The Summer House
When seven murder victims are found in a small town, the homicide investigation shakes a small-town sheriff to her core in James Patterson's tense thriller.Once a luxurious southern getaway on a rustic lake, then reduced to a dilapidated crash pad, the Summer House is now the grisly scene of a nighttime mass murder. Eyewitnesses point to four Army Rangers -- known as the Night Ninjas -- recently returned from Afghanistan.To ensure that justice is done, the Army sends Major Jeremiah Cook, a veteran and former NYPD cop, to investigate. But the major and his elite team arrive in sweltering Georgia with no idea their grim jobs will be made exponentially more challenging by local law enforcement, who resists the Army's intrusion and stonewall them at every turn.As Cook and his squad struggle to uncover the truth behind the condemning evidence, the pieces just won't fit -- and forces are rallying to make certain damning secrets die alongside the victims in the murder house. With his own people in the cross-hairs, Cook takes a desperate gamble to find answers -- even if it means returning to a hell of his own worst nightmares . . .

The Summer House Details

TitleThe Summer House
Author
ReleaseJun 8th, 2020
PublisherLittle, Brown and Company
ISBN-139780316539593
Rating
GenreFiction, Mystery, Thriller, Mystery Thriller, Adult, Audiobook, Suspense, War, Military Fiction, Detective, Adult Fiction

The Summer House Review

  • Matt
    January 1, 1970
    Renewing their collaborative efforts, James Patterson and Brendan DuBois present readers with an intense and thrilling read in this new standalone novel. Working a military investigation angle, the authors do more than pump up the US Military, able to spin a mystery like few others I have read of late. In a small Georgia community lies a large house, referred to by locals as the Summer House. However, after seven civilians, including one child, are slain there, the moniker Murder House seems a b Renewing their collaborative efforts, James Patterson and Brendan DuBois present readers with an intense and thrilling read in this new standalone novel. Working a military investigation angle, the authors do more than pump up the US Military, able to spin a mystery like few others I have read of late. In a small Georgia community lies a large house, referred to by locals as the Summer House. However, after seven civilians, including one child, are slain there, the moniker Murder House seems a better fit. Under 48 hours after the bodies are discovered, four Army Rangers are arrested and taken into custody. Enter the Army Criminal Investigation Division (CID) and Major Jeremiah Cook. When Cook’s team is summoned from Virginia, they are tasked with going down to ensure that the Rangers receive the justice they deserve, as well as discover the culpability that may be involved. When Cook and his team arrive, they receive cold shoulders from the local sheriff and police force, as well as the local military personnel. It would seem that the case is fairly straightforward and any more people snooping around is an insult to all involved. However, Cook has his Army psychiatrist attempt to interview the Rangers to get a better idea of what happened, coming up short as they shut down. Soon, one of the Rangers takes drastic measures so as not to share anything. The local D.A. is happy to move forward, hoping for some capital crimes to boost his notoriety. While Cook feels that things are moving along, he cannot help but wonder if he is missing something, as though there is more to the story that no one wants to share. When his commanding officer is temporarily replaced, Cook is told the team is being sent home and their report will be buried. Could there be a cover-up involved to ensure no truths see the light of day? Working on a hunch and without permission of his superiors, Cook sneaks off to the other side of the world to get some answers, hoping his hunch is more than a gut feeling. As the list of witnesses diminish and increased violence leads some of posit that someone’s trying to erase the truth, the CID team must act fast to get some answers for themselves and the locals. A thrilling ride that leaves the reader in the middle of an intense read throughout. Patterson and DuBois have outdone themselves with this piece. Recommended to those who love investigative novels with a military twist, as well as the reader who enjoys some of Patterson’s better collaborative efforts.I know I tend to whinge when it comes to James Patterson and his numerous publications, but I have a standard that I prefer not be violated in order to sell fluff novels. Patterson has been able to find some quality collaborators over the years and this is one instance in which the novel lived up to the hype. Brendan DuBois injects a great sense of plot and development here and I applaud him for that. The entire CID team can be considered the protagonists of the piece, offering their unique characteristics and perspectives to solving the case at hand. All of them chip in to bring their expertise to the table and much is revealed throughout. Backstories and some evolution in the characters occur throughout, allowing the reader a sense of connection to each of them in their own way. Some of the secondary characters do the same, spinning subplots that keep the story moving ahead and flavouring the narrative so as not to lose any of the momentum. The story itself was unique in a way, as it sought not only to solve a basic crime, but to dig a little deeper and force the reader to think. With a strong narrative that takes on a variety of perspectives, the reader can feel entirely surrounded by the action and in the middle of the developments. Able to effectively break Patterson’s trademark short chapter style without sacrificing fast-pace action, the story clips along and the reader begs to know more before the end. I was pleasantly surprised by this book and the collaborative effort that went into its creation. While I suspect it will be a standalone, I would not mind more in a series, as long as Patterson does not sacrifice quality for quantity, as seems to be his downfall of late.Kudos, Messrs. Patterson and DuBois, for a great novel that came out of nowhere. I am hope others who are on the fence about Patterson give this one a try and see what a good collaborator can do for a novel. Love/hate the review? An ever-growing collection of others appears at: http://pecheyponderings.wordpress.com/A Book for All Seasons, a different sort of Book Challenge: https://www.goodreads.com/group/show/...
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  • Melissa Stablein
    January 1, 1970
    I like reading James Patterson books and I love his idea of trying new ways to get people reading. This book was easily digestible even with little military knowledge. It has good twists and turns that are always leading to the finale. As I approached the last few chapters I could feel the tension increasing. Thinking “How will this all play out?”. It was a steep climb to the top of this roller coaster but the drop to the finale was all I wanted it to be. What a fun ride.
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  • Stacey
    January 1, 1970
    Great book! A page turned that keeps you guessing up until the end!
  • Chasity Easter
    January 1, 1970
    I’ve always been a fan of James Patterson and this book is another one of his greats! I couldn’t put it down!
  • Bookreporter.com Mystery & Thriller
    January 1, 1970
    One could be forgiven for momentarily thinking that a book titled THE SUMMER HOUSE involves bodies passionately bouncing off of each other over the course of a week or two in June. James Patterson and Brendan DuBois’ novel is anything but that. Yes, there are bodies bouncing throughout the book, but not in the carnal sense. What we have here is a thriller from beginning to end, wrapped around the nugget of an intriguing and puzzling mystery. The Summer House was originally conceived, constructed One could be forgiven for momentarily thinking that a book titled THE SUMMER HOUSE involves bodies passionately bouncing off of each other over the course of a week or two in June. James Patterson and Brendan DuBois’ novel is anything but that. Yes, there are bodies bouncing throughout the book, but not in the carnal sense. What we have here is a thriller from beginning to end, wrapped around the nugget of an intriguing and puzzling mystery. The Summer House was originally conceived, constructed and utilized as a seasonal retreat in rural Georgia for a wealthy family. However, over the decades, it passed outside of the family and gradually devolved into a by-the-month rental property, which, in the novel’s present, has fallen into disrepair and disrepute. Indeed, as the book opens, it is little more than a local hub for some small-time drug trade.Within the first few pages, it also becomes the scene of a horrific mass murder. The whodunit element of the story seems resolved almost immediately. Eyewitnesses, forensics and security footage from nearby businesses all demonstrate conclusively that an elite team of Army Rangers known as the Night Ninjas are the doers. Recently returned from Afghanistan, they are noteworthy and notorious for quickly and quietly attacking home bases and leaving carnage in their wake, which is exactly what occurred at the Summer House.The Army sends Major Jeremiah Cook and his team to investigate and make sure that all the t’s are crossed. Cook is an Army veteran and former NYPD detective. He bears scars and secondary limitations from combat action, but steadfastly refuses to let either prevent him from getting the job done. His squad, each of whom possesses a certain investigative skill set, accompanies him to look at what appears to be an open-and-shut case.Interestingly enough, no one, from the local sheriff to officers on the nearby military base, seems to want Cook and his men around. The Night Ninjas are not particularly well-liked, and the evidence seems incontrovertible. But Cook is determined to work the case by the numbers, even when the head of the Night Ninjas strikes a deal to plead guilty on the condition that the remaining members of his team are exonerated and released.Yet Cook can’t let things go, and when parts of the evidence begin to unravel, he follows a slender thread of truth back to a place where he had vowed never to return. His team, meanwhile, is experiencing life-threatening danger from an unexpected source. Truth and lives are at stake, and there is a significant question as to whether either or both will survive to the end of the book. Patterson and DuBois have collaborated on a number of occasions, but this is arguably the best of the works that their partnership has produced thus far, which is saying something. DuBois has been prolific on his own, and the considerable writing chops he brings to the table will keep you reading well into the night. Full of twists, turns and action, THE SUMMER HOUSE makes for terrific reading this summer and beyond.Reviewed by Joe Hartlaub
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  • Melody
    January 1, 1970
    Excellent, excellent book! One of Patterson’s best. From the beginning there’s action and it continues throughout the book. I know it’s fiction, but I also know how some in the Deep South are and with the way things are right now in the US, there’s proof it all isn’t made up. It really can and does happen on occasion. This starts in Quantico, goes to Georgia, over time Afghanistan, and back to Savannah. Not the perfect ending but good enough after what all has gone on. Definitely worth reading. Excellent, excellent book! One of Patterson’s best. From the beginning there’s action and it continues throughout the book. I know it’s fiction, but I also know how some in the Deep South are and with the way things are right now in the US, there’s proof it all isn’t made up. It really can and does happen on occasion. This starts in Quantico, goes to Georgia, over time Afghanistan, and back to Savannah. Not the perfect ending but good enough after what all has gone on. Definitely worth reading. You’ll end up staying up too late like I did because it’s a hard story to let go of.
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  • Christina Cox
    January 1, 1970
    Great read
  • Gail
    January 1, 1970
    I had a very hard time getting into this book. It was slow going and kind of boring to me. It did get interesting the last several chapters.
  • Deb
    January 1, 1970
    One of the better James Patterson books in a long time! It moved along quickly. There were a couple of twists. A decent read!
  • Sandi
    January 1, 1970
    Great story that hooked me from the start. I hope this becomes a series. Really like the CID characters.
  • Darren
    January 1, 1970
    I enjoyed reading this book. It had a good story to it. I liked the variety of characters in it. It was a well written book. It took me longer than normal for a james patterson book to read as some of the chapters were long but a good book to read overall.
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  • J Garcia
    January 1, 1970
    Must read . James Patterson is one amazing author. Love reading his books. Such a page turner. Couldn't put the book down. 🙌🙌🙌
  • Sue
    January 1, 1970
    I always loved books by James Patterson. He didn't disappoint. I've already recommended several friends they need to get this book.
  • Michele A.
    January 1, 1970
    What an interesting read. We get many different perspectives from the main characters in this book. Major Cook is an injured vet who is also an ex-NYPD officer. He leads this merry band of CID investigators who have formed a new task force. York, Sanchez and Pierce round out the main players. Each has their own strength that they bring to the group. York is the only female and Sanchez seems to give her a hard time throughout this book. When they get assigned the Summer House murders and arrive i What an interesting read. We get many different perspectives from the main characters in this book. Major Cook is an injured vet who is also an ex-NYPD officer. He leads this merry band of CID investigators who have formed a new task force. York, Sanchez and Pierce round out the main players. Each has their own strength that they bring to the group. York is the only female and Sanchez seems to give her a hard time throughout this book. When they get assigned the Summer House murders and arrive in Georgia they soon find all is not as it appears on the surface. The more they dig into the case, the more they find that there are some shady things going on. Each time they seem to make progress, something or someone tries to thwart their investigation. Major Cook, after another roadblock is placed in their path, realizes that he has to travel to Afghanistan to see if he can uncover the real truth. York, Sanchez and Pierce are left to finish the case as best they can under the circumstances. Each of them goes above and beyond to get to the truth. There were a few twists and turns but the story was entertaining. I am interested to see if their stories continue. The ending was kind of open-ended.
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  • Heather
    January 1, 1970
    This book starts with a bang, literally and figuratively. We are witness to the murders of seven people inside a house called The Summer House, a historical house in Georgia. What seems like an open and shut case is so much more complicated. I was expecting more of a local murder mystery but I really enjoyed all of the military references. The characters had so much depth from the main investigative team to the locals. My frustration and tension were building throughout the book as I worried wha This book starts with a bang, literally and figuratively. We are witness to the murders of seven people inside a house called The Summer House, a historical house in Georgia. What seems like an open and shut case is so much more complicated. I was expecting more of a local murder mystery but I really enjoyed all of the military references. The characters had so much depth from the main investigative team to the locals. My frustration and tension were building throughout the book as I worried what would happen next and if the truth would be uncovered. I wouldn't exactly classify it as a quick, beach read only because there are a lot of little details that require a bit more focus. However, it hooked me right away and kept me flipping pages. The story has enough information to keep the reader guessing while revealing just enough at the right times to keep us surprised. Honestly, I would love another book at some point so we could follow these characters into whatever happens next. I don't want their story to end here! Great, entertaining and engaging read to add to your TBR list!
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  • Alison
    January 1, 1970
    This book had more depth, more characters to be remembered, more character development and more twists and turns than many of his other books. The reader becomes involved in the story (four Army Rangers, an elite group) accused of wrong doing in Afghanistan and again in a small town in Georgia USA. While all the evidence for the grizzly murders point to the four Rangers, a group from CID begins to unravel the mystery - with witnesses disappearing, a Ranger committing suicide, and a trip to Afgha This book had more depth, more characters to be remembered, more character development and more twists and turns than many of his other books. The reader becomes involved in the story (four Army Rangers, an elite group) accused of wrong doing in Afghanistan and again in a small town in Georgia USA. While all the evidence for the grizzly murders point to the four Rangers, a group from CID begins to unravel the mystery - with witnesses disappearing, a Ranger committing suicide, and a trip to Afghanistan by the lead investigator who was seriously injured during his tour of duty and was apprehensive about returning.Many surprises about the characters unfold as the reader gets deeper into the story. While most of Patterson's books don't take long to read, this one also didn't take long but for a different reason - it was a real turn pager and I wanted to know what was going to happen next and why.
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  • Cliff Dalton
    January 1, 1970
    DisappointingI can't say Brendan DuBois is the kind of author I who's style I enjoy. The book title The Summer House is misleading. This book isn't centered on a vacation house. Rather the house was an introductory device to lead into an investigation by a military Crime Investigation Division or DID just one of the many military acronyms in this book. Although it's a military mystery the setting is rural Georgia. The characters are almost cliche. The crusty head of the unit, Major Cook; Special DisappointingI can't say Brendan DuBois is the kind of author I who's style I enjoy. The book title The Summer House is misleading. This book isn't centered on a vacation house. Rather the house was an introductory device to lead into an investigation by a military Crime Investigation Division or DID just one of the many military acronyms in this book. Although it's a military mystery the setting is rural Georgia. The characters are almost cliche. The crusty head of the unit, Major Cook; Special Agent Connie York, investigator; Captain Pierce, JAG; Lieutenant Huang, psychiatrist and Special Agent Sanchez, second investigator. TheWhile the plot was engaging, the drama felt forced and the pace was stilted. I don't recommend this book unless you enjoy military jargon and simple characters.
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  • Laura plantladyreader
    January 1, 1970
    It has been a long time since I've read a James Patterson book, but he is definitely great at creating an environment and characters that you can't pull away from.The historic Summer House in Sullivan County, Georgia, was once a shining estate, owned and visited by prominent figures in America's history. Now, it stands dilapidated and rented by drug-selling criminals. When a horrific massacre happens within Summer House, and 4 Army Rangers are accused of doing the deed, Major Cook and his elite It has been a long time since I've read a James Patterson book, but he is definitely great at creating an environment and characters that you can't pull away from.The historic Summer House in Sullivan County, Georgia, was once a shining estate, owned and visited by prominent figures in America's history. Now, it stands dilapidated and rented by drug-selling criminals. When a horrific massacre happens within Summer House, and 4 Army Rangers are accused of doing the deed, Major Cook and his elite team of investigators arrive to unearth the truth. However, Sullivan County doesn't take too kindly to outsiders coming in to investigate their murders, and the team is met with plenty of opposition. As Major Cook and his team start to untangle this murder, they wind up getting much more than they bargained for.The characters in this book were well-written - they were diverse in their backgrounds and capabilities, the relationships grew closer as the book went on, and the people of Sullivan County definitely bothered the hell out of me. It was really easy to hate on the villains that were being presented, and the sympathize with the victims. There were a couple "OMG!" moments that kept me turning pages, and in true JP fashion, I couldn't stop until I had all the answers and everything came together.If you're going into this thinking it'll be a fun beach read, you'll be disappointed. If you're in the mood for a (lightly military-esque) thriller, definitely check this one out! (It lost a star because some parts were a bit predictable, and the use of everyone's full name all the time really irked me)4🌿
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  • RickRay
    January 1, 1970
    Was it 3 shots at the gun range or 4? And all those racist...um um um. It was a very entertaining book and James Patterson writes with great form and his transitions from chapter to chapter are pretty much in step with commercial novels. Was it deep and thought provoking..No, but if you just want to be told a bed time story Summer House is great. Even the pandering to the NY 'old guard' frame of mind complete with the ever so common disdain for 'old guard' Southerners the book is extremely enter Was it 3 shots at the gun range or 4? And all those racist...um um um. It was a very entertaining book and James Patterson writes with great form and his transitions from chapter to chapter are pretty much in step with commercial novels. Was it deep and thought provoking..No, but if you just want to be told a bed time story Summer House is great. Even the pandering to the NY 'old guard' frame of mind complete with the ever so common disdain for 'old guard' Southerners the book is extremely entertaining. It is the first James Patterson novel I read and I will definitely read more of his books when taking a break from enlightenment.
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  • Laura
    January 1, 1970
    The Summer House, a historical property in rural Sullivan County, Georgia, was the scene of a horrific murder of seven people. When four Army Rangers are charged with this crime, Major Jeremiah Cook and his elite team of CID officers are sent to investigate. The plot twists and turns with this investigation and the people who become part of it. The book moves quickly and this reader had a hard time putting this book down. Loved it!
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  • Jillian Scott
    January 1, 1970
    I am sorry (and the subsequence thereof). These 3 words reduced my appeciation. Not plausible. Attempt to correct this major flaw in the last chapter. I am sorry. Characters are a bit cartoonish. So is the ending. Fast read, summer read. I attribute nothing to Patterson except his skill at identifying authors, doing a quick read (ha edit) and publishing under his own name. Dubois is the author.
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  • Onceinabluemoon
    January 1, 1970
    Clearly not my kind of book, the title grabbed me, didn't read synopsis... Hung around to solve the big question, and it wasn't pretty, the good old boys need to be knocked off the planet. I'm sure men love this kind of book, just not for me, started audio with husband traveling, only continued solo because I wanted answers.
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  • Pamela DeMine
    January 1, 1970
    from Army Ranger to big city cop to....assasin? this book.covers it all. and it classifying Georgia, USA to Afghanistan. now you lay awake tonight and try to figure otandfromGeorgis, USA to Afghanistan. now you lay awake tonight trying to the all thE together. that is brevIty only the mind of James Patterson.can be I g us!
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  • Marsha
    January 1, 1970
    This was a good one. Patterson and a new writing partner who just kept things interesting page after page. I'm hoping there will be more books by this writing team. The Rangers are in jail in a little Georgia county. Did they do this awful crime they are accused of. Sure seems like it..... Hmm, maybe not. Things get interesting and move fast. I enjoyed all of it.
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  • Cathleen Adams
    January 1, 1970
    I’m a fan of James Patterson from way back so always look forward to a new book. Really enjoyed this book, didn’t want to put it down. Had you thinking you had the story sussed but then things changed. I really enjoyed the CID team and hoping this book might be a first in a new series as would be good see how things progress with the team. Definitely recommend reading this.
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  • Helga Geary
    January 1, 1970
    Once started it was very difficult to put it down. James is a great writer with a lot of twists in the story. The hardship for the CID group to get all the facts needed to save the four Rangers was really mind blowing. I am sure such things happened back in older times. Thank you James for an awesome book.
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  • Jane Horner
    January 1, 1970
    I love reading James Patterson! I just read two of his books in 4 days! The Women's Murder Club #20, and The Summer House! I couldn't put The Summer House down! It was a completely new book with new characters! I have read all of the Alex Cross Books and all of the Women's Murder Club, and I look forward to every new book that he puts out!
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  • Lynn Brown
    January 1, 1970
    Another great book by James Patterson. I was attracted to the cover and the blurb about it at once. An army special unit goes to great lengths to try and find out the truth about a situation. It's fast paced, easy to read, and filled with cover ups. I recommend this book to everyone. It will keep you addicted till the last page.
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  • Ruth Ann
    January 1, 1970
    Told from several viewpoints, main character Major Jeremiah Cook’s first name is rarely mentioned and his POV is written in first person/present tense.Sullivan County is bristling with intrigue, corruption, politics, a gruesome murder, setups, and setups on top of setups and connections to Army Rangers, military CID, Washington DC and the CIA. Pretty good for a Patterson and co-author.
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  • Michelle Strommen
    January 1, 1970
    Excellent story. I’m noT really a military story person, but this was unbelievable. It makes me wonder about how many cover ups are real. Would love to see more missions from this group as additional books.
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