Stamped
A timely, crucial, and empowering exploration of racism--and antiracism--in AmericaThis is NOT a history book.This is a book about the here and now. A book to help us better understand why we are where we are.A book about race. The construct of race has always been used to gain and keep power, to create dynamics that separate and silence. This remarkable reimagining of Dr. Ibram X. Kendi's National Book Award-winning Stamped from the Beginning reveals the history of racist ideas in America, and inspires hope for an antiracist future. It takes you on a race journey from then to now, shows you why we feel how we feel, and why the poison of racism lingers. It also proves that while racist ideas have always been easy to fabricate and distribute, they can also be discredited. Through a gripping, fast-paced, and energizing narrative written by beloved award-winner Jason Reynolds, this book shines a light on the many insidious forms of racist ideas--and on ways readers can identify and stamp out racist thoughts in their daily lives.

Stamped Details

TitleStamped
Author
ReleaseMar 10th, 2020
PublisherLittle, Brown Books for Young Readers
ISBN-139780316453691
Rating
GenreNonfiction, History, Audiobook, Race

Stamped Review

  • Emily May
    January 1, 1970
    There was no science to prove any of this. But who needs science when you have racism? This should be required reading in all American schools. Kids need to know and understand this history (even if the author is quick to tell you it's "not a history book"). It really is absolutely essential. And Reynolds's adaptation is a very accessible, very necessary overview of 500+ years of racism and antiracism in the United States. Now I'm thinking I need to get my hands on Kendi's Stamped from the Be There was no science to prove any of this. But who needs science when you have racism? This should be required reading in all American schools. Kids need to know and understand this history (even if the author is quick to tell you it's "not a history book"). It really is absolutely essential. And Reynolds's adaptation is a very accessible, very necessary overview of 500+ years of racism and antiracism in the United States. Now I'm thinking I need to get my hands on Kendi's Stamped from the Beginning to expand on some of the ideas introduced in this book.Jason Reynolds has done a great job of condensing a lot of information into less than three hundred pages. He has adapted Kendi's work to specifically appeal to young people and he uses humour and a conversational style to keep their attention. He certainly managed to keep my attention. If you’re like me, you’re asking yourself, Was he on drugs? Yes. Yes, he was. The most addictive drug known to America. Racism. It causes wealth, an inflated sense of self, and hallucinations. I studied the American Civil War, the U.S. Civil Rights Movement, and colonialism in quite a bit of depth in school, so I expected to be fairly well-versed in the subject matter, but the book still taught me a lot of things. I was especially interested in the origin story of American racism and how Kendi traced the history back to a man he calls the "first racist".It was also interesting - though, sadly, not surprising - to hear that the old "divide and rule" strategy played such a huge part in the formation of racist ideas. Every student who has studied colonialism knows all too well how those two words in tandem are the cause of so much war, destruction and prejudice. The British did it in India, leading to partition. The Germans and Belgians did it in Rwanda, leading to one of history's worst genocides. And a governor did it in Virginia to pit poor whites and black people against one another: But the governor knew if Blacks and Whites joined forces, he’d be done. Everything would be done. It would’ve been an apocalypse. So, he had to devise a way to turn poor Whites and poor Blacks against each other, so that they’d be forever separated and unwilling to join hands and raise fists against the elite. And the way he did this was by creating (wait for it… ) White privileges. If the racist, anti-immigrant rhetoric circling round the poor white communities of today's America is anything to go by, this policy has had consequences that are still being felt in 2020. The Civil Rights Era stuff was mostly an overview of what I already knew, but it is essential reading for those unfamiliar with it. It introduces readers to the usual suspects-- MLK, Malcolm X, Booker T. Washington, Du Bois, Angela Davis, Marcus Garvey and Stokely Carmichael, to name but a few, and it looks at how racist thinking has not always escaped black writers and activists themselves. I was also pleased that the book spent a little time looking at the overlap of gender, sexuality and racism, and how black women and queer black women have had to deal with prejudice from different angles.I took a number of things from the later chapters, as well. I just remembered how very much I want to reread Roots: The Saga of an American Family, which I thought was excellent when I first read it and I was too young to really appreciate what I was reading. I also did not know the Rocky franchise was basically racist propaganda. Now I don't need to feel bad that I've never seen it. Reynolds also explained the "War on Drugs" to me, in simple terms, so I feel like, for the first time, I actually understand what happened there and how drugs became such a major part of perpetuating racial inequality in America.There's a lot going on this book, and it's a testament to Reynolds's writing skills that it never feels overcrowded or overwhelming. Put this in the hands of all American teens.Facebook | Instagram
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  • Tatiana
    January 1, 1970
    I hope this book is put into the hands of every teen in this country, so that it can at least somewhat counteract the white-colored "history" they learn in schools. This work isn't trying to be objective or neutral or to be a history book. It's a call to all of us to face the centuries of racism in the US, and once and for all become anti-racist. Adapted by Jason Reynolds from Stamped from the Beginning: The Definitive History of Racist Ideas in America by Ibram X. Kendi. I appreciated the compl I hope this book is put into the hands of every teen in this country, so that it can at least somewhat counteract the white-colored "history" they learn in schools. This work isn't trying to be objective or neutral or to be a history book. It's a call to all of us to face the centuries of racism in the US, and once and for all become anti-racist. Adapted by Jason Reynolds from Stamped from the Beginning: The Definitive History of Racist Ideas in America by Ibram X. Kendi. I appreciated the complexity of the thought packed into this very-very abridged, condensed work for teens. While I didn't always like Reynolds' tricks to keep the (young) readers' attention, I still think it is a powerful manifesto that I hope gets widely read. It's pretty clear it'll be getting all kinds of awards and acclaims this year.
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  • Jon
    January 1, 1970
    Jason Reynold’s magic is on every page, transforming Ibram Kendi’s work into an accessible volume for youth. For all libraries Grade 7+.
  • Liza Wiemer
    January 1, 1970
    A thousand⭐️s. Wow. It's a must for every adult. It needs to be taught in history classes in every U.S. school as part of the curriculum. It's important. Critical. Don't wait! Read this book! Share this book!STAMPED has the power to change false perceptions of race, crush lies, and bring about important change in laws that continue to promote racism and other forms of hate. BUT, that means we need to take positive action. Don’t wait! Start by reading this book. Share this book!It's impactful to A thousand⭐️s. Wow. It's a must for every adult. It needs to be taught in history classes in every U.S. school as part of the curriculum. It's important. Critical. Don't wait! Read this book! Share this book!STAMPED has the power to change false perceptions of race, crush lies, and bring about important change in laws that continue to promote racism and other forms of hate. BUT, that means we need to take positive action. Don’t wait! Start by reading this book. Share this book!It's impactful to hear the authors read this novel. So if you can, I highly recommend that you listen to the audiobook. We know that certain books have the power to transform lives IF we learn from them & integrate the lessons learned into our lives. STAMPED is that kind of book.For readers/listeners, STAMPED may be a start or a continuation to embracing antiracist behavior. That's why it's critical for this to be integrated into education. Don't wait! Read it. Share it!
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  • Katiria
    January 1, 1970
    *** I received this book at ALA in exchange for an honest review, thank you to Little, Brown Books for Young Readers publisher for allowing me to read and review Stamped: Racism, Antiracism, and You! ***Now I will tell you all the truth when I heard they wear giving away arcs of Jason Reynolds's new book Stamped: Racism, Antiracism, and You. I jump at the chance to grab one of his books. I tell you I have not read any of his books before but I have heard amazingly fantastic reviews about his boo *** I received this book at ALA in exchange for an honest review, thank you to Little, Brown Books for Young Readers publisher for allowing me to read and review Stamped: Racism, Antiracism, and You! ***Now I will tell you all the truth when I heard they wear giving away arcs of Jason Reynolds's new book Stamped: Racism, Antiracism, and You. I jump at the chance to grab one of his books. I tell you I have not read any of his books before but I have heard amazingly fantastic reviews about his books so I wanted to grab this arc immediately when I saw it at ALA. Now I had no idea this fantastic book was a non-fiction book at first but when I got home and read the synopsis I was shocked to find out it was a non-fiction book and I was more shock when I realize it was a book that was already written by Ibram X. Kendi. Now I was kind of disappointed at first this was a non-fiction book written by Jason Reynolds but the facts and stories in Stamped: Racism, Antiracism, and You are by Ibram X. Kendi. I am not a big nonfiction reader and I don't read a lot of nonfiction books but this book, this book I tell you all had me re-thinking to read more nonfiction books in the future. I think Jason Reynolds wrote this book for Ibram X. Kendi for younger readers and middle graders to better understand and learn the importance of Racism, Antiracism, and You in America today. And oh my Jason Reynolds's writing style was pure brilliant and flawless that I understood every word he wrote in this book and I dare say is writing style will hook you from the very beginning as well. I have heard about Ibram X. Kendi that he is a really strong and very intelligent man that his books are very thought-provoking and will have you thinking about what is going on in the world in the past to this present day about Racism and Antiracism in America. This amazing book has even opened up more of my eyes to the history of Racism and Antiracism from the past and present day. Now Ibram X. Kendi does state at the beginning of this book that Stamped: Racism, Antiracism, and You is not a history book and I can tell you it is not a history book but true stories and facts about Racism and Antiracism through the time and I love reading every story and facts in this book that I just couldn't put this book down that I finish reading this book in two days I just couldn't get enough of this book. All and all I thoroughly loved and enjoyed reading Stamped: Racism, Antiracism, and You that I would like to read more nonfiction books like this one hopefully soon. I will most definitely try to read more books by Jason Reynolds as well.
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  • Molly Dettmann
    January 1, 1970
    I listened to the audiobook courtesy of Libro.fm and all I can say is, dang, I would listen to Jason Reynolds read the phone book.
  • Pernille Ripp
    January 1, 1970
    Still reeling after finishing this advanced review copy written by Jason Reynolds and based on the work of Dr. Ibram X. Kendi. I finished it and immediately wanted to start it again as I knew each read will offer up new knowledge. To see the history of racism wrapped up like this is sheer brilliance, necessary and audacious. Every person, teens and adults, should read this book, discuss this book and jump into action. This is the most important book I have read this year.
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  • Sahitya
    January 1, 1970
    Stamped from the Beginning has been on my tbr since a long time, but as someone who tries to read a lot of books to escape reality (and the real world in general), I’m not always good at catching up with the important nonfiction books that bring light to the ugly truths that exist in our world. But attending a talk and getting to listen to Dr. Kendi speak in such close quarters was truly eye opening and I knew that I had to read his book soon. But then came the announcement of this remix version Stamped from the Beginning has been on my tbr since a long time, but as someone who tries to read a lot of books to escape reality (and the real world in general), I’m not always good at catching up with the important nonfiction books that bring light to the ugly truths that exist in our world. But attending a talk and getting to listen to Dr. Kendi speak in such close quarters was truly eye opening and I knew that I had to read his book soon. But then came the announcement of this remix version of Stamped by Jason Reynolds and I thought I’ll read it first, just to get an idea about the original that inspired it before deep diving into Dr. Kendi’s work. And I think I made the right choice. Firstly, I have to mention that I listened to the audiobook and Jason’s narration is spectacular. There’s just no other word for it. The whole book (and narration) feels like Jason is having a conversation with us, just explaining us the historical truth behind racism in a simple but effective manner, in a way that’ll make us think and want to read more about all the racists and antiracist activists who are mentioned within these pages. He insists multiple times that this is not a history book, and it may not be in a conventional sense, but I feel it is indeed a historical account of the origin and perpetuation of racist ideas and an accounting of all the people who are responsible for the extremely racially divided world we live in today. Just like what Dr. Kendi spoke about in his talk, Jason gives us clear distinctions between segregationists, assimilationists and antiracists and how the ideas each of them perpetuate have been a part of America since it’s inception. But one clear point he makes is that every person can contain multitudes, have both racist and antiracist ideas, or gradually change our beliefs from one to the other - but the most important thing is that if we want to confront the racism that has been entrenched in American society for centuries and has been the backbone of all the prosperity that white people have enjoyed, it is not enough just to not be racist, we have to actively be antiracist and fight against any idea or policy that is not for complete racial equality. There are a lot of historical figures who get mentions in this novel and as someone who doesn’t know much about the revolutionary war or the founding fathers or even the Civil war, there were many things I was very surprised to learn, especially about Jefferson and Lincoln. As the narrative moves on to Jim Crow and later the world wars, we also get to know more about intellectuals and activists like W. E. B. Dubois or Booker T. Washington, MLK Jr and Malcolm X and even Bill Cosby - and the difference in their ideas, which were quite contradictory to each other and sometimes even harmful to black people in the long run. Another narrative that I found throughout the book is how racists have used media and literature and even science to their advantage time and time again to give credence to their horrible ideas, and the inevitable fact that if you keep hammering people with a certain idea over and over, they will believe it to be the truth even though exactly opposite of that. I was appalled to read about some of the books and movies that were essentially used as propaganda at the right moments in history to provoke white rage and fear and lead to violence against black people. And I promise you, if you aren’t aware of racist history much, then after reading this book, you will never see classic movies like Tarzan, Rocky or Planet of the Apes in the same light ever again. This might feel abrupt and there is so much I could talk about this book, but ultimately it’s a small one and I think you should read it for yourself. If you enjoyed Stamped from the Beginning and want an easier version of it for younger readers, or just want to read an accessible version of the book, you should totally check this out. It may not be comprehensive, but it is a brilliant concise account of the history of racist ideas in this country and also a wonderful beginning for any other future readings we might wanna do on these important topics. I also highly recommend the audiobook because Jason’s narration brings fire to the writing and you’ll not want to put it down at all.
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  • Mandi
    January 1, 1970
    Jason Reynold along with Ibram X. Kendi bring this historic nonfiction and make it interesting to read for all ages. I loved learning something I thought I knew but obviously learned more about.
  • Catie
    January 1, 1970
    The more things change, the more they stay the same. This is required reading for anyone with a pulse and especially for those of us who work in or attend a K-12 school. I plan to do everything in my power to bring this to my school in a major way, and I hope many will do the same.
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  • Kathie
    January 1, 1970
    Jason Reynolds has an absolute gift for a taking a topic and putting it in language that's engaging, understandable, and relatable. This book is no different. I can only imagine the conversations STAMPED it will spark with its readers, and I would love to see every high school have this as part of their history curriculum.
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  • Romie
    January 1, 1970
    Jason Reynolds is a gift to this world. this small book is about giving you the tools to understand racism and its history; to make you understand that in order to dismantle racism, you need to see how it's at the very foundation of society, and that you cannot fight against racism if you ‘forget’ about women of colour, queer & disabled poc, because they are also the people you're fighting for. it's a small book, but an important book, and Jason Reynolds' acknowledgment is just as important: scr Jason Reynolds is a gift to this world. this small book is about giving you the tools to understand racism and its history; to make you understand that in order to dismantle racism, you need to see how it's at the very foundation of society, and that you cannot fight against racism if you ‘forget’ about women of colour, queer & disabled poc, because they are also the people you're fighting for. it's a small book, but an important book, and Jason Reynolds' acknowledgment is just as important: scrolling isn't enough, retweeting isn't enough, you have to be an active part of this fight. (4.5)thank you libro.fm and Little, Brown Books for Young Readers for the audio listening copy
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  • Kelly
    January 1, 1970
    A remix of Kendi's adult book Stamped From The Beginning, Reynolds addresses young readers directly, exploring the history of racism from the past ("this is not a history book") to right here and right now. It's accessible and unflinching, and Reynolds's performance of the audiobook is outstanding. Loved the breakdown of the differences between being racist, an assimilationist, and anti-racist, and I loved how we get a real look at some of the most lauded Black leaders and where and how they did A remix of Kendi's adult book Stamped From The Beginning, Reynolds addresses young readers directly, exploring the history of racism from the past ("this is not a history book") to right here and right now. It's accessible and unflinching, and Reynolds's performance of the audiobook is outstanding. Loved the breakdown of the differences between being racist, an assimilationist, and anti-racist, and I loved how we get a real look at some of the most lauded Black leaders and where and how they did and did not advance anti-racist causes. This book was another reminder of how grateful I am for having read Malcolm X's biography in high school.Something I've been chewing on, and something I'll be chewing on as more (white) people read this one: if Reynolds's name weren't attached, would it be as widely read and acclaimed? Because that would run pretty counter to the entire point. Reynolds is beloved and important in the YA world, and he uses that for projects like this one, but he'd likely bristle if another Black writer were the one to remix the book and it didn't see the same sort of immense (and well deserved) praise.
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  • Traci at The Stacks
    January 1, 1970
    As a huge fan of the original STAMPED FROM THE BEGINNING I’m beyond impressed with the energy and clarity Reynolds infused into this remix. The history is still there but it’s totally accessible for young folks and those adults who are intimidated by Kendi’s original.
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  • Abbie | ab_reads
    January 1, 1970
    (#gifted @librofm) I listened to Jason Reynold’s young adult version of Ibram X. Kendi’s ‘Stamped From the Beginning: The Definitive History of Racist Ideas in America’ and it was so informative, accessible, and even funny at times! But Reynolds knows when humour is appropriate and not - although some of his jokes reminded me of those UK GCSE textbooks with their cheesy dad jokes which were still kinda funny 🙊.To be honest, I think as a Brit I probably got a lot more from this book than your ave (#gifted @librofm) I listened to Jason Reynold’s young adult version of Ibram X. Kendi’s ‘Stamped From the Beginning: The Definitive History of Racist Ideas in America’ and it was so informative, accessible, and even funny at times! But Reynolds knows when humour is appropriate and not - although some of his jokes reminded me of those UK GCSE textbooks with their cheesy dad jokes which were still kinda funny 🙊.To be honest, I think as a Brit I probably got a lot more from this book than your average US adult might. But then again, maybe not, as a lot of black history tends to be glossed over or toned down when it comes to the truly shocking parts, even in America..Reynolds starts from Gomes Eanes de Zurara, the guy who is considered the first racist (or at least the first person to write down racist ideas) all the way to present day with the BLM movement. This ‘non-history history book’ hits the perfect length for each section, which means it’s perfect for the wandering attention span of teenagers - another excellent book for if you’re teaching at home, actually!.Reynolds’s tribute to the younger generation in the acknowledgements at the end really hit me. It’s so true that the generations before try to shame young people for being sensitive, or ‘special snowflakes’, just because they’re more attuned to prejudices and want a fairer world. But it is young people who will hopefully change the world for the better..I did occasionally find it hard to take in and retain all the facts with the audio, and if (when) I read X. Kendi’s original text, it will definitely be in print. But Jason Reynolds reads it himself in the audio and it is very well done!
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  • Kaytee Cobb
    January 1, 1970
    This will now be part of my homeschool curriculum. Absolutely amazing and stunning.
  • Mary Thomas
    January 1, 1970
    This is maybe the most important and excellent book I’ve ever read for young people by two of the most brilliant minds of our time. Educators, PLEASE listen to the audio (free through libro.fm this month)& then purchase it & put it in front of young people, adults, your family, EVERYONE. Wow I can’t wait to not shut up about this book for like the next 2 years. MARK THIS TO BE READ YESTERDAY! Preorder it! Call ur public libraries and make sure they’re gonna purchase it. READ. IT. This is maybe the most important and excellent book I’ve ever read for young people by two of the most brilliant minds of our time. Educators, PLEASE listen to the audio (free through libro.fm this month)& then purchase it & put it in front of young people, adults, your family, EVERYONE. Wow I can’t wait to not shut up about this book for like the next 2 years. MARK THIS TO BE READ YESTERDAY! Preorder it! Call ur public libraries and make sure they’re gonna purchase it. READ. IT.
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  • Gary Anderson
    January 1, 1970
    Stamped: Racism, Antiracism, and You is a “re-mix” by Jason Reynolds of Stamped from the Beginning: The Definitive History of Racist Ideas in America by Ibram X. Kendi. In his adaptation for younger readers, Reynolds insists several times that Stamped is not a history book, although it covers the Black American experience from pre-colonial times to the present day with even more historical context from ancient history. If it walks like a duck and quacks like a duck, it’s a duck, and Stamped is a Stamped: Racism, Antiracism, and You is a “re-mix” by Jason Reynolds of Stamped from the Beginning: The Definitive History of Racist Ideas in America by Ibram X. Kendi. In his adaptation for younger readers, Reynolds insists several times that Stamped is not a history book, although it covers the Black American experience from pre-colonial times to the present day with even more historical context from ancient history. If it walks like a duck and quacks like a duck, it’s a duck, and Stamped is a history book. In his afterword, Reynolds even admits that this is a “non-history history book.” I don’t know what all that semantic fuss is about; there is nothing wrong with history books, except that the intended audience of young readers might be reluctant to engage with something that sounds so academic. But this is Jason Reynolds, and Jason Reynolds knows exactly how to engage young readers better than most other authors working today. The subject matter of Stamped focuses on a paradigm that racial attitudes can be classified as segregationist, assimilationist, or antiracist. According to Reynolds, a segregationist is racist; an assimilationist is cowardly; and an antiracist operates with love. As he applies these concepts to American history, Reynolds challenges common perceptions of historical figures such as Phillis Wheatley, W. E. B. Dubois, Martin Luther King, and many others. The most heroic figures emerging from Stamped are Malcolm X, Angela Davis, and the first wave of hip hop artists. Stamped is not an objective book, nor does it need to be. In fact, its subjectivity might be its greatest strength. While most nonfiction books for young adult readers are biographies, autobiographies, sports or outdoor adventure narratives, or books intended to be motivational or inspirational, Stamped is a lively book of ideas and theories designed to stimulate a young reader’s intellect and curiosity. I’d like to see more books like Stamped that use young people’s language to require readers to think deeply about important issues and actively use what they learn for the betterment of themselves and their world. With more books like Stamped, maybe there would be no need to re-frame history books as something other than what they are.
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  • Kristen
    January 1, 1970
    Wow! I will be digesting this book for some time to come. I was able to listen to this as part of Libro.fm's ALC Educators program and will be ordering it in print as well. “We can't attack a thing we don't know. That's dangerous. And...foolish. It would be like trying to chop down a tree from the top of it. If we understand how the tree works, how the trunk and roots are where the power lies, and how gravity is on our side, we can attack it, each of us with small axes, and change the face of th Wow! I will be digesting this book for some time to come. I was able to listen to this as part of Libro.fm's ALC Educators program and will be ordering it in print as well. “We can't attack a thing we don't know. That's dangerous. And...foolish. It would be like trying to chop down a tree from the top of it. If we understand how the tree works, how the trunk and roots are where the power lies, and how gravity is on our side, we can attack it, each of us with small axes, and change the face of the the forest.”- Jason Reynolds
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  • Colleen
    January 1, 1970
    “We must fight against performance and lean into participation.” This book is amazing & I want Jason Reynolds to read me everything. “We must fight against performance and lean into participation.” This book is amazing & I want Jason Reynolds to read me everything.
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  • Bethany
    January 1, 1970
    I should say that I loved Stamped from the Beginning by Ibram X. Kendi and believe it to be an absolute masterpiece. Stamped is very much a remix of the original- taking key information and delivering it in a style that is easily digestible for younger readers and in a more relevant voice. It's truly fantastic and I hope high school teachers will pick this up for educational purposes. It unpacks terms like Racist, Segregationist, and Antiracist, offers an overview of the history covered in the o I should say that I loved Stamped from the Beginning by Ibram X. Kendi and believe it to be an absolute masterpiece. Stamped is very much a remix of the original- taking key information and delivering it in a style that is easily digestible for younger readers and in a more relevant voice. It's truly fantastic and I hope high school teachers will pick this up for educational purposes. It unpacks terms like Racist, Segregationist, and Antiracist, offers an overview of the history covered in the original, and carries the characteristic style of the always brilliant and fun Jason Reynolds. Is this a good substitute for Stamped from the Beginning? No, definitely not. However, this is a fantastic primer that is much more approachable than Kendi's tome and could serve as a educational tool for teens and a good refresher for anyone. If this whets your interest though, Kendi's book is well worth picking up and reading in it's entirety. I received an audio review copy of this book via Libro FM. All opinions are my own.
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  • Karen (idleutopia_reads)
    January 1, 1970
    I’ve had the immense pleasure of reading “How to be an Anti-racist” and wanted to move on to read Stamped from the Beginning but I was intimidated by its sheer size. I was ready when Stamped came out so that I could start building the foundation for the knowledge that I know was coming my way. This book is superb, beyond words, giving you language to see how tightly knit racism is woven into this country’s history. We visited the first racist, talked about Thomas Jefferson (the first person that I’ve had the immense pleasure of reading “How to be an Anti-racist” and wanted to move on to read Stamped from the Beginning but I was intimidated by its sheer size. I was ready when Stamped came out so that I could start building the foundation for the knowledge that I know was coming my way. This book is superb, beyond words, giving you language to see how tightly knit racism is woven into this country’s history. We visited the first racist, talked about Thomas Jefferson (the first person that probably said “I have Black friends”), so many other facets of history, and talked about how much media and words subvert what we know to be true, what many live with every day and yet words abound to try to deny people’s lived experiences. Racism can’t be out logic because there was no logic to the racism, it exists because it allows people to profit off of it and honestly after reading the book there is really no originality to their racism, it’s the same arguments over and over, just dressed differently. This book also called me out because there were things I wouldn’t have thought of as racist (for example Brown v. Board of Education, and Rocky to name a few) but the examples were brought in, broken down to their bare bones and yeah, its pretty racist. I definitely agree with Jason Reynolds, this is an appetizer that made me hunger for more knowledge with Stamped from the Beginning. I can’t wait to dive into that book now. I highly recommend you read this book and then Stamped from the Beginning.
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  • Jan
    January 1, 1970
    This is the book students need to read in their social studies classes. It's everything you wanted to know and need to know about the history of racism in America. Jason Reynolds has blown me away again with his writing.
  • Anupama C K(b0rn_2_read)
    January 1, 1970
    Thanks to libro fm for the ALC. I loved Jason Reynolds's poetry so I had to read this
  • Benji Martin
    January 1, 1970
    This book....you guys. This book. I really can’t think of a good reason it couldn’t or even shouldn’t win the 21 Newbery. It’s so important.
  • Amanda
    January 1, 1970
    OhEmGee! Let’s start with how much I dislike reading nonfiction most of the time. Textbook writing is not my jam. So even though I’ve been anticipating this book release, part of me was worried I would be bored to tears.Nothing could be further from the truth.What was I possibly worried about with Jason at the helm of this remix? He wrote this book like he was having a conversation with you. I couldn’t put it down and read it in one sitting. And boy did it hit home.Let’s talk about the content n OhEmGee! Let’s start with how much I dislike reading nonfiction most of the time. Textbook writing is not my jam. So even though I’ve been anticipating this book release, part of me was worried I would be bored to tears.Nothing could be further from the truth.What was I possibly worried about with Jason at the helm of this remix? He wrote this book like he was having a conversation with you. I couldn’t put it down and read it in one sitting. And boy did it hit home.Let’s talk about the content now: racism’s roots and history just about floored me. And he was right: I didn’t know any of the information he put forth because it wasn’t in ANY textbook I read in school. And shame on them for that. The public school system has failed us all when it comes to black history. THIS is what was should be reading, learning and teaching our students. Every human on the planet should read this book and if not every human—then let’s start now with our students so we can right the wrongs of generations to come.Best book of 2020, if not the entire decade or...ever.
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  • Cassy Lee
    January 1, 1970
    This remix of Ibram X. Kendis' Stamped with Jason Reynolds is For. Every. One!!! But I'll especially address this review to white folks. Yes, us people of European descent who don’t like to be called “white”. Have you been told (implicitly or explicitly) by your parents/school/church/history books/media that you are superior to other races in the human hierarchy, that your place at the top was earned and that white people's benevolence and religious outreach is the only thing that saved the sava This remix of Ibram X. Kendis' Stamped with Jason Reynolds is For. Every. One!!! But I'll especially address this review to white folks. Yes, us people of European descent who don’t like to be called “white”. Have you been told (implicitly or explicitly) by your parents/school/church/history books/media that you are superior to other races in the human hierarchy, that your place at the top was earned and that white people's benevolence and religious outreach is the only thing that saved the savages who could not save themselves? And somewhere deep down have you/do you believe it? Go on. Admit it. It’s freeing to acknowledge that we have all been conditioned this way. Because then you can start tossing out that trash and learning the truth. There are so many resources out there to dig into this subject, but this book, particularly the audiobook version narrated by Jason Reynolds is a brilliant, succinct, eye opening, "not history" history book that explains how we got from the dawn of slavery to the present in which black people in America are still discriminated against (and spoiler alert - it’s not because white people are inherently superior). It's a whirlwind tour through the invention of race and human hierarchy and racist policies. The more we understand that we live in a society that runs on that intentionally created and carefully maintained premise of white supremacy that justifies why other racial groups still aren’t prospering as well as whites in America, the longer those ideas will keep everyone else down and all of us divided by false assumptions and hate. Read this book. Know your history. Then pass it on while you examine how you benefit from these systems. Then choose love. Active, antiracist love that sees people for all the potential they hold instead of the lies we've been told.
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  • Beth
    January 1, 1970
    I’m grateful to Jason Reynolds and Ibram X. Kendi for the difficult journey they are taking young people and educators on in this important book. In it, they help readers see how racism is a system that our country has been building on since before its inception. This book helps the reader see how our racist history continues to impact our present and compels us to change the future.
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  • Mrs. Krajewski
    January 1, 1970
    **Reread 5/1/2020. Looking forward to reading this book with students for the 2020 Global Read Aloud. “This is not a history book. I repeat, this is not a history book. At least, not like the ones you’re used to reading in school.” This IS the book schools should be requiring though. This is real history, written by a man who has a way with words. He brings the facts with a rhythm and musicality that only he can do. Reader, he will hook you. He will make you ask questions and beg for more. He wi **Reread 5/1/2020. Looking forward to reading this book with students for the 2020 Global Read Aloud. “This is not a history book. I repeat, this is not a history book. At least, not like the ones you’re used to reading in school.” This IS the book schools should be requiring though. This is real history, written by a man who has a way with words. He brings the facts with a rhythm and musicality that only he can do. Reader, he will hook you. He will make you ask questions and beg for more. He will make you go out and buy The Autobiography of Malcolm X, and so many other important titles we don’t talk about enough.This book took me a while. Not because I didn’t love it. (I’m obsessed!) It was because I wanted to write down and memorize every word. I have notebook pages filled with quotes I loved, and I’m not done. When this book comes out in March, I plan to gift it to history teachers, other educators, and many MANY children. With this book, Jason Reynolds is going to inspire (more) positive change the world.
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  • Monica
    January 1, 1970
    This should be required reading for everyone, everywhere.
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