Dragon Age

Dragon Age Details

TitleDragon Age
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseMar 10th, 2020
PublisherTor Books
Rating
GenreFantasy, Short Stories, Games, Video Games

Dragon Age Review

  • Kathy
    January 1, 1970
    So you thought your patience meter was pretty high with regards to DA4's release? Well, you can kiss that serenity goodbye, my friends, because the bar's going to be bottomed out by the time you finish this book.Tevinter Nights just displaced The Last Flight as my favourite Dragon Age novel. Not so much in terms of prose and character work, but in terms of the breadth of content --walking you through the northern regions of Thedas, throwing you hints and speculation fodder, teasing you with So you thought your patience meter was pretty high with regards to DA4's release? Well, you can kiss that serenity goodbye, my friends, because the bar's going to be bottomed out by the time you finish this book.Tevinter Nights just displaced The Last Flight as my favourite Dragon Age novel. Not so much in terms of prose and character work, but in terms of the breadth of content --walking you through the northern regions of Thedas, throwing you hints and speculation fodder, teasing you with storylines that will most definitely reappear in the next game (I'll eat my stuffed nug if they don't), and just re-immersing you and setting up the stage for everything that's to come--Tevinter Nights is fantastic and a must-read for all fans of the series. And here's what the stage looks like: the Qunari invasion is well underway; Tevinter is being eaten up bit by bit, even as the Magisters and the Venatori scheme from within; Nevarra is standing on a fracture line that cuts between the Mortalitasi and the royal family; Antiva is being forced to rely on the Crows as their main defense against the Qunari; and a bald overpowered heartbreaker idiot thinks he knows what's best for the world and will stop at seemingly nothing to achieve it. And that's just what's on the surface and on this side of the Veil. Things aren't looking too great right now--and as this is THEDAS we're talking about, that's saying something. A few general criticisms, though. Some of these stories are obviously a lead-in to side quests or the main quest in DA4, so their conclusions aren't super satisfying; they serve more as teasers (but they're pretty good teasers). Also, a lot of them follow the same plot formula: "x is killing y" or "x wants to kill y", followed by "z has to step in to find out who and why." It can get a bit repetitive, especially if you're reading the book all in one go. My top five stories (in order): - "The Wigmaker" by Courtney Woods (5/5)- "Horror of Hormak" by John Epler (4.5/5)- "The Dread Wolf Take You" by Patrick Weekes (4/5)- "Eight Little Talons" by Courtney Woods (4/5)- "Half Up Front" by John Epler (4/5)(And a special mention to Lukas Kristjanson whose stories were just plain fun )~Review copy provided by the publisher for an honest reviewBlog | Twitter | Instagram
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  • Marta
    January 1, 1970
    *screams* DRAGON AGE!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
  • Sandra (LadyGrey Reads)
    January 1, 1970
    Though I haven't read it yet, I have flipped through it. Just because I was curious. HOLY F*CKING SH*T! ****This review will be divided into short thoughts on each story included. And as it will doubtlessly include spoilers for all of the games, it will be hidden behind a spoiler cut. If you plan on playing the games and don't want the story spoiled, do not read the full review until you've played them!(view spoiler)[- Three Trees to Midnight by Patrick Weekes. 4/5 starsAn interesting story to Though I haven't read it yet, I have flipped through it. Just because I was curious. HOLY F*CKING SH*T! ****This review will be divided into short thoughts on each story included. And as it will doubtlessly include spoilers for all of the games, it will be hidden behind a spoiler cut. If you plan on playing the games and don't want the story spoiled, do not read the full review until you've played them!(view spoiler)[- Three Trees to Midnight by Patrick Weekes. 4/5 starsAn interesting story to start with, as it is set in the aftermath of the invasion of Ventus (9:44 Dragon) and features the relationship between humans and elves, Tevinter and Qunari, mages and slaves, as well as the different ranks of mages. Add the wonderful writing by Weekes and you basically have a proper Dragon Age mission storyline! (hide spoiler)]
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  • Demi
    January 1, 1970
    No spoiler review: short stories was the perfect choice to tantalize me for whats coming next. Cant wait to spend the next however many months rereading and speculating over and over again!!!! No spoiler review: short stories was the perfect choice to tantalize me for what’s coming next. Can’t wait to spend the next however many months rereading and speculating over and over again!!!!
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  • Milsi
    January 1, 1970
    Actually one of the best Dragon Age books I've read. My favorite used to be Asunder, and I haven't read anything else of the sort since (so I have some catching up to do).Each short story is tastefully written and, while being self-conclusive, still leaves room for imagining what's going to happen in Dragon Age 4, if it ever comes out as it's meant to be and not as an EA scam. As the title suggests, many of the short stories presented in this book take place in Tevinter, but in reality, we meet Actually one of the best Dragon Age books I've read. My favorite used to be Asunder, and I haven't read anything else of the sort since (so I have some catching up to do).Each short story is tastefully written and, while being self-conclusive, still leaves room for imagining what's going to happen in Dragon Age 4, if it ever comes out as it's meant to be and not as an EA scam. As the title suggests, many of the short stories presented in this book take place in Tevinter, but in reality, we meet characters from all over, from old characters from Inquisition coming back to life to Tevinter magisters and Antivan Crows. In fact I especially enjoyed the short stories starring the Crows, "A Wigmaker's Job" in particular, and I hope we'll see more of Lucanis Dellamorte in Dragon Age 4, for sure.At the core, however, this book means to set up the stage before Dragon Age 4. The Qunari have invaded Tevinter, there's unrest among the Antivan Crows' Talons, horrors are moving beneath the earth and Solas is... being very Solas. (view spoiler)[It's enough to say that his regret over abandoning the Inquisitor is so intense that it summons a demon of Regret from his paintings in Skyhold, miles and miles away from where he most likely is. (hide spoiler)]I loved that Dorian, Cassandra, Charter and even Solas appeared on page. It was something that always made me hopeful about the other Dragon Age books I read: getting to see one of the characters from the games appear on page. This time, I got my wish. But be careful what you wish for lest you find yourself down in Solavellan Hell, friends.
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  • Sarah
    January 1, 1970
    I have been a fan of the Dragon Age franchise for a very long time, so I was very eager to dive back into the world of Thedas. Luckily for those who enjoy dark fantasy but are unfamiliar with the video games, novels, or graphic novels, you do not need to have prior knowledge of what has gone on before to enjoy the short stories presented in this volume. For the enthusiast, there are Easter Egg cameos of previous cast members and further development into little known side characters; but they are I have been a fan of the Dragon Age franchise for a very long time, so I was very eager to dive back into the world of Thedas. Luckily for those who enjoy dark fantasy but are unfamiliar with the video games, novels, or graphic novels, you do not need to have prior knowledge of what has gone on before to enjoy the short stories presented in this volume. For the enthusiast, there are Easter Egg cameos of previous cast members and further development into little known side characters; but they are rather like looking for Alfred Hitchcock in one of his movies - fun but not crucial.I usually find it difficult to review anthologies. I could discuss each and every story, but that would be verbose and boring. There wasn't a work in the collection that I did not enjoy, but two that I found to be particularly well told tales were:"Down Among the Dead Men" by Sylvia Feketekuty. It literally delves into a part of Thedas that has never been explored in depth before - the Nevarran Catacomes and the Necromantic Mortalitasi Mages that look after them. A young guardsmen must help two of the mages locate a corpse that has risen unexpectedly and hidden in the labyrinthine catacombs for some inexplicable reason. The story was fun despite it's macabre setting and circumstance. I was drawn in by the characters and stayed for the hunt. A fun twist to the end made the piece a very satisfying, quick read."The Wigmaker's Job" by Cortney Woods explores the job of an assassin from the view of two cousins that go about their deathly duties in two very different ways - one with flash and style, the other with shadow and strike. From back alleys to high fashion parties they persue their target with skill, flair, and a bit of magic. The banter between cousins was witty and sharp, and the target was as horrendous as he was pompous. A fast and adventurous journey of vengeance with a side of mercy.I also appreciated the smooth and subtle way that some of the stories tied themselves in with others in the book. Little details that helped make each piece stitch together into a whole. Not many anthologies where all the stories share a setting bother to do that. Overall I enjoyed the book. The glimpses into new parts of a beloved world was intriguing and exciting. . . and has left me chomping at the bit for the next installment, in whichever media form it takes.I recommend this for fans of the Dragon Age series, Barb Hendee, Gail Carriger, and Tanya Huff.*Special thanks to NetGalley and Tor Books for an eARC in exchange for an honest review*
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  • Joanna Bennett
    January 1, 1970
    eARC provided by publisher through NetGalley. All opinions are my own.Its always hard to review a book that is full of short stories. They are always unique and filled with many characters on different journeys. I enjoyed reading this one because I love the video games that this is based off of. There are characters old and new found in the pages which I loved. It was easy to get sucked into this world.Of course with any book full of short stories, there are some that I liked more than others. eARC provided by publisher through NetGalley. All opinions are my own.It’s always hard to review a book that is full of short stories. They are always unique and filled with many characters on different journeys. I enjoyed reading this one because I love the video games that this is based off of. There are characters old and new found in the pages which I loved. It was easy to get sucked into this world.Of course with any book full of short stories, there are some that I liked more than others. Even though this was the case, it didn’t take away for my overall enjoyment.If you are a fan of the games then I would definitely suggest checking this book out!
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  • Ruth
    January 1, 1970
    Probably no real reason to read this if you're not a fan of Dragon Age (beyond Courtney Woods' two excellent Crow stories), but since I'm one of those people who has been starved for new DA content for five years, this gets bumped up a star automatically. There's a lot of stories that feel like filler here - none are bad, per se, but it took me forever to finish some of them, and several are already blurred together in my memory. I can only hope that the monster hunts and the Lords of Fortune Probably no real reason to read this if you're not a fan of Dragon Age (beyond Courtney Woods' two excellent Crow stories), but since I'm one of those people who has been starved for new DA content for five years, this gets bumped up a star automatically. There's a lot of stories that feel like filler here - none are bad, per se, but it took me forever to finish some of them, and several are already blurred together in my memory. I can only hope that the monster hunts and the Lords of Fortune treasure stories don't ominously point to the side-quests / dungeons in a new games-as-a-service Dragon Age 4. At the very, least, though, the stories sketch out an intriguing picture of the state of Thedas going into the next game - a divided qunari invasion, the Tevinter imperium trying to decide its future (especially post-Venatori), and of course the Dread Wolf lingering in the background. If you're reading this collection, that last topic is probably the main draw, and Patrick Weekes' final story in the collection will make you happy. It has just enough new information to get you excited for the (probably still years away) next game, but not too much. There's an irritating tendency in modern franchises / shared cinematic universes / etc to put major plot and character developments in supplemental materials. Thankfully that doesn't seem to be the case here. Looking backward to Inquisition, Lukas Kristjanson's Callback is an immense amount of fun and welcome fan-service, drawing together some of the secondary NPCs from Skyhold for one more adventure. His Brother Genetivi story is also quite funny. My favorite stories in the collection were both from Courtney Woods, however, both of them dealing with the Antivan Crows. Both are pulpy genre mashups, one of them a Hitman/Dishonored heist story with a bit of effective horror (The Wigmaker Job), and the other a sexy Agatha Christie pastiche (Eight Little Talons). The stories move at an excellent pace, with charming and well drawn characters, and could stand alone as entertaining fantasy plots which work without the Dragon Age lore. (I was very sad to see that she apparently has recently left BioWare!) Anywho, off to theorize about what this means for the next game before it's inevitably rebooted / canceled / comes out in eight years.
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  • rocky
    January 1, 1970
    ** 3.5 / 5 overall. Books of short stories and anthologies are always hit-or-misses. As a fan of the games, I did enjoy the deep exploration into the lore, but most stories fell into the same format, that almost always being X is killing people and Y have to stop it. One pet peeve of mine - which isn't important, but really irked me in this book - is when authors don't describe their characters so I'm constantly left wondering who the fuck I'm following. I understand that short stories have ** 3.5 / 5 overall. Books of short stories and anthologies are always hit-or-misses. As a fan of the games, I did enjoy the deep exploration into the lore, but most stories fell into the same format, that almost always being X is killing people and Y have to stop it. One pet peeve of mine - which isn't important, but really irked me in this book - is when authors don't describe their characters so I'm constantly left wondering who the fuck I'm following. I understand that short stories have constraints, but it was something that kept coming up.That is not to say all stories were mediocre, some I enjoyed a lot. Some characters were very well written, some relationships so organic it was hard not to get invested. Some interesting lore was confirmed, some old characters made appearances, and overall it was decent. While not mindblowing, I do thing fans of the series will enjoy it and I will definitely be going back to some of the stories to pick apart more of the lore.One last bit of critique is the price point. I did see one other review pointing out that 18 USD for a paperpack is... a lot. I paid 17 euros for my copy and I agree. I've bought nicer paperbacks for less.Anyway here are the ratings for the individual stories:Three Trees to Midnight 4/5Down Among Dead Men 3/5The Horror of Hormak 5/5Callback 3.5/5Luck in the Gardens 4/5Hunger 4.5/5Murder by Death Mages 2/5The Streets of Minrathous 3/5The Wigmaker Jog 5/5Gentivi Dies in the End 2/5Herold Had the Plan 3/5An Old Crow’s Tricks 2/5Half Up Front 3/5Dread Wolf Take You 5/5
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  • Aimée
    January 1, 1970
    Ive enjoyed all the Dragon Age novels and Im a big fan of the series as a whole so its no surprise I enjoyed this, but it still blew me away!We finally get to see more of Thedas in these short stories and its so nice to get a feel for some of the areas we have only been told about so far.There are a lot of hints and teases of what could be coming in DA4 here, including major and minor plot points, potential companions, old companions and of course the next big bad.I enjoyed all of the short I’ve enjoyed all the Dragon Age novels and I’m a big fan of the series as a whole so it’s no surprise I enjoyed this, but it still blew me away!We finally get to see more of Thedas in these short stories and it’s so nice to get a feel for some of the areas we have only been told about so far.There are a lot of hints and teases of what could be coming in DA4 here, including major and minor plot points, potential companions, old companions and of course the next big bad.I enjoyed all of the short stories but my favourites were The Horror of Hormak, Callback and The Wigmaker Job. I was surprised by the return to a more dark fantasy in a lot of these stories as well. There’s some lovecraftian elements, and a fair few body horror moments.
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  • Bria
    January 1, 1970
    *extreme Gretchen Wieners voice* We should totally just stab Solas! Also OH MAN this book has ramped my excitement for DA4 up to the next level and I cant stop thinking about whats been reveal about the state of the world in this book and how it might come into play there and AHHHHHHHHHHH *extreme Gretchen Wieners voice* We should totally just stab Solas! Also OH MAN this book has ramped my excitement for DA4 up to the next level and I can’t stop thinking about what’s been reveal about the state of the world in this book and how it might come into play there and AHHHHHHHHHHH
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  • Jenia
    January 1, 1970
    3.5 stars - some good some meh. RTC!
  • Lisa Lavellan
    January 1, 1970
    I can't.I can't rate this book in my current emotional state.How can this elven egg break my heart after nearly 6 years all over again within a couple of pages. HOW DARE YOU?! I'm feeling abused and absolutely devastated and I am sobbing right now - and that's exactly what I want more of! At least I'm feeling something again since Trespasser.Honestly, Bioware... If I don't get DA4 soon, I can't promise anything.Or at least give me more short story collections like this until then.Var lath vir I can't.I can't rate this book in my current emotional state.How can this elven egg break my heart after nearly 6 years all over again within a couple of pages. HOW DARE YOU?! I'm feeling abused and absolutely devastated and I am sobbing right now - and that's exactly what I want more of! At least I'm feeling something again since Trespasser.Honestly, Bioware... If I don't get DA4 soon, I can't promise anything.Or at least give me more short story collections like this until then.Var lath vir suledin...Jk. I would like to rate this 1000/5 stars if possible.
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  • Krista D.
    January 1, 1970
    A great post-Inquisition collection. As with any short story collection, I didn't like them all, but that's to be expected.
  • Liz (Quirky Cat)
    January 1, 1970
    I received a copy of Dragon Age: Tevinter Nights through NetGalley in exchange for a fair and honest review. Have you been in desperate need of a Dragon Age fix? If so, then this short story anthology is one way to help ease that pain. It's not the same as the games, of course, but that won't stop it from being an entertaining read. Dragon Age: Tevinter Nights is a collection of fifteen short stories, all of them set within the wider world of the Dragon Age franchise. Here you'll find I received a copy of Dragon Age: Tevinter Nights through NetGalley in exchange for a fair and honest review. Have you been in desperate need of a Dragon Age fix? If so, then this short story anthology is one way to help ease that pain. It's not the same as the games, of course, but that won't stop it from being an entertaining read. Dragon Age: Tevinter Nights is a collection of fifteen short stories, all of them set within the wider world of the Dragon Age franchise. Here you'll find everything from bandits to heroes, and back again. Stories included in this collection: Three Trees to Midnight by Patrick Weekes, Down Among the Dead Men by Sylvia Feketekuty, The Horror of Hormak by John Epler, Callback by Lukas Kristhanson, Luck in the Gardens by Sylvia Feketekuty, Hunger by Brianne Battye, Murder by Death Mages by Caitlin Sullivan Kelly, The Streets of Minrathous by Brianne Battye, The Wigmaker Job by Courtney Woods, Genitivi Dies in the End by Lukas Kristjanson, Herold Had the Plan by Ryan Cormier, An Old Crow's Old Tricks by Arone LaBray, Eight Little Talons by Courtney Woods, Half Up Front by John Epler, and The Dread Wolf Take You by Patrick Weekes. All of which I'll review individually down below. Personally, I loved the variety found in this collection. It gave an even wider insight into the world, as well as providing a delightful trip back into a franchise I love so much. Then again, I've always been a fan of the novels and graphic novels, so perhaps my opinion isn't so surprising.Three Trees to Midnight by Patrick Weekes ★ ★ ★ ★ Three Trees to Midnight is the tale of two unlikely allies in the face of great danger. One elf, and one human mage. Not the most likely pair, but together they must face (and escape from) the Qunari and their prison camp. “Myrion raised his hands. If the Veil was thin, it was time to see how much he could really do.” I really enjoyed this short story. It was quick, fun, and yet wasn't afraid to dive into the racism many characters carry, and how that can all be broken thanks to circumstance and perspective. Not to mention, I loved the insight into the lore of Arlathan. Much appreciated. Down Among the Dead Men by Sylvia Feketekuty ★ ★ ★ ★ What happens when corpses take to the streets once again? Down Among the Dead Men is that tale. One corpse rose up in Nevarran, and in doing so dragged one guardsman and several Mortalitasi into the fray. “Would not a guardsman who's recited the history of every stone in every promenade we've passed regret passing up the chance to see the architecture of the Grand Necropolis?” This was another short story that I found myself really enjoying, mostly thanks to the guardsmen's perspective (and his love of architecture, history, and books...that might be my bias showing through, huh?). It was a unique story, though I wish that it had been further explained at points.The Horror of Hormak by John Epler ★ ★ ★ ★ This is an aptly named short story. The Horror of Hormak is at its heart a horror story. Two Gray Wardens have gone off searching for missing comrades (an entire company, actually), only to find that something significantly darker than they could have hoped for was the cause of it all. “For a moment, Ramesh forgot where he was. Black panic threatened to steal over him then, but he fought it down.” Maybe it's because of all the horror I've been reading lately, but I really enjoyed this short story. It was easy to get into, and exceptionally chilling. It is exactly how I pictured the horror side of Dragon Age to go. Callback by Lukas Kristhanson ★ ★ ★ ★ Sutherland has been called to Skyhold. It has been abandoned, yes, but that has not stopped the need to investigate the most recent goings on. More accurately, the state of abandonment is quite the cause for concern. Bonus points for classic character appearances. “The Inquisition wasn't the first army it had hosted. The next might not be so charitably inspired.” If you enjoyed Sutherland's character, then odds are good that you're going to appreciate this short story revolving around him. I also enjoyed the sense of suspense, as well as a brief glimpse into what has been going on here. Luck in the Gardens by Sylvia Feketekuty ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ Following a Riviana Lord of Fortune and a beloved character from the games, this is the tale of a great hunt. Well, mostly. Something dark is poaching within the city, and Dorian Pavus has amassed a small sum of money to pay off a hero (or anyone, really) to put an end to the monster. “Luck is twisting things to your own good, or noticing when they go well.” Once again, if you love seeing characters from the games make an appearance, then you're going to love Luck in the Gardens. I personally adore Dorian, so I was tickled to see his appearance here. I also loved the perspective from the Lord of Fortune, which made for a lot of fun. This was easily one of my favorites from this collection. Hunger by Brianne Battye ★ ★ ★ Grey Wardens take to the forefront again for this short story, Hunger. One village has been plagued by nightly terrors, and while it isn't their directive, two Grey Wardens have decided to step up and save the day. “Are you hungry? It asked itself.” I was intrigued by this story, though truth be told, I had a lot of trouble getting into it. I love the concept of two Grey Wardens trying to change the perspective of an entire town by saving them from the monsters. I think I just wish that it had been more detailed, though that probably would have required it to be a longer tale. Murder by Death Mages by Caitlin Sullivan Kelly ★ ★ ★ A war is brewing in Nevarra (what a surprise), and one Inquisition agent has been assigned to dive into the political mess and hopefully divert it before it begins. Cassandra Penaghast makes a brief appearance, though mostly in reference. “And none of the other Nevarrans would rather feed themselves to a wyvern than return to Nevarra City” I really wanted to love Murder by Death Mages, and I swear that's only partially because of Cassandra's involvement. Truth be told, I simply struggled to get into this story. I feel like if we had gotten more time to appreciate and sympathize with the leading character this whole tale would have gone better. But perhaps that's just me. On the bright side, there's a whole lot of politicking in this novel, from the royalty right down to the people in their care.The Streets of Minrathous by Brianne Battye ★ ★ ★ From one investigation to another. The Streets of Minrathous follows a private detective (as opposed to the Inquisition) as they dig into the Venatori cult – one that is actively fighting for power within Minrathous. “A bad night had turned into a bad morning, so I shouldn't have been surprised when the templars turned up.” I think I would have enjoyed this story a lot more, if not for placement. The last two short stories sort of bled together, but maybe that's just me? I did have to stop and think for a minute, before sitting down and writing about these two. That being said, it was interesting to see a bit more about the cults (and how pervasive they are) in this world. The Wigmaker Job by Courtney Woods ★ ★ ★ ★ Two Crows work in cohesion in order to take out their latest mark – a wigmaker of all people. The Wigmaker Job is a dark tale, following two descendants of the Talon as they hunt down a torturer you'd rather never hear about. “Look at you-quivering over Antivan propaganda.” I loved how dark and disturbing this story got. The more I read stories like these, the more I realize how well-suited it is to horror. Can we get more of this, please? The tone was perfection, as were the characters, whom I really enjoyed reading about. This is probably another one of my favorites from the collection.Genitivi Dies in the End by Lukas Kristjanson ★ ★ ★ ★ Be careful how much you trust the word of others, be it written or spoken. Everything has a bias, even if that fact is not clear. That is the lesson Genitivi Dies in the End seeks to teach us. Or rather, it is one of many lessons. Together, a Bard, a Brother Genitivi, and a former Chantry Sister go off on a quest...and bite off more than expected in the process. “A storied land of Blight and empire is 'unimportant' yet you linger on salacious personal details?” This was a fascinating story – I loved the message behind it, as well as the combination of characters involved. I also appreciated the title, even though there's an obvious spoiler in it. In a way, that warning was helpful. I would have happily read a longer story about these three. Herold Had the Plan by Ryan Cormier ★ ★ ★ ★ Herold Had the Plan is another tale involving a Lord of Fortune. Bharv is a dwarf, and he's been put on a job that comes with some unintended violence and dangers. All thanks to several subplots, all of which are revealed in time. Bonus points: Vaea makes an appearance near the end. “My daughters think it's important I eat right while running for my life.” I was surprised by how emotional this short story made me. I think it's because, despite the short amount of time available, it was easy to connect with and care about Bharv, the main perspective. More than that, he seemed to be in quite the bind, and yet was caring about the others on his team. Well, some of them, at any rate. An Old Crow's Old Tricks by Arone LaBray ★ ★ ★ ★ Never discount the Old Crow. An Old Crow's Old Tricks is about one elderly Crow assassin who is far from retirement. For she's on the hunt again, targeting Tevinter soldiers who did wrong by several elves long ago. “I even made sure to save something specifically for you.” I loved this concept. An old assassin still going off on her hunt, intentionally being underestimated due to her age. It's actually quite brilliant. My only regret is that we didn't have more time to dive into this story. Eight Little Talons by Courtney Woods ★ ★ ★ Looking for a murder mystery? Then Eight Little Talons is the short story for you to check out. The leaders of the Crow assassins have deemed it time to meet, despite all of the risks that come with having them all together. Naturally, things went off the rail from there. “'We are not on holiday' he hissed. 'The other Talons will be judging our every move.'” This short story kind of blends several genres together. It's mainly a murder mystery, but it has a strong romantic plot as well, which actually surprised me quite a bit. There are a lot of interesting details to pick up over the course of this read. I think had it been a full novel, or even novella, mostly because I feel like taking more time to set the scene would have been appreciated. Half Up Front by John Epler ★ ★ ★ A disgraced Altus has been given the opportunity for one final job. One job that will set her and her lover into a world of comfort. One chance to make everything right. It'll be worth it. She's been through worse before this, after all. “One thing you should know about me-I don't take kindly to intimidation.” Half Up Front was a deeply personal story, one following a woman who has been through so much, and yet has a long way yet to go. There were some interesting points and choices made throughout this short story. Though sometimes that resulted in confusing scenes or moments (or even decisions). On the whole, I found it to be interesting, though there were times where it felt like I was waiting for something to happen. The Dread Wolf Take You by Patrick Weekes ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ This is the story of Charter. She has been sent on another mission, this time to gather information about the Dread Wolf (aka, Solas). If you're wondering why you recognize that name, she is one of Leliana's spies, perhaps the one she trusts above all others. And it shows. “We came because we possess a shared interest in the Wolf.” The Dread Wolf Take You is probably the longest short story in this collection, but it's also the anchor story. There is good reason why it's so long, as there's a lot going on here. Honestly? It was fantastic. If you love Leliana half as much as I do, then you're going to love seeing how one of her spies works. The added bonus of the focus being on Silas is a nice touch, one of many throughout this story. I honestly would have happily kept reading this tale, had I been given half a chance.Check out more reviews over at Quirky Cat's Fat Stacks
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  • Chelsea
    January 1, 1970
    Everything I love about Dragon Age, with tons of new flavors thrown in! Diverse cast and stories, political and everyday struggles mixed with hope and triumphs! So much old lore is woven into new tidbits, and some of the stories truly made my heart ache. Old and new characters alike make appearances, and being able to explore as storied and ancient a place as Tevinter was an honest pleasure, all the good and bad, savory and sullied laid bare to see! If this truly is a hint at what we might see Everything I love about Dragon Age, with tons of new flavors thrown in! Diverse cast and stories, political and everyday struggles mixed with hope and triumphs! So much old lore is woven into new tidbits, and some of the stories truly made my heart ache. Old and new characters alike make appearances, and being able to explore as storied and ancient a place as Tevinter was an honest pleasure, all the good and bad, savory and sullied laid bare to see! If this truly is a hint at what we might see in Dragon Age 4, I cannot wait!
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  • Kristin
    January 1, 1970
    Before getting to the review need to start off with two things, a complaint and a confession.The Complaint: I spent a little over $18 on this book, so I was a little disappointed I received a paperback novel. I was even more disappointed that the moment I opened the book the clear protective cover on the cover, instantly began to ripple on the spine. A few stories later, the clear cover began to peel away and curl at the corners. By the time I finished the book, the sides my (where the pages Before getting to the review need to start off with two things, a complaint and a confession.The Complaint: I spent a little over $18 on this book, so I was a little disappointed I received a paperback novel. I was even more disappointed that the moment I opened the book the clear protective cover on the cover, instantly began to ripple on the spine. A few stories later, the clear cover began to peel away and curl at the corners. By the time I finished the book, the sides my (where the pages are) and bottom inch of the front and back cover was free of the clear coat. It's now curled up unattractively.Considering how much I paid and that I baby the crap out of my books (especially the ones I collect), to say I'm disappointed at the quality is an understatement. Then again, considering EA is involved in the production of anything Bioware related, I shouldn't have been surprised they overcharged for a cheaply made book.The Confession: I actually hate anthologies. I could never pinpoint why exactly, but I think it has to do with the different writing styles. I find it too jarring to switch from one writer to the next and if I don't like a story a writer wrote (I always feel obligated to read all of them even if I don't like them), it kind of ruins the mood of the book for me.Which is why it took so long for me to read this and you shouldn't let my interview sway you into not reading it. If you love Dragon Age and are excited about the next game, READ IT! So much information and hints are dropped it's almost overwhelming and has reignited my excitement (which had turned to nervousness and trepidation after Mass Effect: Andromeda and Anthem).The Review: In addition to having 15 (!) individual stories, the book also has a cool (small) map of Thedas (I'm pretty sure my money went to printing it because it's a higher quality than the book cover). I'm going to do a short review of each story (with spoiler free summaries) and a rating, cause I don't know how to actually review an anthology. So bear with me!Also, just a warning this book seems to be going off the assumption that the Inquisition disbanded at the end of the game. I did disband but some of you that didn't might be a little disappointed it isn't more vague or that your choice was overridden.I'm averaging my rating out to 3/5 stars for the whole book. I liked it as a whole but only a few stories really stood out to me, the rest were just...okay.Three Trees to Midnight by Patrick WeekesRating: 4/5 Stars This story is about two men (an elf and a human mage) that are taken prisoner by the Qunari in Ventus. It takes the reader from the Qunari prison camp to the mysterious and magical Artlathan Forest.This was one of my favorite stories, purely for a glimpse into the mysterious and ever present lore involving Arlathan. Down Among the Dead Men by Slyvia FeketekutyRating: 2/5 StarsThis story is about a Nevarran guardsman forced to turn to the eerie Mortalitasi for help in a matter involving a runaway, vengeful corpse of a nobleman.This was one of my least favorite stories. The writing felt too shallow and stiff. The scenes jumped around so abruptly (one passage is in a tomb where drama is happening which abruptly ends in the character sitting in a Mortalitasi office having tea) I felt like I had whiplash from the whole experience. If the plot twist hadn't saved it, I would have given it a flat 1 star.The Horror of Hormak by John EplerRating: 3/5This story involves a couple of Gray Wardens searching for an entire company of GW that disappeared mysteriously while on a secret mission. They uncover a mysterious and ancient ruin that contains magic so twisted and cruel it probably would have made Corypheus pause. It hints at a future baddie or ancient elven lore yet to be uncovered.I can't pinpoint why exactly, but this story didn't sit well with me. The entire plot is brand new, no lore from any books or past games to back it up or anything...which should be exciting, right? A build up to figuring out wtf is going on and who they're talking about...Except it wasn't and I'm not completely sure why. I liked the characters, the writing style and plot was okay (better than the Dead Men story) but something about it just didn't sit well with me. Maybe because the plot reminded me of basically every single spelunking horror movie on the market? Or maybe the thought of this being reduced to a busy side quest (a number is mentioned at the end of the story that made me groan at the thought. Then made me worry about the rumors about DA4 becoming an online only game might be true and these are hints at World Boss Events, ugh please don't make it an MMO) or a war table-like mission took some of the intrigue out? Callback by Lukas KristjansonRating: 5/5This story calls Sutherland and his company back to the now abandoned Skyhold to investigate a strange message they reiceved from a caretaker.I'm a sucker for stories that involve past characters, even minor ones. So I'm not afraid to admit this was my second favorite story (the first being the very last story). I really liked Sutherland's (minor) storyline in DAI so I was excited to see how he was doing after the fact and I wasn't disappointed. I wish there were more stories like this, covering what characters were doing after the game when they found their own paths.Luck in the Gardens by Sylvia Feketekuty Rating: 4/5This story covers a Riviani Lord of Fortune investigating a strange creature that's been sighted in and rumored to be killing people in Minrathous. A twist of fate lands them in the path of Dorian Pavus who hires them to take care of the beast before it causes too much destruction. Again, a sucker for stories about characters after the games...even if they're reduced to background characters. This story was better written than her Dead Men story and had plenty of mystery and suspense to keep me hooked. I'm a little disappointed that no clear answers were given, but hopeful this thing will be mentioned in more detail in future games or literature. Hunger by Brianne BattyeRating: 3/5This story follows two Grey Wardens on a mission, who end up side tracked by a plea from a woman to save her strange village.Best part of this story was the two Grey Wardens, I liked their personalities and and how well developed they were. They (an elf and a dwarf) worked well together and trusted each other like true comrades. I thought it represented the brotherhood of the Grey Wardens well. As for the plot...well...been there done that in DAO.Murdered by Death Mages by Caitlin Sullivian KellyRating: 3/5In this story we follow the misadventures of a Inquisition agent, ordered by Cassandra Penaghast to stop a plot to cause a war in Nevarra by order of the Inquisitor.I liked this story purely for the glimpse into Nevarra's royal society, their weird worship of statues, and their political pot holes. Otherwise...eh.The Streets of Minrathous by Brianne BattyeRating: 3/5Follows a "private detective" investigating the fragments of the Venatori cult scrambling to regain their purpose and power in Minrathous.I'm so-so on this one. I like the plot but the ending battle scene kinda fizzled out for me, it felt too rushed and a bit stiff.The Wigmaker Job by Courtney WoodsRating: 4/5This story is about two Crows, both the grandsons of the first Talon, and their mission to take out their latest mark, a Tevinter wigmaker with a fetish for torture and other things that would make Varric's chest hair fall out.This is definitely on my top 5 favorite stories list. The characters were well written and the plot had me on the edge of my seat as each twist and turn and character development was revealed.Brother Genitivi Dies at the End by Lukas KristjansonRating: 2/5What do you get when you send a Bard, a former chantry sister turned author, and Brother Genitivi on a mission for the Inquisition? A mess. I'm not really sure what the point of this story was, except to not trust what you read and that bards and authors shouldn't be sent to face off against a bunch of Qunari without a Lord of Fortune babysitting them. The Inquisition is really making some weird choices these days to under mind the Dread Wolf. I really hope what Genitivi said the about the Randy Dowager was true, because it not only made me laugh like an idiot it saved this story.Herold had the Plan by Ryan CormierRating: 3/5This story is about the misadventures of dwarven Lord of Fortune, fleeing from Starkhaven with his elven guide and muscle headed bodyguard after a heist gone wrong.Saving grace of this (somewhat pointless) story was Bharv, the dwarven MC. He was old, cranky, and sarcastic and I loved him. There was also a brief appearance from Vaea (of Dragon Age: Knight Errant and then some, fame) at the end.An Old Crow's Old Tricks by Arone Le BrayRating: 3/5This is an...unusual story...it follows the exploits of an elderly Crow assassin as she gets revenge for her clients against a band of Tevinter soldiers and their mage commander.The most interesting part of this story was a 7 foot tall elf (half-elf?). I thought Fenris and Solas were tall for elves, they have nothing on this guy. I hope he shows up in a game, just so we can marvel at his stature.Eight Little Talons by Courtney WoodsRating: 3/5A murder mystery involving the Eight Talons, the leaders of the Crow Assassins. They risk being called together by First Talon Caterina (the grandmother of the two Crows from the Wigmaker's Job) for a rare meeting to discuss the Qunari threat, only to find they've made themselves easy targets in a plot to eliminate their order.Initially I was kind of excited to read a fantasy based murder mystery (mystery being my favorite genre) until I realized this was more "romance" than "mystery". While it was fun figuring out who did it, I really could have done without the sexual tension scenes that dragged the story out and distracted from the problem at hand. Who has the libido of a teenage boy when your life is literally on the line?One problem I had, if they're professional assassins...why do they think blood smells like copper? A quick Google search informs you that our blood, in fact, smells like iron and why.On a kinda fun side note, it's revealed what happened to Zevran's house/Talon after he failed to kill the Hero of Ferelden.Half Up Front John EplerRating: 2/5This story follows a disgraced former Altus who left her family to be with her elven girlfriend/wife, after she disgraced the family by freeing her lover from slavery. She's asked to recover a certain historical object for an amount that guaranteed she and her SO would live in comfort for a long time.This story should have been trimmed of excess fat, it was way too long. I'm also not sure why we were forced to follow the Altus who literally did next to nothing until the end (even standing there gawking while her SO fought a group of Qunari instead of helping or doing what she was supposed to do), while her SO did basically everything.The Dread Wolf Take You by Patrick WeekesRating: 5/5This story is about Charter, an agent of the Inquisition and one of Leliana's most trusted spies, as she attends a meeting to gather information on the movements and motivation of the Dread Wolf/Solas.The plot twist at the end made this story my absolute favorite story in this entire book. If you're iffy about reading any of these stories, you have to read this one. There's an important message that cannot be missed just for you, Inquisitor.
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  • Marlene
    January 1, 1970
    Originally published at Reading RealityIf this is your jam, if Dragon Age is your jam, then Tevinter Nights is the jammiest jam that ever jammed. But I have to say upfront that if youre not already into Thedas, this collection is not the place to get there. The place to begin is the awesome, absorbing videogame Dragon Age Origins, which premiered in 2009 and has, so far, spawned two sequels, the under regarded, boringly named but eminently playable Dragon Age II, and the later Dragon Age Originally published at Reading RealityIf this is your jam, if Dragon Age is your jam, then Tevinter Nights is the jammiest jam that ever jammed. But I have to say upfront that if you’re not already into Thedas, this collection is not the place to get there. The place to begin is the awesome, absorbing videogame Dragon Age Origins, which premiered in 2009 and has, so far, spawned two sequels, the under regarded, boringly named but eminently playable Dragon Age II, and the later Dragon Age Inquisition. Those of us who love the series and replay it endlessly are now in year 6 of waiting for Dragon Age 4, which looks like it’s going to be titled The Dread Wolf Rises and not rise in real life until 2022 at the earliest.I’m not sure whether the Tevinter Nights collection is designed as a teaser, as a hint of things to come, or just to drive us even crazier waiting. Whatever the case, for fans the collection is a terrific way of seeing parts of Thedas we have heard of but not seen much of – at least not yet – catch a few glimpses of beloved characters, and just generally have a good time in a place we’ve come to know and love.And the stories themselves, well, if you’re familiar with where they’re coming from, the collection is a rollicking good time. Maybe not all of the stories are quite worthy of a Tethras (Hard in Hightown) but a good time is certainly had by all, especially if you’re also into the sword and sorcery school of fantasy, because that’s where this collection mostly falls. With a couple of toe dips into the very dark fantasy edges of horror.Dragging myself back from the squeeing to talk about the stories themselves, as I said, they are all pretty much playing in the sword and sorcery end of the fantasy pond, so there are lots of assassins, lots of dastardly plots and LOTS of murders. Then again, several of the stories feature the Antivan Crows, and assassination is their business.The story I found to be the absolute most fun was Down Among the Dead Men by Sylvia Feketekuty. While part of that fun was that it is set in Nevarra, a place we haven’t been, and in the Grand Necropolis, under the purview of Nevarra’s Mortalitasi, the mages who maintain the Crypts and their dead and demonic denizens of whom we’ve heard much but not met many.On the surface this story reads like a dungeon crawl into a dungeon full of creepy, crawly undead monsters, but it subverts itself in the end. The “I see dead people” is expected, the “I be dead people” is rather a shock for our guardsman hero. That he achieves his lifelong dream of becoming a librarian as a dead person turns the gallows humor into a smile.The two stories that edge the closest to outright horror are the aptly named The Horror of Hormak by John Epler and The Wigmaker by Courtney Woods. While their portraits of previously unseen parts of Thedas are fascinating, it’s the evils faced by the protagonists that make both of these stories sing their creepy songs. It wouldn’t have taken much for either of these stories to be just plain horror in any setting, but Thedas gives both of them a bit of extra gruesome spice. That The Wigmaker can also be read as a scathing commentary on the real-life fashion industry just adds to the chills it engenders.The two stories that dealt most directly with characters that fans are familiar with from the series are Callback and Genitivi Dies in the End, both by Lukas Kristjanson. Both of his stories rely on readers’ knowledge of the series, and both take that knowledge and use it to tell stories that pull the reader right back into this beloved world while telling new stories with old friends. Callback is a particularly poignant post-Inquisition story, while the story around Genitivi, while “enhanced” by knowing the character and the world, is actually a well-done version of an often told type of story, one about storytellers and storytelling and the way that so-called history can be embellished – or not – as the tale-teller decides. Or as the tale-teller requires in order to get out of town with a whole skin.Last, but not least, the one that sent chills up my spine not for its creepy or horrific elements but for the way that it continues the post-Inquisition story by giving us a view of exactly what the Dread Wolf has been up to since the end of Dragon Age Inquisition. The final end of the Trespasser DLC when he announced that he planned to essentially destroy the world in order to save his own people and correct the wrong he committed Ages ago. He’s just as proud, self-deluded and self-serving as ever, and just as hot and just as cold, all at the same time. I can’t help but hope that his original name might be prophetic in some way. And that this time “Pride” will go before a very big fall. He certainly has the hubris for it.We’ll see. Eventually. In 2022 or 2023. Not nearly soon enough. But if you love epic fantasy of the somewhat grimdark persuasion, enjoy experiencing a story through videogaming, and have not yet had the pleasure of going to Thedas, you have plenty of time to work your way through the entire series before The Dread Wolf Rises.If you have already fallen in love with Thedas as I have, we have these stories to tease us and tide us over.Escape Rating A-: I loved this collection. Fans will love this collection. Everyone else will wonder what the fuss is about. But for those of us who already know what the fuss is about, Tevinter Nights is a very fun read.
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  • Kyla
    January 1, 1970
    I am always very impressed with the Dragon Age novels, and this is no exception (even if it is a short story collection instead of an actual novel). It has certainly gotten me amped up for Dragon Age 4, even if it is still at least two years away. Dragon Age, as always, has it's strength in the fantastic characters and delightful worldbuilding teases. Three Trees to Midnight It's a good start. Lots of character development crammed into 40 pages. I totally ship it. It really gave a good I am always very impressed with the Dragon Age novels, and this is no exception (even if it is a short story collection instead of an actual novel). It has certainly gotten me amped up for Dragon Age 4, even if it is still at least two years away. Dragon Age, as always, has it's strength in the fantastic characters and delightful worldbuilding teases. Three Trees to Midnight It's a good start. Lots of character development crammed into 40 pages. I totally ship it. It really gave a good background/set up a lot of the other stories (even if some take place before it or don't reference the events in it at all). Down Among the Dead: A nice little Sixth Sense twist that I did not see coming. New lore, kind of! Overall enjoyable.The Horror of Hormak: This was my favourite story in the entire anthology. I love it. Love the gay. Love how creepy it was, and how well John Epler built up the atmosphere. This, more than any other story, made me extra excited for DA4. Grey Wardens 4 lyf. Callback: Eh. It was okay. It was my least favourite out of all the stories. Luck in the Gardens: Non-binary character. Dorian! The story was a lot of fun. I think I liked the framing device. The creature was creepy. Hunger: Werewolves and Grey Wardens and cursed villages, oh my. Antoinne was delightful. Evka was a badass. As an aside, I really love the name Mina. Murder by Death Mages: From the title, I had expected a comedy. Boy was I wrong. Sidoney was churlish and not at all likable, but I shipped her and Cyrros and I was rooting for her in the end. I did suspect the ending from pretty close to the beginning. A good read. Cassandra! <3 The Streets of Minrathous: This was a fun little mystery/private eye story. I definitely ship Neve/Rana. It was a lot of fun to read. I really hope the demon under the city shows up in DA4. The Wigmaker Job: This might have been my second favourite story. The Crows! I miss Zevran. In the meantime, Lucanis and Illario are good substitutes, and I'm very much hoping for Lucanis to show up in the game. It was nice to see the wigmaker get his commupance, and Lucanis is wonderfully noble. The ending was a great teaser for more, too. Genitivi Dies at the End: Lukans Kristjanson, author of Callback, wrote this one too, and once again it was kind of eh. It was kind of a fun storytelling premise and I enjoyed the unreliable storytellers (even if I didn't always love the interruptions), but the sentences were muddled and hard to follow. I guess I'm just not a fan of Kristjanson. Herold Had the Plan: Man, what a touching story. Just so damn sweet. Fucking Panaztotti. You know, somehow not once during Luck in the Garden did I put it together that the Lords of Fortune was an organization and not just a title Hollix gave themself? An Old Crows Old Tricks Another fantastic story. There was something very poetic about the targets all dying the way the killed. I loved how unsuspecting Lessef was. This was a stark reminder of what a garbage society Tevinter is (not that the other stories shy away from that. Just this one is even more obvious). Bicklius' villain monologue were he waxed poetic about all his belongings was a little much. Eight Little Talons: When I first read the title, I had been hoping to the Maker for a griffon story. Alas, what I got instead was pretty great. A Crow Murder Mystery! How do you narrow down the murderer in an estate filled with assassins? Well, my prime suspect was the culprit so I guess it's not too hard har har. Vi and Teia were great together. Courtney Woods, author of "The Wigmaker Job", writes some pretty fantastic Crow fiction. I very much enjoyed it. Half Up Front I had been looking forward to the second Epler story since The Horror of Hormak, though I didn't like this one as much as I liked that one. Still some great gay going on though. The story is very different, from tone to plot to everything, which shows Epler has some great range. The relationship between Vadis and Irian was super intriguing, with Vadis wanting, needing to be the best and Irian just naturally being the best, with no resentment or resignation toward her for being so great leaking through in the narrative (if Vadis can't be the best, well, she can love the best at least haha). Multiple uses of Chekov's Gun, which was great. A really good read. The Dread Wolf Take You: I had wondered if Solas was one of the ones gathered, though my guess hadn't been correct. Luck in the Gardens uses a similar framing device, where the story is being told "orally", but this one does it much more believably, written in a way that someone would actually tell a story aloud instead of written in a way where it's still read like a narrative. Every character had a strong voice and their own style. Love the unreliable narratives. It was a great ending for a fantastic anthology.
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  • Sarah
    January 1, 1970
    I have been a fan of the Dragon Age franchise for a very long time, so I was very eager to dive back into the world of Thedas. Luckily for those who enjoy dark fantasy but are unfamiliar with the video games, novels, or graphic novels, you do not need to have prior knowledge of what has gone on before to enjoy the short stories presented in this volume. For the enthusiast, there are Easter Egg cameos of previous cast members and further development into little known side characters; but they are I have been a fan of the Dragon Age franchise for a very long time, so I was very eager to dive back into the world of Thedas. Luckily for those who enjoy dark fantasy but are unfamiliar with the video games, novels, or graphic novels, you do not need to have prior knowledge of what has gone on before to enjoy the short stories presented in this volume. For the enthusiast, there are Easter Egg cameos of previous cast members and further development into little known side characters; but they are rather like looking for Alfred Hitchcock in one of his movies - fun but not crucial.I usually find it difficult to review anthologies. I could discuss each and every story, but that would be verbose and boring. There wasn't a work in the collection that I did not enjoy, but two that I found to be particularly well told tales were:"Down Among the Dead Men" by Sylvia Feketekuty. It literally delves into a part of Thedas that has never been explored in depth before - the Nevarran Catacomes and the Necromantic Mortalitasi Mages that look after them. A young guardsmen must help two of the mages locate a corpse that has risen unexpectedly and hidden in the labyrinthine catacombs for some inexplicable reason. The story was fun despite it's macabre setting and circumstance. I was drawn in by the characters and stayed for the hunt. A fun twist to the end made the piece a very satisfying, quick read."The Wigmaker's Job" by Cortney Woods explores the job of an assassin from the view of two cousins that go about they're deathly duties in two very different ways - one with flash and style, the other with shadow and strike. From back alleys to high fashion parties they persue their target with skill, flair, and a bit of magic. The banter between cousins was witty and sharp, and the target was as horrendous as he was pompous. A fast and adventurous journey of vengeance with a side of mercy.I also appreciated the smooth and subtle way that some of the stories tied themselves in with others in the book. Little details that helped make each piece tie together into a whole. Not many anthologies where all the stories share a setting bother to do that. Overall I enjoyed the book. The glimpses into new parts of a beloved world was intriguing and exciting. . . and has left me chomping at the bit for the next installment, in whichever media form it takes.I recommend this for fans of the Dragon Age series, Barb Hendee, Gail Carriger, and Tanya Huff.*Special thanks to NetGalley and Tor Books for an eARC in exchange for an honest review*
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  • Jamila Young
    January 1, 1970
    Oh my god, I thought I could wait for DA4 but my patience is gone again now that Ive read this. I cant believe we got more words out of Solas in this book. Im probably going to analyse everything about the story he told and all the words he said. There were many great stories in this book, but all I want to talk about is The Dread Wolf Take You. But Ill talk about my general thoughts and what I think is to come instead of just obsessing over the final story. So some key things stood out to me, Oh my god, I thought I could wait for DA4 but my patience is gone again now that I’ve read this. I can’t believe we got more words out of Solas in this book. I’m probably going to analyse everything about the story he told and all the words he said. There were many great stories in this book, but all I want to talk about is The Dread Wolf Take You. But I’ll talk about my general thoughts and what I think is to come instead of just obsessing over the final story. So some key things stood out to me, there were lots of Antivan Crow stories and mentions which makes me think they’re going to play a big part in the next game. The stories set in Nevarra focused a lot on how they handle the dead, which is another thing that might be important, especially as we know that Solas is totally against binding spirits and there’s a lot of spirit stuff happening with their dead. Maybe we’re going to Nevarra too? Of course lots of Tevinter and Venatori which everyone has been expecting. Varric is working with the Ben-Haasrath to get information on Solas, so hopefully he’s also in the next game. Also, the Horror of Hormak seems to be some lore to do with Ghilan’nain, and shows how cruel she might have been. And finally on Solas himself, what does it mean that the figure is comforting the other figure on the idol? And didn’t we notice that the comforted figure only has one arm too, which everyone thought might be the Inquisitor? To me, the comforting figure looks like Mythal. I honestly have no clue what it could mean, but I am very interested to find out. OMG, I am so excited. 5/5 because I love Dragon Age, and they were well written and entertaining stories. I think The Dread Wolf Take You is my favourite but only because it has my husband Solas lol, but a close second is the Eight Little Talons which was like a mini mystery story. And I loved An Old Crow’s Old Tricks as well. The Horror of Hormak was so chilling. Okay, I’m about to go and read everyone’s theories now.
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  • Dominic
    January 1, 1970
    I wouldn't call myself a hardcore Dragon Age fan, but I enjoyed the first game - later renamed "Origins" - and was sufficiently intrigued by the ending of Dragon Age: Inquisition. The world of Dragon Age is a darker take on Tolkienian epic fantasy. Despite the obvious similarities with The Lord of the Rings - complete with an alliance between men, dwarves, and elves against an army of orcs (called "Darkspawn" in Dragon Age lore) - Dragon Age manages to evoke an illusion of depth. There are I wouldn't call myself a hardcore Dragon Age fan, but I enjoyed the first game - later renamed "Origins" - and was sufficiently intrigued by the ending of Dragon Age: Inquisition. The world of Dragon Age is a darker take on Tolkienian epic fantasy. Despite the obvious similarities with The Lord of the Rings - complete with an alliance between men, dwarves, and elves against an army of orcs (called "Darkspawn" in Dragon Age lore) - Dragon Age manages to evoke an illusion of depth. There are realms as interesting as Ferelden just offscreen. Tevinter is one of those realms. Tevinter Nights is an anthology of short stories that take place after Inquisition and mostly focus Tevinter. This has the effect of helping to build the world of Dragon Age, letting us explore an area and characters not seen in the games, while also providing hints at the announced fourth Dragon Age game. As with many anthologies, the stories contained within are of variable quality. Some are quite entertaining, some a bit slow. I actually found the most interesting tales to be the ones about the Ativan Crows. Zevran was one of the more complex characters in the first game and so I enjoyed learning more about how these assassins operate. For those readers looking for hints about the next installment in the Dragon Age mythos, this book should satisfy you. I won't spoil anything except to say that some of the stories deal directly with the aftermath of Inquisition and the revelation about Solas. I wouldn't recommend this book to general fans of fantasy literature; the book requires an extensive knowledge of Dragon Age lore to appreciate (do you remember what the Mortalitasi are?). However, I would recommend it for Dragon Age fans.[Note: I received a copy of this book from the publisher in exchange for an honest review.]
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  • Michael E.
    January 1, 1970
    As my friends and some acquaintances know, I love Dragon Age. I even have an Inquisition tattoo. I have all the books and comics in one form or another. Tevinter Nights is a collection of short stories meant to fill in the blanks, or rather bridge to the eventual (hopeful) release of the fourth full game. Each story focuses on different characters as we explore parts of Thedas not really fleshed out in the games or other ancillary media. Nevara, Antiva and of course Tevinter being the three we As my friends and some acquaintances know, I love Dragon Age. I even have an Inquisition tattoo. I have all the books and comics in one form or another. Tevinter Nights is a collection of short stories meant to fill in the blanks, or rather bridge to the eventual (hopeful) release of the fourth full game. Each story focuses on different characters as we explore parts of Thedas not really fleshed out in the games or other ancillary media. Nevara, Antiva and of course Tevinter being the three we see the most of, or rather people from those countries. Most stories are typical of Dark Fantasy, especially for Dragon Age people lie, twist and betray one another all while working towards a greater goal. We get to see more of the Qunari Civil War from the ongoing comics and what it means for all of Thedas; we meet elves in the employ of a well known god; and see just how fucked up Cassandra's homeland can be. We mostly deal with new characters, almost each and everyone feeling like a potential player in the next game; and a few cameos from characters that are well known, loved or rising. Hell, we even get to meet the writer of popular Orlesian smut literature!The stories are a little uneven of course, as are any short story collections, but on the whole, the sum is incredible, making me want and need more from Bioware's stable of fantasy. This book is not for everyone, first off if you don't know Dragon Age...you probably will not get it. Even among the fans, it will clash with your player canon. This is Bioware's canon after all, and characters thought dead are alive. Which of course makes things a bit more interesting. I admittedly killed a character that appears, and was happy they showed up alive; because it makes my head canon that much darker.So yea. Read it if you are a fan, or not you should check it out.
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  • Shane Jardine
    January 1, 1970
    Originally posted at www.archeddoorway.comIve been a huge fan of the Dragon Age franchise ever since Dragon Age: Origins was released back in 2009. Im pretty sure Ive played every game in the series and read every book and comic since they first started releasing. So even though Im a big fan of short stories, I was still pretty excited to receive this book in the mail a few weeks ago and started reading it almost right away. Dragon Age: Tevinter Nights is a great collection of stories by some Originally posted at www.archeddoorway.comI’ve been a huge fan of the Dragon Age franchise ever since Dragon Age: Origins was released back in 2009. I’m pretty sure I’ve played every game in the series and read every book and comic since they first started releasing. So even though I’m a big fan of short stories, I was still pretty excited to receive this book in the mail a few weeks ago and started reading it almost right away. Dragon Age: Tevinter Nights is a great collection of stories by some fantastic authors that was well worth the read!While I’m normally not a fan of anthologies like this because I find the stories to be a bit too short for me liking, I do think the format works really well for a franchise like this. Dragon Age: Tevinter Nights does a wonderful job of expanding upon and fleshing out the world of Thedas even more. A lot of the stories in this anthology explore parts of Thedas we only see mentioned in the games and the way they are written they definitely feel like they are leading up to a new game in the franchise. Instead of a single linear storyline, Tevinter Nights bounces around a bit and shows us events and points in time that I think really help build out the lore of Dragon Age franchise as much as any of the games do.I can’t go into much detail on the stories without spoiling things for people who haven’t had a chance to read the anthology yet, but I will say that the Qunari invasion is going to lead the world of Thedas to some really interesting places. One of the things that really surprised me about this book is that I don’t think it contained a single story that I disliked. Though, I will say that both of the stories that Patrick Weekes wrote for Dragon Age: Tevinter Nights were my favorite stories in the entire anthology and would have made the book worth reading even if I didn’t enjoy the rest of the stories like I did.All in all, this was a fantastic book worth reading and I would recommend it to anyone looking for something new to read, whether they are a fan of the franchise or not. The one thing I think this book really did though was to make me want to go out and buy all the games so I can play them again in preparation for when we get the next game in the series!I received a free copy of this book in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Jessie Hopkins
    January 1, 1970
    I give this book 5 stars because it beautifully served its purpose. Dragon Age: Tevinter Nights is a collection of short stories from the creators of the Dragon Age franchise that takes place after the events of the latest video game, Dragon Age Inquisition. Each story serves a purpose in setting up the highly anticipated next installment of these video games, particularly the threats of the Qunari invasion and, even more importantly, the Dread Wolf's plans for the world of Thedas and the Veil.I I give this book 5 stars because it beautifully served its purpose. Dragon Age: Tevinter Nights is a collection of short stories from the creators of the Dragon Age franchise that takes place after the events of the latest video game, Dragon Age Inquisition. Each story serves a purpose in setting up the highly anticipated next installment of these video games, particularly the threats of the Qunari invasion and, even more importantly, the Dread Wolf's plans for the world of Thedas and the Veil.I LOVED this book! I had hoped that this would help alleviate some of my impatience for the next game (which it failed) by providing me more stories of the fictional world I've fallen in love with (which it succeeded). Many stories had characters from earlier games or novels such as Dorian 🥰, Sutherland ❤❤, and Genitivi, while others are clearly setting up characters (and dangers) that will hold some level of importance in the next game. I am much more excited for the next game and will no doubt have to replay and reread Dragon Age materials in order to prevent myself from going insane with the wait. The final story in this anthology actually gave me chills.If you're a fan of Dragon Age, READ THIS!!!! If you're not familiar with the franchise and love fantasy stories involving magic, dragons, flawed heroes, and a world that refuses to stay fixed, I highly recommend diving in. For those that maybe aren't into playing video games, no worries. Lots of books and comics out there to help with world building and YouTube is full of people's playthroughs of the three games so you can get the main storylines. 😉
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  • WS_BOOKCLUB
    January 1, 1970
    Thank you to Netgalley for providing me with this book in exchange for my honest opinion. This book is available for purchase now.Sometimes Im in the mood for a fun, slash em and bash em fantasy. This collection of stories certainly fit the bill. As is the case with most short story collections, I enjoyed some of the stories more than others. However, this is a strong book and even the stories I didnt love were fun.Ill admit that I dont know a ton of the lore surrounding Dragon Age. I dont get Thank you to Netgalley for providing me with this book in exchange for my honest opinion. This book is available for purchase now.Sometimes I’m in the mood for a fun, slash ’em and bash ’em fantasy. This collection of stories certainly fit the bill. As is the case with most short story collections, I enjoyed some of the stories more than others. However, this is a strong book and even the stories I didn’t love were fun.I’ll admit that I don’t know a ton of the lore surrounding Dragon Age. I don’t get much chance to play video games and I prefer multi-players, so I only know what I’ve been able to garner here and there. It didn’t matter, though: everything that is important to the book is explained throughout. Kudos to the authors for making this a book anyone can follow.Even though all the stories are fun, there were two that really stood out to me. The first one is “Three Trees to Midnight” by Patrick Weekes. Without giving anything away, I’ll just say that I loved the development of the relationship between the two main characters. The condescension that built to a grudging respect moved the story along wonderfully.The other story that I loved is “Luck in the Gardens” by Sylive Feketekuty. The narration in this story was excellent and made it easily the most memorable of the tales. The opening immediately hooked me.If you’re looking for a book to take you out of the stress of everything going on, one to escape into, this book is for you.
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  • Kyriaki
    January 1, 1970
    "For a moment, the sunlight illuminated something withina sliver of the spirit that might have been. Not the opposite of regret. A different flavor, or shade. Contemplation. Introspection. It felt the echo of the actions that had summoned it. There might have been a better choice, said a thought it had not been allowed."It could have been called The Absolute Horrors Of Thedas And Those Who Defeat Them. Really enjoyable stories, a few cameos of beloved characters.Special mentions: The Horror of "For a moment, the sunlight illuminated something within—a sliver of the spirit that might have been. Not the opposite of regret. A different flavor, or shade. Contemplation. Introspection. It felt the echo of the actions that had summoned it. There might have been a better choice, said a thought it had not been allowed."It could have been called The Absolute Horrors Of Thedas And Those Who Defeat Them. Really enjoyable stories, a few cameos of beloved characters.Special mentions: The Horror of Hormak, which makes me worried for next game's bossesCallback, for taking us back to Skyhold.The Wigmaker job. Plain. Nightmare. Also, am I sensing a new future companion intro here?)Genitivi Dies In The End. The beginning read a bit messy to me, but once the plot kept going, it turned out to be the funniest story in the book. Just LOVED it.Eight Little Talons. Agatha Christie anyone? Also, that. Chemistry.And of course, The Dread Wolf Take You, for the sheer number of cameos Weekes fit into one paragraph, borderline breaking the fourt wall.Now excuse me while I go back to the circle of hell called "waiting for DA4" which I had forgotten it existed before this book came out.
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  • Laurie
    January 1, 1970
    For those who aren't gamers, Dragon Age is a series of role playing video games that take place in a fantasy world with magic, religious conflict, and a Blight that erupts from underground every few centuries and practically ends the world. This book is one of the series of companion books to the games, although I think you could read and enjoy the books without having played the games. Unlike the other books, which were novels, Tevinter Nights is a collection of short stories. Currently, the For those who aren't gamers, Dragon Age is a series of role playing video games that take place in a fantasy world with magic, religious conflict, and a Blight that erupts from underground every few centuries and practically ends the world. This book is one of the series of companion books to the games, although I think you could read and enjoy the books without having played the games. Unlike the other books, which were novels, Tevinter Nights is a collection of short stories. Currently, the fourth video game is being anxiously awaited by fans, and this book drops tons of hints about where the storyline for that game is probably going to go. As well as whetting fan's appetites, the book is just generally a very good read, with 15 short stories covering a range of characters and settings. A couple of stories had me giggling out loud, a couple had me holding my breath as I waited to see how the caper turned out, and a few were downright horrifying (but in a good way). I found myself falling in love with a few of the characters and I'm now hoping desperately that at least one of them turns up in the game.
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  • Paige
    January 1, 1970
    I received a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review. I played bits of the Dragon Age games, but I definitely watched my brother play them more. So my knowledge of the lore and the world was less than I thought it was going in. However, it absolutely sparked my want to play a big fantasy game, and with the current situation noes the perfect time to dive into that big game you've been scared to start. This is a collection of short stories so I'm giving a general overview. There were I received a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review. I played bits of the Dragon Age games, but I definitely watched my brother play them more. So my knowledge of the lore and the world was less than I thought it was going in. However, it absolutely sparked my want to play a big fantasy game, and with the current situation noes the perfect time to dive into that big game you've been scared to start. This is a collection of short stories so I'm giving a general overview. There were stories I loved more than others, and one I really wasn't a fan of - I just got confused with various voices, but seeing as all of the stories are less an 50 pages I didn't mind so much. I loved the lore, the deep roads and the various races that appear over and over again. It meant that I learnt more and more about the world as I went, and I started to see themes and recurring ideas. It really kept me interested!Basically, this is a great book. It took me a while to read but I really did enjoy it. If you're a fantasy fan I'd recommend it!
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  • Craig
    January 1, 1970
    It's been years since they released a Dragon Age book that wasn't a graphic novel, and while I was a little disappointed it wasn't a novel, after having read it, I'm more than satisfied with these short stories!It's hard to review as I don't want to go through every story one by one, so I'll just give an overall review. The stories were all well written, interesting, with numerous twists, turns, and references to the game/other lore scattered throughout. They've got me excited again for Dragon It's been years since they released a Dragon Age book that wasn't a graphic novel, and while I was a little disappointed it wasn't a novel, after having read it, I'm more than satisfied with these short stories!It's hard to review as I don't want to go through every story one by one, so I'll just give an overall review. The stories were all well written, interesting, with numerous twists, turns, and references to the game/other lore scattered throughout. They've got me excited again for Dragon Age 4, coming up with all sorts of theories, and being very impatient to dip back into the world of Thedas. There are definitely a lot of hints, and things I suspect will be relevant, or will at least appear in side quests in the next game.If you're a fan of fantasy short stories but don't know Dragon Age, you'll probably enjoy this, though you won't get all of the little references. If you do know Dragon Age, then I would thoroughly recommend reading this! I loved it. Thedas is waiting, and I suspect you have questions.
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