They Went Left
Germany, 1945. The soldiers who liberated the Gross-Rosen concentration camp said the war was over, but nothing feels over to eighteen-year-old Zofia Lederman. Her body has barely begun to heal; her mind feels broken. And her life is completely shattered: Three years ago, she and her younger brother, Abek, were the only members of their family to be sent to the right, away from the gas chambers of Auschwitz-Birkenau. Everyone else--her parents, her grandmother, radiant Aunt Maja--they went left.Zofia's last words to her brother were a promise: Abek to Zofia, A to Z. When I find you again, we will fill our alphabet. Now her journey to fulfill that vow takes her through Poland and Germany, and into a displaced persons camp where everyone she meets is trying to piece together a future from a painful past: Miriam, desperately searching for the twin she was separated from after they survived medical experimentation. Breine, a former heiress, who now longs only for a simple wedding with her new fiancé. And Josef, who guards his past behind a wall of secrets, and is beautiful and strange and magnetic all at once.But the deeper Zofia digs, the more impossible her search seems. How can she find one boy in a sea of the missing? In the rubble of a broken continent, Zofia must delve into a mystery whose answers could break her--or help her rebuild her world.

They Went Left Details

TitleThey Went Left
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseApr 7th, 2020
PublisherLittle, Brown Books for Young Readers
ISBN-139780316490573
Rating
GenreHistorical, Historical Fiction, Young Adult, War, World War II, Fiction

They Went Left Review

  • Donna Backshall
    January 1, 1970
    Choose to love. When everything seems hopeless, when you're coming out of something that seemed unsurvivable, when you're overwhelmed beyond belief, you can still choose to love. They Went Left is one of those books that ties your stomach in knots, and makes you want to shout out in anger, but when you're done, you know you have changed. Your heart is crying out to your sense of decency, kindness and compassion, telling you how necessary it is to let these guide your daily actions.Most WWII Choose to love. When everything seems hopeless, when you're coming out of something that seemed unsurvivable, when you're overwhelmed beyond belief, you can still choose to love. They Went Left is one of those books that ties your stomach in knots, and makes you want to shout out in anger, but when you're done, you know you have changed. Your heart is crying out to your sense of decency, kindness and compassion, telling you how necessary it is to let these guide your daily actions.Most WWII genocide stories start before the war, or while European Jews were being sent to the concentration camps. This well-researched and realistic novel, much like Cilka's Journey, shows us the baffling and heartbreaking aftermath. We learn just how difficult it can be to survive the unthinkable and to endure the continuing hell of putting together a life and family torn apart by such evil as the Holocaust.
    more
  • Celia McMahon
    January 1, 1970
    Thank you Edelweiss for this phenomenal e-galley!I cannot stress this enough: I am a sucker for punishment and will read every WW2 book out there no matter how heart-wrenching, gut-punching, how completely soul-destroying it is. THEY WENT LEFT tells the unique story of what happened AFTER the concentration camps were liberated. Zofia, who has lost her entire family, holds onto hope that her little brother, Abek is alive. Accompanied first by a Russian soldier, she arrives back home only to find Thank you Edelweiss for this phenomenal e-galley!I cannot stress this enough: I am a sucker for punishment and will read every WW2 book out there no matter how heart-wrenching, gut-punching, how completely soul-destroying it is. THEY WENT LEFT tells the unique story of what happened AFTER the concentration camps were liberated. Zofia, who has lost her entire family, holds onto hope that her little brother, Abek is alive. Accompanied first by a Russian soldier, she arrives back home only to find it utterly changed. In an effort to track her brother's whereabouts, she travels far and ends up in Germany where she joins a group of people, displaced and lost, but also hopeful. It's there that she finds a future for herself. Zofia is an unreliable narrator. She's traumatized by her time in concentration camps, as anyone would be. It is through her memories that we experience the brutality of what happened and the atrocities that she had witnessed. This book made me uncomfortable, but it should. this stuff HAPPENED and it should not be forgotten because you feel uneasy. The war did not end for a lot of people even after they were liberated and this book is a testament to that. I recommend this book for all ages because we should not censor our kids. The past is very much real and should be discussed and read and seen. This book is beautifully written and raw and powerful.
    more
  • Zoe
    January 1, 1970
    Heartwrenching, haunting, and hopeful!They Went Left is a poignant, compelling tale that sweeps you away to post-war Germany and into the life of Zofia Lederman, a young Jewish girl who after being liberated from a Nazi concentration camp and with a mind traumatized by cruelty and violence travels from her home town in Poland to the Foehrenwald Displaced Persons Camp to search for the one family member who may not be lost forever and that she swore to protect, her younger brother, Abek.The prose Heartwrenching, haunting, and hopeful!They Went Left is a poignant, compelling tale that sweeps you away to post-war Germany and into the life of Zofia Lederman, a young Jewish girl who after being liberated from a Nazi concentration camp and with a mind traumatized by cruelty and violence travels from her home town in Poland to the Foehrenwald Displaced Persons Camp to search for the one family member who may not be lost forever and that she swore to protect, her younger brother, Abek.The prose is raw and tense. The characters are vulnerable, tortured, and resilient. And the plot is a moving tale about life, love, bravery, strength, loss, deception, hope, survival, and the enduring aftereffects of war.Overall, They Went Left is a lovely blend of historical facts, realistic fiction, and palpable emotion that does a beautiful job of reminding us that even after suffering the most unimaginable cruelty and wickedness humanity still has an innate ability to want to love and be loved.Thank you to HBG Canada for providing me with a copy in exchange for an honest review.
    more
  • Nenia ❤️️ I hate everything you love ❤️️ Campbell
    January 1, 1970
    I'm getting an ARC! :D
  • Kelly McWilliams
    January 1, 1970
    A gorgeous, heartbreaking tale about the life of a young woman after the liberation of the Gross-Rosen concentration camp, THEY WENT LEFT asks how we move forward after the unimaginable. This book haunted me for weeks; its the kind of novel that has the power to change you, forever, for the better.I particularly appreciated the way THEY WENT LEFT spun its memory tale, probing the depths of the human psyche after trauma. I hope everyone finds their way to this story at some time or other. A gorgeous, heartbreaking tale about the life of a young woman after the liberation of the Gross-Rosen concentration camp, THEY WENT LEFT asks how we move forward after the unimaginable. This book haunted me for weeks; it’s the kind of novel that has the power to change you, forever, for the better.I particularly appreciated the way THEY WENT LEFT spun its memory tale, probing the depths of the human psyche after trauma. I hope everyone finds their way to this story at some time or other. Ultimately, it’s a study of how hope might be born, even from the ruins of unthinkable destruction.
    more
  • Sarah
    January 1, 1970
    This book was phenomenal, and I think my favourite of Hesse's books so far.Zofia has survived a number of concentration camps and is now beginning the work of trying to reunite with her younger brother. She is doing that through a patchwork of numerous charities - no central database and with the possibility that he has died/been mislabeled in German files/wants to move on without reuniting hanging over the process.I thought Hesse's choice to explore the immediate post-war era was inspired - This book was phenomenal, and I think my favourite of Hesse's books so far.Zofia has survived a number of concentration camps and is now beginning the work of trying to reunite with her younger brother. She is doing that through a patchwork of numerous charities - no central database and with the possibility that he has died/been mislabeled in German files/wants to move on without reuniting hanging over the process.I thought Hesse's choice to explore the immediate post-war era was inspired - I've read a bit about this period of time, but never about how the war affected everyday displaced people, usually I've read about the government/Yalta conference macro reorganization of Europe.The characters are richly drawn, and the unreliable narration kept me on my toes. I highly recommend this story.Thank you to the publisher, via Edelweiss, for providing me with an e-arc for review.
    more
  • Kristen Majkut
    January 1, 1970
    Monica Hesse delivers in yet another historical fiction novel about WWII and the Holocaust. This story begins after the liberation of camps all over Europe, specifically in Poland and in Germany. The main character Zofia is looking for her younger brother Abek, after her entire family was sent to Auschwitz-Birkenau and they were sent to the LEFT. Only Zofia and Abek were sent to the right. Zofia is actively looking for her brother across various displaced persons camps and isn't having any luck. Monica Hesse delivers in yet another historical fiction novel about WWII and the Holocaust. This story begins after the liberation of camps all over Europe, specifically in Poland and in Germany. The main character Zofia is looking for her younger brother Abek, after her entire family was sent to Auschwitz-Birkenau and they were sent to the LEFT. Only Zofia and Abek were sent to the right. Zofia is actively looking for her brother across various displaced persons camps and isn't having any luck. She also can't remember certain details about the last time she saw her family. Why? Zofia is beyond traumatized and her odd behaviors are marked by headaches, anxiety, heightened startle responses and severe memory loss. She doesn't know why this is happening and why everyone keeps asking her if she feeling well or if she'd like to sit down. We, the readers can glean that she is actively experiencing trauma symptoms. Zofia is also angry that so many survivors survived liberation of the camps only to die anyway from their poor health. We know from veterans research that PTSD is a neurological response to trauma. The brain attempts to protect itself from trauma by shutting the memories down. The depth of the disorder reveals itself when the brain is unexpectedly activated by unanticipated triggers such as sights, sounds, and smells. The sufferer is then ambushed by fractured pieces of memories that don't make sense and are not in order. This jumble of physiological and emotional responses overwhelm the sufferer unless and until they can process these traumatic events from a safe distance. We know that this takes a lifetime for most and some just don't make it at all. I love that this book features a scrappy Holocaust survivor such as Zofia and I also love that this alternate happy ending is not what you think. Zofia's potential love interests keep things taut (a Russian soldier named Dima and Joseph, another displaced person in the camp she's in). There is no happily ever after. Or is there just a different version of it? I will post about this related nonfiction book in the future: The Body Keep the Score by Bessel Van Der Kolk. "The single most important issue for traumatized people is to find a sense of safety in their own bodies." - Bessel Van Der Kolk#books #reading #libraries #bookreviews#historicalfiction #youngadult#Holocaust #Auschwitz #Birkenau #WWII#theBodyKeepstheScore #BesselVanDerKolk#trauma #PTSD #posttraumaticstressdisorder #ptsdawareness
    more
  • Zoë ☆
    January 1, 1970
    Why haven't I heard of this anywhere?!
  • Amy
    January 1, 1970
    Many thanks to EdelweissPlus and the publisher for providing me with a DRC of this title for review purposes. All opinions are my own.I can not say enough how good this book was. All the stars, all the accolades, all the YES to this book. It was exactly what you want from a historical fiction book: moving, informative, timely. I put it down and immediately went back to reread certain parts again. This is not something I normally do, but Hesse's words and prose stuck with me in such a way, I Many thanks to EdelweissPlus and the publisher for providing me with a DRC of this title for review purposes. All opinions are my own.I can not say enough how good this book was. All the stars, all the accolades, all the YES to this book. It was exactly what you want from a historical fiction book: moving, informative, timely. I put it down and immediately went back to reread certain parts again. This is not something I normally do, but Hesse's words and prose stuck with me in such a way, I couldn't ignore them. As Zofia says at the end (bearing in mind this was a DRC and subject to change), "What's the minimum expectation I have for human decency in a war that was entirely inhumane?" This question, this haunting expectation of what we do and what we want people to do when faced with seemingly impossible and insurmountable choices, is what made this book so moving. Highly recommend. This is a first purchase type of book for all collections serving YA readers. I would say it is best suited for grades 9 and up due to some of the graphic content and the mature writing.Zofia has survived the war. After being liberated from the concentration camps by the Red Army, she knows she needs to head back to her hometown to find her brother Abek. They are the only two of her family who might have survived the war since they were the only ones in the line who went right. The rest of the family went left, to the showers and the chambers. Mama, Papa, Baba Rose, Aunt Maja, they are all gone. So it's up to Zofia to find her younger brother. But her search for him in the chaos of the aftermath of war is slow-going and the whole time she is haunted by the fact that she isn't sure she remembers the last time she saw him. Will finding him put things right for her? Is that even possible?Like I said, this is a top 10 read for me, not only of this year, but in recent years. Highly recommend. Go preorder this book right now. You can thank me later.
    more
  • Alicia
    January 1, 1970
    "...everyone traveling in a different direction, and every direction was someone's home, as if the world were a board game and all the pieces had ended up scattered in the wrong corners of the box.""Choose to love."Significant visual and messages from Hesse's new book to be released in 2020. I'm beyond happy as a bookworm that I chose this to be my first book of 2020 because I knew I wouldn't be disappointed. She manages to weave another sentimental and informative historical fiction while "...everyone traveling in a different direction, and every direction was someone's home, as if the world were a board game and all the pieces had ended up scattered in the wrong corners of the box.""Choose to love."Significant visual and messages from Hesse's new book to be released in 2020. I'm beyond happy as a bookworm that I chose this to be my first book of 2020 because I knew I wouldn't be disappointed. She manages to weave another sentimental and informative historical fiction while managing to kick us all in the gut but still provide an ounce of hopefulness by the end. This is the story of the liberation of the camps in 1945 and Zofia, a girl who lost most of her family but knows that her younger brother is still out there somewhere, and she's not willing to give up searching and hoping. She returns briefly to their childhood home with the help of a Russian soldier, but she leaves in the night and seeks to find answers about her brother, Abek. This leads her across countries and navigating all the languages that came together when the war happened. She's in a relocation/displaced persons camp, meets a troupe of lovely people all trying to find love and connection and move on, whether to Palestine or returning to their home. She meets Josef and then Abek returns. But there is much to discover about both of them since the war's end. The fact that Hesse chooses a realistic story with painful discoveries rather than a completely happy one is the craft of a writer to stays true to the story and finds the dark AND mixes it with the light. To follow Zofia's journey through this book is why Hesse is phenomenal. I've read everything of hers and will continue!
    more
  • Leah Moore Woods
    January 1, 1970
    Thank you to Little, Brown Young Readers, Hachette Audio, and LibroFM for the advanced listening copy of They Went Left by Monica Hesse.One of my favorite historical fiction books is Girl in the Blue Coat, so when I saw this audiobook on LibroFM, I jumped up and down! Listened to the book in 2 days, and felt so many emotions... Zofia is a very likeable MC and I was rooting for her the whole book. I laughed and cried, and I will be thinking about these characters often. Amazing writting, this Thank you to Little, Brown Young Readers, Hachette Audio, and LibroFM for the advanced listening copy of They Went Left by Monica Hesse.One of my favorite historical fiction books is Girl in the Blue Coat, so when I saw this audiobook on LibroFM, I jumped up and down! Listened to the book in 2 days, and felt so many emotions... Zofia is a very likeable MC and I was rooting for her the whole book. I laughed and cried, and I will be thinking about these characters often. Amazing writting, this book is almost perfect.Read this book.Really, read it.By 2021 this book should be covered in medal stickers. The time after liberation is fascinating and I will be doing more reading - Monica Hesse includes a few recommendations and info about her research in her authors note, so be sure to read to the very last page.
    more
  • Reeka (BoundbyWords)
    January 1, 1970
    It used to be that I sought out gut-wrenching narratives about WWII, fervently combed through shelves at bookstores or libraries for the trendy covers and titles that meant I'd find a specific type of loss within. It started with the horrors depicted in Night by Eli Wiesel, and continued with fictional 'imaginings' like Sarah's Key by Tatiana de Rosnay, The Storyteller by Jodi Picoult and most recently, The Huntress by Kate Quinn. Every single one left me gutted, so much so that I needed It used to be that I sought out gut-wrenching narratives about WWII, fervently combed through shelves at bookstores or libraries for the trendy covers and titles that meant I'd find a specific type of loss within. It started with the horrors depicted in Night by Eli Wiesel, and continued with fictional 'imaginings' like Sarah's Key by Tatiana de Rosnay, The Storyteller by Jodi Picoult and most recently, The Huntress by Kate Quinn. Every single one left me gutted, so much so that I needed a break, I needed to move on to happier occurrences. I decided that They Went Left would be my cautious return to the sub-genre; I would let it quietly guide me back into a space that had previously annihilated my heart. What a fool I was. To think that stories like this could be anything but loud, and all-consuming, and unimaginably important. They Went Left was all of those things, it was all of those things written in one of the most absolutely beautiful ways that I have EVER seen it written. It begins with a family torn apart. Zofia recalls the moment she loses her family to Nazi control in her small Polish town. Her parents, aunt and grandmother are sent to their deaths, and she's separated from her brother as they continue, alive, on to the  Auschwitz-Birkenau concentration camps. Now it's 1945, Zofia's camp has been liberated by the allies, and there's nothing else she wants more than to be reunited with her brother. Unlike hundreds of others searching for loved ones, Zofia refuses to stay put and write letters to various organizations and camps, and instead follows a blind lead to Germany. Propelled by faulty memories and a fierce love, her search leads to an unlikely place, and some unexpected truths.Every single word in this book held purpose. Every moment was one torn straight from the desperate and irreparably damaged hearts of real-life survivors, from the very souls of the those who found luck on their side but also permanent pain as it's consequence. Hesse's characters were, without a doubt, some of the most real and well-depicted characters I've ever read. Not just in a WWII narrative, but ever. She touched on the harsh realities of the camps, but They Went Left focused mainly on the few months following liberation, and what it meant to search for normalcy in the midst of a still-lingering chaos. Zofia's character never felt forced, or sensationalized. Her thoughts, her feelings, her actions, it was raw and honest to the point of feeling unbearable, to where I literally felt transported to her place of urgency, her desperation. Even the conclusion, with all of the possible ways for it to feel gimmicky, and contrived, was executed with a hand that sought only to shed light on very likely realities. It was done with grace and with care. I don't think I'll stop thinking about this book for a very long time, and I'll be hard-pressed to find anything that comes close to it.--------------------*I received an egalley from the publisher via Netgalley in order to participate in this blog tour*
    more
  • Dini Kamayana
    January 1, 1970
    Wow, talk about complete emotional devastation! I'm so glad this was put on my radar through the Fantastic Flying Book Club blog tour because otherwise I would've missed out on a powerful and heartbreaking read that is different to most WWII historical fictions that are my usual picks. Rather than following characters during the actual Holocaust period, we learn about the aftermath of the liberation. I'm ashamed to admit that I never considered what happened after they were "free" to return home Wow, talk about complete emotional devastation! I'm so glad this was put on my radar through the Fantastic Flying Book Club blog tour because otherwise I would've missed out on a powerful and heartbreaking read that is different to most WWII historical fictions that are my usual picks. Rather than following characters during the actual Holocaust period, we learn about the aftermath of the liberation. I'm ashamed to admit that I never considered what happened after they were "free" to return home or if they even had homes to return to; I certainly didn't know that refugee camps even existed! It's clear to me that the author has really done her research and it shows in the details of this well-crafted story that packs a very strong punch to the feels. I really appreciated the author's explanation of her research process and how this book came to life.I don't know why I thought a post-war story would be less emotionally wrecking, but I couldn't have been more wrong. I think the only regret I have in reading this book was doing so in public because I couldn't let myself ugly cry like I wanted to -- and believe me, I really wanted to. My eyes were constantly filling to the brim and the dams were always *this* close to breaking! There were many incidents that take place in this story that I had never heard of before and it was certainly shocking. This was an easy but difficult read. The writing is raw and the author doesn't hold anything back, and this history deserves that. The story sucks you right in and doesn't spit you out until the very end. It's horrifying and uncomfortable, and makes you think about humanity, compassion, trauma and recovery.Zofia is a very unreliable narrator and at first this made me unsure about how I'd like the story. I think Hesse does a really good job in developing Zofia's character, who has suffered extreme mental trauma and resulting memory loss/gaps and periods of disorientation and confusion. Although the way Zofia's narrative is written does take time to get used to, it paints a very clear picture of her struggle and stresses how deeply war leaves mental wounds as much as physical wounds. Zofia's desperation to find her brother Abek, the only family she had left, was palpable. Her growing distress with each moment that she spent separated from him, unable to find clues of his whereabouts, was an almost tangible thing. She's such a strong and driven character, and oftentimes her feisty attitude would come through to highlight her personality from "before", especially when she was interacting with Josef!Although this recounts horrendous events through Zofia's flashbacks and dreams, there's also hope introduced through the characters and life in the refugee camp. I think that life in the camps is testament to the resilience of the human spirit because despite the years of torture, suffering and death that these people endured, they are still full of kindness and experience happiness even through the simplest of things. Yes, life isn't without fear, sadness and sometimes continued suffering, but there's also so much positivity that can be found. I loved the characters we meet at the camp: Breine, Esther, Miriam, Chaim and especially Josef. The fast friendship that was formed between Breine, Esther and Zofia was heartwarming and their happiness was infectious and really warmed my heart. They each suffered such loss to varying degrees, but they all had strong spirits and personalities that filled the story with joy and hope.I found myself wanting so desperately for all the good things to happen to the characters in this book and while the ending wasn't necessarily sad, it wasn't all HEA rainbows either. I don't think there's any possibility of walking away from a book like this feeling completely light-hearted but it's certainly an important read, and a powerful reminder of one of the world's most devastating periods of history that we should never forget. I'd highly recommend it for everyone!
    more
  • Paige Green
    January 1, 1970
    Disclaimer: I received this book from the publisher and fantastic flying book club! Thanks! All opinions are my own.Book: They Went LeftAuthor: Monica HesseBook Series: StandaloneDiversity: Jewish main characters!Rating: 5/5Publication Date: April 7, 2020Publisher: Little Brown Books for Young ReadersPages: 384Recommended Age: 16+ (romance, violence, death, TW for Holocaust mentioning)Synopsis: Germany, 1945. The soldiers who liberated the Gross-Rosen concentration camp said the war was over, Disclaimer: I received this book from the publisher and fantastic flying book club! Thanks! All opinions are my own.Book: They Went LeftAuthor: Monica HesseBook Series: StandaloneDiversity: Jewish main characters!Rating: 5/5Publication Date: April 7, 2020Publisher: Little Brown Books for Young ReadersPages: 384Recommended Age: 16+ (romance, violence, death, TW for Holocaust mentioning)Synopsis: Germany, 1945. The soldiers who liberated the Gross-Rosen concentration camp said the war was over, but nothing feels over to eighteen-year-old Zofia Lederman. Her body has barely begun to heal; her mind feels broken. And her life is completely shattered: Three years ago, she and her younger brother, Abek, were the only members of their family to be sent to the right, away from the gas chambers of Auschwitz-Birkenau. Everyone else--her parents, her grandmother, radiant Aunt Maja--they went left.Zofia's last words to her brother were a promise: Abek to Zofia, A to Z. When I find you again, we will fill our alphabet. Now her journey to fulfill that vow takes her through Poland and Germany, and into a displaced persons camp where everyone she meets is trying to piece together a future from a painful past: Miriam, desperately searching for the twin she was separated from after they survived medical experimentation. Breine, a former heiress, who now longs only for a simple wedding with her new fiancé. And Josef, who guards his past behind a wall of secrets, and is beautiful and strange and magnetic all at once.But the deeper Zofia digs, the more impossible her search seems. How can she find one boy in a sea of the missing? In the rubble of a broken continent, Zofia must delve into a mystery whose answers could break her--or help her rebuild her world.Review: This book is equal parts heartbreaking and equal parts inspiring. The character development is amazing, I absolutely loved our main character and I loved how she wasn't cookie cutter, she had flaws as well. I loved the world building, it's hard to realize how devastating a place can be after a war. I am fortunate enough to not live with destruction like that and to see life go on as normal. I think books like this are very important because we only learn about the during and we don't get to hear a lot about the after.However, I did think the pacing was hit or miss. Sometimes we were sailing through and others we were at a standstill. Verdict: a marvelous book! Definitely recommend!
    more
  • Chelsea
    January 1, 1970
    Thank you to TheNOVL for sending me an Advanced Reader's Copy (ARC) in exchange for review. All opinions are my own, as usual.4.75 stars"We must love the people in front of us."They Went Left by Monica Hesse is a thought-provoking novel about the impact World War II had on people. This story revolves around Zofia, an 18-year-old girl who is looking for her lost brother Abek. She struggles with many severe forms of PTSD due to her years in camps, so be aware of that going into this. Throughout Thank you to TheNOVL for sending me an Advanced Reader's Copy (ARC) in exchange for review. All opinions are my own, as usual.4.75 stars"We must love the people in front of us."They Went Left by Monica Hesse is a thought-provoking novel about the impact World War II had on people. This story revolves around Zofia, an 18-year-old girl who is looking for her lost brother Abek. She struggles with many severe forms of PTSD due to her years in camps, so be aware of that going into this. Throughout her journey, Zofia meets many people, some who she doesn't even know the names of to others who she grows extremely close to. She learns how others have learned to look at the world since the end of the war. This allows for great character development from Zofia and the other side characters. I have never read a book focusing on the aftermath of WWII which I think is just as important and I think Monica Hesse expressed that really well through what the characters did and said. I would love to see a sequel to this to see how Zofia moves on and holds on to her different pasts. I recommend this to people looking for a different YA historical fiction that will touch your heart.
    more
  • Danielle Russell
    January 1, 1970
    They Went Left was so incredibly well done. Its heartbreakingly sad, but readers will walk away with a sense of hope in the end. Zofia promised her little brother Abek that when they find each other again, they would fill their alphabet. The author incorporated the Polish alphabet as chapter titles, which was a really great touch. Its apparent that a lot of research and respect went into creating this book. While it's a work of fiction, Monica Hesse used real people's first names for her They Went Left was so incredibly well done. Its heartbreakingly sad, but readers will walk away with a sense of hope in the end. Zofia promised her little brother Abek that when they find each other again, they would fill their alphabet. The author incorporated the Polish alphabet as chapter titles, which was a really great touch. Its apparent that a lot of research and respect went into creating this book. While it's a work of fiction, Monica Hesse used real people's first names for her characters, enhancing the authenticity of the story she was telling. I highly recommend this book... it's gut wrenching, but the story was so well written. Unlike a lot of books written in this time period, we follow the main character after the liberation of the camps. So far its my favorite book written in this time period.
    more
  • Kristel Villar
    January 1, 1970
    Actual rating: 3.5 starsIt's another Holocaust book that holds so much promise but fell short to my taste. You know that feeling of eating your favorite food that needs, say, more salt? That's what I felt after reading this book.It tells the story of Zofia and her journey to find her brother Abek after war has ended in Europe. I fell in love with the plot. I've read a lot of Holocoaust novels set during the war, but not so much about stories after. But Zofia's journey is not as promising as what Actual rating: 3.5 starsIt's another Holocaust book that holds so much promise but fell short to my taste. You know that feeling of eating your favorite food that needs, say, more salt? That's what I felt after reading this book.It tells the story of Zofia and her journey to find her brother Abek after war has ended in Europe. I fell in love with the plot. I've read a lot of Holocoaust novels set during the war, but not so much about stories after. But Zofia's journey is not as promising as what I was led to be. The narrative is bland, and some of the important characters that I'd love to get to know more just faded into the background (like Dima and Miriam). The romantic side overwhelmed what could have been a raw and authentic plot of the story (Zofia's journey of finding Abek), and I was presented with a cute, tolerable love story. The romance plot is predictable, the climax is underwhelming and overall, I felt short-changed. Still, I didn't regret reading it.
    more
  • Gail Nelson
    January 1, 1970
    4.5 stars. Beautifully written. Thought provoking Holocaust novel that takes place after the war...
  • Julie
    January 1, 1970
    In the aftermath of WWII, a Jewish survivor is searching for her one remaining family member: her brother Abek. But the trauma Zofia experienced leaves gaps in her memories, and shes not always certain whether her recollections really happened or are a figment of her imagination. After recuperating in a hospital, she goes to her hometown in Poland, hoping to rendezvous with Abek at their familys home. But Zofia is not patient enough to wait, so she proactively goes to a refugee camp to continue In the aftermath of WWII, a Jewish survivor is searching for her one remaining family member: her brother Abek. But the trauma Zofia experienced leaves gaps in her memories, and she’s not always certain whether her recollections really happened or are a figment of her imagination. After recuperating in a hospital, she goes to her hometown in Poland, hoping to rendezvous with Abek at their family’s home. But Zofia is not patient enough to wait, so she proactively goes to a refugee camp to continue her search for any information of Abek’s whereabouts. Along the way, she finds love, friendship, and hope, but she also discovers that happiness can bring betrayal.Zofia isn’t always the most likeable character because of her stubbornness, and her faulty memory also makes her an unreliable narrator. Despite these flaws, she is sympathetic, having lost her entire family to the gas chambers of Auschwitz and having barely survived the horrors of concentration camps. I also liked the peripheral characters in the refugee camp and their willingness to live life to its fullest, having experienced the worst deprivations during the war. This is a solid piece of historical fiction that will appeal not only to young readers, but anyone who enjoys a good survival story.I received a complimentary copy of this book via the Amazon Vine Program.
    more
  • Mary Lins
    January 1, 1970
    When I chose They Went Left, by Monica Hesse, from my Amazon Vine queue, I had no idea that it was categorized as Young Adult (YA). If I had, I probably wouldnt have chosen it, and that would have been a shame, because its a great piece of historical fiction; fast-paced, with interesting characters, and a compelling plot with a touch of suspense and twistiness in the mix! All while highlighting a crucial time AFTER WWII as the displaced people, particularly the Holocaust survivors, attempt to When I chose “They Went Left”, by Monica Hesse, from my Amazon Vine queue, I had no idea that it was categorized as Young Adult (YA). If I had, I probably wouldn’t have chosen it, and that would have been a shame, because it’s a great piece of historical fiction; fast-paced, with interesting characters, and a compelling plot with a touch of suspense and “twistiness” in the mix! All while highlighting a crucial time AFTER WWII as the displaced people, particularly the Holocaust survivors, attempt to find each other and find their new lives.Poland: the war is over, Zofia Lederman is eighteen, and recently liberated from Gross-Rosen by way of Auschwitz-Birkenau. She has barely gotten her strength back, and has a hefty case of what we now would call PTSD. (Her memory is faulty. Very. So we know up front that she is an unreliable narrator.) The last time Zofia saw her brother Abek, now twelve years old, was in the concentration camp, she promised him that she would find him after the war. Abek is her only living relative. With the aid of a Russian Red Army soldier, Dima, Zofia finds her way back to her family’s apartment expecting Abek to be there waiting. He’s not, and thus begins our heroine’s journey through post-war Germany to find him.I was especially interested in the way Zofia interacted with the two young male characters, Dima (the Red Army Soldier), and Josef, whom she meets in a survivor’s camp. Hesse does a remarkable job showing the nuances of these interactions; Dima sees himself as Zofia’s protector/rescuer, but Josef knows not to treat a woman who has survived the Nazi death camps as fragile being in need of protection. Their shared experiences inform their relationship from the beginning. I won’t spoil any of what happens on Zofia’s exhausting and often harrowing travels. Hesse has obviously researched this era well, for it is the details that she provides about the liberation of the camps, Nazi bookkeeping, the state of the country, particularly the railways, the pathos/guilt of the German people and the chaos of the displaced persons camps, which makes for informative and compelling reading. It is very easy to pick up this novel and lose oneself entirely to Zofia’s mental struggles, her bitter sorrows and her surprising joys…YA or not!
    more
  • Ana Lopes
    January 1, 1970
    A heartbreaking story about what happens after the end of a war. It is set in 1945, after the end of WWII, but I imagine similar things occur after any war. Quite descriptive and sad at times, They Went Left is a story of hope, resilience and love.Everyone should read this book, Lest we forget.
    more
  • Kim
    January 1, 1970
    I have read a lot of WWII historical fiction, but never one quite like this. This story takes place immediately after WWII in the chaos left behind. Zofia's need to find her brother, to make sense of the chaos not only in this new world, but in her mind made this book hard to put down. The book is both devastating and hopeful. I will be adding it to my list of WWII fiction favorites.
    more
  • Sheri woolman
    January 1, 1970
    I almost cant put into words how fantastic this book is. The rawness of what hell Zofia went through in the concentration camps and to survive. I have read a lot of historical fiction and never have I read about what happens after you survive Auschwitz. How the mind was broken, and trys to heal. Zofia is a 18 and trying to find her brother she is sure that he is alive and she desperately wants to find him. She takes matters into her own hands, because she is free again to do so, and goes across I almost can’t put into words how fantastic this book is. The rawness of what hell Zofia went through in the concentration camps and to survive. I have read a lot of historical fiction and never have I read about what happens after you survive Auschwitz. How the mind was broken, and try’s to heal. Zofia is a 18 and trying to find her brother she is sure that he is alive and she desperately wants to find him. She takes matters into her own hands, because she is free again to do so, and goes across the country searching for him and will stop at nothing to find him. The problem is that she has a hard time remember details of her last moments with him with so much death loss pain and torture parts of her time line are a blank. With what little details she has she finds helpful people along the way with stories like hers and small memories of a young boy like her brother that feeds her hope. This hope leads her to a camp for displaced people where she finally finds the beauty in life again with small love and meaning of work that feeds her soul. I will not give away the ending in this book but I encourage others to read it. To find out if she finds her brother if she finds life worth living and if she truly finds her mind.
    more
  • Munro's Kids
    January 1, 1970
    This is the first book I've been able to finish since going on mat leave, and holy crap, it's set an INCREDIBLY high standard for the next book I pick up!This book is heart wrenching, raw, and visceral in its telling of a teenage girl who has been liberated from a concentration camp at the end of WWII. Zofia has lost most of her family, but she hopes, almost beyond hope, that her brother Abek is still alive somewhere. She begins the overwhelming task of trying to be reunited with him. Zofia This is the first book I've been able to finish since going on mat leave, and holy crap, it's set an INCREDIBLY high standard for the next book I pick up!This book is heart wrenching, raw, and visceral in its telling of a teenage girl who has been liberated from a concentration camp at the end of WWII. Zofia has lost most of her family, but she hopes, almost beyond hope, that her brother Abek is still alive somewhere. She begins the overwhelming task of trying to be reunited with him. Zofia proves herself to be an unreliable narrator throughout the novel. Her mixed-up memories of events - and her awareness that her mental facilities are not strong - drives much of its tension and plot.This book is brutal. Midway through the novel Zofia finds herself in a displaced persons camp, where everyone has stories of death and cruelty, which are told in much detail. The atrocities of war are painstakingly unpacked and left on display. I felt uneasy, and at times sick to my stomach. This book is tiring to read, but not because it is poorly written. It is tiring to read because you feel Zofia's exhaustion over the near-impossible task of finding Abek. You feel the supporting characters' collective mourning and despair over what they have lost. The immediate postwar period is not often explored in YA literature, and certainly not in this way. There is no heroism in this novel. No soldiers happily reuniting with their sweethearts and settling into civilian life once again. This book is a dirge, a mourning song for the people who were freed from unthinkable conditions, and left to figure out how to live again.I would not recommend this for anyone under 16. It would also make a great read for adults who enjoy YA.
    more
  • Sarah Stone
    January 1, 1970
    They Went LeftBy Monica Hesse⭐⭐⭐⭐⭐/5✨Synopsis: Fans of The Blue Coat will be happy to know Hesse is back with another great WWII historic fiction novel. Zofia Lederman survived Gross-Rosen Concentration camp, but can she find her lost brother? As she trapezes across central Europe in search of Abek, Zofia lands a displaced persons camp in Germany where she meets others in search of lost relatives and hope for a new better life. Her search begins to seem insurmountable, will she ever find her They Went LeftBy Monica Hesse⭐⭐⭐⭐⭐/5✨Synopsis: Fans of The Blue Coat will be happy to know Hesse is back with another great WWII historic fiction novel. Zofia Lederman survived Gross-Rosen Concentration camp, but can she find her lost brother? As she trapezes across central Europe in search of Abek, Zofia lands a displaced persons camp in Germany where she meets others in search of lost relatives and hope for a new better life. Her search begins to seem insurmountable, will she ever find her brother? Hesse does a great job filling the pages with fast paced verbiage that makes “They Went Left” a quick and great read. It’s the perfect book for young adults looking for more information about post WWII Europe. Make sure to add it TBR list. “They Went Left” will be available April 20th at your local indie bookstore. ✨ Pros: Great post WWII Historic Fiction for Young Adults, great story✨ Cons: noneFavorite Quote:💬 “ ‘I told him I would find him.’ I explain. ‘The day I was separated from my brother, I said, we will meet in Sosnowiec. The very last day I saw him, I told him, if you’re not there, I will find you wherever you are.’ ”
    more
  • Monica (books_over_everything)
    January 1, 1970
    **Disclaimer: I was given a free e-ARC in exchange for an honest review from the publisher.**Title They Went LeftAuthor Monica HesseRelease Date April 7, 2020Publisher Little Brown Books for Young ReadersDescription from AmazonGermany, 1945. The soldiers who liberated the Gross-Rosen concentration camp said the war was over, but nothing feels over to eighteen-year-old Zofia Lederman. Her body has barely begun to heal; her mind feels broken. And her life is completely shattered: Three years ago, **Disclaimer: I was given a free e-ARC in exchange for an honest review from the publisher.**Title They Went LeftAuthor Monica HesseRelease Date April 7, 2020Publisher Little Brown Books for Young ReadersDescription from AmazonGermany, 1945. The soldiers who liberated the Gross-Rosen concentration camp said the war was over, but nothing feels over to eighteen-year-old Zofia Lederman. Her body has barely begun to heal; her mind feels broken. And her life is completely shattered: Three years ago, she and her younger brother, Abek, were the only members of their family to be sent to the right, away from the gas chambers of Auschwitz-Birkenau. Everyone else–her parents, her grandmother, radiant Aunt Maja–they went left.Zofia’s last words to her brother were a promise: Abek to Zofia, A to Z. When I find you again, we will fill our alphabet. Now her journey to fulfill that vow takes her through Poland and Germany, and into a displaced persons camp where everyone she meets is trying to piece together a future from a painful past: Miriam, desperately searching for the twin she was separated from after they survived medical experimentation. Breine, a former heiress, who now longs only for a simple wedding with her new fiancé. And Josef, who guards his past behind a wall of secrets, and is beautiful and strange and magnetic all at once.But the deeper Zofia digs, the more impossible her search seems. How can she find one boy in a sea of the missing? In the rubble of a broken continent, Zofia must delve into a mystery whose answers could break her–or help her rebuild her world.Initial ThoughtsI really enjoy historical fiction so this book sounded right up my alley. Also, major points for the author’s first name – I always want to support a fellow Monica. That aside, the synopsis of this story really spoke to me. I remember reading Night by Elie Wiesel in middle school and that book has stayed with me for close to 15 years (and I don’t think the emotions it stirred are going anywhere any time soon). The Holocaust is a subject not often touched upon in YA literature and I loved that this book was going to tackle such an emotional topic.Some Things I LikedThe chapter headers. I loved that the author literally led the reader through the entire alphabet. I also loved that it wasn’t the english alphabet (it was, but there were more letters). As Zofia remembered more of her story, I enjoyed learning my own alphabet of her life.No sugar coating. This book had some dark topics. But, they were the reality of the time period and situation. Monica Hesse did an excellent job of describing the horrors that Zofia and family experienced without making this book too graphic or morbid. She struck a perfect balance between accurate historical representation and writing for her audience, YA readers.The romance. Both Dima and Josef represented different aspects of romance, post-war, for Zofia and I loved the way both relationships developed.Zofia’s European travels. Once again, I commend the fact that this was not sugar coated in the least. Zofia’s journey was hard, and honestly, awful, in many ways. But, she persevered to find Abek. I really loved her strength of character as well as the descriptions of post-war Europe.Series ValueI would really enjoy more stories about these characters. Zofia’s journey in Canada would be a great story as well as her friends in their new home. I’d also like to see more about a certain character, no spoilers, who didn’t get a full ending (but I definitely saw why).Final ThoughtsThis book was different than anything else I had read this year. It was emotional, raw, and made me think about a time in history that I don’t reflect on often enough. It’s a must read for any fans of historical fiction.⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️Recommendations for Further ReadingThe Girls with No Names by Serena Burdick – if you liked the emotional, historical fiction aspects of this book, definitely try Serena Burdick’s latest release.Spectacle and Sensational by Jodie Lynn Zdrok – if you enjoyed the historical fiction aspects of this book but are looking for a bit of magic / fantasy, try this duology.
    more
  • Pavitra (For The Love of Fictional Worlds)
    January 1, 1970
    Also Posted on For The Love of Fictional Worlds Disclaimer: An eARC was provided via The Fantastic Flying Book Club and the Author as part of the Blog Tour. The Thoughts, opinions & feelings expressed in the review are therefore, my own. "Abek to Zokia" I told him. "A to Z" he said back. "When I find you again, we will find our alphabet. And we Will be whole, and everything will  be fine. I promise I will find you."There are so many books that chronicle the heartbreaking and absolutely Also Posted on For The Love of Fictional Worlds Disclaimer: An eARC was provided via The Fantastic Flying Book Club and the Author as part of the Blog Tour. The Thoughts, opinions & feelings expressed in the review are therefore, my own. "Abek to Zokia" I told him. "A to Z" he said back. "When I find you again, we will find our alphabet. And we Will be whole, and everything will  be fine. I promise I will find you."There are so many books that chronicle the heartbreaking and absolutely gut wrenching conditions of humans and what they did that made them into monsters; but I have rarely found any book that chronicles the journey AFTER the war ends (if you have any such recommendations, please do not hesitate to comment/message/email me about it!).Zofia Lederman is a young girl recently liberated from the concentration camps in Germany when the WWII ended - and the only thing that's on her mind is to find her younger brother, Abek Lederman.Zofia and Abek were separated when Abek was 12 years old, when theirs and other Jews were being separated by the Nazis to be sent to different camps. It  was the promise that she made to her brother that keeps Zofia going, during and then after the war ends!With the help of a Russian Soldier, Dima; who fancies himself as her protector, she travels back to their family home, where she expects her brother to be waiting for her. And is absolutely heartbroken when that hope shatters when she finds her family apartment desolate and sans her brother!It's easy to see that the author has actually done her research well - not just into the places and timeline; but also on the psyche of the humans and the condition of the country after their whole world is turned upside down - and this, while absolutely commendable does tend to work into the narration of the plot; more than it was needed. Zofia, with her mental issues, is a protagonist whose version of the past and the present, in fact cannot be trusted; but her emotional affect just practically leaps out of the pages! And it is THAT reason why, if you are a fan of this genre; then you definitely NEED to pick up this book!  For more reviews visit For The Love of Fictional Worlds :)Do come join us at For The Fictional Worlds Facebook Page | Twitter | Instagram  | Goodreads  | Amazon |
    more
  • Aria
    January 1, 1970
    full review on my blogThey Went LeftAuthor: Monica HessePublisher: Little, Brown Books for Young ReadersRelease Date: April 7th 2020Genre: Young Adult, Historical FictionI received an e-arc via the Fantastic Flying Book Club and the publisher in exchange for an honest review. This does not affect my opinion in any way.This book is amazing. Incredible. Fantastic. Astounding. Heartbreaking, but still remarkable. Really. They Went Left, by Monica Hesse is one of the best books that I have ever full review on my blogThey Went LeftAuthor: Monica HessePublisher: Little, Brown Books for Young ReadersRelease Date: April 7th 2020Genre: Young Adult, Historical FictionI received an e-arc via the Fantastic Flying Book Club and the publisher in exchange for an honest review. This does not affect my opinion in any way.This book is amazing. Incredible. Fantastic. Astounding. Heartbreaking, but still remarkable. Really. They Went Left, by Monica Hesse is one of the best books that I have ever read. The plot: I have read a lot of books about world war two, and the holocaust, and they all take place during the war. Every single one. They Went Left shows that while the war officially ended in September 2, 1945, the horrors did not go away. Jews that had survived the camps returned to find their homes taken over, or destroyed, and returned to find themselves alone, the rest of their family killed, or that they’d been separated.The entire premise for this book was enough to pull me in, and once I’d started the book, I couldn’t stop reading until I’d finished. The plot was so interesting, and complicated, and I could never have imagined how the story would end, and definitely not how it would get to the ending. It wasn’t a book where less than halfway through I’m like; oh, I know whats going to happen, then at the end, I’m like ‘called it’.This book was more of a ‘what in the world just happened there, and how could the author do this to me and make me suffer such pain on the way to the ending’. In a good way, of course. The writing: The dialogue, the description, the structure in this book, is, incredibly done. When I was reading the book, I felt like I was literally there with the characters, and that I knew them, and that I was witnessing the events in person.Reading a book where the writing is that good is an incredible experience, and just overall fantastic. I felt as if I was was really experiencing and feeling all of Zofia’s adventures, hopes, and dreams as if they were my own. The characters: Abek to Zofia, A to Z, and every person in between, amazing. Zofia especially was an incredible character to read about. Zofia is the narrator throughout this book, and is somewhat unreliable. A survivor of unimaginable horrors, all she wants to do is find her brother, and it is really interesting to see how her character changes and develops throughout the book, while her main goal stays the same.Have you ever read a book where you by the end feel really connected to the main character? Or three of them? In They Went Left, you are introduced to so many new characters, and they are marvelously detailed and described.Overall, I loved this book. I am so happy that I was able to read an advance reader copy, because it is an amazing work of historical fiction, and I definitely recommend it.It’s definitely not a light and fluffy novel, however, it is a hopeful novel, and one that is really incredible to read.My rating: ★★★★★Recommendable: YesI received an e-arc via the Fantastic Flying Book Club and the publisher in exchange for an honest review. This does not affect my opinion in any way.
    more
  • Kathy
    January 1, 1970
    I admit, Im not exactly in the right mood for Holocaust fiction at this point in 2020, but I went into this book for a specific reason: I wanted something hopeful. Something about finding light at the end of a tunnel and holding onto it, despite how easier it might be to turn and walk right back in. Nothing blindingly happy. Just reaffirming.And thats what I got. A story set right after the end of WW2, during its first few months of tentative chaos, with people trying to pick up the pieces of I admit, I’m not exactly in the right mood for Holocaust fiction at this point in 2020, but I went into this book for a specific reason: I wanted something hopeful. Something about finding light at the end of a tunnel and holding onto it, despite how easier it might be to turn and walk right back in. Nothing blindingly happy. Just reaffirming.And that’s what I got. A story set right after the end of WW2, during its first few months of tentative chaos, with people trying to pick up the pieces of their lives. It’s not a healing story, exactly, but it is a story about healing and the complications that come with such a journey. Zofia's mental state--her looping thoughts and fears, her gaps in memory, her disassociation-- are presented with such great care and lyricism. There just aren't a lot of WW2 stories out there that focus on the camp survivors after they're liberated, and I really appreciate Hesse for shining a light on the topic. Because while there's strength in surviving, I think there's even greater strength in living. In moving forward with your life, carrying all the horrors you experienced, and choosing to embrace love and laughter in spite of the pain. It's a kind of courage that deserves to be highlighted more in narratives. "Today I am choosing to love the person in front of me. Do you understand? Because he's here, I'm here, and we're ready to not be lonely together."I was also anticipating a good mystery, though (I mean, the blurbs and synopsis lean heavily on it) but that I didn't get at all. What little mystery there is predictable and rushed and its conclusion left me feeling underwhelmed. And "rushed" is more or less my biggest complaint about the whole thing. The story throws a handful of plot threads at you--a slice-of-life story focusing on the refugees in the displaced person camp; a romantic subplot between Zofia and Josef; a search for Zofia's brother--and while their skeletal structure is interesting, the execution needs a lot more fleshing out. More development of the characters at the camp, better exploration of the romance.Right now it feels more like an abridged book, and while I really liked the prose and the themes presented, I can't help but dream longingly for the unabridged version that never existed.~Review copy provided by the publisher in exchange for an honest review
    more
  • Nicole Dunton
    January 1, 1970
    The war may be over, but for many people, the war still haunts them. Zofia Lederman's body has begun healing. She worries that her mind will never heal. She feels that her life is shattered and doesn't feel she is qualified to pick up the pieces. Her brother is missing. She has no idea where to begin finding him. Journeying out on her own to find him, she soon discovers that just because the war is over doesn't mean that the hate and discrimination is. She also discovers that she is not the only The war may be over, but for many people, the war still haunts them. Zofia Lederman's body has begun healing. She worries that her mind will never heal. She feels that her life is shattered and doesn't feel she is qualified to pick up the pieces. Her brother is missing. She has no idea where to begin finding him. Journeying out on her own to find him, she soon discovers that just because the war is over doesn't mean that the hate and discrimination is. She also discovers that she is not the only one suffering and looking for loved ones. I want to start by saying that this is not a book to pick up if you're looking for a light-hearted and fluffy read. It's very intense. It's deep. It's a book that has the power to stick with you and truly makes you think of how things were for Jews back then. Most people think that just because the war was over that everybody got a happily ever after. That's very far from the truth. This book demonstrates that. It's dramatic. It's raw. It's true. It's captivating and well worth the read.I read somewhere a criticism that Zofia was a very unreliable narrator. I disagree with this statement for the grounds that it's written from her point of view. It wouldn't be authentic if you weren't following the story as if you were her. I do want to say that I'd of liked to see another point of view here. Or maybe flashbacks splashed in for context. I really enjoyed hearing Zofia's story. Don't get me wrong. I just wish that some things were from another perspective. Other than that, I can't think of anything I disliked about this book. This book is narrated by Caitlin Davies. She did a beautiful job. I'm curious to know how many times she had to set it aside because the emotions were so overwhelming. She really stepped into Zofia's role. She became Zofia so much. It made the story even more intense and emotional than it already was. I feel like it connected me to the story. Well more so than I already was. I really enjoyed this story so much. It really hit me in the feels so much. I know that this will be a book that sticks with me for a long time. I'll most likely end up reading it a few more times as well. This book is very deep and thought-provoking. It inspires you to truly think and experience how life was like for those who survived. It also shows that there will always be tragedy and fortune. Sometimes they interconnect so much that it's hard to fully see what's what. I whole-heartedly recommend this novel.
    more
Write a review