Devolution
The #1 bestselling author of World War Z takes on the Bigfoot legend with a tale that blurs the lines between human and beast--and asks what we are capable of in the face of the unimaginable.As the ash and chaos from Mount Rainier's eruption swirled and finally settled, the story of the Greenloop massacre has passed unnoticed, unexamined . . . until now.But the journals of resident Kate Holland, recovered from the town's bloody wreckage, capture a tale too harrowing--and too earth-shattering in its implications--to be forgotten.In these pages, Max Brooks brings Kate's extraordinary account to light for the first time, faithfully reproducing her words alongside his own extensive investigations into the massacre and the legendary beasts behind it.Kate's is a tale of unexpected strength and resilience, of humanity's defiance in the face of a terrible predator's gaze, and inevitably, of savagery and death.Yet it is also far more than that.Because if what Kate Holland saw in those days is real, then we must accept the impossible. We must accept that the creature known as Bigfoot walks among us--and that it is a beast of terrible strength and ferocity.Part survival narrative, part bloody horror tale, part scientific journey into the boundaries between truth and fiction, this is a Bigfoot story as only Max Brooks could chronicle it--and like none you've ever read before.

Devolution Details

TitleDevolution
Author
ReleaseJun 16th, 2020
PublisherDel Rey Books
ISBN-139781984826787
Rating
GenreHorror, Fantasy, Fiction, Science Fiction, Thriller, Adult Fiction, Adult, Mystery Thriller, Speculative Fiction, Mystery

Devolution Review

  • Will Byrnes
    January 1, 1970
    I found a way, I found a way to survive with them. Am I a great person? I dont know. I dont know. Were all great people. Everyone has something in them that is wonderful. Im just different and I love these bears enough to do it right. Im edgy enough and Im tough enough. But mostly I love these bears enough to survive and do it right. from the video diary of Timothy Treadwell, self-proclaimed Grizzly Man, recorded right before he was eaten by a bear On April 1, 1969 the Board of Commissioners I found a way, I found a way to survive with them. Am I a great person? I don’t know. I don’t know. We’re all great people. Everyone has something in them that is wonderful. I’m just different and I love these bears enough to do it right. I’m edgy enough and I’m tough enough. But mostly I love these bears enough to survive and do it right. – from the video diary of Timothy Treadwell, self-proclaimed “Grizzly Man,” recorded right before he was eaten by a bear On April 1, 1969 the Board of Commissioners of Skamania County, Washington State, adopted an ordinance for the protection of sasquatch/bigfoot creatures (Ordinance No.69-01). Although it sounds like an April Fool's Day joke, it was an official ordinance. It was published in the local weekly newspaper, Skamania County Pioneer on April 4 and April 11, 1969. Because people did not take it seriously, the newspaper publisher had the article notarized on April 12, 1969, and printed both the ordinance and an Affidavit of Publication in a subsequent paper edition. - Courthouse Libraries- BCThere are several things going on in Max Brooks’s latest novel, Devolution. First and most obvious is the notion of Bigfoot. The conceit of the novel is that following Mount Rainier going full lava, a small community in Washington State is cut off from the world and massacred by a troop of Bigfoots (Bigfeet?) or Sasquatch. This is a fun look at the real-world possibility of something being out there. Well, maybe not so fun for the victims. If there are yeti-type creatures tramping about in the woods, how did they get there? Where did they come from? Why did they come? Or did they originate here? Max Brooks looks like he is prepared for a rough day (meeting with his agent, maybe?) - image from his siteSecond, there is a satirical look at a group of supposedly back-to-nature enthusiasts who have little appreciation of what nature is really all about, and that does not just mean the possible presence of a superpredator in the neighborhood. The story points out the downside of our reliance on the conveniences of the modern age without considering the need for backup in case something should interrupt, or end, many of the services we take for granted. For example, in one of his talks for the military, Brooks points out how advanced communication technology has made it increasingly possible for soldiers in the field to sustain real-time contact with their commanders. But what if they are being hacked by a hostile force? In that case the advanced tech has become an unwarranted risk and the soldiers need to be able to proceed with their mission on their own. They have to be able to go electronically silent. They need to have the necessary equipment and training required to accomplish the intended goals on their own. In the case of Greenloop, WA, if you lose your communications and have only enough supplies to last for a relatively short time, how do you sustain yourself? And then there is that third element.Image from NH1 in VermontThe need to recognize and prepare for real threats in the world. Well, the Greenloop folks might be forgiven for not heading to their exurban happy place, a small, planned community, expecting to be contending with incoming zombies, or whatever. (they clearly had not read Max’s earlier work) But they find themselves a bit light on death-dealing hardware when faced with fearsome furry foes. It’s great to live free of the other sheep until you hear the wolves howl. These guys do not figure in the novel, although it would be pretty frightening if a herd of them descended on a small community en masse. But their band name, Devo, comes from the concept of 'de-evolution'—the idea that instead of continuing to evolve, mankind has actually begun to regress, as evidenced by the dysfunction and herd mentality of American society. (Like dressing the same?)Brooks has some experience planning for unpleasant possibilities. He is the author, among ther things, of World War Z, and, most relevant here, The Zombie Survival Guide. One could reasonably expect a bit of overlap between preparing for a zombie apocalypse and Survival Sasquatch. He is also a Nonresident Fellow at the Modern War Institute at West Point, and Senior Resident Fellow at the Art of Future Warfare Project, at the Brent Scowcroft Center on International Security of the Atlantic Council. His expertise on how to contend with surprising enemies is taken pretty seriously by the United States military and a top tier international relations organization. The guy might be worth checking out. And I would heartily urge you to watch some of his presentations.Image from Closet.fileswordpress.com – I know that look, bunionsPart of the look at how unprepared we are has to do with a larger question of how those who are aware of impending problems (for example the CDC for disease-related threats, or the leadership of our national intelligence apparatus for the current cyber war Russia is waging on us) can engage the public. Most of the population tends to fall into one of two categories, denial (my children can’t possibly get measles or [insert your favorite not-quite extinct disease here], so there is no need for them to be inoculated) or panic (don’t go anywhere near a person with AIDS or you may become infected). Brooks plays those out in this scenario as well, while having a bit of fun at the expense of the frou-frou, and expressing some appreciation for those who can bring real-world experience of relatable challenges, and those who are able to apply their creativity to finding solutions to unthought-of problems.Image from The Daily BeastThe story is presented with a lightly drawn framing device. It will feel familiar to readers of World War Z. In this one, an unnamed narrator presents to us material about the Rainier Sasquatch Massacre from several sources. Prime among these is the journal kept by one Kate Holland, a resident of Greenloop, and first-hand witness. (One must wonder if Kate Holland’s name might be a nod to Ranae Holland of the Animal Planet show, Finding Bigfoot). Her descriptions show how the social dynamics of the tiny community change in adapting to their newly perilous circumstances. Who rises, who fails. It makes for a very entertaining version of a Big (No, I mean really, seriously BIG) Brother type scheme. There will be heroes and villains. We get to see how the threats arrive, are seen, and how responses evolve as well. Image from Closet.fileswordpress.com – Maybe upset because it is so tough to get a pair of decently fitting shoes?Other intel sources include bits of interviews with Ranger Josephine Schell, and with Frank McCray, brother to one of the Greenloop residents. There are occasional one-off bits from other sources as well. These offer exposition about what was going on in the world around the time of the massacre, and historical and scientific insight. Each chapter is introduced with a quote. These are from very diverse sources, like JJ Rousseau, Teddy Roosevelt, Jane Goodall, Frans de Waal, Cicero, Cato, Aesop and more. These are fun, often informative and/or thought-provoking, some grounding the more fantastical elements in a base of reality. One of the things that I enjoyed most about this book was the trial and error approach the Greenloop residents went through in trying to find ways to contend with their new situation. Really makes you wonder what you would do in their place. It reminded me very much of the hard science fiction of Arthur C. Clark and Neal Stephenson. And the musings on the possible roots of Sasquatch were also quite fun. You just can't satisfy some people - Image from Satanfudge.com Overall, this is a delightful read, with page-turning tension that will keep you at it while delivering a subliminal (or not so subliminal) payload of suggesting you check out your own reliance on things not readily replaced should something really, really bad happen. Adversity introduces us to ourselves. Review Posted – January 31, 2020Published – May 12, 2020I received this ARE from Del Rey. Must have been because of my size 14s.=============================EXTRA STUFFLinks to the author’s personal, Twitter and FB pagesWhere to go to see Bigfoot-----Boring, OR - North American Bigfoot Center-----Felton, CA - The Bigfoot Discovery Museum-----Blue Ridge, GA - Expedition Bigfoot! The Sasquatch Museum-----Portland, ME - International Cryptozoology Museum-----Animal Planet – Finding BigfootItems of Interest-----Hollywood Reporter - Excerpt-----Free Download of Germ Warfare by Brooks-----My review of Germ Warfare-----Wiki on the band Devo -----Wiki on Gigantopithecus-----Muppet Show episode 211 - Us-ness - with Dom DeLuise-----Courthouse Libraries BC - on Sasquatch in the law----- Battle With Bigfoot at Mt. St. Helens - a first person account-----Wiki on the Patterson Gimlin film from 1967 - you know the one - the Zapruder film of Sasquatch sightings
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  • Lisa
    January 1, 1970
    My thanks to Random House/Ballantine/Del Ray. Whew! That's a mouthful! Also, Netgalley, and the often brilliant Max Brooks!I tried not to read this book! I knew I'd love it, so I thought I'd just save it for a month or two. Impossible!The Squatch? I don't believe, but if I did I wouldn't be living here in Montana! Nope. I'd love in a high rise in some awful city! This story worked for me. It wasn't really scary, much! But, I don't like monkeys, orangutans chimps, etc. I think they are flea My thanks to Random House/Ballantine/Del Ray. Whew! That's a mouthful! Also, Netgalley, and the often brilliant Max Brooks!I tried not to read this book! I knew I'd love it, so I thought I'd just save it for a month or two. Impossible!The Squatch? I don't believe, but if I did I wouldn't be living here in Montana! Nope. I'd love in a high rise in some awful city! This story worked for me. It wasn't really scary, much! But, I don't like monkeys, orangutans chimps, etc. I think they are flea infested, poop flinging, bastards! Maybe I'm a bit jealous! I have a few people I'd like to fling my poop at! Also, I have seen those shows where some of them hunt! Now, just imagine that, except much taller than us. Wider, and hungry. I did love how these characters came together to become less humane. Still, they found a deep respect and love for each other. More hunter, than the hunted! Actually, that's not quite right. They were definitely hunted. A green village, where everything is delivered by drone. Not even a damn nail, hammer or screwdriver in the whole place! I may get by "if I had to," without a hammer, but a screwdriver? I use screwdrivers all the time! Damn...I love this story. I have really loved many of these characters. Great job, Mr. Brooks!
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  • Nilufer Ozmekik
    January 1, 1970
    This is the worst choice of book to read when youre quarantined, nervous, anxious, taking your most emotional support from great booze and stocked toilet papers (Im cuddling them, thats why people buy them so much, right? They are like white shapeless teddy bears and I recently tried them in a recipe: just mix them with almond milk, marshmallow and chocolate chips: my husband told me that was the best food Ive ever fixed in my entire life) Anyways, this is frightening, action packed, ominous, This is the worst choice of book to read when you’re quarantined, nervous, anxious, taking your most emotional support from great booze and stocked toilet papers (I’m cuddling them, that’s why people buy them so much, right? They are like white shapeless teddy bears and I recently tried them in a recipe: just mix them with almond milk, marshmallow and chocolate chips: my husband told me that was the best food I’ve ever fixed in my entire life) Anyways, this is frightening, action packed, ominous, dark, wild, savage, disturbing ride! You gotta think again before deciding to read a book from World War Z’s author.What we have so far: A big chaos in Pacific Northwest breaks out with the Mount Rainer’s eruption. So we’re introduced to Greenloop community consists of smart homes located in near Ranier Park, isolated from the society. They just created their own safe, clear, highly tech quarantine place. But what was that howling sound coming from the woods? And those footprints cannot belong to a real human, can it? What the hell happened to those animals in the woods? Bloody, ugly, disgusting massacre start to terrify the small community. Maybe they’re not safe enough as they expected, right? Invisible monsters are not under their beds anymore. They’re all real, they are out there and they are coming for them.I think the most things I enjoyed about the book were detailed, layered and entertaining characterization and addictive progression. There are other narrations but the story mostly told by journal entries. The story-telling style is captivating, keeping your interest alive with realistic, slow building mystery. Things get more violent, raw and vulgar at each second when the monsters appear.Surprisingly I also loved Kate (in the beginning she irritated the hell of me with her weird, quirky antics and ultra-paranoid behavior.) and I wanted to punch her know-it-all face at several times but when the crisis occurs she turns into my hero and the transformation of character made me reminded of other super heroes from comic books: a person seems like an ordinary and creepy can be an enigma hiding so much potential inside. Her narration helps us to understand the nature of danger they are going to fight against so we can see the whole picture in our heads more clearly. And her tragic but also witty sense of dark humor keeps us agitated but also curious to know what’s gonna happen next! When the shit hits the fan she turns herself a kind of Sarah Connor with more knowledge about the nature monsters.Overall: It’s a fantastic, nail-elbow- entire arm biter, heart throbbing, definitely earth shattering, wild, extremely crazy train ride you’ll take. It’s definitely worth it but if you cannot handle a mind bender, heart rate jumper, stress riser book, you are not great fit for this bat shit crazy journey!Special thanks to NetGalley and Random House Publishing/Ballantine Books for sending me one the most anticipated books’ ARC COPY in exchange my honest review. I truly enjoyed it so much.bloginstagramfacebooktwitter
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  • Emma
    January 1, 1970
    Despite the horror framework, the real strength of this book is not in the monsters, but in the character development. Bet you weren't expecting that. When you first meet Kate Holland she's a neurotic mess and her voice is annoying enough that if I hadn't known people were going to die excitingly awful deaths sometime soon, I might have put the book down. But it takes very little time for her to get you on side. Her and her husband are the last to arrive at their new home in a super high tech Despite the horror framework, the real strength of this book is not in the monsters, but in the character development. Bet you weren't expecting that. When you first meet Kate Holland she's a neurotic mess and her voice is annoying enough that if I hadn't known people were going to die excitingly awful deaths sometime soon, I might have put the book down. But it takes very little time for her to get you on side. Her and her husband are the last to arrive at their new home in a super high tech version of an off-grid community and it means she's the proverbial outsider. Through her perspective we get to see the place and its people with unflattering clarity. The social politics of this escape from humanity style set up are immediately apparent and entirely recognisable, each power play and misstep detailed by Kate with insight and humour. In fact, it was all so engrossing that when the creatures did finally show up, I was a bit disorientated... To all intents and purposes, I'd forgotten about them. After the explosion of Mount Rainier closes the group's avenues of escape and takes out their tech, I'd been reading the book as an environmental disaster/survivalist story. But that's precisely why it works so well. Everything feels dangerously real. Whether it be food hoarding or ashes covering the houses' solar panels or the disintegrating relations between people, it's suspenseful because it's so plausible. So when the danger becomes something less credible, you're already in the right mindset, primed so that you're not thinking 'well, that's unlikely', but 'dammit, not ANOTHER thing, how are they supposed to deal with that too...?' By them, I mean Kate, because by this time, you're going to be a fan. She's an incredible character and her transformation in to what felt like her real self was such fun to experience. Adversity clearly makes some people shine and Kate shines bright. (I'm not convinced it'd work the same for me.)On top of that, there's some BRUTAL action. People lose their heads. And I mean actually lose them when they're ripped off by Bigfoot gone mad. It's creepy and bloody and surprising. The whole thing is pure entertainment, even if does hit a little close to home. Well worth a few hours of your time. ARC via Netgalley
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  • megs_bookrack
    January 1, 1970
    Devolution tackles the legend of Bigfoot......told through a set of found journals, as well as an original investigation.It's all I have ever wanted in a book and more. Max Brooks, you may now retire.
  • Tucker
    January 1, 1970
    World War Z was the first book ever to literally make my heart pound inside my chest. So, yes, I am very excited for this
  • Dave
    January 1, 1970
    Truth they say can often be stranger than fiction. And perhaps that is just the case with Devolution, a true account of life in the woods and a rather fatal encounter with the Sasquatch. Told through a series of journal entries spliced together with interviews and news reports, we learn the shocking and harrowing story of how Kate and a handful of people made an intentional community on the slopes of Mt. Rainier and built solar panels and compost piles and lived at one with nature away from the Truth they say can often be stranger than fiction. And perhaps that is just the case with Devolution, a ”true” account of life in the woods and a rather fatal encounter with the Sasquatch. Told through a series of journal entries spliced together with interviews and news reports, we learn the shocking and harrowing story of how Kate and a handful of people made an intentional community on the slopes of Mt. Rainier and built solar panels and compost piles and lived at one with nature away from the traffic jams, the crime, and pollution. It is only after Mt. Rainier erupts and the little community (not even a town) is cut off from the chaos down below in Seattle and Tacoma that Kate and the others first realize they are not alone and all of Darwin's greatest nightmares have come true. There is a long build up in this tale but once the action begins, it is really a fast and furious battle for survival. And to think this really happened to Kate! The narrative voice is great. As a reader, you really get a sense of the horror unfolding and how the community was caught unaware and unprepared, defenseless against the tribe of behemoths. The articles and asides work well with the diary entries, explaining why there was a flurry of sightings in the fifties and sixties and why no respected scientists would touch this with a ten foot pole. So, put your reservations aside, breathe deeply, and be prepared for the unexpected. Bigfoot lives!
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  • Sonja Arlow
    January 1, 1970
    I have to start my review by mentioning just how much I loved World War Z: An Oral History of the Zombie War, it took the overdone zombie theme and made it into a unique reading experience. Some of the military sections felt extremely authentic because the author took inspiration from a collection of thousands of interview excerpts from participants in WWII. I highly recommend that book even if you think you wont like a zombie book.This one however was not in the same category.I think the setup I have to start my review by mentioning just how much I loved World War Z: An Oral History of the Zombie War, it took the overdone zombie theme and made it into a unique reading experience. Some of the military sections felt extremely authentic because the author took inspiration from a collection of thousands of interview excerpts from participants in WWII. I highly recommend that book even if you think you won’t like a zombie book.This one however was not in the same category.I think the setup was too rushed to make the rest of the story believable.The story starts with a remote eco-village of Greenloop situated deep in the wilderness. It is everything a city dweller needs to pretend they are getting back to nature. The houses are ultra high-tech, groceries are delivered by drone, electricity is generated through your sewer system and everyone loves the peace and quiet.But when nearby Mount Rainier blows up cutting off this group from the outside world, nature suddenly becomes a lot closer than what is comfortable. Even if you remove the fantastical element of Big Foot what you are left with is a very predictable story of a group of strangers doing exactly what you would expect them to do when faced with imminent disaster in an isolated place. Secretly hoarding food, in-fighting, blaming each other for stupid mistakes, hysterics etc etc. There was nothing new in the dynamics depicted between the characters in the story.Like with WWZ there are interviews and anecdotes from other sources. In this case park rangers, other residents and zoology experts yet for me it just never worked well.I never had that edge-of-your-seat reading experience and I also didn’t like the constant footnotes on every page.I cannot recommend this book.Netgalley ARC: Publish date 12 May 2020
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  • Helen Power
    January 1, 1970
    Plot & Language What an amazing premise! I love the layout and the style of this book. The majority of the story is told through diary entries, with some interview excerpts and other forms of epistolary thrown into the mix. It genuinely read like a non-fiction book on the subject. Brooks uses a matter-of-fact tone in the excerpts from books on Bigfoot, etc. but the language flows quite conversationally during the diary entries. This narrative flow makes the story that much easier to get Plot & Language What an amazing premise! I love the layout and the style of this book. The majority of the story is told through diary entries, with some interview excerpts and other forms of epistolary thrown into the mix. It genuinely read like a non-fiction book on the subject. Brooks uses a matter-of-fact tone in the excerpts from books on Bigfoot, etc. but the language flows quite conversationally during the diary entries. This narrative flow makes the story that much easier to get lost in.  My only complaint is that the book was comprised mostly of diary entries, with occasional excerpts from interviews and textbooks. I wanted more of these other forms of storytelling! I would have liked to have read more on the history of Bigfoot appearances.  Nevertheless, Brooks takes advantage of this, and I found myself genuinely wondering what was real and what wasn’t. He quoted Frans de Waal and Jane Goodall, two of my favourite animal behaviour experts, and I know that the information in those quotes were real. He talked about evolution of man, including species such as Gigantopithecus, which I know to be true. But I don’t remember much else from my undergraduate anthropology classes, and this novel had me questioning and believing that Bigfoot could be real. That’s the sign of a talented writer!I also loved the theme of the novel, which is reflected in the title, “Devolution”.  Throughout the story, we question whether or not Bigfoot could exist, while being presented with information about evolution and primate behaviour. All the while, Kate and the others at Greenloop are struggling to survive, and we learn just what people are willing and capable of doing when their lives are in danger. This story is compelling and quite haunting at times.  It’s definitely a horror, but one that can be enjoyed by those who aren’t fans of the genre, as it has so much more to offer. Characters I did find that Kate and her husband, Dan, weren’t as fleshed out as I would have liked. While I’m glad that Brooks didn’t spend a lot of time in the diary entries having Kate talk about their past, their failing marriage (any more than was necessary), it did leave a lot of questions unanswered. For one: Why is Kate joining this group? I didn’t quite understand it, as she didn’t quite fit in with the others, and I would have benefited from a little more handholding in the beginning of the book, with Brooks possibly having her explain why she was there more than just “to fix their marriage”. I also wanted more about her past. We know that she had a brother, but what was their relationship like? What did she have back home to fight to survive for? Side characters in the novel were quite interesting, and I enjoyed the occasional additional piece of information that the author provided, whether it was an interview or a diary entry—to provide more information into their backgrounds.I recommend this book to those who want to read a compelling story about survival, and to those who want to dip their toes into epistolary fiction.  A suspension of disbelief isn’t even required to enjoy this story about a first-hand eyewitness account of Bigfoot. * Thank you to OLA Super Conference and Del Rey Books for the arc to review! * This review appeared first on https://powerlibrarian.wordpress.com/ Instagram | Blog | Website | Twitter My 2020 Reading Challenge
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  • Liz Barnsley
    January 1, 1970
    I LOVED this.A one sitting read and straight onto my favourite books list, Devolution tells the tale of volcanic eruption, chaos and confusion, whilst one woman and her community face a fight of an entirely different kindTold via diary entries, interviews and news reports, Devolution is a highly addictive, totally involving tale that harks back to the fears of our childhood, the monsters that roam just beyond our vision, that in this book become horrifyingly real. The characters are pitch I LOVED this.A one sitting read and straight onto my favourite books list, Devolution tells the tale of volcanic eruption, chaos and confusion, whilst one woman and her community face a fight of an entirely different kind…Told via diary entries, interviews and news reports, Devolution is a highly addictive, totally involving tale that harks back to the fears of our childhood, the monsters that roam just beyond our vision, that in this book become horrifyingly real. The characters are pitch perfect, Kate Holland especially so, she could be any one of us thrown into a fight for survival where the smallest decisions can have irrevocable consequences.The descriptive sense within Devolution is also quite brilliant, the subtle unnerving tones building the fear, some of it visceral and sudden, other parts quietly disturbing. The science is also scarily sound, it isn’t that difficult whilst reading it to take the leap into believing it is all too real..Bigfoot is iconic, a legend born from so many possibilities – Max Brooks takes that here and turns it around on itself, making it in the head of the reader as if it is actually so, Kate’s battle is both personal and practical and you will live it with her to the bittersweet, cleverly thought provoking end.Beautifully imagined, intelligently executed, Devolution comes highly recommended from me.
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  • Melissa
    January 1, 1970
    I received a copy of this from Netgalley in exchange for a review.It's a new book by Max Brooks, author of World War Z aka my favorite zombie novel/the greatest zombie novel ever written, the one that if you haven't read yet you should totally get on posthaste. This book is about Bigfoot, a creature about which I didn't really have feelings before, but thank you Max Brooks because now I've been forced to consider these creatures beyond that one game thread in Red Dead Undead. In a continuation I received a copy of this from Netgalley in exchange for a review.It's a new book by Max Brooks, author of World War Z aka my favorite zombie novel/the greatest zombie novel ever written, the one that if you haven't read yet you should totally get on posthaste. This book is about Bigfoot, a creature about which I didn't really have feelings before, but thank you Max Brooks because now I've been forced to consider these creatures beyond that one game thread in Red Dead Undead. In a continuation on my personal theme for this absolutely neverending month that is March 2020 wherein every book I read is somehow about the world ending, this book has Bigfoot but it's also about when a volcano erupts and cuts you off and everyone outside of your little high-tech eco-community starts losing their shit. Brooks does a nice job illustrating the way characters break down and reform under pressures like a lack of more than a few week's worth of food and a troop of displaced omnivores in the woods who seem to have decided that you and your friends are tasty. I especially appreciate the evolution of diary-writer Kate Holland, whose journal kept at her therapist's behest comprises the bulk of the story - in these times of high anxiety, may we all find such fortitude. There's also a very high creep factor and quite a bit of gruesome death; at some point I was scoffing about how I wasn't particularly afraid of these Bigfoot creatures because what had they even done that was so bad? and then someone died a really nasty death and I was properly chastened and thoroughly grossed out. Since this is the only book on this topic I've ever read it seems unfair to call it the greatest Bigfoot novel ever writen, but it is a tense, gory, good time and I will never stop being into any tale told through diary entries.
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  • Bandit
    January 1, 1970
    This was quite possibly the most eagerly anticipated book on my Netgalley wishlist. And then my wish got granted and there it was, the new Max Brooks book about Sasquatches on my kindle. Woohoo. Mind you, I would have been excited for Devolution if it featured just one of those elements, either Brooks or Sasquatches, but the combination of the two is like a wish granted indeed. Comparisons with WWZ are bound to be inevitable, its almost impossible to think of Brooks without the context of his This was quite possibly the most eagerly anticipated book on my Netgalley wishlist. And then my wish got granted and there it was, the new Max Brooks book about Sasquatches on my kindle. Woohoo. Mind you, I would have been excited for Devolution if it featured just one of those elements, either Brooks or Sasquatches, but the combination of the two is like a wish granted indeed. Comparisons with WWZ are bound to be inevitable, it’s almost impossible to think of Brooks without the context of his first person zombie apocalypse epic, so let’s just address that straight away…Devolution is also a first person account of an apocalypse, albeit done on a micro scale. WWZ covered the globe, Devolution covers one remote eco village isolated by a catastrophic volcano activity. WWZ was narrated by a collective of people, Devolution is primarily told through journal entries of one of the eco villagers found post facto with a variety of asides mixed in. The style of narration Brooks is so adept at utilizing works extremely well in making the story come alive with a sort of immediacy and emotional engagement a more traditional third person narrative might not quite hit. Max Brooks is a smart and erudite author and those smarts and erudition always find a way to shine through the text and makes the narrative seem more realistic for having so many facts surround it. So the bulk of the novel is spent witnessing a microscale war between the people and the…well, the other people in a way, it is a war of primates of varied levels of advancements. It is conducted with all the brutality and cunning intelligence of a war. It’s epic in its own way. And it’s tons of fun. I mean, it’s a properly well written book with a variety of developed interesting characters (they are the sort that would end up in a remote high tech eco village, but you do get a diversity and a much needed balancing factor represented by an artist in residence with a past that makes her very well equipped to handle crisis and privation). It also turns out that a Sasquatch apocalypse can do miracles for a struggling marriage…go figure. The quote used in this book and so aptly suited for it is that adversity introduces us to ourselves. And it really does. Take away the conceits of modern conveniences and the real selves emerge, sometimes ugly, sometimes shining and brave. It may not be the most practical relationship counseling strategy in real world for logistical reasons, but it works magic for the couple here, the wife of that couple is the main narrator, so you can really witness the progress. But anyway, that isn’t the main thing here. The main thing is large violent primates of a lesser known strand of evolutionary tree, you know the ones with very, very large feet. They steal the show and they own this show and the book is all the more awesome for it. Yes, I already said this was tons of fun…so maybe I can go with wildly entertaining to throw in a pun and avoid redundancy. Don’t expect another WWZ, this is a different beast, quite literally. And also, where WWZ was very difficult to adapt and therefore in the end didn’t really work on screen or at least didn’t live up to the greatness of the source material…this one, being a smaller scale setting and all, would make an awesome movie if done right. And there’s definitely technology out there to do this right and I’d love to relive this adventure in cinematic form. Until then, read this book, you’ll have a blast. That might have been a volcano pun. Sorry, kinda. Recommended. Thanks Netgalley.
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  • Alondra Miller
    January 1, 1970
    Won copy of Goodreads Giveaways!! Woot!!
  • Ash
    January 1, 1970
    This cover is so ugly but I would die for another Max Brooks novel so you know Ill read it. This cover is so ugly but I would die for another Max Brooks novel so you know I’ll read it.
  • Kyle
    January 1, 1970
    Many thanks to NetGalley & Random House Publishing Group - Ballantine for providing me this eARC, in exchange for an honest review.After a volcanic eruption at Mt. Rainier unleashes a horde of Bigfoots (whats the pluralization? Sasquatches? Sasquatchi?) onto a biotech-green community, a fight for survival ensues with (wo)man vs. squatch.I dig this sort of story: a sci-fi/horror journalistic piece investigating something supernatural. We have Max Brooks, the journalist (and author), again Many thanks to NetGalley & Random House Publishing Group - Ballantine for providing me this eARC, in exchange for an honest review.After a volcanic eruption at Mt. Rainier unleashes a horde of Bigfoots (what’s the pluralization?— Sasquatches? Sasquatchi?) onto a biotech-green community, a fight for survival ensues with (wo)man vs. squatch.I dig this sort of story: a sci-fi/horror journalistic piece investigating something supernatural. We have Max Brooks, the journalist (and author), again giving us the facts in between chapters of Kate’s “journal entries”. The gimmick (and that’s pretty much how I viewed it) of using a journal to tell a story was a hinderance to the plot overall, in this case. I just couldn’t picture Kate rushing to record her thoughts and actions, as well as the movements of the Greenloop community, every time something happened. It was unrealistic to think that she’d essentially go “Dear Journal” after a gruesome attack and/or event. Having the story in retrospect made the writing a bit too sloppy at times, with Kate frequently saying something along the lines of “I am writing this now...” or “I took a moment to jot down what just happened...”. It was like “found footage”, but way less interesting or effective.Some of the interspersed “interviews” and sections were hit-or-miss; And a few were, to be frank, quite boring. It ruined the pacing of the novel, this continuous stop-and-go between Kate’s journal entries and the post-massacre sections. To add to that: a bulk of pages (especially in the latter part of the book) were heavily devoted to “crafting”—in this case: weapons! I’m not gonna lie, I think the text got bogged by each passage detailing how to properly make a spear, javelin, hatchet, etc. I mean, it was kind of interesting, sure. I’ll give it that. Then again, I don’t need a two-page rundown on the technicalities of Martha Stewart-ing bamboo stalks, electrical cords and kitchen knives into instruments of death... and then repeat that countless times over for this particular weapon, or that particular fighting style.As far as characters go, Kate was... how shall I put this? A drip! In the earlier sections, I really wanted to slap her (more than once!). She’s so passive and judgmental, naively irrational, and altogether meek and annoying. The shift in her was unconvincing and seemingly came out of nowhere—she went from super skittish to bloodthirsty confidence too quickly for it to be believable. Every other character was painted surface-level, and I really didn’t connect with or care about any of them. The only character I really liked was Mostar, honestly (view spoiler)[she deserved better!!! (hide spoiler)]. The entire plot is predictable, too (and aside from spoilers, predictability is one of my biggest pet peeves). From the first few pages, you already know that everyone is dead (with the exception of Kate, whose body was never found). And that level of knowing took the surprise and the immediacy out of the story completely. When the—for lack of a better term—“battle” happened, I felt nothing. I actually think more time was spent on the weapons “How To” crafting than on the actual onslaught. Disappointing.The good: The author paints a vivid picture of the Washington wilderness. I saw clearly the trees, compound grounds, and Mount Rainier looming over it all. In a book like this, nature becomes its own character, and I feel like that was done somewhat well. Also, the first few deaths were (although expected) pretty effective in building some tension. It was the slow burn with a weak flame, but still something, I guess.In the end, I don’t believe I wasted my time with this book. It has its moments, and I’m sure will interest genre fans, but I wouldn’t necessarily go out of my way to recommend it.
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  • Trin
    January 1, 1970
    Oh dear. I loved World War Z, and waited so long for a follow up, but this has none of its predecessor's cleverness or spark. Not because "Bigfoot attack" is inherently a dumber concept that "worldwide zombie plague" -- both are pretty goofy, and in WWZ, the seriousness with which Brooks tackles the silly setup is a large part of the charm. But here the mechanics fail him. Devolution is told (for the most part) as a found diary, which is simply not a good format for an action/suspense story. Oh dear. I loved World War Z, and waited so long for a follow up, but this has none of its predecessor's cleverness or spark. Not because "Bigfoot attack" is inherently a dumber concept that "worldwide zombie plague" -- both are pretty goofy, and in WWZ, the seriousness with which Brooks tackles the silly setup is a large part of the charm. But here the mechanics fail him. Devolution is told (for the most part) as a found diary, which is simply not a good format for an action/suspense story. Nothing the diarist -- in this case, a deeply generic woman named Katie -- writes has any immediacy: it can't. When Brooks tries to capture that feeling of being in the moment anyway, it reads false, because you know Katie is scribbling all this down after the fact. And you know as long as Katie keeps writing, she's fine. Like, we know Bigfoot's never gonna get her mid-scene; the form feels ill-chosen because from the get-go it robs Brooks of so many possibilities. It's the exact opposite of the brilliant use of oral history in WWZ.WWZ had a vast cast from around the globe, none of whom were the focus. This book sticks almost entirely with a small group of characters, and that also turns out to be to its detriment, because it allows the reader to realize that not one of them is vividly drawn. Instead, the people of Greenloop are bland cliches. You don't get to know them, so you don't care when they die. The one maybe-intriguing character never feels realistically like a person, she's so OTT.Brooks may also be trying to deliver some commentary about the importance or fruitlessness of environmentalism, or about how the human capacity for violence is a very bad, but maybe sometimes good, thing? I don't know, it's hideously muddled. But here's another scene of a sasquatch ripping someone's guts out!I don't care, I don't care, nothing in this book ever made me care.Deeply disappointing.
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  • Jordy’s Book Club
    January 1, 1970
    QUICK TAKE: eco-thriller with a sci-fi twist when a group of technologically-advanced hippies move off the grid but are trapped in the wilderness when a volcano erupts, leaving them isolated and forced to fend for themselves against a group of Sasquatches (is that the plural for Sasquatch??). The book takes way too long to get moving and ultimately left me wanting more. The end poses some interesting questions, in particular about a character snapping, and I would have loved if there had more QUICK TAKE: eco-thriller with a sci-fi twist when a group of technologically-advanced hippies move off the grid but are trapped in the wilderness when a volcano erupts, leaving them isolated and forced to fend for themselves against a group of Sasquatches (is that the plural for Sasquatch??). The book takes way too long to get moving and ultimately left me wanting more. The end poses some interesting questions, in particular about a character snapping, and I would have loved if there had more investment in that storyline. Entertaining, but ultimately a little bit of a letdown.
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  • Mike
    January 1, 1970
    This was a fun book. My only (completely unfair) complaint is that its not World War Z, But With Sasquatches Instead of Zombies. So this was something of a victim of Brooks success (like I said, its unfair), but still a good deal of fun.Rather than the interview-format of WWZ (there are some, but theyre purely authorial asides), Devolution is the recovered diary recorded by a woman when her remote, isolated town was attacked by a troop? Is troop the right term for a group of Sasquatches? (Come This was a fun book. My only (completely unfair) complaint is that it’s not World War Z, But With Sasquatches Instead of Zombies. So this was something of a victim of Brooks’ success (like I said, it’s unfair), but still a good deal of fun.Rather than the interview-format of WWZ (there are some, but they’re purely authorial asides), Devolution is the “recovered” diary recorded by a woman when her remote, isolated town was attacked by a … troop? Is troop the right term for a group of Sasquatches? (Come to that, is “Sasquatches” the plural of “Sasquatch,” or would the plural of “Sasquatch” just be “Sasquatch”? As both a proud grammar nerd and proud spec fic nerd, these questions are important to me) … we’ll go with troop of Sasquatches. Really, when you get down to it, Devolution is a book version of the “monster in the woods” subgenre of horror movie, of which Alien is probably the best known (yes, yes, I know it’s not set in the woods, but work with me here).Where it suffers is, as I said, in comparison to World War Z. WWZ was relentlessly creative and eminently readable. Devolution is every bit as readable, but lacks the creativity of WWZ. WWZ told a story that was as literally global as you can get. Devolution takes place entirely in an isolated group of houses in Washington state - there’s literally 11 characters.It also suffered a bit in that I found it so difficult to empathize with many of those 11. The isolated little group of houses is a kind of eco-commune near Mount Rainier, designed to be zero impact. Houses constructed of compressed bamboo, power coming from solar cells, heat coming from gas generated by septic waste, food deliveries coming once a week via the electric driverless delivery van … you get the idea. Naturally, the 11 people who live there are all the kind of stereotypical affluent champagne liberal that gets irrationally angry when their grocery order doesn’t include GMO free organic broccollini. In context it makes sense that that’s the cast, but it did make it harder to be upset when certain of them get eaten.All in all, this was a very fun and easy-to-read book. Don’t go into it expecting World War Z and you’ll be a happy reader.(one final aside: in reading this book, I ended up down a Wikipedia rabbit hole about volcanoes, and let me just say that lahars seem pretty freakin scary).
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  • Brianna
    January 1, 1970
    I really liked this book. Maybe because Im a total Bigfoot nerd, maybe because its setting in Washington had me recognizing the sites and cities, but I really enjoyed it. Its definitely intense and a bit scary and a lot of what ifs thread through it. I really liked this book. Maybe because I’m a total Bigfoot nerd, maybe because its setting in Washington had me recognizing the sites and cities, but I really enjoyed it. It’s definitely intense and a bit scary and a lot of “what if’s” thread through it.
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  • Em
    January 1, 1970
    Its so Max Brooks-y!!! I loved WWZ so much I read it twice, and Im so glad hes back to working in a similar form again. This has all the same hallmarks as WWZ - socio-economic and political background that enrich and lends plausibility to the events of the novel, as well as neat little twists of the knife here and there when youre least expecting them. Highly highly recommended. It’s so Max Brooks-y!!! I loved WWZ so much I read it twice, and I’m so glad he’s back to working in a similar form again. This has all the same hallmarks as WWZ - socio-economic and political background that enrich and lends plausibility to the events of the novel, as well as neat little twists of the knife here and there when you’re least expecting them. Highly highly recommended.
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  • Geoffrey
    January 1, 1970
    (Note:I received an advanced reader copy of this book courtesy of NetGalley)In Devolution, Max Brooks performs several major inversions of the format of his bestselling work, World War Z. Once again the fragile high-tech modern day has been suddenly upset by what were supposed to be only mere myths. In the aftermath of the horror, the author-reporter uses first-hand resources to try and get a picture of the horror that's occurred. However, instead of a global terror that took humanity to the (Note:I received an advanced reader copy of this book courtesy of NetGalley)In Devolution, Max Brooks performs several major inversions of the format of his bestselling work, World War Z. Once again the fragile high-tech modern day has been suddenly upset by what were supposed to be only mere myths. In the aftermath of the horror, the author-reporter uses first-hand resources to try and get a picture of the horror that's occurred. However, instead of a global terror that took humanity to the brink of extinction, this time it’s a far more local affair with an eruption at Mount Rainier that left isolated residents of a nearby planned eco-community perfect prey for a pack of hulking, large-footed and very hungry menaces.I definitely applaud Brooks’ for stepping away from zombies and trying something new, especially after the immense success that they have given him. Not only does he attempt to craft a realistic horror scenario through a completely different creature, but he tries to accomplish this in a vastly different setting scaled back from worldwide pandemic to just one single community. Unfortunately, I think that this more intimate setting ultimately ended up being too constraining. The story, mainly told through the journal of a member of the Bigfoot-besieged community, wasn’t able to become much more beyond a fairly standard survival-horror tale of a community under strain from an outside threat, complete with several common tropes and easily identifiable twists in the plot. Brooks does an admirable job of transforming the Sasquatch. Out of all the cryptids and nonexistent creatures out there, I think this is one that I have always taken the least serious of all (the fact that it is commonly called "Bigfoot" plays a very heavy role in there). However, through the various interviews and readings that make up this book, the existence of wild ape-people is definitely made more realistically plausible than I have seen anywhere else. And not only are these the most feasible Sasquatches, but they are also more genuinely threatening and anxiety-inducing than I have encountered in any other book, TV show or film. Devolution is not the second World War Z that I confess I hoped it would be. But for its limits and cliches, I still overall enjoyed Books’ latest tale.
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  • Kaora
    January 1, 1970
    I'm a huge fan of Max Brooks, ever since he first released World War Z. I really wasn't into zombie or horror books at the time, but he opened a whole new world for me, so when Devolution came up I had to grab it right away.I'm so glad he stuck to the epistolary format in World War Z, because he does it so well. I feel like I really get to know the characters through their stories and care about them.Devolution hooked me from the first page to the last. It was one of those books where I stayed I'm a huge fan of Max Brooks, ever since he first released World War Z. I really wasn't into zombie or horror books at the time, but he opened a whole new world for me, so when Devolution came up I had to grab it right away.I'm so glad he stuck to the epistolary format in World War Z, because he does it so well. I feel like I really get to know the characters through their stories and care about them.Devolution hooked me from the first page to the last. It was one of those books where I stayed up late just to read it, then after closing it stayed up even later thinking about it. It is a relatively short book, but the slow burn is so well done and builds throughout the book to its final conclusion that you feel like you are stuck on a ride that you don't want to get off of. Every piece, the diary, the articles, the interviews, the quotes all gradually takes a speculative ape-like creature to a terrifying monster that had me looking twice at the woods at night and completely changed my opinion of apes in general.Read this!
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  • Becky Spratford
    January 1, 1970
    STAR Review in the April 2020 issue of Library Journal and on the blog: http://raforall.blogspot.com/2020/03/...Three Words That Describe This Book: stellar world building, fictional true crime frame, claustrophobic
  • Jocelyn
    January 1, 1970
    Welp, I've officially read a book about Bigfoot. And not just Bigfoot, but Bigfoot (Bigfeet?) in the midst of a violent volcanic eruption. It was a truly fantastic combo that was so much to read!Full review to come closer to the publication date!
  • Michelle Morrell
    January 1, 1970
    Just look at the title, how could this not be great??
  • Meredith
    January 1, 1970
    I mean, if you have to pick a book to escape into while humanity is fighting an invisible enemy, why not choose one where the enemy is big, and smelly, and quite visceral. Like, the opposite of invisible. Bottom line: It's a solid cryptid thriller; I will recommend to fans of Michael Crichton or Douglas Preston. I also got "Salt Line" vibes, so I'll be pairing with that.(view spoiler)[I loved WWZ, and looked forward to this. One of the things I loved about WWZ was its geopolitical commentary I mean, if you have to pick a book to escape into while humanity is fighting an invisible enemy, why not choose one where the enemy is big, and smelly, and quite visceral. Like, the opposite of invisible. Bottom line: It's a solid cryptid thriller; I will recommend to fans of Michael Crichton or Douglas Preston. I also got "Salt Line" vibes, so I'll be pairing with that.(view spoiler)[I loved WWZ, and looked forward to this. One of the things I loved about WWZ was its geopolitical commentary couched in a zombie thriller. This book is more intimate - while Brooks brings in the outside world in a slight nod to some backstories of the characters, and comments about how sasquatch/yeti/whatever have been documented around the world and hushed up or whatever, it's really only ever the story of the handful of folks living in a bourgeois tech-driven eco-village on the slopes of Mt Rainier, and what happens when they get cut off & encounter these "beasts." It's a solid thriller. Not much more. What will this scrambled-together group of folks do to survive. How will the main character, who we see through her journal entries directed somewhat toward her therapist, grow. The silent girl (Palomino) was a lost opportunity...unless she comes into her own in the sequel. He does a little bit of "who is the real beast" sympathizing with the creatures nuance, but not enough not to make you cheer when they get it in the end. WWZ was a novel; this is a book-written-to-be-optioned-for-the-screen. (hide spoiler)]I'll say one thing that parallels the current situation: like many of these books, makes you wonder how useful you'll actually be when the shit hits the fan and tech can't save us. Victory gardens FTW.Also, can the park ranger have a spin-off? Because I really liked her for some reason.
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  • Maia
    January 1, 1970
    Get ready for nightmares, y'all. Sometimes I wonder why I still choose to read horror novels in the midst of a pandemic, but I haven't put them aside, either. Maybe it's that there's something satisfying in knowing that the terrors contained in these novels are purely fictional. Although, Max Brooks' characteristic journalistic style is enough to make me forget the 'fiction' designation sometimes.Devolution is sort of like X-Files meets Lord of the Flies, but add some more gore. If you love Get ready for nightmares, y'all. Sometimes I wonder why I still choose to read horror novels in the midst of a pandemic, but I haven't put them aside, either. Maybe it's that there's something satisfying in knowing that the terrors contained in these novels are purely fictional. Although, Max Brooks' characteristic journalistic style is enough to make me forget the 'fiction' designation sometimes.Devolution is sort of like X-Files meets Lord of the Flies, but add some more gore. If you love exploring the darkest parts of human nature calling us back to our evolutionary origins, then you'll love this book. It's not for the faint-of-heart, but it will certainly suck you in and distract you from the world outside. Might I recommend not reading it right before bedtime?This is a 'found journal' style narrative, featuring the firsthand account of Kate, a thirty-something, anxiety-ridden, Silicon Valley suburbanite. Needing a break from life's pressures to reconnect, Kate and her failed tech entrepreneur husband move into a high-tech eco-village in the middle of nowhere Washington with a fabulous view of Mt. Rainier. And then Mt. Rainier erupts. And then the displaced deer and rabbits flee through their village. And then something much more dangerous follows.My one complaint is that, as a thirty-something, anxiety-ridden, suburbanite woman myself, I didn't feel like Brooks got the voice quite right in the early parts of the book. But if you can suspend that disbelief for the first few chapters, the payoff is there in the end.
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  • Angela
    January 1, 1970
    Oh goodness. Hard to know of I'm fairly reviewing anything at this point. This took me ages to read-- pandemic anxiety or a rather cluttered second act, who knows.Anyway this a tale of a super tech, low bio impact town going wrong. The idea was to get closer to nature, cut off from TOO MUCH society. Then a Sasquatch species, forced out by Ranier blowing, complicates the already strained community.I liked this, I did, but felt the multiple sources of found media just bloated the story. I only Oh goodness. Hard to know of I'm fairly reviewing anything at this point. This took me ages to read-- pandemic anxiety or a rather cluttered second act, who knows.Anyway this a tale of a super tech, low bio impact town going wrong. The idea was to get closer to nature, cut off from TOO MUCH society. Then a Sasquatch species, forced out by Ranier blowing, complicates the already strained community.I liked this, I did, but felt the multiple sources of found media just bloated the story. I only wanted to know what was happening to Katie and everyone there! The interviews from rangers and all at the beginning of each chapter just made me impatient-- they'd have been more effective in shorter bursts. And the whole second half, when things are REALLY going down felt drawn out even with the surface level excitement. Still. A pretty good story. I cared about the MAIN focus character (again, I think the outside interviews distracted from that). Early review copy courtesy of Netgalley.
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  • Kimberly
    January 1, 1970
    As a very early reader of World War Z (I read the manuscript) ] was so excited and grateful to be able to read the galley of Devolution, Max Brooks' first non-graphic novel since World War Z. I knew I had to temper my expectations, but I was truly gripped by this tale of off-the-grid survival that combined a volcano (a favorite survival topic of mine), loss of technology and a self-isolated community of people unprepared for survival.With the exception of a sage-like elder who has survived an As a very early reader of World War Z (I read the manuscript) ] was so excited and grateful to be able to read the galley of Devolution, Max Brooks' first non-graphic novel since World War Z. I knew I had to temper my expectations, but I was truly gripped by this tale of off-the-grid survival that combined a volcano (a favorite survival topic of mine), loss of technology and a self-isolated community of people unprepared for survival.With the exception of a sage-like elder who has survived an earlier catastrophe, and through whose eyes our narrator (in diary form) learns to trust to survive, this community of folks that consider themselves off-the-grid have no idea how interlinked with the grid they are until the net goes down and traps them in the wilderness. Lava flows keep them from escaping, and drive a monstrous threat their way - an uncompromising legend whose fight for survival has one rule: win.I feel bad for Brooks that he'll have to curtail his book tour due to the coronavirus and Covid-19 threat. However: we were able to spread the word on WWZ like a virus back in the day! Let's help him out with Devolution: this will be an excellent quarantine/self-isolation read. The audiobook should be terrific, too -- I believe I saw on reddit that it will be fully cast. (Brooks did an AMA that's worth looking up.)Keep your trashcan lids on tight.
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  • Katelyn
    January 1, 1970
    When Mount Rainier erupts, the small community of Greenloop finds itself cut off from the rest of the world and up against a pack of starving Bigfoots eager to find their next meal. Devolution is a realistic survival tale mixed with the fantastic what-ifs surrounding the nature and existence of Bigfoot. This is an obvious choice for those fascinated by stories of Bigfoot.The story is told as a series of diary entries mixed with interviews and other tidbits to explain what happened at Greenloop When Mount Rainier erupts, the small community of Greenloop finds itself cut off from the rest of the world and up against a pack of starving Bigfoots eager to find their next meal. Devolution is a realistic survival tale mixed with the fantastic what-ifs surrounding the nature and existence of Bigfoot. This is an obvious choice for those fascinated by stories of Bigfoot.The story is told as a series of diary entries mixed with interviews and other tidbits to explain what happened at Greenloop and the possible nature of Bigfoot. The format helps the story feel more personal while diving into how an unexpected crisis can change people (and Bigfoot) whether for the better or worse.The beginning felt a little slow with a lot of set up and introductions to the characters and Greenloop, but once Bigfoot was introduced the story took off.I received an ARC for review.
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