Legacy of Lies (Bocephus Haynes, #1)
A small-town attorney takes on prejudice and corruption in this powerful legal thriller. Small-town lawyer Bocephus Haynes comes home late one night to find District Attorney General Helen Lewis waiting for him. Her ex-husband has just been killed. She’s about to be arrested for his murder. And she wants Bo to represent her.There’s a lot working against them. Just before his death, Helen’s ex-husband threatened to reveal a dark secret from her past. Bo has been in a tailspin since his wife’s death. What’s more, his whole life has been defined by a crime committed against his family, and he continues to face prejudice as the only African American litigator in Pulaski, Tennessee.Bo’s back is against the wall, and Helen resigns herself to a dismal fate—but a stunning discovery throws everything into chaos. There’s a chance for justice, but to achieve it, the cost might be too much for Bo to bear.

Legacy of Lies (Bocephus Haynes, #1) Details

TitleLegacy of Lies (Bocephus Haynes, #1)
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseJun 1st, 2020
PublisherThomas & Mercer
Rating
GenreThriller, Fiction, Mystery, Legal Thriller

Legacy of Lies (Bocephus Haynes, #1) Review

  • Linda
    January 1, 1970
    Legacy of Lies is packed to the hilt like a weighty pulled-pork sandwich. Plenty to sink your teeth into.Robert Bailey sets out his characters rubbing shoulder-to-shoulder with one another. It's small town Pulaski, Tennessee where everyone knows everyone else's business and beyond. We set foot into Helen Evangeline Lewis' office where she is the District Attorney General known as "The General" for good reason. No nonsense and to the point, Helen wears her usual black assemble with black heels th Legacy of Lies is packed to the hilt like a weighty pulled-pork sandwich. Plenty to sink your teeth into.Robert Bailey sets out his characters rubbing shoulder-to-shoulder with one another. It's small town Pulaski, Tennessee where everyone knows everyone else's business and beyond. We set foot into Helen Evangeline Lewis' office where she is the District Attorney General known as "The General" for good reason. No nonsense and to the point, Helen wears her usual black assemble with black heels that signal she's coming. Helen and her assistant, Gloria Sanchez, are preparing to go to trial against one of the largest landowners in the county. Michael Zannick has been accused of rape and his attorney has been pressing Helen to settle out of court. It's a no go for Helen.And later Helen's ex-husband, Butch Renfroe, threatens to bring up something from Helen's past if she doesn't settle in the Zannick case. Someone in the shadows of the darkened courtroom hears Helen threaten to kill Butch if he does. Yup, Butch ends up dead that night and they're coming after Helen.Enter Bocephus "Bo" Haynes, twice suspended lawyer, who will take on Helen's case. Bo has met with a lot of grief and misfortune over the years. Right now Doubt seems to be his middle name. The case is solid against Helen and she seems to be withholding important information from Bo. He needs to have a win in order to get his teenage kids back from their grandparents. There's a lot at stake here weighing on a man who doesn't always bring it across the finish line.Legacy of Lies has a lot of plots and subplots in the mix with some stronger than others. Some of this gets in the way on the dance floor. But it's the African American character of Bocephus Haynes that shows a lot of promise for future novels in this series. There's always room for a wounded warrior and Bo shows up ready and willing. Robert Bailey throws quite a few curve balls in the last inning to ratchet up the ol' twister-roo. I'd like to see what he has in mind for Bo in the future.I received a copy of Legacy of Lies through NetGalley for an honest review. My thanks to Thomas & Mercer Publishers and to Robert Bailey for the opportunity.
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  • Julie
    January 1, 1970
    Thank you to Amazon prime reads for this page turner. Holy cow, couldn't put it down. A disgraced lawyer takes the case of his career to turn his life around. he is defending the district attorney who is accused of murdering her ex-husband. Great action and cast of characters. The tension builds until, BOOM, the twist at the end was shocking.
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  • Catherine
    January 1, 1970
    I read this because I got it for free, and it was worth about that much. It’s not the worst legal thriller I’ve ever read, but it’s a weak entry. The courtroom procedure and evidence were sloppy, the plot twists were unbelievable and contrived, and an air of sexism and racism permeated the book. This is also one of those irritating books that constantly refers to earlier ones, which are apparently similarly unbelievable and contrived. Not reading anything further by this author.
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  • Claire Matturro
    January 1, 1970
    Attorney Robert Bailey knows how to write a dynamic, riveting legal thriller with depth and emotional integrity. He’s proved this before with his award-winning, best-selling McMurtrie and Drake legal series. He is an author who knows how to put the thrill back in legal thriller, with full blown action, unexpected twists, and dramatic climaxes.With Legacy of Lies, Bailey’s newest book, he proves he is at the top of his game. While prior books had adversaries threatening the lives of protagonists, Attorney Robert Bailey knows how to write a dynamic, riveting legal thriller with depth and emotional integrity. He’s proved this before with his award-winning, best-selling McMurtrie and Drake legal series. He is an author who knows how to put the thrill back in legal thriller, with full blown action, unexpected twists, and dramatic climaxes.With Legacy of Lies, Bailey’s newest book, he proves he is at the top of his game. While prior books had adversaries threatening the lives of protagonists, this time a dominant threat to the main two characters comes from within. Which is not to say they aren’t in danger from outside forces, only that the enemy within is as dangerous as the enemy without. This makes Legacy of Lies even more compelling and richer for the deep humanity Bailey captures in a finely wrought thriller and stirring story of redemption.Helen Evangeline Lewis, aka The General, is the district attorney general for a four-county area in Tennessee. Attractive, confident, and tough, she is haunted by a devastating event in her past that causes a kind of PTSD fugue at a critical junction in the story. Her ex-husband, Butch Renfroe, threatens to reveal his version of that event in order to blackmail her. He wants her to drop statutory and forcible rape charges against Michael Zannick, who is powerful, unscrupulous, and rich. She recognizes Butch must be in Zannick’s clutches but refuses to drop the charges. In the heated argument that follows, she threatens to kill her ex-husband. Her threat is overheard by her assistant district attorney.The night after their argument, someone kills Butch—and a neighbor witnesses Helen coming and going from his house. Traces of his blood are found in her vehicle. Her DNA is found on the victim. In short order, the local sheriff reluctantly accepts that he must arrest Helen, despite his long-time respect for her. It might all be circumstantial, but it’s a tight case establishing motive, means and opportunity.Knowing arrest is imminent, Helen seeks out Bo Hayes to be her defense attorney. She believes that only Bo—with his courtroom skills, personal dedication and fierce drive—can save her. Bo is a tall, broad-shouldered black man who gained early fame as a football player under legendary coach Bear Bryant at The University of Alabama. However, when Helen finds him, Bo is a drunken mess, having just lost custody of his two children to their grandparents. Bo has never recovered from witnessing the murder of his beloved wife a year before and has slid into a self-pitying, useless remnant of the “wide-ass open” attorney he used to be.Bo must not only find a defense for Helen, he must redeem himself. Increasingly the odds seem stacked against them both.A stunning discovery, a triple twist, and dramatic courtroom scenes all make for a riveting, satisfying read in what might well be Bailey’s best book to date. While the twists come as a surprise, they also seem inevitable once the shock wears off—and that is a hard thing for an author to pull off, but Bailey does it exceptionally well.Legacy of Lies is a grand story with a morality tale vibe, gripping and thrilling throughout. It showcases Bailey once more as a writer who knows how to keep the suspense high, the pacing fast, the narrative strong, the characters compellingly complex, and his plot full of white-knuckle tension and twists.
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  • Brad Trout
    January 1, 1970
    A good, easy read.Somewhat predictable....until the very end. Storytelling kept my interest. Characters are colorful. Not too much legalese. Nice short chapters makes for easy stop/start for picking up and putting down as needed.
  • Mrs.J.C.Mooney
    January 1, 1970
    What a Gift !This was my monthly freebie via my Prime membership & what a gift it is. I have previously read Robert Bailey's legal thrillers and I've enjoyed them immensely & this book has certainly earned a well deserved Five 🌟 Review from me - Mind you I've always had a soft spot for Bo. Well done R.B. I'm looking forward to the next one!! What a Gift !This was my monthly freebie via my Prime membership & what a gift it is. I have previously read Robert Bailey's legal thrillers and I've enjoyed them immensely & this book has certainly earned a well deserved Five 🌟 Review from me - Mind you I've always had a soft spot for Bo. Well done R.B. I'm looking forward to the next one!!
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  • Paul Barnett
    January 1, 1970
    Fantastic! Starting with his first novel, The Professor, Robert Bailey creates a world full of Alabama football nostalgia, southern landmarks, intriguing characters and captivating stories. Legacy of Lies continues his success while focusing on my favorite character from his first four books, Bocephus Haynes. Start with The Professor and you’ll quickly become addicted to this Rammer Jammer legal thriller series.
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  • Johnny
    January 1, 1970
    As a “sucker” for almost any series of mysteries which has a unique, fascinating lead character, I am thrilled with the protagonist for Legacy of Lies, part mystery, part thriller, and part courtroom drama. But how could you get more interested in a series than having the lead character be a black lawyer in the South? And this is not just any black man but, “A black man whose biological father was the Imperial Wizard of the KKK.” (p. 85) But it even gets stranger. “All those years I spent trying As a “sucker” for almost any series of mysteries which has a unique, fascinating lead character, I am thrilled with the protagonist for Legacy of Lies, part mystery, part thriller, and part courtroom drama. But how could you get more interested in a series than having the lead character be a black lawyer in the South? And this is not just any black man but, “A black man whose biological father was the Imperial Wizard of the KKK.” (p. 85) But it even gets stranger. “All those years I spent trying to bring the men that murdered Roosevelt Haynes to justice, and turns out my daddy wasn’t Roosevelt but the leader of the lynch mob. How’s that for irony?” Despite the prevalence of lawyer mystery-thriller combinations, Bocephus (“Bo”) Haynes is not your ordinary attorney. In addition to his precarious situation in a racist environment, he has his own baggage of debilitating grief and a tendency toward drunkenness that feeds on that.For Legacy of Lies, Robert Bailey introduces a most unique defendant. His client for a dramatic murder trial is the “hanging prosecutor,” the District Attorney General for the county. It seems like it is poetic justice for a zealous prosecutor to be tripped up in a trial seemingly rigged against her. When the richest man in the county is pulling the strings and the prosecutor is the opponent running for her job, it doesn’t seem like it could get any worse. Yet, it does. Some of the twists rely a little too much on coincidence, In terms of characterization, I love the way that guilt eats upon many of these characters. And, as unconvincing as they are at times, I like the nifty twists Bailey gives us—especially in the denouement. Best of all, there is a sense of redemption in this story. The characters may never completely get rid of their guilt. That wouldn’t be realistic. Yet, there is enough poetic justice and measures of redemption to go around. Legacy of Lies is the first volume in a series featuring “Bo” Haynes (Yes, I finally started a series with the inaugural novel!) and, although I don’t want to read them back-to-back, I’m definitely along for the ride.
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  • Jamie Jack
    January 1, 1970
    I have to admit that I don't quite understand the one-word, one-star reviews of this book. Legal thrillers are one of my favorite subgenres, but I hadn't read this author before this story. While I was perhaps a little turned off by the initial scene, though I understand its necessity, I was riveted by the story as soon as we got to the heroine, a female prosecutor nicknamed The General. I thought she was absolutely awesome when we first meet her, standing tall against threats and doing what's r I have to admit that I don't quite understand the one-word, one-star reviews of this book. Legal thrillers are one of my favorite subgenres, but I hadn't read this author before this story. While I was perhaps a little turned off by the initial scene, though I understand its necessity, I was riveted by the story as soon as we got to the heroine, a female prosecutor nicknamed The General. I thought she was absolutely awesome when we first meet her, standing tall against threats and doing what's right even if it isn't easy or perhaps even in her best interest. I like a character with moral integrity, and she had it in spades.This book is unusual as far as legal thrillers go. We expect to have external villains that muck up the story. But in this novel, the main characters--the prosecutor heroine and the lawyer she had to hire to defend against an erroneous murder charge--had past and present demons they had to wrestle with to pull off what they needed to to do against all odds that seemed increasingly unbeatable. The courtroom drama is what you hope a legal thriller will have. I will admit to being surprised at some of the twists and turns of the plot, yet once I looked back, I could see where those came from. The author had baked them into the story very cleverly. I don't think this is easily done, so hats off to the author on that one.Don't listen to one-word, negative reviews! I always think that ANY review, especially very negative ones, need to be backed up with why the reviewer thought the way they did. If I dislike a book, I tell you precisely why.If you like legal thrillers, this is a good one.I received a free copy of this book, but that did not affect my review.My book blog: https://www.readingfanaticreviews.com
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  • John
    January 1, 1970
    Probably the worst book I’ve read in 2020, for many reasons. I decided to read this book when I saw it available for free on Amazon Prime reading because (a) It was free and I was between books, (b) I am a fan of the legal thriller genre, (c) the author is from my home state, and (d) the setting is less than an hour’s drive from my former middle Tennessee home. Given all those things, I was hoping for something like the late Scott Pratt’s Joe Dillard series. I was very disappointed. Firstly, I w Probably the worst book I’ve read in 2020, for many reasons. I decided to read this book when I saw it available for free on Amazon Prime reading because (a) It was free and I was between books, (b) I am a fan of the legal thriller genre, (c) the author is from my home state, and (d) the setting is less than an hour’s drive from my former middle Tennessee home. Given all those things, I was hoping for something like the late Scott Pratt’s Joe Dillard series. I was very disappointed. Firstly, I wouldn’t recommend reading this without first reading the author’s previous series. Events of the past books are frequently intertwined with the plot of this book, and it’s frequently a confusing read without that background. Of course having read this mess of a novel, I am not the least bit tempted to backtrack. Just wish I’d understood that dependency beforehand. Secondly, multiple elements of the plot are simply unbelievable. I won’t point them all out here, but by the time the last one was revealed - SPOILER BEGIN - wherein the baddest bad guy is revealed to be the son of one of the two protagonists - SPOILER END - I was so numbed to the stupidity of it all that I just didn’t care anymore. Finally, another major flaw with the book is that every single Caucasian male character is a bad guy, yet not a single non-Caucasian male is portrayed as much less than heroic. Am I hyper-sensitive to this? Probably, but it’s a recurring theme that has infected nearly every part of the media in the past 10 years or so, and frankly I’m sick of it. Dear author and readers, would you like to see fewer one star reviews of your work/reading material? How about a more balanced treatment of ALL people? If I want to see your kind of bias, I’ll just watch CNN or MSNBC. I thought people from Alabama knew better.
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  • Carol
    January 1, 1970
    A plot-driven, hard-to-put-down kind of book, but I don't know. It kind of left me with a bad taste in my mouth. There was almost TOO MUCH plot. Perhaps that par for the course with genre fiction, but I've read better...
  • Meg Leader
    January 1, 1970
    Bo was an interesting character, but the story elements were lame and the final 'surprise' was simplistic.
  • Edward Westerbeke
    January 1, 1970
    A great thriller about SE Tennessee. The last chapter was amazing. A definite 5 star with more surprises than Christmas morning.
  • CYRIL HUDSON
    January 1, 1970
    What a legal thriller should beFirst time I have taken the trouble to write a review but the author clearly put a lot of effort into writing this book, with it's believable characters that you could relate to, that I felt almost obligated to so.The storyline had so many twists and turns it was impossible to see them all coming, I appreciate it when a plot can do that.I also appreciate that the author could write a story about criminal and sordid events, with unsavoury characters, without resorti What a legal thriller should beFirst time I have taken the trouble to write a review but the author clearly put a lot of effort into writing this book, with it's believable characters that you could relate to, that I felt almost obligated to so.The storyline had so many twists and turns it was impossible to see them all coming, I appreciate it when a plot can do that.I also appreciate that the author could write a story about criminal and sordid events, with unsavoury characters, without resorting to bad language.A good read and one that I would recommend.
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  • Bonnye Reed
    January 1, 1970
    May 2020 1st reads Amazon Prime
  • The CurvyJones
    January 1, 1970
    Good to see Bo... But I definitely enjoyed the previous series better. This isn't a book you should read without at least reading BETWEEN BLACK AND WHITE.
  • Cid
    January 1, 1970
    Cid Herman OUTSTANDING PLOT, realistic, deep, rich characters, and a few momentum issues.Reviewed in the United States on May 3, 2020I read a lot, and Courtroom Drama is one of my favorite genres. To make that Courtroom Drama into a Legal Thriller, you need to throw in some danger and action that takes place outside the courtroom. It also helps to keep the reader guessing as to who the guilty party is, right up until the big reveal at the end. That's it folks! LEGACY OF LIES is the complete pack Cid Herman OUTSTANDING PLOT, realistic, deep, rich characters, and a few momentum issues.Reviewed in the United States on May 3, 2020I read a lot, and Courtroom Drama is one of my favorite genres. To make that Courtroom Drama into a Legal Thriller, you need to throw in some danger and action that takes place outside the courtroom. It also helps to keep the reader guessing as to who the guilty party is, right up until the big reveal at the end. That's it folks! LEGACY OF LIES is the complete package.My love of Legal action novels means that I was quite familiar with First Reads author, Robert Bailey. I have read all four books the preceded LEGACY OF LIES. I have long considered him one of the best authors currently writing Legal Fiction. I enjoyed LEGACY OF LIES, and thought the plot was clever and entertaining, though don't think I liked it QUITE as much as his previous books. It still gets high marks, and I'll explain why.I appreciate that Bailey isn't a prolific author, just churning out the books, as so many others, often sacrificing quality for quantity. You have to wait for the next book, in eager anticipation, and can be pretty much assured that you will not be disappointed. Those early reviews that called this book awful, probably didn't read the entire book. The ending, alone is worthy of appreciating the authors creativity and his ability to come up with an entirely original plot. Fans of the genre who finish this book are almost certainly going to be looking for the next book this author writes. He is a good writer and LEGACY OF LIES has an excellent plot. The characters are people that feel very real, and you get to know them quite wellGreat plot and character driven? What's there not to like? Well, the construction of the story and introduction to the characters made for a confusing start to he story. With so many people introduced in the first few pages, you feel like you will never be able to keep them all straight. This actually turns out NOT to be true, so it is worth disregarding the initial and unfortunate confusion.The other thing that hurts the momentum a bit, is the authors attempts to straddle the line between addressing his loyal fans and first time readers. All five of the books are unique standalone novels, but the characters wind in and out of all the authors books, even if only in the memories of those that are featured in later books. It is fitting because. I LOVE ALL OF THE AUTHOR'S MAIN CHARACTERS. They are amazing, and you will love them too. But...there are almost too many references to things that have gone on before, without much clarity for first time readers. It isn't necessary and the vaugeness slows down the momentim of the current story.let me conclude by saying, read the story and enjoy it. Don't get too hung up on the vague back stories. They don't change the fact that this story is great all by itself. You SHOULD read the previous books, because they are FANTASTIC. This is also an excellent story! I for one, can hardly wait until the next legal thriller by Bailey. I don't even care who it features. I love ALL his characters and EVERYTHING written by thIs author. The plot is ALWAYS trump. If you feel the same, get this book and you will be happy happy reader.
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  • Brittany
    January 1, 1970
    The bones of this book were good and fit the legal thriller category, however, I was very turned off by the crude language and vulgar content found herein. The case centered on the topics of rape, prostitution, and abortion- all of which are sensitive issues. I didn’t particularly enjoy reading the thoughts and conversations of the scumbag men involved in the former two, whether true to life or not. I feel the author could have maintained the premise of the case without including the language an The bones of this book were good and fit the legal thriller category, however, I was very turned off by the crude language and vulgar content found herein. The case centered on the topics of rape, prostitution, and abortion- all of which are sensitive issues. I didn’t particularly enjoy reading the thoughts and conversations of the scumbag men involved in the former two, whether true to life or not. I feel the author could have maintained the premise of the case without including the language and content he did. Another thing I found difficult about this book, especially in the beginning, is all the background info. It felt like the snippets we were told of the characters’ histories could have been it’s own book- which turns out- it is. This book is a spin-off series of the author’s previous series and I would probably recommend reading that first if you want to understand this book better. I never read them and was somewhat confused and now, since I know how that series ended, I probably wouldn’t go back and read them. The ending is a bit of a whiplash, and at first blush I appreciated the twists but in later contemplation found them to be presented a bit unbelievably. SPOILER BELOWBo and Helen were all down in the dumps about most likely losing the case because of how her abortion would be perceived in their county/state. But then at the end of the trial Helen testified in her cross-examination that she actually didn’t have an abortion but had the baby and put it up for adoption. That was one of the twists- it was this “big secret” she had kept up until that moment. I couldn’t figure out if Bo even knew about it until then. Okay, cool twist, but putting a baby up for adoption is a way better scenario than an abortion- why not start with that? It’s what largely dismantled the prosecution’s case. And why would she prefer to have people think she aborted a child than put one up for adoption? Or at least tell her lawyer in the beginning when the perceived motive was wrong and could be proven? Also, how would Zannick have ever found our Helen was his mother? Add to that his obvious malicious feelings toward her that weren’t exactly explained and that twist felt a bit soap opera-ish to just be thrown in at the end without much proper build-up. SPOILERS OVERSo yeah there were good elements of this story but, to me, they were lost in the muddle of vulgarity. 3 stars because if that doesn’t bother you, you’d probably like this book a lot, but to others, you might want to pass.
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  • Eli Sab
    January 1, 1970
    Many thanks to NetGalley and Thomas & Mercer for the digital ARC of this book.Blackmail today, murder tomorrow. Helen Evangeline Lewis knew she was going to be accused of the murder of her ex-husband. The night before her ex died, he threatened to expose something that will surely jeopardize her chances of being reelected as District Attorney General. She hires Bocephus Haynes to represent her, though she doesn't believe that it would make a difference. The evidence is overwhelming and conclusiv Many thanks to NetGalley and Thomas & Mercer for the digital ARC of this book.Blackmail today, murder tomorrow. Helen Evangeline Lewis knew she was going to be accused of the murder of her ex-husband. The night before her ex died, he threatened to expose something that will surely jeopardize her chances of being reelected as District Attorney General. She hires Bocephus Haynes to represent her, though she doesn't believe that it would make a difference. The evidence is overwhelming and conclusive. More importantly, a whole lot of people would benefit if she is found guilty. Did she or Did she not do it? And just what is justice? Is it about exposing the truth? Or is it a matter of who could prove their own version of the truth?I agree with most people who reviewed this book. It IS quite predictable. What I don't agree with is how it is perceived negatively. I think it balances the numerous atrocious acts committed in the book. Besides it adds a lot of punch to the drama. Although, I did notice that, for all the brilliance that is Bocephus Haynes, somehow I find it hard to believe how he could miss the obvious. Then again, he has a lot going on in his life and of course, he really is just human.Apart from the General's secret, which affected me quite personally, I was really bothered by what happened to one of most important characters in this story. If you condemn someone for being wicked, hate them for committing a crime, disrespect them for being a sinner, then just what is the difference between the two of you? Isn't it the Christian way to forgive? Is there even a religion that doesn't teach the importance of forgiveness?Why is it so easy to judge and hard to forgive? The General has been in office for over 20 years, voted for, by the people of Pulaski, Tennessee. All it took was one social taboo and suddenly all respect and the 20 something years of public service went down the drain.Lastly, who is more admirable? That person who wouldn't hesitate to drop you because it's the moral thing to do, or that person who would stand by you, for better or for worse, even when the ship sinks to oblivion?I should like to say a couple of things about the General's issue but eh, spoilers. Ain't nobody got time for that!I cannot wait for the next book in this series!!!
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  • Stanley McShane
    January 1, 1970
    A new author, new series for me, and apparently a spin-off of a previously successful series. Main character Helen Evangeline Lewis is the General (district attorney general of the Twenty-Second Judicial Circuit), Tennessee. Helen loves that designation, revels in it, and she does her utmost to maintain that level of fear and respect. But now she finds herself on the other side and begs protagonist Bocephus Hayes to represent her in the alleged murder of her ex-husband. Bo has been through a tri A new author, new series for me, and apparently a spin-off of a previously successful series. Main character Helen Evangeline Lewis is the General (district attorney general of the Twenty-Second Judicial Circuit), Tennessee. Helen loves that designation, revels in it, and she does her utmost to maintain that level of fear and respect. But now she finds herself on the other side and begs protagonist Bocephus Hayes to represent her in the alleged murder of her ex-husband. Bo has been through a triple whammy, however, the loss of his wife, his children, his practice as one of Pulaski's premier defensive attorneys. You have to give it to author Bailey for putting together a suspenseful, emotional well-plotted and fast-paced legal thriller. Short chapters keep you flipping pages as Bo recreates his team and begins to wrest tidbits. Helen, after all, has as many detractors as fans. It won't be easy. It's apparent there are layers to the plot, conspiracies in a separate case with which she was working, and Bo's racially charged background. Bo, a big African American who might have gone pro NFL had he not blown out his knee, is a force to be reckoned with in the courtroom as well. The reader almost gets a three-dimensional character here though I assume there will be more to come after this set up of a new series. The author isn't through as there are several more twists, one designed to knock the breath out of you. The conclusion has surprises, one on top of the other until the great reveal that turns into one big shock. Still, how is all this possible? Hmmm...It's complex, entertaining, and immensely engaging. And that ending? Surely that'll produce a HUH! And you can't say it wasn't a fun ride. I received this digital download from the publisher and NetGalley and greatly appreciated the opportunity to read and review. Looks like I have a new legal thriller author I'll be following and I'm looking forward to Book 2 in this series. Recommended. See my full review at https://rosepointpublishing.com/2020/...
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  • Jennifer Robb
    January 1, 1970
    This was my Amazon Prime free pick. I enjoyed it. As far as I remember, I haven't read anything else by this author. Since I see this is book #1 in the series, I was a bit confused by some of the reviews that refer to "previous books in the series". I do see that one reviewer said she thought it was a spin-off of another series by the author.I hadn't realized that in Tennessee the District Attorney General is referred to as "General". Since this series is supposed to center around Bocephus Hayne This was my Amazon Prime free pick. I enjoyed it. As far as I remember, I haven't read anything else by this author. Since I see this is book #1 in the series, I was a bit confused by some of the reviews that refer to "previous books in the series". I do see that one reviewer said she thought it was a spin-off of another series by the author.I hadn't realized that in Tennessee the District Attorney General is referred to as "General". Since this series is supposed to center around Bocephus Haynes, I'm a bit surprised that the main character in this book is Helen Lewis rather than Bo. What Bo did to get suspended from practicing law isn't fully addressed in this novel. I do have sympathy for his character. He's lost his wife; his wife's parents, the father in particular, want to keep his kids away from him; he's had to tell his son, who would rather live with him, to say he wants to live with his grandparents because he wants his son to protect his daughter. I'm glad to see him turn it around and convince the courts that he is a fit parent for his children.There are some plot twists at the end that I wasn't expecting. I'm not sure a reader could have anticipated them (at least some of them) because Helen wasn't very forthcoming with information that might have allowed readers to guess. In fact, I'm not very clear on whether she told her lawyer (Bo) the full truth or not about what happened. Since I thought her character had been set up to be the epitome of justice, it surprised me that she was willing to let someone else take responsibility (even if only assumed by the jury) for a crime he didn't commit (and in the process create reasonable doubt allowing the person who accidentally committed the crime to go free). The fact that she later doesn't prosecute the person who created the reasonable doubt for that crime but only does so for other crimes doesn't really mitigate that it's bad ethics.
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  • Anne Gardepe
    January 1, 1970
    "Earlier this morning, my ex-husband, Butch, was found murdered at his home in Pulaski...I'm here because I need a lawyer....Because I'm going to be arrested for Butch's murder." -excerpts from conversation between Helen Lewis and Bo Haynes, from the novelI'll admit I chose to read this novel after noting one of the settings is Huntsville, Alabama, the place my husband and I think of as our "hometown." We both spent our teenage years there, met and married there and still have 3 brothers between "Earlier this morning, my ex-husband, Butch, was found murdered at his home in Pulaski...I'm here because I need a lawyer....Because I'm going to be arrested for Butch's murder." -excerpts from conversation between Helen Lewis and Bo Haynes, from the novelI'll admit I chose to read this novel after noting one of the settings is Huntsville, Alabama, the place my husband and I think of as our "hometown." We both spent our teenage years there, met and married there and still have 3 brothers between us who live there. It was a kick seeing references to places I was quite familiar with such as the Madison County Courthouse, the Von Braun Center and Maple Hill Cemetery. Also Huntsville High School, where my husband and I both graduated, Papou's Greek restaurant and Baskin Robbins off Airport Road, where we have eaten. The plot was fast-paced with short chapters, making for a true page-turner! District Attorney General Helen Lewis of Pulaski, TN, is charged with the murder of her ex-husband and somehow feels the only one who can represent her successfully is Bocephus "Bo" Haynes, living in Huntsville and seemingly depressed after the death of his wife and other past traumas. Reluctantly Bo takes on Helen's case in which the evidence against her is extremely overwhelming. The secondary plot has wealthy town VIP Michael Zannick being charged with the rape of an underaged girl and prosecuted by Attorney General Helen Lewis. Of course, that case is in limbo after "the General" is arrested but the two plots weave together as certain characters are involved in both.The twists and turns in the story are difficult to predict. Around page 300 there is a real shocker and a couple of other BIG surprises by the end of the novel. I found it a very entertaining read and will likely look for another by this author. My rating is 5.
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  • Donna Boyd
    January 1, 1970
    Thank you to #NetGalley, the author and the publisher for providing me with a digital copy of this book prior to publication in exchange for my honest review. Legacy of Lies is the first book I have read by Robert Bailey and it will not be my last. It is the story of a small town attorney who has been disbarred twice, Bocephus Haynes (Bo) who represents District Attorney General Helen Lewis (the General) who is accused of killing her ex-husband, Butch Renfroe. Prior to Renfroe's murder, he and t Thank you to #NetGalley, the author and the publisher for providing me with a digital copy of this book prior to publication in exchange for my honest review. Legacy of Lies is the first book I have read by Robert Bailey and it will not be my last. It is the story of a small town attorney who has been disbarred twice, Bocephus Haynes (Bo) who represents District Attorney General Helen Lewis (the General) who is accused of killing her ex-husband, Butch Renfroe. Prior to Renfroe's murder, he and the General meet and he asks her to drop the charges against someone who has been charged with rape. He tells her that if she refuses he will reveal a secret from her past. In anger, she threatens to kill him and her assistant district attorney overhears this. The next day Renfroe is murdered and the General's fingerprints and DNA are all over the crime scene. Making matters worse, there is a witness who saw the General coming to the house and leaving it later, with the timing coinciding with the time of Renfroe's death. The General asks Bo to represent her and reluctantly he accepts. It is Bo's chance to save the General and redeem himself in the process. What follows is an investigation, a trial with multiple twists, several shocking confessions and enough courtroom drama to keep you on the edge of your seat. This book has the makings of a great movie but make sure you read the book first.Reviews will also appear on Amazon and Barnes and Noble
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  • Jane
    January 1, 1970
    Bocephus Haynes, a small-town attorney from Pulaski, Tennessee, has been considered one of the best litigators in the state. But, due to false imprisonment, suspension (twice), and the loss of two people close to him, Bo hasn’t practiced law in more than several years. in the midst of trying to pull his life together and regain custody of his two children, he receives a visit from an old friend. Helen Evangeline Lewis is the District Attorney General in Pulaski, her ex-husband has been murdered, Bocephus Haynes, a small-town attorney from Pulaski, Tennessee, has been considered one of the best litigators in the state. But, due to false imprisonment, suspension (twice), and the loss of two people close to him, Bo hasn’t practiced law in more than several years. in the midst of trying to pull his life together and regain custody of his two children, he receives a visit from an old friend. Helen Evangeline Lewis is the District Attorney General in Pulaski, her ex-husband has been murdered, and evidence points to her guilt. Bo can’t say no to an old friend and he agrees to act as Helen’s attorney. From there the story takes several twists and turns, with new revelations and old scores to settle.In a previous series by Robert Bailey, Bo was a secondary character. Now, with Legacy of Lies, the reader will learn more about him. As with many spin-offs, this book would be enjoyed the most by someone who has read the previous series and is familiar with some of the reoccurring characters and prior events. Unfortunately, I have read only one of the books in the other series, so I played a little catch-up as I read Legacy of Lies. Nevertheless, I thoroughly enjoyed this book and I’m looking forward to more from Mr Bailey…but not before I finish the first series!Many thanks to NetGalley and the publisher for providing a copy of this book for review
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  • Aimee
    January 1, 1970
    Intriguing And SuspensefulLegacy of Lies started out strong and kept on to the last page. Robert Bailey brought back all that I loved about the McMurtrie and Drake series, minus the beloved McMurtrie. I thought Pulaski was but a memory after finishing The Final Reckoning. Saying goodbye to a unique series with believable characters and a town that feels like it could be home brought with it a sadness. Robert Bailey created this place in time that you could only visit through his written pages.Le Intriguing And SuspensefulLegacy of Lies started out strong and kept on to the last page. Robert Bailey brought back all that I loved about the McMurtrie and Drake series, minus the beloved McMurtrie. I thought Pulaski was but a memory after finishing The Final Reckoning. Saying goodbye to a unique series with believable characters and a town that feels like it could be home brought with it a sadness. Robert Bailey created this place in time that you could only visit through his written pages.Legacy of Lies picks up where The Final Reckoning leaves off. Some people have moved on, some have declined and others are stagnant in the stream of time. Bocephus Haynes, a favorite of mine, has barely been treading water after his devastating losses. He has all but given up when he is challenged with, what could be, the biggest case of his career. Robert Bailey masterfully weaves this story of deceit, hatred, forgiveness and redemption into a suspenseful and intriguing courtroom drama. Not every story is black and white. Not every crime has a clear cut remedy. But this story has an unbelievable ending.I highly recommend Legacy of Lies, especially if you enjoyed the McMurtrie and Drake series. It is a fascinating legal thriller. And you will positively want to read it if you just love a good book.
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  • Carol Davis
    January 1, 1970
    Typical lawyer-client-trial-surprises at the end novel. But this will be my last by this author. Not well-developed, too many weird coincidences and contrived situations. I totally did not buy into the background of this novel and the relationship of Bo (the lawyer) with all his old friends and relatives. Fighting with them one minute and then asking for favors the next. I also did not care for Helen (the accused) at all. I could get past all of this except for the constant reminders of what has Typical lawyer-client-trial-surprises at the end novel. But this will be my last by this author. Not well-developed, too many weird coincidences and contrived situations. I totally did not buy into the background of this novel and the relationship of Bo (the lawyer) with all his old friends and relatives. Fighting with them one minute and then asking for favors the next. I also did not care for Helen (the accused) at all. I could get past all of this except for the constant reminders of what has happened (apparently) in other books that I have not read. Mr. Bailey should have spent his time developing the characters of this book. I will say that the end was interesting- I did not see the reveal coming, however, I also hated it.I will add that I live in the area that is the setting of this novel. I was particularly interested in the beginning of chapter 54 which talked about my town. But a riverfront private investigator's office probably does not exist in my town. Our riverfront is a congested mess of factories and boat docks. There is one tiny stretch with apartment buildings and elderly high-rises. This chapter could have mentioned the eyesore that is the Meow-Mix factory and placed the investigator's office downtown on Bank Street. That I would have understood.
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  • Cindy
    January 1, 1970
    Legacy of Lies, by Robert Bailey, is a legal thriller and the first entry of a new series, featuring Bocephus Haynes. Haynes played a supporting role in Bailey’s previous series, which “starred” law professor, Thomas McMurtrie. To be clear, there is no need to have read the first series to appreciate the newest novel. However, if you have read the earlier version, you certainly will enjoy reacquainting yourself with old friends.The story is set in a small Southern town, common to the legal thril Legacy of Lies, by Robert Bailey, is a legal thriller and the first entry of a new series, featuring Bocephus Haynes. Haynes played a supporting role in Bailey’s previous series, which “starred” law professor, Thomas McMurtrie. To be clear, there is no need to have read the first series to appreciate the newest novel. However, if you have read the earlier version, you certainly will enjoy reacquainting yourself with old friends.The story is set in a small Southern town, common to the legal thriller genre. The first chapter pulled me in and really didn’t let go until the last page. There are many twists and turns, right up until the very end. Most caught me by surprise; a few struck me as improbable. Nonetheless, I finished this book in less than 24 hours! I look forward to the second in the series, which is expected next year. Bailey’s characters are quirky, engaging, and strong. I expect they will evolve through the series. If you are staying in and looking for distraction or on your way to the beach, this book may be just what you need! Thanks to NetGalley and Thomas and Mercer for the opportunity to read an electronic ARC in exchange for an honest review.#LegacyofLies#RobertBailey#NetGalley
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  • LTC Larry Davis
    January 1, 1970
    A great read that is hard to put down!Legacy of Lies could easily be a blockbuster movie with its twists and turns in the high profile murder trial of the local District Attorney General. Helen Lewis is a formidable attorney in her own right, and as District Attorney General she strikes fear into the hearts of defense attorneys, who call the "The General." But her world comes crashing down when she is accused of murdering her ex-husband. The only person she can entrust her fate to in this trial A great read that is hard to put down!Legacy of Lies could easily be a blockbuster movie with its twists and turns in the high profile murder trial of the local District Attorney General. Helen Lewis is a formidable attorney in her own right, and as District Attorney General she strikes fear into the hearts of defense attorneys, who call the "The General." But her world comes crashing down when she is accused of murdering her ex-husband. The only person she can entrust her fate to in this trial is a twice disbarred attorney, Bo Haynes. Before his life had spiraled and crashed, Bo had been as good at being a defense attorney as The General had been a prosecutor. Now he is offered a chance to rebuild his life while saving hers.Author Robert Bailey is himself an attorney, and that brings a sizzling realism to his story. As he lays out the tale, the reader finds himself a captive audience, rushing headlong into the investigation and the sordid secrets barely hidden from the townspeople. I really enjoyed the rollercoaster ride, and I think others will, too.
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  • Bob Miller
    January 1, 1970
    I enjoy stories about legal systems. They remind me of the good and bad in all such systems, and how in the 21st century, many of those systems have maximized good and minimized bad. Still, conviction of a crime is about what can be proven in court and acquittal does not imply innocence. There are cases where innocent people are convicted, cases where good people have made a mistake, cases where a person intended to do wrong, and cases where a person is well down the road to perdition. Criminal I enjoy stories about legal systems. They remind me of the good and bad in all such systems, and how in the 21st century, many of those systems have maximized good and minimized bad. Still, conviction of a crime is about what can be proven in court and acquittal does not imply innocence. There are cases where innocent people are convicted, cases where good people have made a mistake, cases where a person intended to do wrong, and cases where a person is well down the road to perdition. Criminal law and procedure are important in society, and even those people who participate in these proceedings are flawed, as we all are. Writing about the fictional character Bocephus in more than one story is an interesting technique. Including other characters and the general area where the stories takes place moves a follow on story along while adding depth for anyone who read the earlier stories. Each story is complete. Loose ends are minor and yet another story develops without the feeling that the first story never ended.
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  • Carol Mcgrath
    January 1, 1970
    Did the district attorney kill her husbsndA secret that has been hidden since 1977 is coming out if the district attorney doesn't drop the case against the rapist. Her ex-husband was going to release information about what happened in 1977. She went to his house that night to kill him but did she kill him? Helen was arrested for the murder of her husband. She spent the next several months in jail. She retained Bo to represent her. He had been suspended and was recently reinstated to represent he Did the district attorney kill her husbsndA secret that has been hidden since 1977 is coming out if the district attorney doesn't drop the case against the rapist. Her ex-husband was going to release information about what happened in 1977. She went to his house that night to kill him but did she kill him? Helen was arrested for the murder of her husband. She spent the next several months in jail. She retained Bo to represent her. He had been suspended and was recently reinstated to represent her. He had not tried to case in 5 years. He fell apart after his wife was murdered in front of him, his children with taken away from him, and given it to the grandparents to raise. Bo had 5 months to get his life and water and get his kids back This is a very good story of How a case is built And who was blamed for the murder of Helen's husband was it her or was it someone else this. This book is a quick read and I think you will enjoy it.
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