The Paper Girl of Paris
Now:Sixteen-year-old Alice is spending the summer in Paris, but she isn’t there for pastries and walks along the Seine. When her grandmother passed away two months ago, she left Alice an apartment in France that no one knew existed. An apartment that has been locked for more than seventy years.Alice is determined to find out why the apartment was abandoned and why her grandmother never once mentioned the family she left behind when she moved to America after World War II. With the help of Paul, a charming Parisian student, she sets out to uncover the truth. However, the more time she spends digging through the mysteries of the past, the more she realizes there are secrets in the present that her family is still refusing to talk about.Then:Sixteen-year-old Adalyn doesn’t recognize Paris anymore. Everywhere she looks, there are Nazis, and every day brings a new horror of life under the Occupation. When she meets Luc, the dashing and enigmatic leader of a resistance group, Adalyn feels she finally has a chance to fight back. But keeping up the appearance of being a much-admired socialite while working to undermine the Nazis is more complicated than she could have imagined. As the war goes on, Adalyn finds herself having to make more and more compromises—to her safety, to her reputation, and to her relationships with the people she loves the most.

The Paper Girl of Paris Details

TitleThe Paper Girl of Paris
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseMay 26th, 2020
PublisherHarperTeen
ISBN-139780062936622
Rating
GenreHistorical, Historical Fiction, Young Adult, Contemporary

The Paper Girl of Paris Review

  • Amanda Belcher
    January 1, 1970
    This one is probably about a 3.5 for me but I rounded up because the ending was satisfying and improved upon some of the things I wasn't a fan of throughout the earlier parts of the book (mainly the portrayal of Alice's mother's mental health). The Paper Girl of Paris is a blend of historical fiction and a present-day narrative as Alice tries to find out more about her family, specifically her great aunt Adalyn, after she inherits her grandmother's family home in Pairs, perfectly preserved and u This one is probably about a 3.5 for me but I rounded up because the ending was satisfying and improved upon some of the things I wasn't a fan of throughout the earlier parts of the book (mainly the portrayal of Alice's mother's mental health). The Paper Girl of Paris is a blend of historical fiction and a present-day narrative as Alice tries to find out more about her family, specifically her great aunt Adalyn, after she inherits her grandmother's family home in Pairs, perfectly preserved and untouched since World War II. I was happy we get Adalyn's perspective because that was what was really gripping for me. Her narrative drives the story, coupled with the storyline of Alice trying to figure out what happened. The description of World War II, occupied Paris also felt authentic and I was interested in Adalyn and Chloe's family dynamic throughout that horrible time, as the two teens try to navigate that climate. As Adalyn becomes involved with her work (no spoilers), the stakes get much higher and I found myself enthralled and also constantly anxious for her and the others. There were some parts of the writing that felt a bit odd and as I mentioned before, there were times that the portrayal of mental health was frustrating (though the characters seem to learn and grow by the end). But overall, this was a really engaging and fast-paced read.*I received a complimentary copy of this book from HarperCollins through Edelweiss. Opinions expressed in this review are completely my own.*
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  • Zoë ☆
    January 1, 1970
    This was SUCH a heavy book to read, but also super interesting! It tells the story of the people who were brave enough to resist the Germans during the Second World War, and it was honestly so impactful and eye-opening.Set in Paris, this story is about Alice who has recently lost her grandmother. And in her will, her grandmother wanted Alice to have her apartment in Paris, which up until then their family new nothing about. When they go to look in the apartment, they come to realise it hasn't be This was SUCH a heavy book to read, but also super interesting! It tells the story of the people who were brave enough to resist the Germans during the Second World War, and it was honestly so impactful and eye-opening.Set in Paris, this story is about Alice who has recently lost her grandmother. And in her will, her grandmother wanted Alice to have her apartment in Paris, which up until then their family new nothing about. When they go to look in the apartment, they come to realise it hasn't been touched since the war. But why? Since her grandmother didn't like to talk about her past, it's up to Alice herself to find out what exactly happened; why did she inherit an apartment that hasn't been touched in decades?First of all, I love everything set in Paris so that was honestly the first thing that interested me about the book. When I found out it was historical fiction set (partly) during the Second World War, I was sold. And I ended up really enjoying reading this (even though it was a hard read)! It was very interesting to find out the mystery of her grandmother along with Alice herself and it led me to have finished this book in a day. It's SO hard to imagine everything that is described from the perspective of Adalyn (Alice's great-aunt), who was in the resistance during the war. It definitely got me thinking more about the war and how hard it must have been. These people were so incredibly brave! And even though there was some drama in Alice's life throughout the book that I feel like wasn't completely necessary to tell the story, I still think this is an important read.If you like reading (YA) historical fiction or are interested in the Second World War in any way, I would highly recommend it! Thanks so much to HarperTeen for sending me an e-arc of this book 💕
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  • Alexa
    January 1, 1970
    3.5 stars, but I’m comfortable rounding up for the feels this one gave me. I appreciated many aspects of this story: the multiple timelines and narratives, the Paris setting, the uncovering of a part of history I don’t know all that much about and the way it was made more personal.
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  • Caden
    January 1, 1970
    5/5 Stars! Trigger Warning for Depression I absolutely loved this book. I am a huge fan of historical fiction and historical romance, so I immediately knew that I was going to like this book from the moment I read the synopsis. However, I was not expecting to love it as much as I do. I rarely cry when I read books, and this book made me ugly cry. Jordyn Taylor's writing is simple, yet beautiful. She constructed this book so well and made characters that were flawed yet lovable. This book is so p 5/5 Stars! Trigger Warning for Depression I absolutely loved this book. I am a huge fan of historical fiction and historical romance, so I immediately knew that I was going to like this book from the moment I read the synopsis. However, I was not expecting to love it as much as I do. I rarely cry when I read books, and this book made me ugly cry. Jordyn Taylor's writing is simple, yet beautiful. She constructed this book so well and made characters that were flawed yet lovable. This book is so powerful and moving. I truly recommend picking it up, even if Historical Fiction is not usually a genre that you pick up. Thanks for reading! Caden
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  • Vee_Bookish // stan shea couleé
    January 1, 1970
    Happy release day! I'm a day late.This is my most anticipated book for May.
  • Shannon (It Starts At Midnight)
    January 1, 1970
    You can find the full review and all the fancy and/or randomness that accompanies it at It Starts at Midnight This was such a sweet, inspiring story! It starts with a young woman inheriting her grandmother's apartment (and apparently, her secrets!) in Paris, and weaves through an incredible tale about standing up against an oppressive regime (1940s) and finding out who you are, where you came from, and just generally speaking up for yourself (present). Alice's story is sweet, and I enjoyed watch You can find the full review and all the fancy and/or randomness that accompanies it at It Starts at Midnight This was such a sweet, inspiring story! It starts with a young woman inheriting her grandmother's apartment (and apparently, her secrets!) in Paris, and weaves through an incredible tale about standing up against an oppressive regime (1940s) and finding out who you are, where you came from, and just generally speaking up for yourself (present). Alice's story is sweet, and I enjoyed watching her sleuth all over Paris with a very lovely Parisian fellow. I also really liked how the author delved into her family life a bit, and how that was clearly a focus of the story overall. I didn't connect totally to Alice, but I enjoyed her nonetheless. For me, the absolute bread and butter of this story was Adalyn's perspective. She's incredibly privileged and knows it, but uses it for good during the Nazi invasion of France. Without giving too much away, Adalyn refuses to just sit around while people are tortured and killed, but of course it must be kept a secret. And now, many years later, it's up to Alice to unravel this history of secrets. I really don't want to say much else, because I fear it'll ruin the story which would be a shame. But it is absolutely one worth reading, as you'll no doubt be inspired by Adalyn's story, and probably wish you were Alice having coffee and being a detective in adorable Parisian cafes.  Bottom Line: A lovely story about families, secrets, and standing up for what's right no matter the cost. 
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  • Lindsey (Bring My Books)
    January 1, 1970
    This is a title where the topic of intended audience is so important - as an adult reader, I found myself unable to really get into the story, but I think as a younger reader I would have loved this. It gives a lot for a reader to research and discover, and the journey that Alice and her new Parisian friend take to find out more about her grandmother was really interesting. In a perfect world, I would have loved to have way more of the past storyline, because I think that's where this book reall This is a title where the topic of intended audience is so important - as an adult reader, I found myself unable to really get into the story, but I think as a younger reader I would have loved this. It gives a lot for a reader to research and discover, and the journey that Alice and her new Parisian friend take to find out more about her grandmother was really interesting. In a perfect world, I would have loved to have way more of the past storyline, because I think that's where this book really stood out.My biggest frustrations were how little of present day Grandma we were given - I understand that her not being around was basically what created the story and drove the plot - but there is so much that doesn't make sense about her actions after the war and prior to her death. I was also frustrated with how the mental health aspects of the book were handled - those portions seemed as if they were written with a much, much younger audience in mind.Thank you to NetGalley, HarperTeen, & HarperCollins for the opportunity to read and review this book before it's publication date! This in no way affected my review, opinions are my own.
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  • Raji
    January 1, 1970
    Find this review and more on my blog at Worlds Unlike Our Own .3.5 starsThank you to the publisher, HarperTeen, and Edelweiss for providing me with an eARC of this book in exchange for an honest review.Sixteen year old Alice Prewitt has just inherited an apartment in Paris from her grandmother that no one in the family has ever heard about before. She finds an apartment perfectly preserved in time, untouched since the years of World War II, but more interesting are some old photos and the dia Find this review and more on my blog at Worlds Unlike Our Own .3.5 starsThank you to the publisher, HarperTeen, and Edelweiss for providing me with an eARC of this book in exchange for an honest review.Sixteen year old Alice Prewitt has just inherited an apartment in Paris from her grandmother that no one in the family has ever heard about before. She finds an apartment perfectly preserved in time, untouched since the years of World War II, but more interesting are some old photos and the diary of her great-aunt Adalyn, whom no one knew existed, which set her off on a quest to uncover long buried family secrets.The Paper Girl of Paris is narrated in both present and past. On one hand, we follow Alice as she deciphers Adalyn’s diary and retraces her life in Nazi occupied France and on the other, we see the events through Adalyn’s own eyes as she gets involved with the Resistance and takes on dangerous missions to fight against the Nazis, all the while struggling with keeping things a secret from her parents and especially her sister. I loved how immersive the storytelling was and the descriptions of France in the 1940s and the French Resistance make you feel like you’re really there. This particular side of WWII is one I have only begun to explore in historical fiction, and the author did a fantastic job giving us a deeper understanding of the state of things in Paris during this time and how ordinary people rose up to fight in their own ways.However, I can’t really say the same for the present day chapters. Although Alice’s POVs were nice enough to read, I feel that diary entries apart, this story could have been told to far better effect through Adalyn’s POV alone as that is where the real excitement is. Besides, while Alice is not an uninteresting character, I just found it hard to connect to her present day struggles in contrast to the sufferings of Occupied France. The portrayal of mental health was also quite frustrating. Though I am hardly any kind of expert, I thought the subject was taken too lightly and ended up being a hanging plot point that didn’t really ever tie into the main story – not to mention, we never do learn exactly what issues Alice’s mom had with her mother.I’ve been reading a lot of World War II stories lately and they’re always hard to get through due to how heavy the content is, but I have to say that this was the easiest of the lot. The narration is somewhat balanced by the air of mystery and adventure still hanging over the entire tale and this would probably be a good choice for someone starting out on this particular time period in historical fiction or even younger YA readers. This is the first time I’ve come across a historical fiction narrated from a present day POV and I would definitely recommend this unique, beautifully written, fast-paced novel that can easily be read in one sitting!
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  • The Candid Cover (Olivia & Lori)
    January 1, 1970
    Full Review on The Candid Cover3.5 StarsThe Paper Girl of Paris by Jordyn Taylor is set in Paris during World War II and follows both a member of a resistance group and a girl in the present day who discovers her diary. The historical elements of the book are very well done, and I learned a lot about women in the resistance. However, I didn’t think that the modern storyline was as necessary, and I found the main character’s drama takes away from the emotions of the narration in the past.This boo Full Review on The Candid Cover3.5 StarsThe Paper Girl of Paris by Jordyn Taylor is set in Paris during World War II and follows both a member of a resistance group and a girl in the present day who discovers her diary. The historical elements of the book are very well done, and I learned a lot about women in the resistance. However, I didn’t think that the modern storyline was as necessary, and I found the main character’s drama takes away from the emotions of the narration in the past.This book tells the story of a girl who stays in Paris after inheriting an apartment from her grandmother. The apartment is in perfect condition despite being abandoned decades ago, and Alice discovers her great aunt’s diary which leads her on a path to discovering what happened in the past. I loved how she is interested in learning more about her family history, and I enjoyed learning about the resistance in occupied France. This book is a historical novel, but I think it is very accessible to those who don’t typically read this genre.❀ ADALYN’S CHARACTER IS INTERESTINGI especially enjoyed Adalyn’s perspective since it takes place during the war and follows her activity in the resistance. I find it interesting reading about women in the war, and this book contains strong female characters who play crucial roles in the resistance. Adalyn spies on Germans while pretending to socialize with them at parties, but she has to make sacrifices to do so. Her story has so much tension, and the stakes are high. I learned a lot through Adalyn, including information about the Zazous, which is a movement I was unfamiliar with.❀ MULTI-GENERATIONALThe multi-generational aspect of the book is intriguing, but to me, it doesn’t really work out. I didn’t think Alice’s story in the modern day was as significant since her role is to figure out what happened in the past. At the same time as she is piecing together the events of the war, the reader is already watching them happen. To me, all Alice’s drama takes away from the wright of the book, and I found her voice to be childish. I also don’t think the portrayal of mental health in her timeline was as strong as it could have been. Adalyn’s story was much more powerful than Alice’s, and I feel like the book would have been better without the interruptions.❀ A POWERFUL STORYThe Paper Girl of Paris is a powerful story about family history and the resistance of occupied France. I loved reading about the work Adalyn does to fight back, but Alice’s perspective in the modern day was not as impactful. However, if you are a fan of books across multiple timelines, this one may still appeal to you.
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  • Russell Taylor
    January 1, 1970
    Loved this book, felt so real and super interesting to see into the minds of people living in Nazi occupied France. So good, I miss all the characters!
  • Lizette
    January 1, 1970
    ✨Review ✨📖 The Paper Girl of ParisBy Jordyn TaylorOn sale: May 26,2020Advanced copy provided by publisher in exchange for muy honest review which follows.✨In a word: Enticing✨What phenomenal storytelling!✨🎁🎁🎁The Paper Girl of Paris is definitely suitable as a gift to YA readers of all types .Such immersive storytelling takes you from present day to 1940's occupied France, taking part of the French Resistance. Putting this book down was tough but when I did I could almost smell fresh croissoints ✨Review ✨📖 The Paper Girl of ParisBy Jordyn TaylorOn sale: May 26,2020Advanced copy provided by publisher in exchange for muy honest review which follows.✨In a word: Enticing✨What phenomenal storytelling!✨🎁🎁🎁The Paper Girl of Paris is definitely suitable as a gift to YA readers of all types .Such immersive storytelling takes you from present day to 1940's occupied France, taking part of the French Resistance. Putting this book down was tough but when I did I could almost smell fresh croissoints and luscious chocolates.Put this on your summer reading list! The unforseen pivots in the story will captivate you . This was a well crafted nostaglic and modern read by debut author Jordan Taylor.Go pre-order your copy now!📚Book Summary: Sixteen year old Alice is in Paris for most of the summer with her family to figure out what to do with the Paris apartment she just inherited from her grandmother. Alice starts investigating why her French Grandmother kept this apartment a secret from everyone when she discovers her great aunt Adylyn's diary from the 1940's (shortly before grandma left France for the US) in the pristine apartment. Adylyn's diary sends Alice on a journey through Nazi occupied France to discover lost secrets.Merged review:Review The Paper Girl of ParisBy Jordyn TaylorIn a word: Enticing!What phenomenal storytelling!The Paper Girl of Paris is definitely suitable as a gift to YA readers of all types.Such immersive storytelling takes you from present day to 1940's occupied France, taking part of the French Resistance. Putting this book down was tough but when I did I could almost smell fresh croissoints and luscious chocolates.Put this on your summer reading list! Pre-order from www.jordynhtaylor.com.The unforseen pivots in the story will captivate you .This was a well crafted nostaglic and modern read by debut author Jordyn Taylor.Book Summary: Sixteen year old Alice is in Paris for most of the summer with her family to figure out what to do with the Paris apartment she just inherited from her grandmother. Alice starts investigating why her French Grandmother kept this apartment a secret from everyone when she discovers her grandmother's sister's diary from the 1940's shortly before grandma left France for the US. Adylyn's diary sends Alice on a quest through Nazi occupied France to discover the secrets behind this straight out of pre-war France apartment. There are more secrets
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  • Fiction Addition Angela
    January 1, 1970
    Sixteen year old Alice is visiting Paris with her family during the summer holidays. She has recently lost her Grandmother who has left her an apartment in Paris in her will. But why has the apartment been a secret from everyone? Why has it been left untouched all that time? ..... Alice discovers her Great Aunts diary from 1940 just before her Grandmother left for the USA. Will this tell her why? The diary sends Alice on a journey, a sad Nazi riddled journey of bravery and loss. This is a lovely Sixteen year old Alice is visiting Paris with her family during the summer holidays. She has recently lost her Grandmother who has left her an apartment in Paris in her will. But why has the apartment been a secret from everyone? Why has it been left untouched all that time? ..... Alice discovers her Great Aunts diary from 1940 just before her Grandmother left for the USA. Will this tell her why? The diary sends Alice on a journey, a sad Nazi riddled journey of bravery and loss. This is a lovely historical fiction set in Paris giving us a glimpse into occupied France and the French Resistance during WWII.Narrated between the past and the present lots of suspense and a little romance. This story actually covers a period of four years 1940-1944 and how everyone’s lives are affected by the occupation. Soldiers are everywhere, rationing is in place and women are publicly castigated for having “friendships” with Germans. Adalyn and Chloes life is put on hold as they know it and they both struggle day to day with the challenges. Chloe joins the Zazou movement whilst Adalyn meets boys her age who are connected to the resistance and she eventually is sent to spy on Germans pretending to socialize with them in exchange for information that will be useful. I became invested in the characters and found it hard to put down. I was literally transported to Occupied France and the bravery of the many resistance members. Well done Jordan Taylor on your debut novel. I will be watching out for your future publications. Thanks in advance Edelweiss books.
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  • Rachel
    January 1, 1970
    Real rating: 3.5 stars but rounding up!
  • Lizz Schumer
    January 1, 1970
    This book was such a beautiful journey into Paris during the resistance. The characters and setting were both so vivid, I felt like I was leaving friends behind when the book ended. I could taste the coffee and the pastries, and audibly gasped each time something exciting happened – just ask my partner! Even though I'm not usually a big historical fiction fan, this one drew me in with rich detail and relationships that felt real. Now I'm inspired to learn more about the time period. And even tho This book was such a beautiful journey into Paris during the resistance. The characters and setting were both so vivid, I felt like I was leaving friends behind when the book ended. I could taste the coffee and the pastries, and audibly gasped each time something exciting happened – just ask my partner! Even though I'm not usually a big historical fiction fan, this one drew me in with rich detail and relationships that felt real. Now I'm inspired to learn more about the time period. And even though this book is YA, I'm sharing it with my mom and grandma, who I'm sure will love it just as much as I did.
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  • Alyson Kent
    January 1, 1970
    Thank you, Edelweiss, for the ARC.
  • Andrea
    January 1, 1970
    Rate: ⭐️ ⭐️ ⭐️ ⭐️ Author: Jordyn Taylor Publish Date: May 26, 2020Series: N/AFull review in: BlogThank you so much to Harperteen for giving me a copy of Jordyn Taylor’s The Paper Girl of Paris in exchange for an honest review via Edelweiss.Alice’s grandmother has recently died. Her French grandmother, who immigrated to America during WWII, made Alice the sole heir to her inheritance, including a luxurious apartment in the heart of Paris that seemed to have frozen in time. Left with mysterious cl Rate: ⭐️ ⭐️ ⭐️ ⭐️ Author: Jordyn Taylor Publish Date: May 26, 2020Series: N/AFull review in: BlogThank you so much to Harperteen for giving me a copy of Jordyn Taylor’s The Paper Girl of Paris in exchange for an honest review via Edelweiss.Alice’s grandmother has recently died. Her French grandmother, who immigrated to America during WWII, made Alice the sole heir to her inheritance, including a luxurious apartment in the heart of Paris that seemed to have frozen in time. Left with mysterious clues to the past of her grandmother, Alice is determined to know her grandmother and her great aunt’s story during WWII. The Paper Girl of Paris is a good mix of summer-y, YA Parisian love, and WWII historical romance. It does a great job of comparing two different lives, in two different settings, and weaves it perfectly at the end. The underlying themes of the novel are something we all can understand, no matter our experiences and age. The WWII aspect of this novel is light and can be enjoyed by YA readers. I would recommend this novel to everyone.
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  • Elisha Jachetti
    January 1, 1970
    **4.5 out of 5 stars**THE PAPER GIRL OF PARIS by Jordyn Taylor is a new young adult novel that is both a contemporary and historical fiction. The story is told from two perspectives— Alice in present day and Adalyn during WW2, the link between them being Chloe Bonhomme, Alice’s late grandmother and Adalyn’s sister. Having never known much about her grandmother’s childhood, Alice is surprised when Chloe wills her a secret Parisian apartment. Now, on top of trying to understand her mother’s depres **4.5 out of 5 stars**THE PAPER GIRL OF PARIS by Jordyn Taylor is a new young adult novel that is both a contemporary and historical fiction. The story is told from two perspectives— Alice in present day and Adalyn during WW2, the link between them being Chloe Bonhomme, Alice’s late grandmother and Adalyn’s sister. Having never known much about her grandmother’s childhood, Alice is surprised when Chloe wills her a secret Parisian apartment. Now, on top of trying to understand her mother’s depression and her father’s denial, Alice is determined to figure out why Chloe hid her past. With the help of her new French friend, Paul, Alice searches her grandmother’s old apartment, which no one has been in since the 1940’s, and finds Adalyn’s diary. Paul aids in translating it, and the truth is more than Alice could have ever expected. In fact, it may be what heals not only Alice’s family, but those from Adalyn’s past too.This story is absolutely heartbreaking and I haven’t been able to stop thinking about it since I finished reading. The spirit of the book is so beautiful, and it’s made me consider how well I really know my own grandparents. In fact, it’s sparked multiple conversations, and I love when a work of fiction makes me think about life in a deeper and meaningful way. It also resonates strongly right now as it’s about human connections and the bonds between us, which some people may be strengthening or reexamining during this time of quarantine.All the important questions are tied up by the end of the book, but I still have so many more. I want to know about Chloe Bonhomme. I want to know how she met the American soldier. I want to know about her zazou friends, and if she knew of her sister’s or her parents’ fate. When was she aware the apartment was hers? What made her keep it? How did she feel about Adalyn later in life? I understand that we, the readers, are made to share Alice’s experience, as she, too, probably wishes she could inquire about the same subjects, and in that way, the book is a perfect mirror to life. With that being said, I’d love to read a sequel, or prequel, to learn more about the woman who connected Alice and Adalyn. In the book, as it is, we don’t know too much about her character, since Adalyn kept a secret life from Chloe, and later Chloe kept her secrets from Alice.With that being said, THE PAPER GIRL OF PARIS is an enchanting read set in an enchanting city with enchanting characters, surprising twists, and sweet romances. This book is a must-read for fans of ALEX & ELIZA and JOJO RABBIT.Review originally posted on YA Books Central: https://www.yabookscentral.com/yafict...
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  • Ilhaam
    January 1, 1970
    “Did you make it here okay? The trains ran smoothly, Luc. The trains ran smoothly.” I just sobbed half the life out of my body. This book was incredible. I will admit that in the beginning I was a little hesitant, which is why it took me so long to finish, but then when I got into it I was into it . It was a really unique experience to have Adalyn’s POV and Alice’s where they ran parallel to each other and I honestly had a really good time making all the connections. Okay wait no that’s a lie. “Did you make it here okay? The trains ran smoothly, Luc. The trains ran smoothly.” I just sobbed half the life out of my body. This book was incredible. I will admit that in the beginning I was a little hesitant, which is why it took me so long to finish, but then when I got into it I was into it . It was a really unique experience to have Adalyn’s POV and Alice’s where they ran parallel to each other and I honestly had a really good time making all the connections. Okay wait no that’s a lie. Most of the connections made me cry so much that I couldn’t carry on reading but it’s fine I’m fine.Adalyn was such a good character. Her character development, her growth, her strength. Her everything. It was nerve wrecking to read her chapters and if you read this book you’ll know exactly what I mean. She broke my heart. Her and Luc. They made me cry and cry and cry. And so many of the things she said were so relevant regarding what’s happening in the world at the moment that it hurt 100 times more to read about the victims of such cruelty.I definitely recommend this especially if you’re ready to get your heart broken. (If you haven’t read the book now is your last chance to exit this review because major spoilers are incoming)Alices parts were quite frustrating for me. There was just something about her that was annoying me, but in the end when she showed her mom the proper attention she needed I understood her. And Luc. Gosh, when she met him I was losing my mind. Let’s talk for a second about how I cried for the last 30% of the book. So yeah, I did kind of expect some of them to maybe get hurt, and after Arnauld (who made me cry so much I can’t even explain) I wasn’t expecting more of them to die. BUT THEN the author casually mentions that the photographer went to a freaking camp and died there. And I cried some more. And then Adalyn with the German soldier and I cried. And then Adalyn and Luc and I could feel the tragedy and I carried on crying.And then May 31st happened and I sobbed. The trains ran smoothly. WHO EVEN GAVE THE AUTHOR THE PERMISSION TO BREAK MY HEART LIKE THAT. it hurt so so so much to read that this book instantly became one of my favourites ever. Like ever. So, again, I definitely recommend this especially if you’re ready to get your heart broken. Thank you to Harper Collins for the ARC! 🤍
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  • Kidlitter
    January 1, 1970
    A DRC was provided by Edelweiss in exchange for a fair and honest review.There has been a spate of novels set in World War II France, and this is one of the better ones. One girl is caught up investigating her grandmother and great-aunt's past in Paris, when they were swept up in anti-German activities that led to triumph and tragedy. Alice, our contemporary heroine, is a little less interesting than Chloe and Adalyn, the brave French sisters who each find their own way to fight the Nazis, but t A DRC was provided by Edelweiss in exchange for a fair and honest review.There has been a spate of novels set in World War II France, and this is one of the better ones. One girl is caught up investigating her grandmother and great-aunt's past in Paris, when they were swept up in anti-German activities that led to triumph and tragedy. Alice, our contemporary heroine, is a little less interesting than Chloe and Adalyn, the brave French sisters who each find their own way to fight the Nazis, but there is enough character development for Alice (and vicarious fascination on the reader's part with her good fortune at inheriting a fabulous flat in the centre of Paris) that one bears with her travails with a depressed mother. Usually one waits for Alice to finish her current campaign to get her parents to recognize their issues and just get on with the reading of Adalyn's diary and uncovering the truth of the sisters' past. The very best historical fiction has a way of immersing the reader in the miieau, both physical and cultural, that makes one feel as if they are there with the characters. I hever quite managed to feel that with Chloe and Adalyn but the author gives it a good run with more than the usual French phrases and croissants scatterd about for Parisian flavour. One of those YA novels that can easily be used for young adult or adult fiction Reader's Advisory. A special note of appreciation that the cover does not feature an impossibly well dressed woman in period costume seen from the back walking into some impossibly lovely background, an all too tired design trope that already wraps the book in mothballs before it's read. This design is appealing, obviously Paris but also open to the imagination.
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  • Heather
    January 1, 1970
    Happy Book Birthday to The Paper Girl of Paris!This is a narrative alternately told by Alice, current day American in Paris eating pain au chocolate and falling for French dreamboat Paul and her great aunt Adalyn, society girl during the Nazi occupation of Paris, also falling for a hunk of her own. This book mentions muscles rippling under shirts weirdly often. This book does a really good job of making rebellion/French Resistance seem attainable for teens--a sense they could have been heroic to Happy Book Birthday to The Paper Girl of Paris!This is a narrative alternately told by Alice, current day American in Paris eating pain au chocolate and falling for French dreamboat Paul and her great aunt Adalyn, society girl during the Nazi occupation of Paris, also falling for a hunk of her own. This book mentions muscles rippling under shirts weirdly often. This book does a really good job of making rebellion/French Resistance seem attainable for teens--a sense they could have been heroic too--while showing how easy it was to bury one's head out of fear and try to wait it out. A good lesson for all today.I'm not a huge fan of alternating dual POV, although the author does a good job of leaving you with a story long enough to get and stay engaged before rabbiting to the other timeline. Unfortunately, the author makes the dreadful mistake of having us, the readers, figure out what's going on with aunt Adelyn well before Alice does, and that's really frustrating. As much as I enjoyed a really relatable tale of the French resistance, I found the clumsily handled issue of Alice's mother's depression/mental health issues really detracted from the story overall. The blurb for this book sells it as a mystery, and I don't think that aspect of it pans out well. Teens with a passion for historical fiction will enjoy this, but it's not a stand-out book among the crowd of WWII novels for me. Recommended grades 10+
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  • Emily Hill
    January 1, 1970
    An inspiring debut focused on the impacts of lost history within a family.This was the kind of book that drew me in from the first pages and didn't let me go until I finished hours later - losing half of a day but gaining new insight and understanding of the sacrifices and heroism displayed by women in the Second World War.One of the most profound aspects of this book was author's ability to craft two character journeys across eras, and make them compelling, unique, and connected. It is a challe An inspiring debut focused on the impacts of lost history within a family.This was the kind of book that drew me in from the first pages and didn't let me go until I finished hours later - losing half of a day but gaining new insight and understanding of the sacrifices and heroism displayed by women in the Second World War.One of the most profound aspects of this book was author's ability to craft two character journeys across eras, and make them compelling, unique, and connected. It is a challenge, particularly when faced with such a heartbreaking time in history, to develop a strong contemporary narrative. And yet this author does. Both main characters are courageous in their fights to keep their families safe - not just physically, but emotionally. This book also does an excellent job of addressing mental health and how to reach out to those who are suffering. These aspects make it an excellent read for young adults, as well as adult readers - offering opportunities for authentic discussion.I am grateful for the chance to review an ARC of this beautifully written and deeply honest book from Edelweiss, and would recommend it to readers of contemporary and historical fiction alike.
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  • Mel (Daily Prophecy)
    January 1, 1970
    This was a really good book that features two different main characters in two different time lines. We have Alice, who is searching for answers about her mysterious grand-aunt Adalyn. Her grandmother Chloe left her an apartment in Paris and when she finds Adalyn’s diary she needs to find out what happened.Then there is Adalyn, the close sister of Chloe, who lives a double life in World War 2 that tears the bond between the two girls. There is always something heartbreaking about stories with ch This was a really good book that features two different main characters in two different time lines. We have Alice, who is searching for answers about her mysterious grand-aunt Adalyn. Her grandmother Chloe left her an apartment in Paris and when she finds Adalyn’s diary she needs to find out what happened.Then there is Adalyn, the close sister of Chloe, who lives a double life in World War 2 that tears the bond between the two girls. There is always something heartbreaking about stories with characters that are misunderstood. It was sad to read about the destruction of Chloe’s and Adalyn’s bond (view spoiler)[ because Chloe doesn’t know Adalyn is acting as a spy for the good side (hide spoiler)]I liked Alice and Paul was cute too, although their romance felt a bit too forced and fast for my taste. It would have been good if the two of them were just friends, because I was so wrapped up in Adalyn’s story of bravery and her blossoming romance, that I sometimes wanted to skip forward. I can’t say too much about the portrayal of mental health, because I am not familiar with it, but this aspect felt a little iffy at times. It didn’t feel right all the time, but like I said, I don’t think I am the right person to judge about it.Overall, a story filled with emotions.
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  • Shelee at Book Reader Chronicles
    January 1, 1970
    The Paper Girls of Paris was an intriguing read, telling two very different stories that were connected by a single thread of family. The blend of historical and contemporary was such an interesting, but crucial way to tell this story and I don't think it could've worked had it been any different. The WWII aspect—both in design and setting—was absolutely fascinating, making the jump back in time feel as heartbreaking as it was frustrating. Taylor's writing was so effortless to fall into that The Paper Girls of Paris was an intriguing read, telling two very different stories that were connected by a single thread of family. The blend of historical and contemporary was such an interesting, but crucial way to tell this story and I don't think it could've worked had it been any different. The WWII aspect—both in design and setting—was absolutely fascinating, making the jump back in time feel as heartbreaking as it was frustrating. Taylor's writing was so effortless to fall into that it was incredibly easy to read this story in one sitting. Both main characters had purpose and depth, and their individual paths were nice to read side-by-side so that when one felt too heavy, the other gave you a reprieve. Alice and Adalyn were strong young women, fighting for agency in their own ways and I admired how their journeys paired well together, no matter the distance in time or circumstance. It was an enjoyable read from start to finish and I think readers will appreciate all the pieces that made it what it was. **Received an early copy; this had no bearing on my opinions**
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  • Samantha Scharmett
    January 1, 1970
    I LOVED this book. I recently received an advanced copy and couldn't put it down. I'm not usually a big historical fiction reader, but this would certainly make me think twice before overlooking the genre again. Every time I reached the end of a character's POV chapter, I was upset that it was over because I just had to know what was going to happen next. Also, as other readers have mentioned, I felt alllll the emotions - from joy to anger to pretty profound sadness and back again. The intertwin I LOVED this book. I recently received an advanced copy and couldn't put it down. I'm not usually a big historical fiction reader, but this would certainly make me think twice before overlooking the genre again. Every time I reached the end of a character's POV chapter, I was upset that it was over because I just had to know what was going to happen next. Also, as other readers have mentioned, I felt alllll the emotions - from joy to anger to pretty profound sadness and back again. The intertwining storylines are really beautiful and there are some really important takeaways/lessons to be learned from this book. I've already told all my friends to pre-order :)
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  • Christine
    January 1, 1970
    Pros: interesting story set in Nazi occupied Paris, ending wasn't neat and tidy and felt realistic, Adalyn was a wonderful character to follow.Cons: Alice felt more like a 12 year old than an 18 year old. She was unbelievably dense at times and didn't feel like an authentic teenager. A lot of the writing occasionally felt hollow or formulaic - something just wasn't quite right. It worked much better for 1940 French citizens, but not nearly as well for contemporary American teenagers.Still a good Pros: interesting story set in Nazi occupied Paris, ending wasn't neat and tidy and felt realistic, Adalyn was a wonderful character to follow.Cons: Alice felt more like a 12 year old than an 18 year old. She was unbelievably dense at times and didn't feel like an authentic teenager. A lot of the writing occasionally felt hollow or formulaic - something just wasn't quite right. It worked much better for 1940 French citizens, but not nearly as well for contemporary American teenagers.Still a good story and worthwhile historical fiction, with a sweet light romance.
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  • Laura Gilson
    January 1, 1970
    I absolutely loved reading this book! Just a couple chapters in, I could feel my mood shift as the plot developed, and characters, who I came to love, were impacted. In particular, I loved the author's in-depth look at family--the importance of communication as well as the difficulty of trying to communicate and trust. Would absolutely recommend to anyone interested in historical fiction, World War II, coming of age tales, and novels with strong female leads!
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  • Diana
    January 1, 1970
    I absolutely loved reading this book! Gripping storytelling from the author. I felt every possible emotion while reading it. I finished it in two days because I couldn't put down! I'm 17 and historical fiction is one of my favourite genres. I love how the author is able to transport you from present to past with the dual storyline and immerse you in Nazi occupied France. Perfectly suited for YA readers. Would recommend! Jordyn Taylor please write another book soon!
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  • Miranda Martin
    January 1, 1970
    This story had me instantly captivated and wanting to hear more. I really enjoyed how the stories of two girls so many generations apart were woven together seamlessly and in a way that came together so well at the end. The book was so interesting and transported me to a different place and time. I'd recommend it to anyone looking to get lost in their next read and feel all the emotions!
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  • Kris
    January 1, 1970
    I couldn’t put this book down. A great historic book about families and secrets. Alice’s grandmother leaves her an apartment in Paris locked in time. She discovers a great Aunt she never knew existed. She discovers a diary, photographs and a note that don’t add up. This story is also about depression That I found very moving. Fantastic read!
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  • Bridgette
    January 1, 1970
    Such a great read! Literally could not put this book down and read it in one day. I loved the dual perspective format, the unique glimpse into an oft-retold part of history, and the focus on strong female characters. The descriptions of Paris throughout the book ring so true, you can tell the author did her research. Now I'm dreaming of eating oysters in the Marais someday soon.
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