I Dream of a Journey
Akiko Miyakoshi's picture book explores how an innkeeper who spends his days at the crossroads of others' journeys secretly longs to have adventures of his own.People from all over the world come and go at the innkeeper's little hotel. He enjoys meeting them, and many even become his friends. Only, sometimes, when he goes to sleep at night, the desire to travel far away himself wells up inside him. He dreams of packing a big bag and journeying wherever he pleases, from one unfamiliar town to another. He imagines stopping to visit friends and having wonderful and unexpected experiences. The innkeeper continues to go about his daily routine at his hotel, but, someday, he is sure, he will explore the world.

I Dream of a Journey Details

TitleI Dream of a Journey
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseMar 3rd, 2020
PublisherKids Can Press
ISBN-139781525304781
Rating
GenreChildrens, Picture Books, Travel, Animals

I Dream of a Journey Review

  • PattyMacDotComma
    January 1, 1970
    4★In my dreams, I set off on a journey.With a big suitcase.Ah, the dream of so many people as I read this during the worlds Covid 19 pandemic when travel is the stuff of memories! This is an attractive Japanese production with an interesting mix of black and white (real life) and colour (dreams and postcards sent by travellers).Our dreamer runs the Solitude Hotel (if Im reading the sign correctly!), which leads me to believe its a quiet, peaceful place.Check-in at the hotelThere are visitors 4★“In my dreams, I set off on a journey.With a big suitcase.”Ah, the dream of so many people as I read this during the world’s Covid 19 pandemic when travel is the stuff of memories! This is an attractive Japanese production with an interesting mix of black and white (real life) and colour (dreams and postcards sent by travellers).Our dreamer runs the Solitude Hotel (if I’m reading the sign correctly!), which leads me to believe it’s a quiet, peaceful place.Check-in at the hotelThere are visitors from all over the world, and obviously from all walks of life (and species).He and the visitors swap stories about their homes.But he dreams of travelling the world . . . with his big suitcase, of course!He plans to roam freely, wherever he wants.Maybe all of his new friends would invite him to visit them for a change!He imagines a bright, happy picnic with all of his old hotel guests.He does consider whether or not he would get homesick, as many people do.He wanders alone on a deserted, windswept beach.Meanwhile, still at home, he pores over the letters and photos and cards from all of the people who have stayed at his hotel and become his friends. You can see the different languages and designs, and the bright colours indicate to me that they are what have put the colour and the yearning into his dreams. His correspondents send him news from everywhere.He continues to dream, but he’s starting to sound pretty serious now.“I’ve never been anywhere but this little town. And yet ... One day I might just set off on a journey.”There are so many people at the moment who are having these same dreams, I’m sure. I’ve admired Miyakoshi’s illustrations before, in The Piano Recital (which I reviewed and also included some illustrations: https://www.goodreads.com/review/show...). I particularly like that using animals helps to make this a universal story of acceptance and inclusion and friendship that knows no borders. Thanks to NetGalley and Kids Can Press for the review copy from which I’ve copied some illustrations, all the better to show off the author’s talents.
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  • Toni
    January 1, 1970
    This is my second book by Akiko Myakoshi and I expected charming dreamlike illustrations in her trademark style and a gentle subtle story. The book didn't disappoint -it is beautiful and evocative.The protagonist of the book, the owner of a place aptly named The Solitude Hotel, likes his job of welcoming guests from all over the world. He likes making them feel comfortable and telling them the stories of his little town. But at night he enters a different world, the world where he is a brave This is my second book by Akiko Myakoshi and I expected charming dreamlike illustrations in her trademark style and a gentle subtle story. The book didn't disappoint -it is beautiful and evocative.The protagonist of the book, the owner of a place aptly named The Solitude Hotel, likes his job of welcoming guests from all over the world. He likes making them feel comfortable and telling them the stories of his little town. But at night he enters a different world, the world where he is a brave traveller and explorer of unknown places, full of joy and happiness for seeing his old friends and amazing landscapes, cherishing these special moments and being ready for unexpected. The contrast between soft black and white of his daily routine and soft and pastel colours of his dreams is stunning. It is as if his dreams are full of sunshine and are glowing from within. The room where he keeps notes and postcards from his friends seems to be the only colourful place in his hotel. It is the place that is singing with possibility and opportunity, and it is important for both children and adults to think big and reach in their imagination to far away countries where things are different from our usual daily life. Will he ever pack his suitcase and set off on a journey? I believe so. In the last sequence the colours are back to black and white, but he is travelling, so perhaps he is closer now to making these dreams reality.Thank you to NetGalley and Kids Can Press for the ARC provided in exchange for an honest opinion
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  • La Coccinelle
    January 1, 1970
    I went into this book with fairly high expectations, given that I've enjoyed the other books I've read by this author. Sadly, I Dream of a Journey just didn't work that well for me. It seems to lack the magic of The Piano Recital and The Tea Party in the Woods that so intrigued me when I read those books. In contrast, I Dream of a Journey seems more like a lament for adults, with a main character dreaming of the day he can leave his responsibilities behind and live the life he truly dreams I went into this book with fairly high expectations, given that I've enjoyed the other books I've read by this author. Sadly, I Dream of a Journey just didn't work that well for me. It seems to lack the magic of The Piano Recital and The Tea Party in the Woods that so intrigued me when I read those books. In contrast, I Dream of a Journey seems more like a lament for adults, with a main character dreaming of the day he can leave his responsibilities behind and live the life he truly dreams of. I'm not sure how well that message is going to resonate with kids.The illustrations are interesting, with black-and-white drawings of the innkeeper's everyday life contrasting with colourful dream sequences. Various anthropomorphized animals make up the cast of characters. The pictures have a certain charm, and will likely appeal to Miyakoshi's fans.But the story is just a little too melancholy and... well, mature. It seems to be more about missed opportunities, regrets, and living vicariously through those around us. While the book does end on a hopeful note, the whole tone of the story seems just a little too gloomy and adult for the intended audience.Thank you to NetGalley and Kids Can Press for providing a digital ARC.
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  • Ivonne Rovira
    January 1, 1970
    One day, I might just set off on a journey.The innkeeper (a badger?) of The Solitude Hotel greets travelers day in and day out, yet has never traveled himself. But does he dream of visiting the former guests who send him postcards and letters from their current travels! Of taking an airplane, a car, a train, even a bicycle and seeing the sights! Will our narrator take that final step?The pictures whether the black-and-white illustrations of the innkeepers workaday life or the dreamy pastels of “One day, I might just set off on a journey.”The innkeeper (a badger?) of The Solitude Hotel greets travelers day in and day out, yet has never traveled himself. But does he dream of visiting the former guests who send him postcards and letters from their current travels! Of taking an airplane, a car, a train, even a bicycle and seeing the sights! Will our narrator take that final step?The pictures — whether the black-and-white illustrations of the innkeeper’s workaday life or the dreamy pastels of his travel dreams and daydreams — will prove more attractive to adults than to the children to whom they read. And that’s absolutely all right. I enjoyed this wistful book about the importance of keeping your possibilities open.In the interest of full disclosure, I received this book from NetGalley and Kids Can Press in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Rebecca Reviews
    January 1, 1970
    Akiko Miyakoshis I Dream of a Journey is a lovely story with beautiful illustrations. I enjoyed the gentle pace but I would have liked a bit more substance to the story. While children will enjoy the pretty drawings and cute animal characters, I believe the book has a greater appeal to adults because of its nostalgic sentiments and melancholic tone.Our protagonist is a lonely hotelkeeper who runs a small hotel. People from all over the world come to visit his hotel. Many visitors even become his Akiko Miyakoshi’s I Dream of a Journey is a lovely story with beautiful illustrations. I enjoyed the gentle pace but I would have liked a bit more substance to the story. While children will enjoy the pretty drawings and cute animal characters, I believe the book has a greater appeal to adults because of its nostalgic sentiments and melancholic tone.Our protagonist is a lonely hotelkeeper who runs a small hotel. People from all over the world come to visit his hotel. Many visitors even become his friends. However, he has never left his little town. At night, he dreams of traveling the world. He imagines going to visit the friends and guests who have stayed at his hotel over the years. Will the hotelkeeper stick to his usual routine? Or will he step out of his comfort zone and go see the world? Miyakoshi’s soft and lovely illustrations are my favourite part of this book. They are so well-done and pretty! I like the colour contrast between the black-and-whiteness of the hotelkeeper’s daily life and the gentle colours of his travel-filled dreams. I especially like that the characters are all adorably drawn animals! This is a very quiet and slow-paced story. I enjoyed this book and I can see myself returning to it again and again. However, I wish the story had a little more substance or action. But, I like that there isn’t a definitive ending or answer. I also like that the book encourages reflection with regards to the longing for adventure and the dedication to the comforting familiar. However, I’m not sure if there is enough in this book to hold very young readers’ attention. Moreover, the themes like longing and wanderlust as well as the book’s melancholic mood seem too mature for younger readers. I believe the book will be more suitable for older children and will definitely resonate with adults who have more life experience. I Dream of a Journey is a lovely and moving picture book with beautiful illustrations. While I think this book is better suited for adults than for children, it will be a great addition to any collection. I will definitely purchase this and I can’t wait to read more of Miyakoshi’s work!Thank you to NetGalley and Kids Can Press for this book in exchange for an honest review.✈️✈️✈️✈️ out of 5 planes!
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  • Etienne
    January 1, 1970
    A children book not much for children. It's a very pretty books, original and has a lot of melancholy both in the arts and story, but I'm unsure how children would react to it. The story, the subject, in my opinion would resonate a lot more in an adult head, with the idea of following your dream and stop pushing them further into the future. Even if the targeted readers is unclear to me, this is definitely a book worth reading!
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  • Natalie
    January 1, 1970
    I received an advanced reader copy of this book to read in exchange for an honest review via netgalley and the publishers.This is a beautifully illustrated book about a hotel owner who has visitors to their hotel day in and day out, but never gets to visit new and exciting places themselves. This book is great however I'm not too sure if a child would enjoy it very much as the book fell abit flat for me which I was disapointed in with such beautiful artwork throughout it.
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  • Pop Bop
    January 1, 1970
    May Be A Bit Hard to Relate ToI am a big fan of Akiko Miyakoshi's work, and this one has much to recommend it. But, of all the Miyakoshi books I know it seems to me that this one might be a bit of a challenge in terms of getting a kid reader to invest in it."The Tea Party in the Woods" is a gentle tale of a genial gathering of animal friends, and its message is warm and clear. "The Storm" addresses a kid's disappointment over a rained-out beach holiday. "The Way Home in the Night" follows baby May Be A Bit Hard to Relate ToI am a big fan of Akiko Miyakoshi's work, and this one has much to recommend it. But, of all the Miyakoshi books I know it seems to me that this one might be a bit of a challenge in terms of getting a kid reader to invest in it."The Tea Party in the Woods" is a gentle tale of a genial gathering of animal friends, and its message is warm and clear. "The Storm" addresses a kid's disappointment over a rained-out beach holiday. "The Way Home in the Night" follows baby bunny's thoughts as Mom carries her home through their neighborhood, in the dark. All of these resonated with little readers and read-tos.But "I Dream of a Journey" is about the wistful longing of an adult for travel and adventure. Ironically, our hero runs a small hotel and so his days are filled with travelers as they come and go. He pines over postcards and daydreams about how wonderful his journeys would be. The book is sweet and big-hearted, but it has an edge and a touch of bittersweet melancholy. In the right mood I'm always up for some muted, pastel, dreamy reflection, but I'm not sure that's what I want at bedtime or read-with-me time. And while the art certainly complements and advances the story and the mood the author wants to convey, drawings of a sad character standing behind a hotel registration desk might be a hard sell. (I note that even the publisher's blurb notes that this book might be likely to resonate with adults.)So, this is a touching, thoughtful, and gentle book about wanderlust and roads not taken. Where it goes on the shelf, though, is a different matter.(Please note that I received a free advance will-self-destruct-in-x-days Adobe Digital copy of this book without a review requirement, or any influence regarding review content should I choose to post a review. Apart from that I have no connection at all to either the author or the publisher of this book.)
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  • Andrea Pole
    January 1, 1970
    I Dream of a Journey by Akiko Miyakoshi is a gem of a book that will resonate with adult readers every bit as much as it will with children. This is a story about longing, and finding the courage within yourself to leave what is comfortable in search of new and exciting possibilities. The use of black and white to illustrate the familiar, and vibrant hues to represent adventure is truly inspired and most impactful. I would highly recommend this book to anyone.Many thanks to NetGalley and Kids I Dream of a Journey by Akiko Miyakoshi is a gem of a book that will resonate with adult readers every bit as much as it will with children. This is a story about longing, and finding the courage within yourself to leave what is comfortable in search of new and exciting possibilities. The use of black and white to illustrate the familiar, and vibrant hues to represent adventure is truly inspired and most impactful. I would highly recommend this book to anyone.Many thanks to NetGalley and Kids Can Press for this ARC.
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  • Leah Horton
    January 1, 1970
    I love the soft colors in the illustrations. The contrast between the innkeepers dreams and his awake states is beautiful with the monotone daytime and the colorful dreams.The writing is simple and sweet. This innkeeper travels vicariously through his friends and guests. I thought it was beautiful the way he travels. This longing he has for far away places is a bit sad, but the opportunity is there and thats so wonderful. I love the soft colors in the illustrations. The contrast between the innkeepers dreams and his awake states is beautiful with the monotone daytime and the colorful dreams.The writing is simple and sweet. This innkeeper travels vicariously through his friends and guests. I thought it was beautiful the way he travels. This longing he has for far away places is a bit sad, but the opportunity is there and that’s so wonderful.
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  • Jennifer (JenIsNotaBookSnob)
    January 1, 1970
    Very pretty- the story doesn't go anywhere in particular as it's mostly a dream/daydream. The main character owns a hotel and has welcomed guests for years- but daydreams about going to some of the places they are from. But, that's all it is, the book ends with the character still working at his hotel. Maybe that's a bit dark- but, many of us just don't get to travel that much and instead have to read about traveling or hear about it from someone else and live vicariously. The hotel keeper has Very pretty- the story doesn't go anywhere in particular as it's mostly a dream/daydream. The main character owns a hotel and has welcomed guests for years- but daydreams about going to some of the places they are from. But, that's all it is, the book ends with the character still working at his hotel. Maybe that's a bit dark- but, many of us just don't get to travel that much and instead have to read about traveling or hear about it from someone else and live vicariously. The hotel keeper has no concrete plans to travel, just a loose dream about something they might do one day. You know, the dream of someone who knows they likely never actually will get to. I liked it quite a bit, not sure of the kid appeal. But, it is very pretty and manages to convey a lot in few lines which is the magic of a good picture book.
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  • Amit Verma
    January 1, 1970
    .It is a small cute fable.Jewelled with wonderful art it, soaks right to the heart of the reader.It is simple but still so deeply moving.It is about a devoted workoholic who visits places in dreams as he interacts with guests in his lodge who come from all over the world.He longs to travel to distant lands but can't escape his duties.Artwork is exceptional. It is soothing for both mind and eyes.It is drawn in both colored panels and black and white panels.I enjoyed story very much and read it to .It is a small cute fable.Jewelled with wonderful art it, soaks right to the heart of the reader.It is simple but still so deeply moving.It is about a devoted workoholic who visits places in dreams as he interacts with guests in his lodge who come from all over the world.He longs to travel to distant lands but can't escape his duties.Artwork is exceptional. It is soothing for both mind and eyes.It is drawn in both colored panels and black and white panels.I enjoyed story very much and read it to my son at bed time.He loved it.Best quality of the book is its simplicity. It is very great effort to simplify things even if it is only an art work.I recommend it to everyone.Thanks edelweiss plus and publisher for review copy.
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  • Andrew
    January 1, 1970
    There is something truly special about Miyakoshi's picture books in several ways that stand out from the rest. In I Dream of a Journey, she shows off her artistic brilliance in illustrations that depict the nightly travels that a critter dreams every night after working all day at their hotel. These pictures are quite literally dreamlike-- and the variety of color schemes that work with the aesthetic of each place portrayed, even the black and white drawings from everyday hotel life. I Dream of There is something truly special about Miyakoshi's picture books in several ways that stand out from the rest. In I Dream of a Journey, she shows off her artistic brilliance in illustrations that depict the nightly travels that a critter dreams every night after working all day at their hotel. These pictures are quite literally dreamlike-- and the variety of color schemes that work with the aesthetic of each place portrayed, even the black and white drawings from everyday hotel life. I Dream of a Journey brings new life to the everyday wishes of going on an adventure.
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  • Wayne McCoy
    January 1, 1970
    'I Dream of a Journey' with story and art by Akiko Miyakoshi is a picture book about a hotel owner who travels vicariously.The Innkeeper has guests from all over the world. They tell him stories and send him postcards, and someday he wants to go too. So badly that he dreams about it.I'm a big fan of Akiko Miyakoshi's thoughtful picture books. They express feelings that children have, but may not be expressed in other books, and they have quiet, introspective pictures and moments. The pictures 'I Dream of a Journey' with story and art by Akiko Miyakoshi is a picture book about a hotel owner who travels vicariously.The Innkeeper has guests from all over the world. They tell him stories and send him postcards, and someday he wants to go too. So badly that he dreams about it.I'm a big fan of Akiko Miyakoshi's thoughtful picture books. They express feelings that children have, but may not be expressed in other books, and they have quiet, introspective pictures and moments. The pictures are melancholy and beautiful. I received a review copy of this ebook from Kids Can Press in exchange for an honest review. Thank you for allowing me to review this ebook.
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  • Joy
    January 1, 1970
    Wow. Even as an adult I can empathise with the hotel keeper and his quiet wonder and yearning to explore the world. This is a simple story, yet it holds such a dreamy atmosphere.I loved how the strong contrast of colours in the illustrationwhere at home, in his hotel, the colours are in greyscale yet closed-off and full of routine but out in the world, its full of colour and the scenes are open and free. Although this book has a bit of a melancholic feel to it, its also full of wonder and hope. Wow. Even as an adult I can empathise with the hotel keeper and his quiet wonder and yearning to explore the world. This is a simple story, yet it holds such a dreamy atmosphere.I loved how the strong contrast of colours in the illustration—where at home, in his hotel, the colours are in greyscale yet closed-off and full of routine but out in the world, it’s full of colour and the scenes are open and free. Although this book has a bit of a melancholic feel to it, it’s also full of wonder and hope. I’d recommend having an adult read this book to a child. Thank you to NetGalley and the publisher for a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Amy
    January 1, 1970
    I. Love. This. Book. I was taken in from the first illustration and could not read this fast enough. I devoted the book visually, and then went back through to take in the story of a hotelier who dreams of his own one day travels, but finds the beauty in his current day existence as well. There are fabulous lessons to be taken in related to persistence, ambition, mindfulness, and goal-setting. This book is going to be a go-to gift for quite some time.This book was received as a digital ARC I. Love. This. Book. I was taken in from the first illustration and could not read this fast enough. I devoted the book visually, and then went back through to take in the story of a hotelier who dreams of his own one day travels, but finds the beauty in his current day existence as well. There are fabulous lessons to be taken in related to persistence, ambition, mindfulness, and goal-setting. This book is going to be a go-to gift for quite some time.This book was received as a digital ARC through NetGalley in return for a fair and honest review.
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  • Jana
    January 1, 1970
    We're over a month into our social-distancing Stay Home orders, and I'm pretty sure lots of readers will be able to relate to hotelkeeper's dreams of traveling to distant lands and meeting new and interesting people. The hotel receives guests from all over the world, and the hotelkeeper hears all of his guests stories. He longs to get on an airplane and visit his friends across the globe. This could inspire young writers to share their own dreams of travel and visiting new places.
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  • Victoria
    January 1, 1970
    'I Dream of a Journey,' is beautiful. The artwork evokes deep emotion. t. It is really lovely. That being said, the art, when combined with the text, is sad. It hits a lot of emotional buttons for adults - how they choose to spend their lives, living vicariously through others, playing the hand you are dealt, and so on. While packaged for children I would not share this book with a child. However, I love the artwork and would definitely look for other titles by this author/ illustrator.
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  • That One Librarian
    January 1, 1970
    This quiet, lovely picture book strikes a delicate balance between nostalgia in adult readers and curiosity in the young. A simple story about wondering inspires both wanderlust and appreciation for home and friends. A lovely gift for travelers, or for a quiet bedtime story. Beautiful and delightful.l
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  • Aliza Werner
    January 1, 1970
    Soft, dreamy, nostalgic illustrations accompany an inner monologue. This is not a story about something that happens, its about what could happen. I absolutely love quiet stories like this. Blurred lines between asleep and awake, pondering, deceptively simple. Soft, dreamy, nostalgic illustrations accompany an inner monologue. This is not a story about something that happens, it’s about what could happen. I absolutely love quiet stories like this. Blurred lines between asleep and awake, pondering, deceptively simple.
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  • Colleen Obrien
    January 1, 1970
    In the beginning of the book, the illustrations are black and white. When the hotel-keeper begins to talk about his journey, the illustrations change into color. Changing the color of the illustrations changes the dynamic of the book, as if to present hope and dreams to come ahead during the duration of the colored illustrations, and gloom and longing as it goes back to black and white.It leaves the ending up to the readers imagination. The illustrations add tremendously to the story.
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  • Becky B
    January 1, 1970
    An inn keeper who has welcomed guests from near and far for years shares how he secretly wishes to travel too.This story just shares the inn keepers dreams, it doesnt tell you what happens. That part is left up to you. Does the inn keeper get to fulfill his dreams? Are they everything he hoped for? Or does he find treasures in staying where he is? Your imagination gets to fill in the gaps, so it lends itself well to being a creative writing prompt. As always, Akiko Miyakoshis illustrations are An inn keeper who has welcomed guests from near and far for years shares how he secretly wishes to travel too.This story just shares the inn keeper’s dreams, it doesn’t tell you what happens. That part is left up to you. Does the inn keeper get to fulfill his dreams? Are they everything he hoped for? Or does he find treasures in staying where he is? Your imagination gets to fill in the gaps, so it lends itself well to being a creative writing prompt. As always, Akiko Miyakoshi’s illustrations are amazing. I added a star for the art. The anthropomorphic animal characters look like they’d feel soft, the landscapes are stunning, and the hotel looks whimsical. Recommended for fans of stories with open endings, those who dream of travel, and animal lovers.I received an ARC of this title from the publisher through NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.
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  • SpoonfulofHygge
    January 1, 1970
    Disclaimer: I received an e-ARC of this book by Netgalley and Kids Can Press in return for an honest review.I was deeply moved by this story. There was a certain melancholy in both illustrations and prose. A book that must be read by kids and adults alike. I am against the notion that kids books should only be happy and positive as I feel that they are better off exploring all emotions good and bad!I highly recommend this one and I would love to purchase a physical copy of this book. Beautiful 5 Disclaimer: I received an e-ARC of this book by Netgalley and Kids Can Press in return for an honest review.I was deeply moved by this story. There was a certain melancholy in both illustrations and prose. A book that must be read by kids and adults alike. I am against the notion that kids books should only be happy and positive as I feel that they are better off exploring all emotions good and bad!I highly recommend this one and I would love to purchase a physical copy of this book. Beautiful 5 star read for me!#Netgalley #KidsCanPress #idreamofajourney #AkikoMiyakoshi
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  • Jason
    January 1, 1970
    Definitely for niche audiences. the picture are amazing and the content is not entirely inaccessible, but the story's sentiments may be somewhat mysterious for younger readers. That said, Miyakoshi leaves in plenty of room for wonder.
  • Edward Sullivan
    January 1, 1970
    An enchanting, evocative picture book with a lovely touch of melacholy.
  • Jessica Gard
    January 1, 1970
    Akiko Miyakoshi is not only a wonderful writer, but a stunningly beautiful illustrator as well. I loved this story of a hotel keeper who dreams of one day traveling and making his own storied adventures. The color changes throughout are truly lovely, and I found myself incredibly touched by the hotelkeeper's hopes and dreams.Thank you so much to Netgalley and Kids Can Press for the opportunity to read this title in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Laura
    January 1, 1970
    Beautiful and dreamy, the illustrations remind me some of Chris Van Allsburg. I'm not sure of the appeal to kids, at least young ones, my daughter got pretty quickly distracted, although the slightly sleepy tone might be good for right before bedtime. I, on the other hand, loved it. There's such longing and melancholy here. I loved that it wasn't a 'lesson' book, there was no easy answer, either "yes go out and travel" or "be happy with what you have here at home", it was more of a journey into Beautiful and dreamy, the illustrations remind me some of Chris Van Allsburg. I'm not sure of the appeal to kids, at least young ones, my daughter got pretty quickly distracted, although the slightly sleepy tone might be good for right before bedtime. I, on the other hand, loved it. There's such longing and melancholy here. I loved that it wasn't a 'lesson' book, there was no easy answer, either "yes go out and travel" or "be happy with what you have here at home", it was more of a journey into the emotion of "what if". The innkeeper is happy with their life in a small town where they know everyone and everything, and they clearly get joy from the correspondence of past guests, they know they would miss this if they went and traveled. They also would like to have seen more of the world and the thought that they still could someday clearly brings them joy.I'm at a point in my life where I feel like that a lot. Married, midthirties, two young kids. I wouldn't change what I have for the world, and I would miss my kids so much if I went on a trip without them. But I still wonder what if sometimes. In my next life, I'll move to NYC after school and stay single for a while and focus on friends and career and be a bit more selfish. It's not that I want to ditch what I have, it's that I want to experience those other possibilities. That's what this book is like. That slight longing that tinges all your choices. So I'm not sure if young children are going to appreciate that feeling, or if they will feel that the pace is slow and just enjoy the beautiful art, but this may be a decent gift for young adults who are already getting many copies of Oh, the Places You'll Go!.
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  • Theediscerning
    January 1, 1970
    The Solitude Hotel is always in black and white, apart from the room that's decorated with copious letters and postcards from elsewhere, and apart from the owner's dreams of hitting the road and finding a world to explore. Oh, if only he could. You do end up really feeling for the guy, in this wonderful, nay beautiful, book. From the off the artwork was only going to get five stars, and the short story more or less matches, as we see the lonely hotel proprietor respond to all the letters he gets The Solitude Hotel is always in black and white, apart from the room that's decorated with copious letters and postcards from elsewhere, and apart from the owner's dreams of hitting the road and finding a world to explore. Oh, if only he could. You do end up really feeling for the guy, in this wonderful, nay beautiful, book. From the off the artwork was only going to get five stars, and the short story more or less matches, as we see the lonely hotel proprietor respond to all the letters he gets from his guests on their return, or their next travels. I suppose the routine thing for the age range this is aimed at would be to show the moral, to show the benefit of putting one foot forward, but the fact that that more or less remains a pipe dream here doesn't lost much of the impact. A delight.
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  • Kasey Gilbert Poindexter
    January 1, 1970
    A lonely hotel owner in a small town dreams of traveling the world. He longs to visit the places that his guests are from. He spends his nights looking at their postcards and thinking about what kind of journey he may take. Let me just say, this book wrecked me emotionally. It caught my attention from the first page, because the illustrations are ah-may-zing! So detailed and they really capture the mood of the story. I feel like we all know that person, a person that's never left home, everyone A lonely hotel owner in a small town dreams of traveling the world. He longs to visit the places that his guests are from. He spends his nights looking at their postcards and thinking about what kind of journey he may take. Let me just say, this book wrecked me emotionally. It caught my attention from the first page, because the illustrations are ah-may-zing! So detailed and they really capture the mood of the story. I feel like we all know that person, a person that's never left home, everyone knows and loves them, they're a town staple. Some of us may even be that person. We wonder if they'll ever leave, if they even want to leave.In short, this book is a must read. *Thank you to NetGalley and the publisher for providing me with an e-copy in exchange for an honest review.*
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  • Dontreadlikethem
    January 1, 1970
    There aren't many picture books that I want to add to my own collection of books but this is one of them. The vintage style illustrations, the lack of character names, the theme of daydreaming/dreaming, and the idea that travel gives us freedom are just some of the reasons this book found a place in my heart. An innkeeper who meets many travelers longs to have his own travels but worries about leaving at the same time. As a reader you get to decide the ending since it is left open to There aren't many picture books that I want to add to my own collection of books but this is one of them. The vintage style illustrations, the lack of character names, the theme of daydreaming/dreaming, and the idea that travel gives us freedom are just some of the reasons this book found a place in my heart. An innkeeper who meets many travelers longs to have his own travels but worries about leaving at the same time. As a reader you get to decide the ending since it is left open to interpretation. Everyone from 5 - 99 will love this book.
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