The Year 1000
From celebrated Yale professor Valerie Hansen, a groundbreaking work of history showing that bold explorations and daring trade missions connected all of the world’s great societies for the first time at the end of the first millennium.In history, myth often abides. It was long assumed that the centuries immediately prior to AD 1000 were lacking in any major cultural developments or geopolitical encounters, that the Europeans hadn’t yet discovered North America, that the farthest anyone had traveled over sea was the Vikings’ invasion of Britain. But how, then, to explain the presence of blonde-haired people in Mayan temple murals in Chichen Itza, Mexico? Could it be possible that the Vikings had found their way to the Americas during the height of the Mayan empire?Valerie Hansen, a much-honored historian, argues that the year 1000 was the world’s first point of major cultural exchange and exploration. Drawing on nearly thirty years of research on medieval China and global history, she presents a compelling account of first encounters between disparate societies. As people on at least five continents ventured outward, they spread technology, new crops, and religion. These encounters, she shows, made it possible for Christopher Columbus to reach the Americas in 1492, and set the stage for the process of globalization that so dominates the modern era.For readers of Jared Diamond’s Guns, Germs, and Steel and Yuval Noah Harari’s Sapiens, The Year 1000 is an intellectually daring, provocative account that will make you rethink everything you thought you knew about how the modern world came to be. It will also hold up a mirror to the hopes and fears we experience today.

The Year 1000 Details

TitleThe Year 1000
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseApr 14th, 2020
PublisherScribner
ISBN-139781501194108
Rating
GenreHistory, Nonfiction, Science, Geography, Economics

The Year 1000 Review

  • Peter (Pete) Mcloughlin
    January 1, 1970
    I think this book would have gotten a better reception in the 1990s when globalization was a buzzword with a little more shine to it. Still, the phenomena the author relates are real and important just not seen as an unalloyed good these days. We have been seeing increasing contact and trade and sometimes integration with different parts of the world since about the year 1000 there is no doubt about that. Just a reminder globalization looks different in 1900, 1950, 2000 and the present and each I think this book would have gotten a better reception in the 1990s when globalization was a buzzword with a little more shine to it. Still, the phenomena the author relates are real and important just not seen as an unalloyed good these days. We have been seeing increasing contact and trade and sometimes integration with different parts of the world since about the year 1000 there is no doubt about that. Just a reminder globalization looks different in 1900, 1950, 2000 and the present and each could be called globalized under very different geopolitical contours. All these periods were globalized but had very different characters and relations between the parts. So it is still very much a factor just not as neoliberal triumphalists imagined in their "end of history" moment in the 1990s. Good book if a little unfashionable at the moment.
    more
  • Naomi
    January 1, 1970
    I learned a lot of surprising things from this book.The first was how wealthy and powerful Constantinople and the Islamic world were in the year 1000. In archaeology digs across Scandinavia and Eastern Europe, an estimated 400,000 Islamic coins from the tenth century have been found. Apparently the Islamic world purchased tons of slaves and furs from Eastern Europe -- in fact, the word "slave" comes from the word "Slav" for this very reason.Another thing that started around the year 1000 was tax I learned a lot of surprising things from this book.The first was how wealthy and powerful Constantinople and the Islamic world were in the year 1000. In archaeology digs across Scandinavia and Eastern Europe, an estimated 400,000 Islamic coins from the tenth century have been found. Apparently the Islamic world purchased tons of slaves and furs from Eastern Europe -- in fact, the word "slave" comes from the word "Slav" for this very reason.Another thing that started around the year 1000 was tax collection. For the first time, plundering chieftains were replaced with tax-collecting monarchies. And Hansen describes the pros and cons of taxing commerce versus taxing land, something I had never thought about. It was interesting to read about the beginning of large monarchies and how they formed.The Vikings chapter was also fascinating. Who knew there was such strong evidence that the Vikings arrived in Central America long before Columbus, or that African ships gone off course had also arrived in America before 1492?Highly recommend!
    more
  • Bill
    January 1, 1970
    The Year 1000 by Valerie Hansen is an engagingly informative look at, well, the year 1000 (though Hansen move forwards and backwards from that date for context. Hansen argues that the trading relationships (and routes) created around this time were the first form of globalization, paving the path to our current world.A non-exhaustive list of cultures Hansen covers includes the Vikings (particularly their travel to North America), Mesoamerica (such as the Mayan trade with Southwestern US cultures The Year 1000 by Valerie Hansen is an engagingly informative look at, well, the year 1000 (though Hansen move forwards and backwards from that date for context. Hansen argues that the trading relationships (and routes) created around this time were the first form of globalization, paving the path to our current world.A non-exhaustive list of cultures Hansen covers includes the Vikings (particularly their travel to North America), Mesoamerica (such as the Mayan trade with Southwestern US cultures at Chaco), Scandanavian travels east where they were known as the Rus, connections between China, Japan, India, Korea, and more. While Hansen points to some of the similarities beween our world and the one covered in the book, she also makes the important distinction that during this time when civilization met for the first time, their level of technological/military technology was pretty equal, unlike for example when the Europeans met Native Americans several centuries later. While Hansen covers the well-known, she also introduces several less known cultures, and some that were wholly unfamiliar to me. I’m no historian, but I do read a lot of popular history, so that was a welcome bit for freshness. The same is true for some of the trade relations and items. Furs and gold, spices and amber were well known to me, but some of the “aromatics” were less well known.Hansen’s style is always clean, lucid, and engaging. Despite covering a lot of ground (literally) and throwing a lot of regions, cultures, names at the reader, she keeps her audience well grounded in time and place and theme. An excellent popular history book.
    more
  • Kristine
    January 1, 1970
    The Year 1000 by Valerie Hansen is a free NetGalley ebook that I read in mid-March.Neat, this shines a light on the mysterious, deep-sea trench that is ancient civilized history. Hansens voice is excellent, guiding, and can be relied upon for an occasional witty bon mot on the topics of well-stocked marketplaces with a wide variety of fancy imported goods, population studies, forms of leadership, agriculture, spoken and written languages, religions, travel, ocean voyages, contested borders The Year 1000 by Valerie Hansen is a free NetGalley ebook that I read in mid-March.Neat, this shines a light on the mysterious, deep-sea trench that is ancient civilized history. Hansen’s voice is excellent, guiding, and can be relied upon for an occasional witty bon mot on the topics of well-stocked marketplaces with a wide variety of fancy imported goods, population studies, forms of leadership, agriculture, spoken and written languages, religions, travel, ocean voyages, contested borders between countries, skirmishes, and warfare.
    more
  • Tyler Wentzell
    January 1, 1970
    I really enjoyed The Year 1000. I grew up on the West Coast of Newfoundland, not far from the Viking settlement at Lanse aux Meadows, and this book made the context of that settlement come to life in an entirely new way. Hansen made a vast story comprehensible, tackling the world by geographic regions and showing how globalized the world was in the year 1000, with trade stretching all the way from Newfoundland around the world to the Pacific Ocean, and within North America. Amazing. She did a I really enjoyed The Year 1000. I grew up on the West Coast of Newfoundland, not far from the Viking settlement at Lanse aux Meadows, and this book made the context of that settlement come to life in an entirely new way. Hansen made a vast story comprehensible, tackling the world by geographic regions and showing how globalized the world was in the year 1000, with trade stretching all the way from Newfoundland around the world to the Pacific Ocean, and within North America. Amazing. She did a wonderful job of using tangible items and ideas that affected people's daily lives to make these vast distances comprehensible. I would recommend this book to anyone interested in history and geography generally, but especially if you are interested in trade, world religions, and exploration.
    more
  • Claire Banks
    January 1, 1970
    I picked up this book after listening to her fascinating talk with The Explorers Club in New York City.Its filled with incredible stories about the ways in which humans and ideas were moving about the globe, way earlier than I had ever imagined. Professor Hansen is a great storyteller and brings to life this rich history of the roots of globalism that traditional schoolbooks don't teach about.The book compiles deep research from a variety of sources and pulls them together in a really compelling I picked up this book after listening to her fascinating talk with The Explorer’s Club in New York City.It’s filled with incredible stories about the ways in which humans and ideas were moving about the globe, way earlier than I had ever imagined. Professor Hansen is a great storyteller and brings to life this rich history of the roots of globalism that traditional schoolbooks don't teach about.The book compiles deep research from a variety of sources and pulls them together in a really compelling way. I would recommend this to anyone and everyone, regardless of whether you're a history buff.
    more
  • Paul
    January 1, 1970
    Not bad. I haven't read many history books, but seemed less researched than I expected, and contain more conjecture than I'd prefer. However, similar approaches have resulted in more accurate history periodically. That doesn't mean it's not interesting. If you're not a serious history buff, I suspect this may be of interest to the curious who are OK with a typically dry read of history. 3.5 stars.Thanks very much for the review copy!!
    more
  • Cool_guy
    January 1, 1970
    An interesting overview global interconnectedness around the year 1000. Especially interesting was the development of cash crop and resource extraction economies in SE Asia to meet Chinese and middle eastern demand.The author tries to hard to shoehorn the processes which brought the world together at the 1st into a contemporary concept like globalization
    more
  • Ryan McDermott
    January 1, 1970
    Enjoyable ReadThis was a great introduction to the history of global trade. It's mostly a very high level view of things, but it provides a good starting point to direct you towards further learning if the history of global trade interests you.
  • Davis
    January 1, 1970
    It was eye-opening to enter into such an exciting view of interregional connections. As globalization has presented new possibilities for historical research, this book is the perfect demonstration of what a powerful effect that can have when executed with a rigorous and engaging pen.
    more
  • Christine
    January 1, 1970
    There is compelling evidence that globalization started long before we usually think of it. This was an interesting look at routes and realms in the decades surrounding the year 1000. I also enjoyed learning about the sources and how archaelogists figure out some of this stuff.
    more
  • Kirsten
    January 1, 1970
    This was not as in depth as I might have wanted - it is a solid overview of a large, busy chunk of human history.
  • Sarah - All The Book Blog Names Are Taken
    January 1, 1970
    I always enjoy this time period and the author did a wonderful job bringing these civilizations to life. You can read my full review on my blog: https://allthebookblognamesaretaken.b...
  • Andrew
    January 1, 1970
    Even though the author has a conversational writing style the subject matter of this book is often so dry that it overwhelms the conversational nature of the presentation. Having said that this does present a series of interesting year 1000 globalization issues. I found the argument that the Vikings (or Norseman) may have traded with the Maya or at least with members of cities or tribes living in what is now East St Louis, particularly fascinating. Recommended for history lovers. Even though the author has a conversational writing style the subject matter of this book is often so dry that it overwhelms the conversational nature of the presentation. Having said that this does present a series of interesting year 1000 globalization issues. I found the argument that the Vikings (or Norseman) may have traded with the Maya or at least with members of “cities” or tribes living in what is now East St’ Louis, particularly fascinating. Recommended for history lovers.
    more
  • Jason Park
    January 1, 1970
    "Did the Vikings make contact with the Mayans?" and more of your turn-of-the-millennium questions are answered in Valerie Hansen's wonderful new book "The Year 1000". My full review: https://medium.com/park-recommendatio...
  • Kim
    January 1, 1970
    Thank you NetGalley for the ARC.I actually disliked this one. The organization of topics seemed off, the subject matter was repetitive, and the conclusions were drawn from a fair amount of guesswork, and were honestly nothing memorable. It added nothing new to the field.
    more
Write a review