The Tyrant Baru Cormorant (The Masquerade, #3)
Seth Dickinson's epic fantasy series which began with The Traitor Baru Cormorant, returns with the third book, The Tyrant Baru Cormorant.The hunt is over. After fifteen years of lies and sacrifice, Baru Cormorant has the power to destroy the Imperial Republic of Falcrest that she pretends to serve. The secret society called the Cancrioth is real, and Baru is among them.But the Cancrioth's weapon cannot distinguish the guilty from the innocent. If it escapes quarantine, the ancient hemorrhagic plague called the Kettling will kill hundreds of millions...not just in Falcrest, but all across the world. History will end in a black bloodstain.Is that justice? Is this really what Tain Hu hoped for when she sacrificed herself?Baru's enemies close in from all sides. Baru's own mind teeters on the edge of madness or shattering revelation. Now she must choose between genocidal revenge and a far more difficult path—a conspiracy of judges, kings, spies and immortals, puppeteering the world's riches and two great wars in a gambit for the ultimate prize.If Baru had absolute power over the Imperial Republic, she could force Falcrest to abandon its colonies and make right its crimes.

The Tyrant Baru Cormorant (The Masquerade, #3) Details

TitleThe Tyrant Baru Cormorant (The Masquerade, #3)
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseAug 11th, 2020
PublisherTor Books
ISBN-139780765380760
Rating
GenreFantasy, LGBT, Fiction, Science Fiction, GLBT, Queer, Science Fiction Fantasy, Adult

The Tyrant Baru Cormorant (The Masquerade, #3) Review

  • Bradley
    January 1, 1970
    After the first two books in the Masquerade, the third would have to pull off a miracle to outdo what has already been done.I mean, seriously, I've never read a more grimdark tale of friendship and betrayal in the name of a cause. The second one already blew my mind with a certain bloody scene, so I was frankly a little worried that this one would be yet another huge build-up and betrayal.Strangely, I got the feeling that the author was worried about the same thing. And, indeed, he went out of t After the first two books in the Masquerade, the third would have to pull off a miracle to outdo what has already been done.I mean, seriously, I've never read a more grimdark tale of friendship and betrayal in the name of a cause. The second one already blew my mind with a certain bloody scene, so I was frankly a little worried that this one would be yet another huge build-up and betrayal.Strangely, I got the feeling that the author was worried about the same thing. And, indeed, he went out of the way to surprise and delight me with the kinds of twists and turns in this book. What other books would have me sit on the edge of my seat with SEVERAL lobotomies? What? The book lobotomized me? ;) Perhaps, but I feel all the smarter for it. Tons of economic theories, lots of time on the sea, and even more time building alliances. And I was amazed almost the entire time.Few books go all out to worldbuild the way this one has, and few do it with genetics, gene warfare, unique mutations, economic warfare, and naval battles. This read is not for the faint of heart, but it is a very worthy sequel. If you've come this far, don't miss out on this one. :)
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  • Mike
    January 1, 1970
    I have a lot to say about this book. TLDR: it was great.Now for the long version.I read *Monster* immediately before reading *Tyrant*. *Monster* had been lurking on Mt. Readmore since it came out, and getting an ARC of *Tyrant* finally pushed it to the top of the queue, for obvious reasons. So I basically read them as one big book, and I’m glad that I did.*Monster* is about a broken Baru. Bluntly, I didn’t *like* Baru in *Monster*. I could certainly empathize with her, but I didn’t *like* her. S I have a lot to say about this book. TLDR: it was great.Now for the long version.I read *Monster* immediately before reading *Tyrant*. *Monster* had been lurking on Mt. Readmore since it came out, and getting an ARC of *Tyrant* finally pushed it to the top of the queue, for obvious reasons. So I basically read them as one big book, and I’m glad that I did.*Monster* is about a broken Baru. Bluntly, I didn’t *like* Baru in *Monster*. I could certainly empathize with her, but I didn’t *like* her. She was simply in too dark a place. She was prepared to do anything that would punish herself (because she felt she deserved it, because of Tain Hu’s death) and she was prepared to do ANYTHING to further her goal of destroying Falcrest (because to do any less would have meant Tain Hu’s death wasn’t worth it). I can appreciate a character crossing a moral event horizon, but it’s not exactly pleasant when that person is the protagonist, she’s judging herself far too harshly, and you’re spending most of the time in her head.Plus, she just wasn’t the same Baru as we had in *Traitor*. That Baru was clever, she was a problem solver. She was an *accountant*. Baru the would-be bioterrorist just wasn’t a good fit. There were flashes of clever Baru, but only brief ones. She was too absorbed in her grief.I’m happy to say that we get the old Baru back in *Tyrant*. She’s changed by her experiences, certainly, but no longer shattered by them. She is still seeking the downfall of Falcrest, but she’s trying to cause it by means of economics and trade routes rather than unleashing plagues. She wants to dismantle Incrasticism without destroying the Falcresti people. She would like to preserve things like Falcresti trade routes and covered sewers without keeping things like Falresti eugenics and corrective rape. It was a refreshing, and uplifting, change to see her really come alive again.Parts of this gave me the same feeling as watching *Memento* for the first time. Wheels within wheels doesn’t begin to cover it. We don’t know what Baru’s plans are in any detail, and the nature of her head injury means that Baru herself doesn’t necessarily know them either. We don’t know what Heyschast and Farrier are planning, we don’t know what Svir and Yawa are planning, and we don’t know if Baru is working her own will, or Farrier’s. As people remark more than once, for someone who is trying so hard to undercut Farrier and Falcrest, her actions do seem to always be just what Farrier would have liked her to do. The gradual unravelling is certainly a brain bender.We get a frame story, which is new. The book begins with a confused, very clearly not-OK Baru recounting recent events to Farrier, who is both sorrowful and very, very proud of her. I’ve worried from the beginning of this series that Baru would end up lobotomized and on the Imperial Throne. Seth wasn’t making me feel any better about that literally from the first page. Been rather upset about it, in fact, which is not a commentary on how anything turns out. Just that Seth had me worrying over it.We learn more about the Cancrioth, and Farrier and Tau and Heyschast’s backstory. The past gets filled in even as things move forward. And while there is one hell of an interesting sequel hook, I’d also be content with the story ending here.All in all a great read. Comes out on August 11, and highly recommended.
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  • Elizabeth
    January 1, 1970
    This is my MOST anticipated book out of all the upcoming in 2020 books. Can’t wait to see a cover and summary blurb. The title is awesome.EDIT 09/26/2019 LOOK AT THAT COVER! It’s gorgeous! The hype is so real.EDIT 11/16/2019 FINALLY WE HAVE A SUMMARY. Oh my gosh. Baru, what have you gotten yourself into? And that Tain Hu mention ... my heart. :(
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  • Katie
    January 1, 1970
    The Masquerade series holds a place on my shelves as one of my all-time favorite fantasy series. As such, The Tyrant Baru Cormorant was my most anticipated book of 2020. While the book goes a different direction than I expected and I'm not fully satisfied with the ending, I still very much enjoyed it and believe fans of the series will too.The tone of Tyrant does a complete 180 from its predecessors. If Monster is  the lowest low, Tyrant is the manic high that follows. While I still wouldn't cal The Masquerade series holds a place on my shelves as one of my all-time favorite fantasy series. As such, The Tyrant Baru Cormorant was my most anticipated book of 2020. While the book goes a different direction than I expected and I'm not fully satisfied with the ending, I still very much enjoyed it and believe fans of the series will too.The tone of Tyrant does a complete 180 from its predecessors. If Monster is  the lowest low, Tyrant is the manic high that follows. While I still wouldn't call this book (or this series really) "happy", the overall tone is certainly more upbeat. Baru has come to accept Tain Hu's death and is now on a path for revenge against Falcrest, revenge to make Tain Hu's death count. There's a new flame of determination that drives Baru, giddy with excitement that a plan will work. This is the first time we really see Baru in control of a situation and it's fascinating.I was surprised by the humor in this book and it's a humor I vibe with. It's dry, sarcastic, sometimes meta in a way that cryptarchs would be, and often unexpected. Yet the jokes never felt out of place and served as a bit of tension relief in an otherwise tense scene. My favorite was a quick dig at pure mathematicians. Definitely saving that for future use. Likewise, there was an underlying sexual element that I didn't notice in prior books. Maybe it's because Baru needs to get laid without hating herself after. Maybe it's because Aminata just needs to get laid period. Either way, there's definitely an underlying element of horny. Of the other characters, my surprise favorite turned out to be Xate Yawa. We get more from her perspective. Her conflicts over keeping her brother safe, her determination to free Aurdwynn from Falcrest, and her friendship with Heingyl Ri made her a surprisingly compelling character this time around. I've apparently either ignored age or it wasn't really specified because I always assumed Yawa was way younger than she actually is. Also Tau is forty! Speaking of Tau, if Baru goes from depressed to determined With A Plan™, Tau goes from annoyingly cheerful to just full-on depression. I really have to give credit to Dickinson's character development because Tau sans trim was one of the most fascinating, yet disturbing character flips I've read in a long time.Going to take a quick interlude to throw in that my man Apparitor deserves so much better. Please give this poor man his husband, his boyfriend, a ship, and some fat stacks of cash and let him go exploring.Readers who complained that Monster was too slow-paced and introspective will be happy to know that Tyrant has a much faster pacing, and is generally more action-driven. Similarly, those that complained that Baru didn't use enough of her economic savant-ness should be happy to know that Baru flexes those skills here. In fact, one of my favorites parts of this book is how Dickinson addresses war as a means to expand trade, and the drive of trade and economics to those actions.The worldbuilding in this series is part of what draws me to is and Tyrant is no exception. In particular, the cancer-worshipping Cancrioth are an absolutely fascinating group of people. I believe it's best for the reader to learn about them on their own, so I won't say more about them. We also finally get a dive into Falcresti society, and in particular I enjoyed seeing the minds of their averages citizens. I do wish we got to see more of the Stakhieczi, but with the direction this series is going, I suspect they'll be a big player in book four. Having read this book, I still have absolutely no idea if magic actually exists in this world if or if it's all a case of psychology and science so advanced it seems like magic.As always, Tyrant delves into some heavy themes, and at a 250K wordcount, Dickinson has plenty of time to explore them. There's a heavy exploration of colonialism, its motivation and effects. With Tyrant, the conversation turns to the aftermath: what happens ten, twenty years down the line, when a group of people and a place have been colonized. Baru, living off her childhood memories of Taranoke, slowly discovers how much she has forgotten of the culture she's trying to save. Kyprananoke, a discarded Falcresti colony, exists in dying embers, its past self forgotten. On the flip side, Xate Yawa lives in the consequences of an Aurdwynn forged in Falcrests views and even the Oriati Mbo, yet unconquered, have been forced changes to accommodate Falcrest. Secondary are discussions of rebellions, and the people behind them, feminism in Falcresti society and its intersectionality with the treatment of minorities or lackthereof, and the exotification of other cultures in the eyes of colonizers.My one dislike with Tyrant is that I didn't like the ending. Not in a, ruined the series kind of way, but just, after the previous too, the ending felt way too easy. Too clean, one could say. It really can't say more without giving things away, but the last fourth felt rushed.Overall, I rate this book a 4/5. Loved the characters and this new flip on Baru's POV, loved the worldbuilding and the tie-ins from previous books, and I was enthralled with the exploration of colonialism, rebellion against ones oppressors and those many facets. Fans of the series will not be disappointed
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  • Matthew Bryan
    January 1, 1970
    5★I just finished an ARC of this book 30 seconds ago and I swear this is going to be the best book of 2020. Mark my words. I know that Stormlight 4 is coming out and another Malazan book I believe but this book was just that good!So I have a lot to say about this book. First off, I'm excited to say I think we're getting a 4th book?! I was under the impression this was a trilogy but maybe not. So what I liked about it:•Seth Dickenson is clearly an incredibly intelligent guy. His series has a ton 5★I just finished an ARC of this book 30 seconds ago and I swear this is going to be the best book of 2020. Mark my words. I know that Stormlight 4 is coming out and another Malazan book I believe but this book was just that good!So I have a lot to say about this book. First off, I'm excited to say I think we're getting a 4th book?! I was under the impression this was a trilogy but maybe not. So what I liked about it:•Seth Dickenson is clearly an incredibly intelligent guy. His series has a ton of really amazing themes throughout it. We see these two great cultures' polar opposite philosophies, we talk a lot about the power of trade, power structures and systems to keep other people down, we see racist eugenics, and we talk about decolonization. Seth had a lot to say about all of it and he made some very cogent points throughout this book and the whole series. •The stakes! The stakes in this book were SO high and it truly kept me on edge, filled with fear of almost everything that happened, just waiting for the other shoe to drop. There were so many terrifying moments in this book, from the constant threat of lobotomy, to the Kettling, to the Cancrioth. •The Cancrioth. Jeeez, they are soo scary. Honestly as a people they were all actually very sympathetic and well characterized but as a concept, they terrify me with their practices. Nothing scares me more than 1) Immortality 2) Sharks and 3) growths, tumors, protuberances. What are the Cancrioth but an immortal cancer cult with a murderous cancer whale that acts like a shark!•Baru's character begins to grow in this book. In book two she's kind of an unrelentingly bad person, even if she feels bad about it. But in this book she really starts to make some changes and we get to see her happy.•The other character work in this book was really good. I feel like I got an amazing sense of who everyone was, even people we hardly see from.•The humour! This book was surprisingly very funny. It was the kind of humour that subverts your expectations of what's going to happen by just throwing a shocking non sequitur of a joke that just takes you by surprise. There were honestly a few moments when I just burst out laughing in public because a joke caught me so off guard and I really loved that. When Baru is caught with Iscend in what should be a really serious moment and suddenly ______ who caught them comes out and says the funniest thing. That literally had me just cackling for like 5min. So Dickenson really came through with some good jokes in this book! I wasn't expecting that. •That last chapter. It was sooo intriguing. We get a new continent full of lightning? What does it mean? Will Baru's story have anything to do with it or is that final chapter simply there to intrigue us about his next book set in the same world? I have no idea but I'm excited to find out.There's really only one thing I didn't like about this book and that was the writing style in the beginning. If you've read the book Nevernight you'll truly feel what I'm about to describe. For whatever reason, the writing style in the first maybe 50 or 100pgs of the book had some very purple prose. There were a lot of lines that just had me scratching my head trying to figure out what they meant. "Their eyes meeting like summer sun through a loose slat"Like that really doesn't make much sense. And there was a lot of that going on throughout the first chunk. The other issue with the writing style was the way some information was I guess supposed to be implied? I'm honestly not even sure how to describe it other than to say those first 100pgs made me feel very stupid. I just constantly felt like things were going over my head. I was confused with the story at all but I felt like there was a lot of context and nuance I just couldn't see for some reason, even having reread Monster before starting Tyrant. It just made me feel like a child when your parents are talking about something and you have no idea what they're talking about because you're missing out on the necessary context. Thankfully this only persisted for the start of the book and soon enough, he decided to leave that behind and go back to his normal writing style from the last two books.All in all though, Tyrant was an amazing continuation of Baru's story and with some of the hugely cathartic moments we get at the end, I can honestly say, I'd still feel satisfied even if this was the end of her story and that last chapter was just set-up for another series Seth plans to write in this world. I love the book so much and I am truly convinced this will be my favorite of 2020! You have to read it!
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  • Chris
    January 1, 1970
    *copy from Netgalley in exchange for a review*The Tyrant Baru Cormorant is the conclusion to Seth Dickinson’s Baru series. I absolutely adored the first of those, and the second was no slouch either; a conclusion had a lot to live up to. And, to get the tl;dr out of the way: it does. Absolutely smashes it. There’s a whole lot of stuff I loved from the first two books - life-in-crisis Baru, looking at deep moral and ethical issues through a fantasy lens, some baffling magic, and rock-solid, multi *copy from Netgalley in exchange for a review*The Tyrant Baru Cormorant is the conclusion to Seth Dickinson’s Baru series. I absolutely adored the first of those, and the second was no slouch either; a conclusion had a lot to live up to. And, to get the tl;dr out of the way: it does. Absolutely smashes it. There’s a whole lot of stuff I loved from the first two books - life-in-crisis Baru, looking at deep moral and ethical issues through a fantasy lens, some baffling magic, and rock-solid, multi-layered characterisation. And then there’s some new cool stuff too. Spending some time in the heartland of the Empire. Baru getting asked some hard questions. Some intriguing backstory (more on that later). And, of course the sort of byzantine power plays, personal leveraging and political machinations from unexpected angles that help keep baru the savant alive. This is all the things I loved about the first two books, and you can rest assured that if you enjoyed those, this one proves to be a worthy conclusion..Baru...oh, Baru is the heart of this book. A woman absolutely determined to do what must be done to reach her goals. Ruthless, driven, focused. After spending much of the previous book deep in depression and being dragged out of it, it’s good to see her on task. Well, I say good. Baru is definitely paying the cost for her actions, mostly by watching those costs happen to other people. There’s a moral corrosion which she’s aware of, as everyone else bears the price for her decisions, and as she weighs up whether to let them continue to do so, or walk away and pay the cost of that decision too. Part of the reason I love Baru so much is her complexity, and her internal conflicts. In other books, she might be seen as a villain, and is..absolutely responsible for some deeply sketchy stuff. But at the same time, we can see Baru as a person with a strong moral purpose, trying to do the best for her people, and for herself. Do the means justify the end? It’s a question that the narrative is asking the reader, not just about the protagonist, but about her opponents. It helps that Baru is self-aware enough to question whether she is, in other people’s lights, a monster. And the emotional heart of the book, her relationship with her old friend Amanita, and the tragedy of her love for a now-dead revolutionary, ground Baru, keep her human. If she’s sometimes odd, febrile, prone to lashing out, and too focused on the board and not the other players, still she can be empathised with, understood, seen sympathetically. Baru is complicated, as are we all - and in trying to break apart forces both personal and systemic, she’s someone we can stand alongside, even as they do terrible things.Anyway. If you’re this deep in the series, you know Baru. Know this: you’re going to see the costs of Baru’s actions paid. You’ll see her work through her understanding of who and what she is. Of what she’s willing to do. You’ll see love and family and professionalism and respect and madness and outright hate. It’s going to get emotionally messy. But it’s Baru, whose inner life (and trauma) is richly realised here, and who comes to us as a living, breathing person. Reading this is going to hurt. It may make you laugh, it’ll probably make you cry. It may rip your heart out of your chest...possibly literally. It will, to coin a phrase, be emotional. Be warned. But its also fantastic.The world...well, we don’t spend quite as much time at sea as previously. But we do get to see some mind bendingly imaginative, and occasionally horrifying environments. Falcrest, the city, gets a look in, the towering spires of the shining city on the hill, mixed with the cold cells, and reconditioning rooms, and icepicks to the frontal lobe. There’s also some time spent with the Mbo, drawing us back into the past, looking at the reaching hand of Falcrest, and the rise of the Cryptarchs whose later presence has put such a weight onto Baru. We can see history at work here, the underpinnings of the modern tragedy in the heroics of the past. And the Mbo, its warmth and its reliance on intrinsic social bonds, and its reaction to threats...all those things stand as a fascinating contrast to the Falcresti model of industrial society. It has its flaws as well, and the text does not flinch away from those, but lets the reader think and draw their own conclusions from the options on the table, and from the people living within the systems. Quite whether any system can be good, or just less oppressive, is something I had to think about as the story drew to a close - but I was also thinking about the clinical efficiency and ravening energy of the Falcresti, and the hospitality, the warmth, and the stratification of the Mbo. It’s a difficult world, this one, filled with unknown terrors, and even the people we see are grist for the mill. But they are also, importantly, people, with faces, lives and names, and in the end, both the world and the people in it feel important, feel real.I won’t go into the story, but will say that it kicks off very strongly, and only improves from there. As Baru drives forward, the story carries her along, a fast-flowing river that becomes a torrent of plays, counter-plays, betrayals, revelations and revolutions. There is, basically, always something going on, and that something always grabbed my attention and kept my eyes on the page. I wanted to see how this one shook out, see what Baru could do, what she would allow herself to do, and how the various seemingly unsolvable moral and ethical dilemmas (and their rather more immediate physical counterparts - threats of warm invasion or world-ending pestilence) would turn out. This is a story with bite, which stands before you unflinching and asks you to follow it through, and to think it through as well. It made me gasp, genuinely, more than once, and swear, loudly, more than once too. This is the ending I was hoping for, once which takes the investment I made in the characters and the world, and makes it worth it.If you’ve reached this point in the series, I can only urge you to finish it - because this is a book i was sad to finish, and a book I couldn’t stop reading. It’s a fantastic ending, and one that delivers on the promise of earlier installments - so go read it.
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  • Vi
    January 1, 1970
    ohhhh my god we have a title, we have a cover, we have a release date, oh my god if I am not able to read this the day it comes out I WILL perish. 752 PAGES!!!!!!!edit: WE HAVE A SUMMARY!! A BLURB!! AAAA
  • John
    January 1, 1970
    I was lucky enough to receive an ARC of this book, and the first thing I should say is that this is definitely not a standalone. Having read "Traitor" and "Monster" is absolutely necessary or this book will not make any sense.But if you have been following the story of Baru Cormorant, everything she had gone through (and everything she has done), this is a book that is very rewarding. Like "Monster", "Tyrant" has multiple POV characters, with Baru herself being the main one. While "Monster" felt I was lucky enough to receive an ARC of this book, and the first thing I should say is that this is definitely not a standalone. Having read "Traitor" and "Monster" is absolutely necessary or this book will not make any sense.But if you have been following the story of Baru Cormorant, everything she had gone through (and everything she has done), this is a book that is very rewarding. Like "Monster", "Tyrant" has multiple POV characters, with Baru herself being the main one. While "Monster" felt like a complete mess in terms of where the story was going, in "Tyrant", most of the secondary POV characters are more interesting, especially Aminata, and Yawa, who we see in a very different light in this book. There are some POV characters whose stories were once again not as interesting (Tau-indi for example, but also to some extent Apparitor). The Prince Hill story ends up being very important, but I had difficulties relating with Tau's point of view.The star of the book however remains Baru. When I saw the title ("Tyrant") I had prepared myself for something terrible, but I felt this was the first time the author gave her a true voice. We see Baru for who she truly is, and while she continues being mistrusted by almost everyone, she defends herself, and allows others to see that, in addition to her brain, she also has a heart (as Tain Hu very eloquently put it in her letter to Aminata). I am really glad this finally happened, because I don't know if I could bear another book in this series where the MC is treated like dirt, and feels like dirt as well. One thing I found very interesting about this book is that it could have easily been the final book in the series. This is a coherent story, with a beginning, middle and end, and while there is still a lot that needs to be done, and a lot that could go wrong, the author didn't leave us high and dry, but instead gave us a satisfying conclusion.A few things I didn't like: As I said above, not all POV characters had interesting stories. There were way too many descriptions of (cheap) sex, not so much in the Baru chapters, who still misses Tain Hu, but in some of the other characters' POV chapters. Honestly, some of them were behaving as sex addicts. The author plays with some interesting ideas (the seductress, the fascination with exotic women), but to be honest, I felt that he missed the mark in how he used them. I understand that he was making a statement against colonialism and gender stereotypes, but I felt he did it a lot better in "Traitor", and I feel he succeeded more in this one when working with more generic tropes, such as the hero who struggles, but overcomes.I wasn't really sure how to rate the book. There are parts that I felt were cringeworthy that I would have given a 2/5, parts that weren't as interesting to read and I would give a 3/5, parts that filled me with joy (the reunions!): 4/5, and finally parts where the story completely takes off and deserve a 5/5. But when a book makes you care so deeply about its main character, and also makes you want to say so much, you have to give it the benefit of the doubt.P.S. (not really a spoiler until you read the book) Was the title of the next book revealed in the last paragraph of the penultimate chapter? I think so!
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  • Braxiatel
    January 1, 1970
    Looking back, it's always surprising just how many of the characters have become my favourites over the course of this series so it's only natural that this series was one of my most highly anticipated novels of 2020. And not only are Baru and Tain Hu my favourites, but also Farrier, Svir, Tau-Indi and Torrinde. I suppose this series, thus, has one of the highest % of my favourite characters to date so I've always been super invested in their story arcs.PROS:1) To me, Monster always felt like an Looking back, it's always surprising just how many of the characters have become my favourites over the course of this series so it's only natural that this series was one of my most highly anticipated novels of 2020. And not only are Baru and Tain Hu my favourites, but also Farrier, Svir, Tau-Indi and Torrinde. I suppose this series, thus, has one of the highest % of my favourite characters to date so I've always been super invested in their story arcs.PROS:1) To me, Monster always felt like an incomplete novel and this book delivers on the other half of the story bringing a great sense of closure to this particular plot arc. 2) I'm happy to say that Baru, the plotter, is back and better than ever before. We also get to see more maneuvers, politicking and grand scheming. 3) I was also impressed by the ending. It was quite pitch-perfect. (view spoiler)[I have to say that my favourite part was the Cairdine Farrier bullying. Ahaha! It was something he both completely deserved and yet simultaneously didn't deserve. Don't know what happened between books 1 and 3 but he definitely wormed my way into my heart. Sneaky, but as expected... of the keikaku master! (hide spoiler)]4) Prose was lovely as always, but the strong point of this series, of course, is its thoroughly loveable characters and the fact that the author writes some of the greatest endings.CONS:1) There's a dry spot in the middle of the book where things feel a little aimless and divided2) Tain Shir is a little less irritating, but remains to be an unintentional source of comedy.Overall, great story and I hold out high hopes for another sequel.
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  • Alpha
    January 1, 1970
    3.5/5 - Oof, this was a long road to go down for a pretty reasonable payoff. I kind of thought this would be the last book in the series, but apparently not? I did find the plot armor to be quite abused by the plot, but overall, I still enjoyed the action and culture criticisms posed by the book.
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  • Heaven Claussen
    January 1, 1970
    Great series can’t wait to begin another one.
  • Jhoanna
    January 1, 1970
    📚📚📚1/2
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