad spark plug. Sam is on his way to the air field to prepare for a show. Irene tags along with the promise of a new spark plug for her car. What follows life changing for both. Irene falls in love with flying, and Sam falls in love with Irene. The story is told in dual timeline by Janey Everett, a photojournalist who is writing a book about Sam Malloy. The past time line is interestingly told in the form of excerpts of Janey’s book “The Aviatrix”. Throughout the book, there is a sense that something is brewing under the surface. I couldn’t quite put my finger on it, but I knew that every part of the story was important, and that I must be vigilant while reading so that I didn’t miss anything. The story lines are expertly woven so that the twists are both a surprise while making perfect sense. This is a five star read, without a doubt. It will be released June 30, don’t miss it. Thank you @netgalley for the ARC of this wonderful book by one of my favorite authors.
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  • Mary Peaks
    January 1, 1970
    First let me introduce myself. My name is Lynne and I love to read. Reading is an escape for me so fiction is my choice. I was honored to get to read Beatriz Williams early release of Her Last Flight. I found myself confused early on due to some time jumps. Going back and planting the time line in my mind set me off on a thrilling “flight” of mystery and intrigue. Though this book is fiction I found myself thinking of the early flights of Amelia Earhart. Imagine my surprise when in the authors n First let me introduce myself. My name is Lynne and I love to read. Reading is an escape for me so fiction is my choice. I was honored to get to read Beatriz Williams early release of Her Last Flight. I found myself confused early on due to some time jumps. Going back and planting the time line in my mind set me off on a thrilling “flight” of mystery and intrigue. Though this book is fiction I found myself thinking of the early flights of Amelia Earhart. Imagine my surprise when in the authors notes she mentions Ms. Earhart. I’ve read most of Beatriz’s book and hands down this is my favorite thus far. The story starts in California where we meet the two most central characters in the story, Irene Foster and Mr. Mallory. It is 1928. From the start I could actually feel how these two separate people would and did come together. They meet one day surfing and due to car trouble Irene was taken by Mr. Mallory to his place of work.....an airfield. Air hangers, men in coveralls and planes. From the moment Irene saw Mr. Mallory fly she knew she wanted to do the same. From there you have a love story for the ages. In the time jump you met a third character photojournalist, Janey Everett, who is hungry for a story on Mr. Mallory’s life. To do so she must find Irene. What she finds and the story that unfolds will have you reading into the night.Even though we jump from the late twenties to the 40’s each chapter is from the mind of Irene or Janey. To see how the two fiercely independent women come to meet and the truths that come out will show you a story of love, love lost, adventure and of course the mystery. Remember the phrase it’s a small small world?
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  • Tami
    January 1, 1970
    What a fascinating read! This new novel by Beatriz Williams covers the early days of aviation and is loosely based on the life of Amelia Earhart. What if Amelia Earhart had survived? Where would she be living? Why had she retreated from the public eye?Irene Foster is the “Amelia” of the story. She meets Sam Mallory at a young age and falls in love with flying and with Mallory. Sam Mallory, a famous aviation pioneer, teaches Irene to fly and for a time, they fly as a team. During a flight from Ha What a fascinating read! This new novel by Beatriz Williams covers the early days of aviation and is loosely based on the life of Amelia Earhart. What if Amelia Earhart had survived? Where would she be living? Why had she retreated from the public eye?Irene Foster is the “Amelia” of the story. She meets Sam Mallory at a young age and falls in love with flying and with Mallory. Sam Mallory, a famous aviation pioneer, teaches Irene to fly and for a time, they fly as a team. During a flight from Hawaii to Australia, the duo encountered engine trouble and had to make an unexpected landing at a remote island where they were stranded for several weeks before being rescued.Naturally the whole world was speculating about their relationship considering they were alone together for so long on a deserted island. Their publicist, George Morrow, tried to control the publicity for a time, but when things seemed to get out of his control, he managed to separate Mallory from Irene and became her publicist, manager and eventually her husband.After a few years, Mallory and Irene reconnected and the meat of the story is the events that occurred after their reunion. The ending is one readers will not be able to tear away from. Even though I thought it was a bit of a slow start, I really enjoyed this story—especially the little twists at the ending.
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  • CMDH
    January 1, 1970
    Beatriz Williams has become a not just a must read author for me but a must buy. Her stories are consistently ones I’m going to recommend, gift, and want to read again. These are my top books, my five stars. Her Last Flight is the right book at the right time. Smart immersive fiction with strong female characters who are flawed, human, multidimensional. The book is inspired by early female aviators. Janey Everett tracks down Irene Foster while writing a biography on Sam Malone, a famous aviator Beatriz Williams has become a not just a must read author for me but a must buy. Her stories are consistently ones I’m going to recommend, gift, and want to read again. These are my top books, my five stars. Her Last Flight is the right book at the right time. Smart immersive fiction with strong female characters who are flawed, human, multidimensional. The book is inspired by early female aviators. Janey Everett tracks down Irene Foster while writing a biography on Sam Malone, a famous aviator who disappeared during the Spanish Civil War. Irene’s story, is told though flashbacks and alternates with Janey in ‘present day’ 1947. The stories of both women are incredibly interesting, well researched, and really use their locations extremely well as characters in their own right. I highly recommend for lovers of historical fiction, contemporary fiction, mysteries, immersive fiction. Thank you to LibraryThing and William Morrow for the Advanced Reader Copy and the opportunity to review Her Last Flight by Beatriz Williams. All opinions are my own. A special note that the ARC is simply beautiful with an iridescent sheen making the goldtones in the background imperceptibly glow like a sunset. Well done on the cover art! I hope this carries over to the hardcover.
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  • Kirsten
    January 1, 1970
    I won this in the publisher's giveway and read it just as this crazy March ended. I escaped into the author's lush descriptions - felt myself in Hawaii, California, and all the other locations the book takes us. History is hit or miss for me - some topics are INCREDIBLY interesting and it doesn't matter who writes about it, and some topics are boring and it takes an incredible author to intrigue me. This had both, to be fair. There were bits about Spain / the Spanish Civil war (fav) and then the I won this in the publisher's giveway and read it just as this crazy March ended. I escaped into the author's lush descriptions - felt myself in Hawaii, California, and all the other locations the book takes us. History is hit or miss for me - some topics are INCREDIBLY interesting and it doesn't matter who writes about it, and some topics are boring and it takes an incredible author to intrigue me. This had both, to be fair. There were bits about Spain / the Spanish Civil war (fav) and then there were bits about aviation (not exactly my fav). Williams brings the excitement of Aviation's golden age alive and made me feel excited about these death traps circumnavigating the globe. The story had it all it seemed - and it was so well executed. I didn't see most of the twists coming and I loved how she kept us guessing until the last minute. This is the type of book that makes me remember why I love historical fiction so much - it transports us, and encourages us to lean me - thus transforming us.
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