For the Ride
A major new book-length visionary poem from a writer "whose poems are among the major astonishments of contemporary poetry" (Robert Polito, The Poetry Foundation)Alice Notley has become one of the most highly regarded figures in American poetry, a master of the visionary mode acclaimed for genre-bending, book-length poems of great ambition and adventurousness. Her newest book, For the Ride, is another such work. The protagonist, "One," is suddenly within The Glyph, whose walls projects scenes One can enter, and One does so. Other beings begin to materialize, and it seems like they (and One) are all survivors of a global disaster. They board a ship to flee to another dimension; they decide what they must save on this Ark are words, and they gather together as many as are deemed fit to save. They "sail" and meanwhile begin to change the language they are speaking, before disembarking at an abandoned future city.

For the Ride Details

TitleFor the Ride
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseMar 3rd, 2020
PublisherPenguin Books
ISBN-139780143134572
Rating
GenrePoetry, Science Fiction

For the Ride Review

  • Anima
    January 1, 1970
    Deserted images, rough pathways among mosaic fragments spread on the canvas of a delicate heart. Within the borders of poetry, an interesting new style built with dispersed particles of grace, sensitivity, gentleness.One remembers too much: love has killed One. What tense is that? Past love,thats a tense. When one enters into a rock one cant regulate,its too hard. Death exists to make it harder. Theyre just words, though, here.The words-to-be crowd round. Not separate! Thats the first thing to Deserted images, rough pathways among mosaic fragments spread on the canvas of a delicate heart. Within the borders of poetry, an interesting new style built with dispersed particles of grace, sensitivity, gentleness.“One remembers too much: love has killed One. What tense is that? Past love,that’s a tense. When one enters into a rock one can’t regulate,it’s too hard. Death exists to make it harder. They’re just words, though, here.The words-to-be crowd round. Not separate! That’s the first thing to know.”
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  • Geoff
    January 1, 1970
    Lots and lots of pyrotechnics using and about language. Reminds me a lot of the modernist formal language experiments of Gertrude Stein or T.S Eliot or Samuel Beckett. But just like those works, while this one was intellectually interesting, it mostly left me cold. I can see how Notley was putting passion into some of her arguments around language and words and their importance, but the word to suss them out put me so into my head, that the emotional impact just washed right over me. I'm left Lots and lots of pyrotechnics using and about language. Reminds me a lot of the modernist formal language experiments of Gertrude Stein or T.S Eliot or Samuel Beckett. But just like those works, while this one was intellectually interesting, it mostly left me cold. I can see how Notley was putting passion into some of her arguments around language and words and their importance, but the word to suss them out put me so into my head, that the emotional impact just washed right over me. I'm left impressed but mostly unmoved.**Thanks to NetGalley and the publisher for the advanced reader copy in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Kyle
    January 1, 1970
    Easily one of the more difficult things I've read lately, but Notley has always had a way of making that difficult really feel worth it. Not because she reaches grand epiphanies and imparts wisdom, but because while you work through the text and when that work is done, you are able to think yourself in new and different ways. Even if this is not my favorite of her works, it is work well done.
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