Logging Off
From bestselling author Nick Spalding comes a laugh-out-loud story about getting offline—and getting on with life.Andy Bellows is in a right state. Plagued with insomnia, anxiety and neckache, he’s convinced there’s something seriously wrong with him. And the worst thing is that his doctor agrees. The diagnosis: Andy is in the grip of a self-destructive addiction to technology—he just cannot put that bloody mobile phone down.Texting, tweeting, gaming and online dating—technology rules Andy’s life. His phone even monitors his bowel movements. So how will he cope when he’s forced to follow doctor’s orders and step away from all of his beloved screens?From having to leave the flat in search of food like some kind of Neanderthal to engaging in conversations with actual people, Andy’s about to discover just how bewildering—and scary—the analogue world can be.And when his sixty-day detox hits the headlines—making him a hero to suffering technophiles everywhere—Andy is sorely tempted to pack it all in and escape in the nearest Uber.Can he get himself out of this mess, and work out how to live a better, technologically balanced life…without consulting Google even once?

Logging Off Details

TitleLogging Off
Author
ReleaseApr 23rd, 2020
PublisherBrilliance Audio
ISBN-139781799760030
Rating
GenreFiction, Humor, Contemporary, Audiobook, Comedy

Logging Off Review

  • JEN A
    January 1, 1970
    This is a must read book for anyone who has found themselves spending just a little too much time on the Internet (basically all of us). The main character Andy is a normal run-of-the-mill guy who comes to realize that hes really not living a full life by being so obsessed with social media. The situations that Andy finds himself in are hilarious but also thought-provoking. The great takeaway from this novel is balance - something we all need alittle bit more of in our lives This is a must read book for anyone who has found themselves spending just a little too much time on the Internet (basically all of us). The main character Andy is a normal run-of-the-mill guy who comes to realize that he’s really not living a full life by being so obsessed with social media. The situations that Andy finds himself in are hilarious but also thought-provoking. The great takeaway from this novel is balance - something we all need alittle bit more of in our lives
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  • Peter
    January 1, 1970
    RebalancingIn our world of instant communications, information overload, connected devices and online communities have we become slaves to the relentless appetite of the internet? Are we addicted to data? Nick Spalding has a formula for taking many of these real-world (and often sensitive) issues and building an entertaining and thought-provoking story around it. In Logging Off Nick poses this particular scenario when his main protagonist, Andy Bellows, suddenly finds himself in the middle of a RebalancingIn our world of instant communications, information overload, connected devices and online communities have we become slaves to the relentless appetite of the internet? Are we addicted to data? Nick Spalding has a formula for taking many of these real-world (and often sensitive) issues and building an entertaining and thought-provoking story around it. In Logging Off Nick poses this particular scenario when his main protagonist, Andy Bellows, suddenly finds himself in the middle of a client presentation and his body goes into a breakdown with his jaws locking, his speech slurring and his vision disturbed.When his doctor checks him he suggests that the episode may be a result of obsessive online activity and his body is not resting enough at night. The doctor suggests that for two months he logs off all online social platforms and doesn’t use any computer technology except that for work and only emails as a means of communication. Andy meets his best friend Fergus to tell him about his new plan and seek some moral support. What he gets from his friend, the editor and journalist of the local newspaper, is: “Fergus also smiles. ‘And this ginger twat is going to help you do it.’ ‘Really? How?’ ‘I’m going to write a story about you for the paper.’ ‘No you’re bloody not.’ ‘Yes, I bloody am.’ ‘No, Fergus. You really bloody are not.” Fergus wins Andy round as it also ensures Andy has an added incentive to stick to the challenge. As the news circulates, an array of colourful characters are drawn into the story. Andy forms an oldfashioned group of similarly concerned internet addicts who meet weekly at a local cafe. Each has their own background and life story to tell, and there is always someone you can relate to. One of the people Andy meets is Grace, the owner of the cafe, who has her own issues and as they both deal with everything they are facing, they develop an endearing friendship – hmmm, maybe something stronger.While this is a repeatable formula from Nick Spalding and initially I felt that I could almost describe how the story would unwind, it is worth pointing out that Nick has developed a winning formula. The humour throughout the narrative is extremely entertaining and engaging. His main character is often hapless which helps expose many issues in more dramatic form. Nothing is ever plain sailing as that wouldn’t help with the insights that often come through – yes life is difficult, there are ups and downs, but learn to address the challenges and enjoy the good moments whenever possible is what life is all about.As a daily user of Goodreads, Twitter and other social media platforms, the message coming out from this book is to Log Off, and that fills me with unease. I’m still a software engineer at heart and the owner of a medical software company and this is all part of my life. But am I addicted? Try leaving it alone and see if you have withdrawal symptoms. The incentive of this book, and in life, is balance. When we tend to become obsessed or addicted to any facet of our lives we lose connection with other important aspects. The ultimate message is not about Logging Off Completely but Logging Off Sometimes.I will continue to read Nick Spalding for the sheer entertainment factor but credit for also making us look at ourselves with the cleverly crafted life message. I would recommend this book and I would like to thank Amazon Publishing UK and NetGalley for providing me with an ARC copy in return for an honest review.
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  • PamG
    January 1, 1970
    LOGGING OFF by Nick Spalding is classified as British humor and satire. There is some humor and satire in it so that seems to fit. Andy Bellows is a freelance graphic designer that is afflicted with headaches, neck aches, insomnia, muscle aches and gastrointestinal issues. With the help of his phone and tablet, he tries to self-diagnose himself, but ends up going to the doctor. The doctor tells him he needs to do a digital detox for two months and gives him a pamphlet to guide him. His only use LOGGING OFF by Nick Spalding is classified as British humor and satire. There is some humor and satire in it so that seems to fit. Andy Bellows is a freelance graphic designer that is afflicted with headaches, neck aches, insomnia, muscle aches and gastrointestinal issues. With the help of his phone and tablet, he tries to self-diagnose himself, but ends up going to the doctor. The doctor tells him he needs to do a digital detox for two months and gives him a pamphlet to guide him. His only use of technology would be the minimum amount he needs for his work. How would he survive without texting, tweeting, online dating, and all of the social media that drives his days and nights? How would he even find food? Will it even help him? Can he survive?Andy is an interesting character that you can root for and sympathize with, but I would not call him a compelling character. Humor and, especially satire are used throughout the novel. The language was a little stronger than I like at times, but I still enjoyed some laughs. The internal and external conflicts were well defined and the secondary characters had were nicely developed. Themes include digital dependence, physical ailments, romance, isolation and self-discovery.Overall, I liked the book. It was well-crafted and I would recommend it to those that read this and think it might be something they will enjoy.Thanks to Amazon Publishing UK and Nick Spalding for a complimentary ARC of this novel via NetGalley and the opportunity to provide an honest review. Opinions are mine alone and are not biased in any way.
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  • JEN A
    January 1, 1970
    This is a must read book for anyone who has found themselves spending just a little too much time on the Internet (basically all of us). The main character Andy is a normal run-of-the-mill guy who comes to realize that hes really not living a full life by being so obsessed with social media. The situations that Andy finds himself in are hilarious but also thought-provoking. The great takeaway from this novel is balance - something we all need alittle bit more of in our lives This is a must read book for anyone who has found themselves spending just a little too much time on the Internet (basically all of us). The main character Andy is a normal run-of-the-mill guy who comes to realize that he’s really not living a full life by being so obsessed with social media. The situations that Andy finds himself in are hilarious but also thought-provoking. The great takeaway from this novel is balance - something we all need alittle bit more of in our lives
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  • Amanda
    January 1, 1970
    Andrew is obsessed with Facebook, Twitter and is constantly looking at his phone and playing computer games. He visits his doctor regarding his health conditions, after googling and jumping to the conclusion that he has Cancer. The Doctor advises to have a Digital Detox This sounds easier than what it is, no more looking at weather apps before going out and even ordering food online is now a no go!!I liked this book as we can all relate to Andrew, spending too much time on the internet, forever Andrew is obsessed with Facebook, Twitter and is constantly looking at his phone and playing computer games. He visits his doctor regarding his health conditions, after googling and jumping to the conclusion that he has Cancer. The Doctor advises to have a “Digital Detox” This sounds easier than what it is, no more looking at weather apps before going out and even ordering food online is now a no go!!I liked this book as we can all relate to Andrew, spending too much time on the internet, forever looking at our phones land at Facebook afraid we might be missing out on something!! Next time you go out for a meal in a restaurant just look around at people who are on their phones rather than talking to one another!!I loved all the characters, a very funny book that had me giggling to myself!!Thank you to Netgalley for my copy in exchange for a review.
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  • Mark
    January 1, 1970
    At times hysterically funnyAt other times irritating as! Andy needs to log off from the internet and social media and get his life in order, this all comes to a head when he goes to sell his wares as a graphic designer to a hip and happening company, to say he has a meltdown is an understatement and he decides after a trip to the Drs that giving it all up is for himThe book then charts his success on his 60 day detox in this very 121 author to reader chat style read and as said some of it is At times hysterically funnyAt other times irritating as! Andy needs to ‘log off’ from the internet and social media and get his life in order, this all comes to a head when he goes to ‘sell his wares’ as a graphic designer to a ‘hip and happening’ company, to say he has a meltdown is an understatement and he decides after a trip to the Dr’s that ‘giving it all up’ is for himThe book then charts his success on his 60 day detox in this very 121 author to reader chat style read and as said some of it is nothing short of LOL ribald hilarious.....the trip to Bath, the dog ‘incident’ and the blind date all farcically brilliant I am not sure why then some of it was irritating,but it was.....maybe the break neck speed of the book?, it really doesn’t stop from the first to the last word or maybe because some of it was too truthful re how the internet and social media takes up all our lives ( although of course especially now this is a blessing, in fact its probably not the best time to release this book when everyone is now relying on it for our sanity ) maybe because he talks a lot about his irritable bowel ( referenced ALL the time ) l honestly am not sureIt’s not a relaxing read but it is a quick read that will make you think, laugh and happily move on to your next read but all in all you will enjoy it, mostly I read about the author after reading this book and he has a big back catalogue with some I would like to read and the style of this book looks to be his style of writing in all books 7/103 Stars
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  • The Cats’ Mother
    January 1, 1970
    This is about the fifth book Ive read from this author, having loved my first, Dry Hard, and the rest progressively less. Theres definitely a formula - neurotic Everyman takes on a daunting challenge while being followed by some form of media, discovering heart-warming home truths and usually love in the process.Theres also generally a combination of distinctly puerile comedy and a serious topic that at least gets you thinking at least. Theyre quick easy reads and Spalding has an engaging style This is about the fifth book I’ve read from this author, having loved my first, Dry Hard, and the rest progressively less. There’s definitely a formula - neurotic Everyman takes on a daunting challenge while being followed by some form of media, discovering heart-warming home truths and usually love in the process.There’s also generally a combination of distinctly puerile comedy and a serious topic that at least gets you thinking at least. They’re quick easy reads and Spalding has an engaging style if you don’t mind the first person present narration.Andy Bellows, a 36 year old single graphic designer somewhere in Southern England, is a stressed out hypochondriac who is overly dependent on social media and the internet. When his doctor suggests a digital detox, he is appalled, but his best friend, a journalist, persuades him it’ll make a good story, and with raging irritable bowel syndrome, neck pain and bruxism making his life miserable, he agrees to try stopping all non-work-related Internet use for two months. Initially this leads him into some amusing debacles, but will his new-found appreciation for the simple life be enough to hold the course?It’s deeply ironic to have read this while most of the world are in lockdown from the Covid-19 pandemic and for many the Internet is the only thing that’s made it bearable, so I don’t see this book convincing many people of the benefits of giving it up any time soon. It did make me think about my own level of dependence - I look at GoodReads, Facebook, my emails and news sites multiple times a day, including first thing when I wake up, but have zero interest in celebrities, games or influencers and the only individuals I follow are authors. It would certainly not hurt to cut down on opinion pieces and the comments that follow, and certain groups on Facebook that attract a certain kind of negativity that invariably winds me up, so I’m grateful to the author for making me confront this.I did not find this one anywhere near as funny as his previous books - there was way too much toilet humour - he’s a big fan of poo jokes - and the slapstick comedy, including humping dogs and people getting stuck in windows did nothing for me either. Andy took a long time for me to warm to, although I enjoyed his eventual maturation and enlightenment and the romance was cute. By coincidence, we watched a TV show set in Bath this week that had already confirmed that it’s somewhere I really must visit one day, and added to that resolution.Overall this was a light read with a message that was fairly obvious from an author who can be laugh out loud funny at times, but missed the mark with this one. My thanks to NetGalley and Amazon UK Publishing for the ARC which allowed me to give an honest review. Logging Off is available now.
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  • Sherwood Smith
    January 1, 1970
    Some added irony in this satiric look at the tech-generation, and the joys of logging off and getting out to meet real people. Not the fault of the author, of course, that his book is being released at the height of social distancing.It's a fun story, if sometimes a tad predictable: Andy, an ordinary guy (or, as this takes place in England, bloke) is having all kinds of physical difficulties. Like everyone else, he turns to the Internet to self-diagnose, and as he notices, all self-diagnosis Some added irony in this satiric look at the tech-generation, and the joys of logging off and getting out to meet real people. Not the fault of the author, of course, that his book is being released at the height of social distancing.It's a fun story, if sometimes a tad predictable: Andy, an ordinary guy (or, as this takes place in England, bloke) is having all kinds of physical difficulties. Like everyone else, he turns to the Internet to self-diagnose, and as he notices, all self-diagnosis roads on the Internet lead to terminal cancer.Desperate, he visits his doctor, to be told that he needs to cut free of tech for 60 days. So we follow along as he tries to wean himself off social media, then to make his way in the world without handy-dandy stuff like satnav and Yelp reviews. He even turns to the personal ads at the back of the newspaper to try to connect with possible dates. We know that's going to be a disaster, but how it turns out was pretty funny--in fact, one of the best scenes in the book for me.What happens, how he becomes an influencer for the logged-off, and its results, forms the rest. It was a fun read, thoroughly enjoyable as I sit here in the house I haven't left except for masked-and-gloved grocery runs for the very two months he has to stay off the Internet. I could have done with less bathroom humor, but that might be one of those Brith/Yank humor divides. The rest was a lot of fun, and I really enjoyed the romance.Copy provided by NetGalley
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  • Obsidian
    January 1, 1970
    Not too much to say, typical Spalding. Parts were really funny and parts of it were really draggy. I liked the overall premise, Andy is told by his doctor he needs a tech detox because of some medical issues he is having, and shenanigans occur.I ultimately wish that the book had actually moved more into a direction of Andy's other interests (he started reading and walking more) instead of him acting like an ass because he couldn't look up what stars were up to via Instagram. I think that a lot Not too much to say, typical Spalding. Parts were really funny and parts of it were really draggy. I liked the overall premise, Andy is told by his doctor he needs a tech detox because of some medical issues he is having, and shenanigans occur.I ultimately wish that the book had actually moved more into a direction of Andy's other interests (he started reading and walking more) instead of him acting like an ass because he couldn't look up what stars were up to via Instagram. I think that a lot of people take social media breaks. I have done so before and it honestly helps. When you read nothing but terrible news and people's perfect lives via social media it is going to skew your perspective. Spalding danced near that with Andy finding about a real life person he was following, but Spalding played it for laughs instead of actually pointing out how everyone does this.Loved the Easter eggs to other books that he has written and I think this one's ending worked a lot better than the last book of his I read "Dumped, Actually."
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  • Donna Hines
    January 1, 1970
    If you need a vacay from the world this is your go too!Loved, everything about this one from the humor, to the sarcasm, to the romance, to the message that we have to detox from technology.Too much is too much and folks I for one couldn't agree more with Nick when he notes a tech diet is in order.Sure, it's all fun and games but I enjoyed the entire scene with the gaming, the online dating, the revolution that one must correspond and engage in actual face to face conversations.It was all a If you need a vacay from the world this is your go too!Loved, everything about this one from the humor, to the sarcasm, to the romance, to the message that we have to detox from technology.Too much is too much and folks I for one couldn't agree more with Nick when he notes a tech diet is in order.Sure, it's all fun and games but I enjoyed the entire scene with the gaming, the online dating, the revolution that one must correspond and engage in actual face to face conversations.It was all a pleasant ride to reality and away and in essence the ending was what one could only hope would be the finale -like the icing on the cake.It's all about a healthy balance and I hope everyone finds that balance in today's day and age!God bless everyone in their suffering #HighRiskCovid19
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  • Priya Shrinath
    January 1, 1970
    This is the most fun filled male centric novel I've ever read. I laughed, giggled almost every single chapter and loved it.Andy Bellows, a freelance graphic designer is addicted to internet and everything online. So addicted that he has a habit of googling every symptom he has and getting diagnosed online without consulting an actual doctor. Oh did I tell you about the App he uses to monitor his every bowel movement?One fine day when he's pitching his new design to a probable client, shit This is the most fun filled male centric novel I've ever read. I laughed, giggled almost every single chapter and loved it.Andy Bellows, a freelance graphic designer is addicted to internet and everything online. So addicted that he has a habit of googling every symptom he has and getting diagnosed online without consulting an actual doctor. Oh did I tell you about the App he uses to monitor his every bowel movement?One fine day when he's pitching his new design to a probable client, shit happens and he discovers something is terribly wrong with him and it has nothing to do physically. His doc advices a 60 day digital Detox and reluctantly Andy decides to give it a go.What happens next? It's not easy to stay out of internet these days. Especially if your job involves lot of time googling for designs. Andy has to face his worst fears, fight his urge to give up the Detox just to hold his dear phone in his hands. As days move on, Andy experiences a new way to life that he never knew existed and certainly can't handle without being awkward and funny!Nick Spalding touches a rather sensitive topic with humor and wit making it a light read for his readers. I love every character in the book. They're well developed and likeable. Uplifting and thoughtful in every way. This is just the book you need to read in the modern world where we're glued to gadgets and just can't live a analog life in the digital world. Highly recommend it. Many thanks to the publisher for my copy of the book. All opinions mine.
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  • Chrissie
    January 1, 1970
    As evidenced by the title, Logging Off is a quirky little novel relaying the story of Andy Bellows as he puts himself through a digital detox. He needs his physical and mental health to be transformed, as he is suffering from a wide variety of stress-induced ailments and, most notably, irritable bowel syndrome. Doctor's orders.Logging Off, while not without its charm in some spots, was silly but not incredibly entertaining. Andy was whiny, lacking a great deal of depth, and, while he held As evidenced by the title, Logging Off is a quirky little novel relaying the story of Andy Bellows as he puts himself through a digital detox. He needs his physical and mental health to be transformed, as he is suffering from a wide variety of stress-induced ailments and, most notably, irritable bowel syndrome. Doctor's orders.Logging Off, while not without its charm in some spots, was silly but not incredibly entertaining. Andy was whiny, lacking a great deal of depth, and, while he held countless chatty sessions via his running internal dialogue, he lacked a certain amount of introspection and variance in his emotions with which would have garnered more empathy. Andy just wasn't a very gripping narrator. He was prone to overdramatics and his traits were limited to being thirty-six years old, white, male, and addicted to the internet. Other than his apparent skill as a graphic designer (a talent we never actually see displayed but are told about several times), Andy doesn't have any unique qualities. Spalding never really hit his stride with Andy, and instead just inserted one too many escapades and near-funny situations where hijinks were likely to ensue . . . and did.Andy's overall story was supported by the premise of the logging off and detoxing your body by stepping away from the internet. But that level of completely cutting yourself off is unsustainable in this day and age—something of which we should be profoundly aware during the quarantine, as without this level of communication built and established, functionality would be difficult or a proper quarantine level unattainable. However, so many people recognize how they need to strive for a balance of being on- and offline. And in that, I think Spalding succeeded—I just wish we had a better developed companion for the journey (potentially someone who said "poo" a little less often).I received this book for free from the publisher via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. This affected neither my opinion of the book, nor the content of my review.
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  • Jenny Hobson
    January 1, 1970
    Nick Spalding never fails to deliver. Logging Off had the usual Spalding wit and humor and I really enjoyed the serious note to this book. Are we addicted to technology? I'm the first to put my hand up and say that I always start my day by checking emails and my social media. I often find myself checking things on my phone and will always txt instead of having an actual phone conversation with someone.Andy is struggling with a whole host of health issues. He's got IBS, neck pain, lack of sleep Nick Spalding never fails to deliver. Logging Off had the usual Spalding wit and humor and I really enjoyed the serious note to this book. Are we addicted to technology? I'm the first to put my hand up and say that I always start my day by checking emails and my social media. I often find myself checking things on my phone and will always txt instead of having an actual phone conversation with someone.Andy is struggling with a whole host of health issues. He's got IBS, neck pain, lack of sleep etc and upon consulting the Internet discovers he could have all manner of illnesses. Fearing the worst he decides to visit his doctor for a diagnosis. What he actually is suffering from is too much screen time and the remedy is a 2 month digital detox. This is a scary thought. Can he go 2 months without using any devices? With the help of his friend Fergus he gives it a go and has his fair share of hilarious ups and downs.If you like a bit of comedy in your reading then I really do recommend giving Nick Spaldings books a try. He really knows how to write comedy. The story was good although slightly crazy at times and really highlighted the issues (good and bad) that surround technology and social media.
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  • Erin B SC
    January 1, 1970
    This was a very interesting book. We follow Andy Bellows, technology addict and sufferer of several health problems because of it, as he goes through a digital detox. Obviously, there are lots of lessons learned along the way. The irony was not lost on me that I read this book on the Kindle app of my iPhone and found that several times I thought of something I needed to do or popped off the book into social media. We all have some addict in us! This was not the most sophisticated writing and was This was a very interesting book. We follow Andy Bellows, technology addict and sufferer of several health problems because of it, as he goes through a digital detox. Obviously, there are lots of lessons learned along the way. The irony was not lost on me that I read this book on the Kindle app of my iPhone and found that several times I thought of something I needed to do or popped off the book into social media. We all have some addict in us! This was not the most sophisticated writing and was definitely British style humor, with far too many descriptions of bodily functions and perfectly ludicrous situations. I did enjoy a male narrator, which can be difficult to find in fiction, and I also really enjoyed the satire on our digital obsession as a culture. Spaulding explored many aspects, from the physical addiction to social medial influencers to how we portray ourselves online and how others' approval becomes so important. He hits the nail on the head with all of it. 2.5 stars overall.Thank you to NetGalley for my ARC of this book - all opinions are my own.
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  • Shreshtha
    January 1, 1970
    I am so glad to have read this book. Logging Off was light, funny, and very easy to read. It's exactly what I needed during these stressful times. The books is about Andy Bellows, a man who is addicted to the internet. He experiences a lot of physcial and mental health issues, to which his doctor suggests a total internet detox as a way to help. The story follows his (mis)adventures through a 60-day trial of an internet free life. I had not read anything by Nick Spalding previously, but his I am so glad to have read this book. Logging Off was light, funny, and very easy to read. It's exactly what I needed during these stressful times. The books is about Andy Bellows, a man who is addicted to the internet. He experiences a lot of physcial and mental health issues, to which his doctor suggests a total internet detox as a way to help. The story follows his (mis)adventures through a 60-day trial of an internet free life. I had not read anything by Nick Spalding previously, but his writing style and storyline really appeal to me, and I'll be reading more in the future. There were many parts where I literally laughed out loud, and some chapters where I was laughing so hard I had to pause and breathe before getting back to the book. It is a perfect read if you're looking for levity and relief!
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  • Laura McToal
    January 1, 1970
    Andy is ridiculously addicted to the internet. To such an extent that he barely manages not to defecate all over himself at an interview and experiences symptoms similar to a stroke in said interview.He books himself a Drs appointnent, spends the time leading up to the appointment Googling his symptoms (always a great idea), to be told by his GP that he needs a technology detox.Now Andy must spend two months navigating life without technology while learning exactly to what extent he has let that Andy is ridiculously addicted to the internet. To such an extent that he barely manages not to defecate all over himself at an interview and experiences symptoms similar to a stroke in said interview.He books himself a Drs appointnent, spends the time leading up to the appointment Googling his symptoms (always a great idea), to be told by his GP that he needs a technology detox.Now Andy must spend two months navigating life without technology while learning exactly to what extent he has let that technology completely take over his entire existance.I am a Nick Spalding fan and do already have this book pre-ordered. Having read all of Nick's books, I was absolutely delighted to find that I could access #LoggingOff it early on #NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.As a fan, this book does not disappoint. Filled with witty language, a hillarious storyline and loveable characters, this is one of Nick's best books yet. I loved how characters from some of Nick's other books make little cameo appearances too. This book, whilst being hilarious, also shines a very real light on the serious effects that the overuse of Technology can have on us. Also, how unrealistic it is to aspire to be anything like the trendsetters on Instagram as profiles are often fake or heavily edited/retouched and only show what the account holder wants to project to the world which is not necessarily the truth. If you are a fan of other Nick Spalding books, you are going to love this one. It is very typical of his writing in that you will laugh out loud while reading. If you have never read any Nick Spalding read this book to see why you need to read the rest of his books.Although the book will not be released to the public until next month, you can pre-order it on Amazon now.
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  • Bonnye Reed
    January 1, 1970
    I received a free electronic copy of this humorous yet-should be required reading in mid-April from Netgalley, Nick Spalding, and Amazon Publishing UK. Thank you all for sharing your hard work with me. I have read Logging Off of my own volition, and this review reflects my honest opinion of this work. Nick Spalding is always funny. And usually spot on with his off-the-cuff advice. The timing of the arrival of this book was excellent, caught me actually flatfooted with the shut-in orders from my I received a free electronic copy of this humorous yet-should be required reading in mid-April from Netgalley, Nick Spalding, and Amazon Publishing UK. Thank you all for sharing your hard work with me. I have read Logging Off of my own volition, and this review reflects my honest opinion of this work. Nick Spalding is always funny. And usually spot on with his off-the-cuff advice. The timing of the arrival of this book was excellent, caught me actually flatfooted with the shut-in orders from my state on coronavirus pandemic, and the fear that I would have too much time on my hands. Not! It was appropriate, however, in that, I don't have enough hours in the day to get to all my special projects, household chores, and gardening preparations and maintenance even with social distancing and the necessity of remaining home-bound. My eyes are now wide open. If you, too, find yourself with a crick in your neck, frequent debilitating headaches, trouble sleeping, and many and varied aches and pains, perhaps it's time to set limits on your internet time. I can't give it up as Nick Spalding did as I would NEVER hear from children if I did, but it is definitely time to more sensibly reevaluate my time online... Amazon Publishing UKReviewed on May 4th, 2020, at Goodreads, Netgalley, and AmazonSmiles. Not available for reviews, BookBub, Barnes&Noble, GooglePlay.
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  • Nora St Laurent
    January 1, 1970
    Content Warning: I dont normally read books with so much cussing in them. (or any cussing for that matter) But we are facing crazy, unusual times with the deadly Corona virus; so, I took a risk and jumped at the chance to laugh out loud and escape the realities of life for a while. This book is just the ticket for that. Its entertaining and funny as the author does a great job of allowing readers to view things from the perspective of Andy Bellows, an internet junkie whos just gotten some bad Content Warning: I don’t normally read books with so much cussing in them. (or any cussing for that matter) But we are facing crazy, unusual times with the deadly Corona virus; so, I took a risk and jumped at the chance to laugh out loud and escape the realities of life for a while. This book is just the ticket for that. It’s entertaining and funny as the author does a great job of allowing readers to view things from the perspective of Andy Bellows, an internet junkie who’s just gotten some bad news about some health issues. The Dr. said he’d have to do an unusual detox immediately.In the beginning of the detox, Andy Bellows acknowledges he’s become a “potty mouth”. Lots of bloody hell’s, Damn, one “F” bomb I think, and some other colorful words thrown in the mix. I appreciated the fact that it calms down after a while with more bloody hell’s than I cared for near the end. All and all I enjoyed the story, the quirky characters and the great message at the end.This author does an amazing job of giving readers an insightful peek at how Andy and friends at how connected they are to the internet. These people can’t make a decision about what to eat without help from Yelp, go for a drive without checking the traffic, weather, and set their course with their google maps app. Then there’s the useful sites to help self-diagnose what ails you. Andy concludes, “If the poo app thinks I should see a healthcare professional, then I’d bloody well better do what it says….“After all, if I trust apps to tell me what to eat, where to go and who to date, why wouldn’t I trust them when it comes to something like my health?”Andy has IBS and is thrilled they’ve developed an app to track his poo! Ok, I wasn’t sure where the author was headed with this until Andy gets ready to go onto a job interview. I smiled as Andy Bellows checks online to get ready for this interview. After the interview he’s not feeling so good. He’s checked the three go to websites and then finally to Dr. Google and had a diagnosis. It was comical. This author had me laughing so hard as Andy has convinced himself he has Cancer. Andy prepares himself to hear the Dr. say the “C” word when out of the blue he tells him he knows what’s wrong and it’s not cancer. The Dr. tells him he needs a 30-day break from the internet. His friend encourages him and says he’ll help him stay the course with accountability. He’ll write a weekly article. He’ll call it the Detoxification of Andy Bellows. Andy’s not too keen on it but if he were to give this a go, he’d need support. He’s hungry about this time and wants to grab a bite to eat. Then he thinks, “How the hell are you supposed to know whether you’re getting good food or not, if you don’t have an app to tell you what the reviews for it are?” I laughed my way through Andy’s detox as he discovers new things about himself and the world around him without the use of the internet. I liked Andy and the quirky cast of characters as I watched them grow stronger in their quest to be real, discover the truth, and seek a balance in life. The story is hilarious in parts, heartfelt and insightful, in others. I could overlook the cussing because I liked the main character and loved the message at the end. I liked what Andy and his friends learned as they faced the world without using their computers, and apps etc.This is what the author said about his book, “Logging off is actually a book about people…don’t let all that talk about technology fool you.”…”I met my gorgeous wife Gemma online. “This means that, in my book, the internet is just about the best thing ever.”As all of us are staying at home this is a great, funny escape with a satisfying ending (if you can get past the cussing.) LOL! Disclosure of Material Connection: I received a complimentary copy of this book from the publisher. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255 “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising”Nora St. LaurentTBCN Where Book Fun Begins!
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  • Mithila
    January 1, 1970
    Nick Spaldings main character, Andy Bellow, a graphic designer, suffers from all the possible ailments that our digitally-integrated lives could give us neck and back aches, a chronic need to stock up on juicy gossip and the latest updates from celebrities and influencers we follow on various social media sites, irritable bowel syndrome, sleeplessness, a general inability to navigate safely through a road or through a healthy dating life, and so it goes on.On the recommendation of his doctor, Nick Spalding’s main character, Andy Bellow, a graphic designer, suffers from all the possible ailments that our digitally-integrated lives could give us – neck and back aches, a chronic need to stock up on juicy gossip and the latest updates from celebrities and influencers we follow on various social media sites, irritable bowel syndrome, sleeplessness, a general inability to navigate safely through a road or through a healthy dating life, and so it goes on.On the recommendation of his doctor, he uncharacteristically decides to go on a digital detox for 2 months. His decision is chronicled in his best friend’s newspaper, and now there is no going back.Does he succeed? If yes, how? If no, why? You’ll have to read the book to find out.In “Logging Off”, Andy goes through many adventures in his sixty days, including understanding some of the real realities of Instagram influencers living lives that seem like a fairytale and going on a blind date with someone he met via an ad she placed in the newspaper. Armed with his singular love for flat whites (Howdy, sir!) and relatability, we are taken along for an adventure through the country of England. Near the end of the book, we are introduced to a conundrum to figure out as we enjoy our agonising solitude during this lockdown.I loved the story of the book and it was intriguing to be in the mind of a 30-something. Though the premise of the book seems commonplace at first, it truly has some memorable moments in it. It was a bit too long-winded for my liking in certain places, but nevertheless, an enjoyable read.I give this book 3.5 stars and recommend it to anyone pondering the true extent of control that our phones, laptops and e-readers have on us.I would like to thank Netgalley and Amazon Publishing UK for giving me an e-ARC to read in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Joelle Egan
    January 1, 1970
    Nick Spaldings wry humor sweetens a strong lesson in Logging Off, his most recent novel and thinly disguised cautionary tale. The book is the farcical account of first-person narrator, Andy, a graphic designer whose addiction to technology and social media has resulted in some serious physical and psychological side effects. When an important client meeting becomes disastrous due disturbing symptoms, Andy decides that he will embark on a 60-day digital detox to reset his health. His best friend Nick Spalding’s wry humor sweetens a strong lesson in Logging Off, his most recent novel and thinly disguised cautionary tale. The book is the farcical account of first-person narrator, Andy, a graphic designer whose addiction to technology and social media has resulted in some serious physical and psychological side effects. When an important client meeting becomes disastrous due disturbing symptoms, Andy decides that he will embark on a 60-day “digital detox” to reset his health. His best friend is a reporter who composes a feature about Andy’s experiment—the publicity acting as a reinforcement to his endeavor. Andy soon discovers how completely obsessed with online activities he has become. The removal of these sources of security illuminate the life skills that have been underdeveloped and highlight his utter dependence on instant information and entertainment. The wacky “fish-out-of-water” misadventures and slapstick episodes that follow are entertaining, if a bit far-fetched. Along the way, a romance blooms and the protagonist finds himself the unwitting object of wide-spread admiration and attention. Despite being ambivalent about pursuing his “detox,” Andy feels compelled to continue by the pressure of his new “followers” and the irrepressible current of a movement he never intended to spark. As he struggles with feelings of hypocrisy and confusion, he also recognizes the benefits that the endeavor has brought. Logging Off is a bit too long and the humor at times is contrived and lowbrow, but the book remains a fun read despite its strong moralistic stance. Spalding’s attempt to preach moderation and life-balance is perhaps obvious and over-stated, but his amusing approach makes it a lesson that is easy to swallow.Thanks to the author, Lake Union Publishing (Amazon) and NetGalley for an advance copy of this book in exchange for an unbiased review.
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  • Patricia Bello
    January 1, 1970
    Im suddenly struck by a huge sadness, thinking about all the people I may have missed out on over the years. Logging Out by Nick Spalding3.5 stars! Ive been reading books of Nick Spalding for years. His books are light and his dry humor comes out nicely.This is probably one of my fave of his. Logging Out is about Andy, a man who suddenly had to quit cold turkey, his online life for his hearth. Andy has all the apps and more than you can think of. I mean hes so very much connected. So like any “I’m suddenly struck by a huge sadness, thinking about all the people I may have missed out on over the years.” Logging Out by Nick Spalding3.5 stars! I’ve been reading books of Nick Spalding for years. His books are light and his dry humor comes out nicely.This is probably one of my fave of his. Logging Out is about Andy, a man who suddenly had to quit cold turkey, his online life for his hearth. Andy has all the apps and more than you can think of. I mean he’s so very much connected. So like any other addiction, his logging off, except for work related matters, was a huge struggle. And his struggle was...a little funny. I mean the situations he found himself in because he was unplugged. And the people he met too were...characters. 😂 Except for Grace who he stumbled on.For a lighthearted book (in my opinion), this deals with something we seriously need to do every now and then... our dependence, addiction with being connected. Let’s be real here. I’ve had those aches in the back because of being hunched over the iPad. My eyesight has gone bad because of reading/surfing on my phone. And you lose track of time when you’re sucked into YouTube or Flipboard or IG or Facebook. So I’ve had to find my own balance. Just like Andy did. Though I never had it as bad as him.Thank you Amazon Publishing UK for the arc of this book. Nick Spalding is always a fun read.
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  • Anne
    January 1, 1970
    I'd never read a Nick Spalding book before but this was simply put, hilarious! I literally laughed all the way through the novel. Andy's doctor recommends a "digital detox" as his obsession with social media has manifested itself into physical symptoms that Andy can no longer ignore. The characters are quirky, the humor is constant, and the message is poignant. What Andy comes away with is a sense of balance that, of course makes sense for all of us as he feels lost without his devices. And I'd never read a Nick Spalding book before but this was simply put, hilarious! I literally laughed all the way through the novel. Andy's doctor recommends a "digital detox" as his obsession with social media has manifested itself into physical symptoms that Andy can no longer ignore. The characters are quirky, the humor is constant, and the message is poignant. What Andy comes away with is a sense of balance that, of course makes sense for all of us as he feels lost without his devices. And ironically, he becomes what he initially detested: a media influencer with thousands of fans who join him in "logging off." I thoroughly enjoyed this romp and will read more of Spaulding in the future! I also feel fortunate that I grew up without social media so the only thing I feel addicted to is my kindle (and that's mainly for reading; ok and Words With Friends). I love the idea of unplugging for awhile!Thanks to NetGalley for this ARC!
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  • Sherri Lewis
    January 1, 1970
    ***I received an advanced e-copy from Net Galley in exchange for my honest reviewAfter a disastrous work presentation, Andy Bellows realizes he can't go on like he has been and makes an appointment to see his doctor. As he tells Dr Hu about the IBS, the insomnia, the jaw locking up during the presentation so he couldn't talk, and the head and neck aches, Andy is convinced Dr Hu is going to tell him something is seriously wrong with him. In a way he was right. Dr Hu said he was addicted to ***I received an advanced e-copy from Net Galley in exchange for my honest reviewAfter a disastrous work presentation, Andy Bellows realizes he can't go on like he has been and makes an appointment to see his doctor. As he tells Dr Hu about the IBS, the insomnia, the jaw locking up during the presentation so he couldn't talk, and the head and neck aches, Andy is convinced Dr Hu is going to tell him something is seriously wrong with him. In a way he was right. Dr Hu said he was addicted to technology and needed to detoxify. He suggested 60 days without going online except for work. Easier said than done, right?This book kept me laughing. It made me think of all of the things that would be so much harder without the internet. This is a fun, quick read with lots of quirky & delightful characters that will keep you smiling. Isn't that what we all need right now?
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  • LianaReads blog
    January 1, 1970
    Its my second story by the author and I cant recommend it enough. You could say its a romantic comedy told only in the males character POV and this one ends with a happily ever after. I loved how real it feels everything and the topics that it touches as well as the laugh out loud moments and there are some very good ones like the one with the dog and Puggerlugs song. I think its a must-read story because it talks a lot about the social media and the health side effect that it brings with all It’s my second story by the author and I can’t recommend it enough. You could say it’s a romantic comedy told only in the male’s character POV and this one ends with a happily ever after. I loved how real it feels everything and the topics that it touches as well as the laugh out loud moments and there are some very good ones like the one with the dog and Puggerlugs song. I think it’s a must-read story because it talks a lot about the social media and the health side effect that it brings with all the new technology and apps available and how some people are just giving up their own life decisions to others just because those people had it better in their opinion. So if you want a reality touch with a romance story and all the thoughts and feelings coming from a male perspective, you have to read this book
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  • Ixxati
    January 1, 1970
    Omg I can relate to Andy!! I'm addicted to Twitter, Facebook, Instagram and etc! I can't live without my phone or internet lol All my good friends stay far from me so I use social media to connect to them. I use my phone whenever I feel awkward or don't want to talk to people haha Btw I'm pissed off whenever my internet connection went bad hahha this is not good right? Goshhh I knowwww!! But I can't help myself 🤣This is a good book for someone who loves internet and spending more time on social Omg I can relate to Andy!! I'm addicted to Twitter, Facebook, Instagram and etc! I can't live without my phone or internet lol All my good friends stay far from me so I use social media to connect to them. I use my phone whenever I feel awkward or don't want to talk to people haha Btw I'm pissed off whenever my internet connection went bad hahha this is not good right? Goshhh I knowwww!! But I can't help myself 🤣This is a good book for someone who loves internet and spending more time on social media like me and maybe you guys should try doing the digital detox. It's going to be hard af! Btw It was fun reading Andy journey through the whole process. They are some funny situations he encountered during his digital detox lolThank you Netgalley for Logging Off ARC!
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  • Kim Ramsay
    January 1, 1970
    I received an ARC thanks to Netgalley! The timing was perfect with the current pandemic and extra time on my hands!!! This is a lighthearted, comical read that I did enjoy. With that being said, my own personal digital experience is limited as the only thing I'm addicted to digitally is my kindle and Goodreads!Overall, this was an easy going read, however I thought the characters were lacking, the events throughout the story were either over detailed (driving on the B roads of England and IBS) I received an ARC thanks to Netgalley! The timing was perfect with the current pandemic and extra time on my hands!!! This is a lighthearted, comical read that I did enjoy. With that being said, my own personal digital experience is limited as the only thing I'm addicted to digitally is my kindle and Goodreads!Overall, this was an easy going read, however I thought the characters were lacking, the events throughout the story were either over detailed (driving on the B roads of England and IBS) or lacking of details (dinner at his home with his "friend").I did enjoy it, but it will be quickly forgotten and not a book I would encouragingly recommend. It is definitely a laugh out loud read though!
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  • Rebecca Rowlands
    January 1, 1970
    Sort of a weird book to read during the lockdown where I am spending about 13 hours a day on my phone or laptop or Nintendo but Spalding books always make me laugh and I needed that.I loved it. I laughed a lot. I related a lot to the subject and I almost even decided to google a detox for myself, but I will be sure to avoid the duck ponds for a while. The characters in this book are likeable from the very beginning and there are so many laugh out loud moments throughout the thing meant I got Sort of a weird book to read during the lockdown where I am spending about 13 hours a day on my phone or laptop or Nintendo but Spalding books always make me laugh and I needed that.I loved it. I laughed a lot. I related a lot to the subject and I almost even decided to google a detox for myself, but I will be sure to avoid the duck ponds for a while. The characters in this book are likeable from the very beginning and there are so many laugh out loud moments throughout the thing meant I got exactly what I expected from it! I LOVE that Nick Spalding references his other books in this book too, it's really smart, I love that he's building a universe for his own characters but also appreciate the effort that must take! The book is a very solid 5/5 for me. A very easy to read funny book with a pretty sweet and sensible takeaway point right at the end.
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  • Suzanne Griffin
    January 1, 1970
    Funny, uplifting, thought provoking and a little bit of romance. As we follow the often funny consequences of Andy 'detoxing' from the digital age due to the negative impact too much instant information is having on his health we can also learn a few things about our own lives. Read this book, have laugh at Andy's detox and the unusual characters he encounters, then maybe give a detox ago. I love the way Nick Spalding brings his humour into the writing and the witty character names in this Funny, uplifting, thought provoking and a little bit of romance. As we follow the often funny consequences of Andy 'detoxing' from the digital age due to the negative impact too much instant information is having on his health we can also learn a few things about our own lives. Read this book, have laugh at Andy's detox and the unusual characters he encounters, then maybe give a detox ago. I love the way Nick Spalding brings his humour into the writing and the witty character names in this books. Cob and Ham are still making me chuckle,Thank you to the publishers and Netgalley for a free version of this book in return for an honest review.
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  • Tracy Collier
    January 1, 1970
    Quite an apt title for the book giving its something we should all perhaps being doing given our somewhat over dependence of gadgets and the internet! I am a massive fan of the author and I thought there would be a little more humour in the book than there was, although when it came I did literally LOL! I liked how it managed to tie in too with one of the author's other books - nice touch! However, given we are in a current lockdown situation, its definitely a good book to read to fend off the Quite an apt title for the book giving its something we should all perhaps being doing given our somewhat over dependence of gadgets and the internet! I am a massive fan of the author and I thought there would be a little more humour in the book than there was, although when it came I did literally LOL! I liked how it managed to tie in too with one of the author's other books - nice touch! However, given we are in a current lockdown situation, its definitely a good book to read to fend off the boredom or as an alternative to being on your gadgets... well unless reading it on your device!
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  • Sabrina Roy
    January 1, 1970
    I received a free ARC ebook from publisher via Netgalley in exchange for an honest review.I enjoyed this book more than I thought I was going to. There was a lot of laughs throughout. I thought it might be a bit much for me within the first few chapters but once the actual detox started I was hooked. It was fun seeing how much we do rely on the technology for mostly everything. Especially our calendars, I will admit that is a life line for me. I do recommend this book because it was a fun change I received a free ARC ebook from publisher via Netgalley in exchange for an honest review.I enjoyed this book more than I thought I was going to. There was a lot of laughs throughout. I thought it might be a bit much for me within the first few chapters but once the actual detox started I was hooked. It was fun seeing how much we do rely on the technology for mostly everything. Especially our calendars, I will admit that is a life line for me. I do recommend this book because it was a fun change of pace and it was interesting and fast to follow. I did laugh that I was using an app to read it though. It was ironic....don't ya think.
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