The Woman's Hour
This adaptation of the book Hillary Clinton calls "a page-turning drama and an inspiration" will spark the attention of young readers and teach them about activism, civil rights, and the fight for women's suffrage--just in time for the 100th anniversary of the ratification of the Nineteenth Amendment. Includes an eight-page photo insert! American women are so close to winning the right to vote. They've been fighting for more than seventy years and need approval from just one more state. But suffragists face opposition from every side, including the "Antis"--women who don't want women to have the right to vote. It's more than a fight over politics; it's a debate over the role of women and girls in society, and whether they should be considered equal to men and boys. Over the course of one boiling-hot summer, Nashville becomes a bitter battleground. Both sides are willing to do anything it takes to win, and the suffragtists--led by brave activists Carrie Catt, Sue White, and Alice Paul--will face dirty tricks, blackmail, and betrayal. But they vow to fight for what they believe in, no matter the cost.

The Woman's Hour Details

TitleThe Woman's Hour
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseJun 2nd, 2020
PublisherRandom House Books for Young Readers
Rating
GenreNonfiction, History, Feminism

The Woman's Hour Review

  • Nursebookie
    January 1, 1970
    This is an adaptation for young readers and what a great and fascinating read this was. I found this to be an inspirational read that taught me as well about civil right, and how women fought for the right to vote. What a perfect time to read this as we celebrate the 100th anniversary of the ratification of the 19th amendment. It is so inspiring to read about the brave activists such as Carrie Catt, Sue White, and Alice Paul fight for what they believe in, setting an amazing example for our youn This is an adaptation for young readers and what a great and fascinating read this was. I found this to be an inspirational read that taught me as well about civil right, and how women fought for the right to vote. What a perfect time to read this as we celebrate the 100th anniversary of the ratification of the 19th amendment. It is so inspiring to read about the brave activists such as Carrie Catt, Sue White, and Alice Paul fight for what they believe in, setting an amazing example for our young readers and encourage their active involvement in politics and policies today. What an amazing read I highly recommend!
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  • Edith
    January 1, 1970
    3 and 1/2 stars. Despite some occasional Catherine-Drinker-Bowen-esque language describing emotions and physical behavior that can really only be guessed at, this is a well researched history of the battle to get the 19th Amendment ratified in Tennessee. The prose is readable, and there are explanations of terms which might be unfamiliar to a younger person. This is an inspiring story--the suspense is powerful, even though readers already know how it turned out. A good starting point for anybody 3 and 1/2 stars. Despite some occasional Catherine-Drinker-Bowen-esque language describing emotions and physical behavior that can really only be guessed at, this is a well researched history of the battle to get the 19th Amendment ratified in Tennessee. The prose is readable, and there are explanations of terms which might be unfamiliar to a younger person. This is an inspiring story--the suspense is powerful, even though readers already know how it turned out. A good starting point for anybody, even a grownup, to learn more about the suffragists and their struggle. Illustrated with photographs.
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  • joyce w. laudon
    January 1, 1970
    The right to vote is one of the most important cornerstones of a democracy; right now voting feels so critical to the future of the U.S.  But...children may need to be reminded that this right is not one to take for granted and that it came to be only after many struggles.  In fact, they might be surprised to learn that women were not given the right to vote until 1920, long after the country came into being.  As is obvious, this year is the 100th anniversary of the enfranchisement of women and The right to vote is one of the most important cornerstones of a democracy; right now voting feels so critical to the future of the U.S.  But...children may need to be reminded that this right is not one to take for granted and that it came to be only after many struggles.  In fact, they might be surprised to learn that women were not given the right to vote until 1920, long after the country came into being.  As is obvious, this year is the 100th anniversary of the enfranchisement of women and an ideal time to learn about and reflect on this critical right and responsibility. In this illustrated chapter book, the story of women's suffrage is told   The work of three generations of women, men and those of many backgrounds to change opinions and win this campaign, is described with its many ups and downs.  Readers will meet the many important women who fought this fight including Carrie Chapman Catt, Susan B. Anthony, Elizabeth Cady Stanton and others.  They will see this struggle put into context with issues of prejudice that were very much present in the country.In addition to the main text, there are many pages that describe terms that readers may not be fully familiar with, as for example, how congress works or what the term constituent means.  These will enhance the learning of the book's audience.This title should be in school libraries and in the homes of families.  It details such an important movement in America.  Hopefully readers will walk away with a sense of the importance and privilege of casting a ballot.Many thanks to NetGalley and the publisher for this title in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Naomi
    January 1, 1970
    5 StarsReview posted on Goodreads and AmazonEvery school library should own this book. Ms. Weiss did an excellent job at simplifying the journey of the women's vote for young readers. I was most impressed at the author's ability to keep it apolitical focusing on both the positive and negative events by both parties. It is rare these days. I liked the explanation for political terms which young readers may not be familiar with. If there is one criticism I may have for the book, it may be that the 5 StarsReview posted on Goodreads and AmazonEvery school library should own this book. Ms. Weiss did an excellent job at simplifying the journey of the women's vote for young readers. I was most impressed at the author's ability to keep it apolitical focusing on both the positive and negative events by both parties. It is rare these days. I liked the explanation for political terms which young readers may not be familiar with. If there is one criticism I may have for the book, it may be that the placement and number of pictures of critical people during this movement. I thought pictures were lacking and placed in the center of the book as a simple addition rather than as part of the "text" of the book. Not a big enough issue to decrease my rating, but definitely something that disappointed me while reading it. Reviewed via Netgalley
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  • Sara (A Gingerly Review)
    January 1, 1970
    This was inspirational, relevant, and NEEDED. This taught me things I never knew but wish I had. It was about civil rights and just how hard women had to fight for the ability to vote. We take it for granted today, often forgetting just how much blood, sweat, and tears went into getting it. I plan on buying a copy for every female I know and gifting because it needs to be in the hands of women and readers.
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  • michelle
    January 1, 1970
    This was an excellent book for young readers to get informed about the fight for women's suffrage. I listened to the audio book version and it just seemed to fly by. The focus of the book was the vote in Tennessee that made all of the difference for the movement, but it also gave history on how they got there and focused on the key players. Excellent for 10-16 and should be in every middle school library.
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  • Linda
    January 1, 1970
    The Youth version of her adult book about the fight for the ratification of the 19th amendment in Tennessee the 36th state. It was not a given and at times looked like it would not happen. Weiss does a great job of re-creating the tension ( after all we did know the ending) and informing the reader of the main characters in this drama as well as some history of the suffrage movement.
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