The Future We Choose
Climate change: it is arguably the most urgent and consequential issue humankind has ever faced. How we address it in the next thirty years will determine the kind of world we will live in and will bequeath to our children and to theirs.In The Future We Choose, Christiana Figueres and Tom Rivett-Carnac--who led negotiations for the United Nations during the historic Paris Agreement of 2015--have written a cautionary but optimistic book about the world's changing climate and the fate of humanity.The authors outline two possible scenarios for our planet. In one, they describe what life on Earth will be like by 2050 if we fail to meet the Paris climate targets. In the other, they lay out what it will be like to live in a carbon neutral, regenerative world. They argue for confronting the climate crisis head-on, with determination and optimism. The Future We Choose presents our options and tells us what governments, corporations, and each of us can and must do to fend off disaster.

The Future We Choose Details

TitleThe Future We Choose
Author
ReleaseFeb 25th, 2020
PublisherKnopf Publishing Group
ISBN-139780525658351
Rating
GenreNonfiction, Science, Environment, Climate Change, Politics, Nature

The Future We Choose Review

  • Lou
    January 1, 1970
    By far the most prominent, urgent and important environmental issue our planet has ever faced, the climate crisis we currently find ourselves in means we are disappearing into the abyss and the topic can no longer be ignored if it is to abated. Regardless of what your opinion is on the main players in the arena such as extinction rebellion, young and bold climate activist Greta Thunberg, or David Attenborough their message is an extremely important one.The Future We Choose: Surviving the Climate By far the most prominent, urgent and important environmental issue our planet has ever faced, the climate crisis we currently find ourselves in means we are disappearing into the abyss and the topic can no longer be ignored if it is to abated. Regardless of what your opinion is on the main players in the arena such as extinction rebellion, young and bold climate activist Greta Thunberg, or David Attenborough their message is an extremely important one.The Future We Choose: Surviving the Climate Crisis is a passionate ode to reality, a powerful call to action and a tour de force written by experts in their respective fields and immaculately and comprehensively researched to ensure it is equal parts accurate and fascinating. Although not an issue for me due to knowing this area quite well I am pleased to report that it’s a highly accessible read even for those with no prior knowledge and/or interest in the area.We no longer have the luxury of time to decipher the statistics and cultivate a thorough plan of attack yet it is of the utmost importance that we act now. In unity. Because we as a species cannot be saved unless we set aside and cast asunder our differences and evolve as a society. What is crucial to point out is that I have read many books that touted themselves as a climate saviour prior to this but this is by far the most empowering, eye-opening, inspiring and most appealing, and it gives us tactics to put into action to work each towards our own goals which will end up working collectivelyHonestly, you would be both shocked and utterly dismayed by the climate books I have perused that leave you somewhat scared by their facts but offer no points of action to make a difference and seem reticent to offer anything but a depressed outlook and pessimistic doom and gloom. Seriously, though, it felt like the authors got some perverse pleasure out of terrifying the reader to death about the future of our species before basically admitting defeat. Thank the lord that this is a different kettle of fish altogether! Many thanks to Manilla Press for an ARC.
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  • Viv JM
    January 1, 1970
    This is an absolutely excellent book. A book on climate change could (quite rightly) be depressing, but not this one. Yes, the climate emergency is real and frightening but the authors argue not only that we must act but also give examples of what this might look like. They lay out what we need to do and how to go about doing it and the overall tone is optimistic and inspiring and very readable. I highly, highly recommend this book to everyone on this beautiful planet.
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  • Steve
    January 1, 1970
    This review is from my blog Live Many Lives at www.livemanylives.wordpress.comWe are faced at this very moment with a climate emergency. Christina Figueres is Executive Secretary of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change. She took the role shortly after the failed COP15 in July 2010 and led the delivery of negotiations that resulted in the 2015 Paris Agreement. Tom Rivett-Carnac was the Senior Political Strategist. As a result, they feel like suitably qualified people to guide This review is from my blog Live Many Lives at www.livemanylives.wordpress.comWe are faced at this very moment with a climate emergency. Christina Figueres is Executive Secretary of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change. She took the role shortly after the failed COP15 in July 2010 and led the delivery of negotiations that resulted in the 2015 Paris Agreement. Tom Rivett-Carnac was the Senior Political Strategist. As a result, they feel like suitably qualified people to guide us through the nature of that emergency and provide some hope and crucially action that we can all take to face it.The first section of the book covers the junction that we currently stand at and the two potential directions that we can choose to take. The differences are extremely stark depending on the future we choose. We can try to keep going down our current route, burning fossil fuels, over consuming and competing to pile pressure onto our planet’s resources and ecosystems, or we can seek to transform the way we live and accept that we are part of one whole and need to live in balance with the planet that sustains us. Both will transform our planet and our quality of life, but in radically different ways.The next section considers the mindsets that are required to take on the task that we face. This is about the determined optimism and ultimately resilience that we will need in order to find hope in our current situation. We cannot stare into the future like rabbits into headlights. It is also about moving our mindset away from competing for resources that are perceived to be scarce (and creating scarcity through the dysfunctional behaviours of competition) towards collaborating to provide what each person needs at the point that they need it.Having now set the scene and laid some groundwork the meat of the book looks at what we can actually do to face the crisis of climate breakdown. It is essential to understand that we can make a difference and that we need to take action individually, as well at the structural level, if we are to succeed in the transformation that our planet and species needs.The suggested actions are a mix of orientations, ways of looking at the way we live and realigning some of our basic assumptions about what makes a good life, and specific things that we can do collectively and as individuals to move towards a new regenerative economy and culture. It is essential if we are to succeed in the grand vision that we each take personal responsibility for moving our own individual lives towards that vision.We also need to understand that this is not about moving backwards or diminishing the human experience, but is rather a positive and creative vision of moving forwards into a way of life that combines both the awe and wonder of the natural world and the best of human ingenuity. The future is a move away from exploiting the earth and its resources to collaborating with it (and as an intrinsic part of nature ourselves) in a creative, regenerative project.We are in the midst of an emergency, but The Future We Choose reveals that we are also fortunate to be alive at such a defining moment in our history. This is our opportunity to understand the meaning of our lives and to become a part of the bigger picture of life on earth in a positive way. The last 50 years have been a destructive search for meaning through consumption, a race to accumulate, but the next 25 or so are our opportunity to reshape our culture to the natural patterns of birth, death and regeneration and truly take our place in the world.The Future We Choose is an urgent read, but it also requires an urgent response from us all. Take the first step now.
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  • Jacob Aron
    January 1, 1970
    Part blueprint for the next decade, part call to action and part self-help book, The Future We Choose is an important read in the run up to the COP26 climate negotiations, which will take place five years after the vital Paris agreement put together by the authors. Thought-provoking, though I couldn't agree with everything in the book - repeated calls for mediation and mindfulness seemed somewhat out of place.ARC provided by NetGalley
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  • Jemima Pett
    January 1, 1970
    This excellent book sets out practical ways in which WE (not they) can alleviate the climate crisis and keep global temperature rise to below the critical1.5 degrees by 2050. Its OUR choice.Stay under 1.5 degrees, and have hotter weather, but the capacity for food and living conditions that are livable.Go above 1.5 degrees, and have runaway weather conditions, possible a 5 metre sea level rise (bye bye most several countries, and several US states, and nearly all of the Pacific Islands), and This excellent book sets out practical ways in which WE (not they) can alleviate the climate crisis and keep global temperature rise to below the critical1.5 degrees by 2050. It’s OUR choice.Stay under 1.5 degrees, and have hotter weather, but the capacity for food and living conditions that are livable.Go above 1.5 degrees, and have runaway weather conditions, possible a 5 metre sea level rise (bye bye most several countries, and several US states, and nearly all of the Pacific Islands), and regular massive fires the like we have seen in Australia in recent months, California and the Amazon, last year, Indonesia the year before… Go outside only in facemasks, and byt the way, safer to ear them indoors as well, where you work rest and play, although the temperature only reaches comfortable sleeping temperatures between 2 and 4 am. In formerly temperate regions like Northern Europe. Oh, and have I mentioned the refugee problem?I have conversations most weeks about ‘what can I do?’ Recycling, using the car less, buying locally grown food, all seem to be very small things compared with the magnitude of the effort needed, and who am I among the 8 billion on the planet? What difference can I make?Christiana Figueras has had these conversations at lofty levels, United Nations levels to be precise, with representatives of every nation party to the forum. She gives not only the implications of a choice to act or not act, in her two scenarios for life in 2050, but also insights into the difficulties of getting the Paris Agreement of 2015 agreed.The situation is: we know what we need to do to achieve these targets. There is very little that is technically a barrier. Socially (and that includes the social side of economic arguments) it is more difficult—getting people to CHOOSE to change their habits and sometimes their belief systems (not religion, most religions believe in moderation and clean living), to stop this planet of ours becoming basically uninhabitable.So Figueras sets out the mindsets needed to achieve the changes necessary, and then some more practical steps to halving your carbon emissions.I find the mindsets very helpful, especially post-Brexit. Start to put in the smaller actions, and I start to see problems… mainly, in how to reach the majority of people to explain these mindsets and persuade them to adopt them..The mindsets give me a set of principles by which to continue to fight for a reasonable future. However, I have little hope that the people who will not read this book will ever be persuaded to act on the contents. I find it equally difficult to believe that Boris Johnson, who has signed the UK up to be zero-emissions by 2050 (which is the target), has any intention of putting in any policies that might get us there. He will say the proud thing, and do exactly what will best fill the pockets of himself and his cronies.So, this is an excellent book, which everyone should read and act on. You could even decide to change one of your habits a day, or week, in order to take us closer towards a zero-emissions world. Apart from the book’s website wechoosethefuture.dom, you could follow Erlijn van Genuchten’s excellent journey on 365 Sustainable Decisions Challenge for ideas that you can do too. Blog your own.But how are we going to get these messages through to those whose culture is deeply engrained in me, me, me? I’m sure the United Nations have somebody on the case. Let’s help them.
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  • Linh
    January 1, 1970
    Okay. I know everyone is going to have opinions about this book, the author(s--remember, there's two of them!) and what "climate" people think about it. I'll start. First, it could have been 3 or 4 stars. It depends on why you read. For me, the extra star is personal; I like reading about issues that I'm engaged in, within contexts that I have experience of. (Which is to say, I'll consume almost any content about social movements and/or the UN; in lieu of current content available, I settle for Okay. I know everyone is going to have opinions about this book, the author(s--remember, there's two of them!) and what "climate" people think about it. I'll start. First, it could have been 3 or 4 stars. It depends on why you read. For me, the extra star is personal; I like reading about issues that I'm engaged in, within contexts that I have experience of. (Which is to say, I'll consume almost any content about social movements and/or the UN; in lieu of current content available, I settle for psychological crime thrillers). More seriously, the writing is good. It's simple and clear, this was an easy and largely quite pleasant to read. There were many sentences that managed to successfully simplify the complexity of the climate crisis in a way that was still accurate. I plan on borrowing some of these phrases after a particularly terrible recent instance of explaining net-zero in another language...The Paris Agreement is complex and given the authors, it makes sense that they were able to distil down the process and intended outcomes. This section of the book is useful for old-hands, and mainly associate the city with the Eiffel Tower as opposed to multilateralism. I found the final third of the book (about solutions, both at the systemic and individual level) to be far lighter though, in terms of substance. The book could have gone anywhere after the first two-thirds, instead the ending wasn't fitting and it read like things wrapped up before it delved into anything of significance. I found the solutions segment to be a more holistic and realistic detailing of what's outlined in Paul Hawken's Drawdown. I wasn't expecting anything new because, yes, it really is true, we have the solutions at hand. Given some of the likely readers of this book, it could have gone into more depth around what this would look like through policy or existing hurdles.The chapters about mindsets is what I derived the most value from. It pieced together my past interactions with the authors, and speeches that I had seen Figueres given on "stubborn optimism". The additions of "endless abundance" and "radical regeneration" were fitting. This book could have been reframed as a "business one" where these concepts get explored, with climate just being one potential use case. It would have broadened the audience; it also read like there was more to say here. Lastly, Figueres and Rivett-Carnac painted some pretty good future scenarios. They could both go into speculative cli-fi!
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  • Eric Bea
    January 1, 1970
    This book was written by the "architects of the Paris Agreement". Immediately, this should let the reader know what the authors' positions are. Unfortunately, this reads too much like a defense of the increasingly-untenable Paris Agreement (four years later, we are still no closer to completing the Paris Agreement rules, especially on Article 6) in the first two parts ("Two Worlds" and "Three Mindsets"). "Stubborn Optimism", "Endless Abundance", and "Radical Regeneration" sound more like This book was written by the "architects of the Paris Agreement". Immediately, this should let the reader know what the authors' positions are. Unfortunately, this reads too much like a defense of the increasingly-untenable Paris Agreement (four years later, we are still no closer to completing the Paris Agreement rules, especially on Article 6) in the first two parts ("Two Worlds" and "Three Mindsets"). "Stubborn Optimism", "Endless Abundance", and "Radical Regeneration" sound more like something out of a self-help book than a climate book. If we still haven't gotten the message that "individual actions" are not going to crack this, then we're getting nowhere. After almost 30 years, you'd think we've learnt something. The third part, "Ten Actions", are a hodge-podge of genuinely useful concepts, "Move Beyond Fossil Fuels", "Reforest the Earth", "Invest in a Clean Economy", and "Build Gender Equality", and anodyne statements like "Let Go of the Old World" and "Face Your Grief but Hold a Vision of the Future". Nothing here is new, really, though, if you've been following this field for some time now.In conclusion, this is probably fine for a newcomer, but this is an overly-rosy picture of the state of affairs. The climate crisis is not something we can stave off - it is happening now, and is only going to get worse at increasing rates. I would suggest, for a more realistic view, read just the first two chapters of this book, "Choosing Our Future" and "The World We Are Creating" ("It is 2050. Beyond the emissions reductions registered in 2015, no further efforts were made to control emissions. We are heading for a world that will be more than 3 degrees warmer by 2100"), then go to The Uninhabitable Earth by David Wallace-Wells.
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  • Ryan Mizzen
    January 1, 1970
    This offers a sense of hope about climate change. The authors also speak about the importance of mindset and taking time for ourselves when we need it and I think that's absolutely crucial.
  • Dawn M. Gaetke
    January 1, 1970
    Just the right balance of sobering facts and reasons for hopeI have been studying sustainable management for over two years. The authors have helped me articulate in just a few hours what months of studying could not. I will be returning here often for persuasive quotes.
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  • Marie-Helene Fasquel
    January 1, 1970
    Thank you Christiana Figueres and Tom Rivett-Carnac, Manilla Press and Net Galley for the opportunity to read this amazing book! I have been sensitive to environmental issues for decades and we, as a family, do everything we can to improv eour way of living in order to protect the Earth, so this was an excellent read!We cannot wait any longer and this book is pointing out what could happen if our leaders and if we individually do not act now. I found the book informative but also engaging with Thank you Christiana Figueres and Tom Rivett-Carnac, Manilla Press and Net Galley for the opportunity to read this amazing book! I have been sensitive to environmental issues for decades and we, as a family, do everything we can to improv eour way of living in order to protect the Earth, so this was an excellent read!We cannot wait any longer and this book is pointing out what could happen if our leaders and if we individually do not act now. I found the book informative but also engaging with some kind of humour (the two scenarios for what will happen in 2050 if we do / do not act now are so telling, the analysis is so comprehensive and logical that it cannot leave people unmoved.I found very useful information and ways to improve our way of life and do recommend this book to all!#TheFutureWeChoose #NetGalleyFrance
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  • Charlotte Jones
    January 1, 1970
    *Disclaimer: I received this book for free from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.Like a lot of people, I am trying to change my lifestyle to better the environment and this was the perfect book to pick up. In conjunction with Greta Thunberg's No One is Too Small to Make a Difference which I read earlier this year, this is was a great book to read to learn more about what I can actually do about the climate crisis.As well as setting out scenarios of what would actually happen should we *Disclaimer: I received this book for free from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.Like a lot of people, I am trying to change my lifestyle to better the environment and this was the perfect book to pick up. In conjunction with Greta Thunberg's No One is Too Small to Make a Difference which I read earlier this year, this is was a great book to read to learn more about what I can actually do about the climate crisis.As well as setting out scenarios of what would actually happen should we not reach the targets of the Paris climate agreement by 2050, it explains what we can do as individuals and organisations. Engaging and informative, this book inspired me to make several changes in my own life and to use my vote to elect change.4 out of 5 stars! 
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  • Tim
    January 1, 1970
    Thank you Christiana Figueres, Tom Rivett-Carnac, Bonnier Books UK and NetGalley for the ARC in exchange for an honest review of The Future We Choose Surviving The Climate Crisis.This excellent informative book is divided into several sections. A section describes the earth in 2050 given two scenarios. With the failure of COP25 to resolve Article 6, much of the east coast of Australia on fire and a general lack of political will, the scenario of devastation seems to be the most probable.There is Thank you Christiana Figueres, Tom Rivett-Carnac, Bonnier Books UK and NetGalley for the ARC in exchange for an honest review of The Future We Choose Surviving The Climate Crisis.This excellent informative book is divided into several sections. A section describes the earth in 2050 given two scenarios. With the failure of COP25 to resolve Article 6, much of the east coast of Australia on fire and a general lack of political will, the scenario of devastation seems to be the most probable.There is an outstanding section describing how individuals can act locally to reduce impact.I recommend this book, particularly to our political leaders.
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  • Barbara Piotrowska
    January 1, 1970
    First, full disclosure: I was waiting for this book since I heard about its inception. I'm an avid listener of the podcast run by the two authors together with Paul Dickinson and in general, a reader deeply concerned and motivated by the topic.What is lovely about the book is the stark motivation and clarity of solutions it proposes. The three parts (the choice, the attitude/philosophy necessary to adopt and the actions for different time horizons) are very well laid out and well-argued. As First, full disclosure: I was waiting for this book since I heard about its inception. I'm an avid listener of the podcast run by the two authors together with Paul Dickinson and in general, a reader deeply concerned and motivated by the topic.What is lovely about the book is the stark motivation and clarity of solutions it proposes. The three parts (the choice, the attitude/philosophy necessary to adopt and the actions for different time horizons) are very well laid out and well-argued. As someone very familiar with the topic and the general approach of Figueres and Rivett-Carnac, I don't think that there were many pieces of information that I found new or surprising, but it certainly was a great motivation to stay engaged!I feel like one aspect that I found a bit off putting is the attack on economic growth. So many of the solutions presented in the book actually do contribute to the growth of GDP (education of women [through productivity], improvements in technology, harnessing renewables [both as a "new" natural resource and as a source of jobs], improvements in energy efficiency). I do understand that the intention might have been to move the focus away from GDP growth as the main or only measure of necessary progress. Unfortunately, I find that it could be a bit (needlessly) discouraging for more market liberal readers. That said, given that the podcast is consistently encouraging and excited about new solutions, I am sure that the authors would not object to economic growth coming from these sources.All in all, a very fast, engaging read, providing a wonderful range of practical solutions that everyone can implement in their own individual and social life to help fight the climate crisis.
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  • Gregg
    January 1, 1970
    I wish I could just hand this to my composition students and tell them to read it over the weekend. Its a model of persuasion. Early, authors Christiana Figueres and Tom Rivett-Carnan (Figueres was on the ground floor of the Paris Accords that our Cheeto-in-Chief pulled us out of recently) give us a Worst Case Scenario for Planet Earth: syrupy air, lack of resources, a constant barrage of collapsing ecosystems in the news. Eventually a kind of living death in the industrial world. I read it and I wish I could just hand this to my composition students and tell them to read it over the weekend. It’s a model of persuasion. Early, authors Christiana Figueres and Tom Rivett-Carnan (Figueres was on the ground floor of the Paris Accords that our Cheeto-in-Chief pulled us out of recently) give us a Worst Case Scenario for Planet Earth: syrupy air, lack of resources, a constant barrage of collapsing ecosystems in the news. Eventually a kind of living death in the industrial world. I read it and went cold. It’s sourced, it’s convincing. Bring it on, I guess, I thought to myself, if that’s what we deserve. If we had to have Hummers to drive and Big Gulp sodas to chug, then we deserve everything we’re getting.But then in the next chapter, they paint a picture of the world as it could be. Greener cities. Clean power. Communal living. Lots of adjustments that would need to be made, sure, but only a fantasy if we can’t act collectively. And I read that chapter and found myself wistful, a child with his face pressed up against the glass. Yeah, I thought. That. I want that.The rest of the book is a blow-by-blow of how to get there, including ten things that need to be done, and several pages at the end telling you where to start. I started these steps already, but I’m far from on pace with zero emissions by 2030, and I’m miles away from the activism necessary to pressure our leaders and society to get behind this effort. But this book gives me a breath of fresh air. Stubborn optimism is a bitch for me, but I’ll practice it. What other choice do we have?
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  • Andrew
    January 1, 1970
    This is an optimistic book about climate change. It is extremely accessible and a joy to read.Christiana Figueres, former head of the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change (who led the Paris Agreement) and her lead adviser, Tom Rivett-Carnac jointly lay out their thinking in relation to the path ahead. They argue that it's not too late to solve the problem of climate change; that if we can get cracking over the next decade we can save the planet. We need to halve global emissions by 2030 so This is an optimistic book about climate change. It is extremely accessible and a joy to read.Christiana Figueres, former head of the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change (who led the Paris Agreement) and her lead adviser, Tom Rivett-Carnac jointly lay out their thinking in relation to the path ahead. They argue that it's not too late to solve the problem of climate change; that if we can get cracking over the next decade we can save the planet. We need to halve global emissions by 2030 so we can get to zero net emissions by 2050. This requires efforts from everyone - governments, companies, individuals. It's an 'all in' effort. We've now moved on beyond the old debates of developing vs developed countries. We are now all in this together. We'll either succeed together or fail together.Getting there will require three mindsets: 'stubborn optimism' (we are not powerless); 'endless abundance' (moving beyond 'scarcity' thinking to a focus on what we can collectively make abundant); and 'radical regeneration' (with humanity becoming a life-sustaining influence on the planet).The authors propose 10 actions that will help us all get there. They urge us to engage deeply in politics, writing that 'we all have a responsibility to exert what leverage we can inside the traditional power systems and push them as far and fast as we can.' Notably, they endorse civil disobedience (it is 'not only a moral choice, it also the most powerful way of shaping world politics').
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  • Shannon
    January 1, 1970
    Short, practical, realistic but hopeful...The "behind-the-scenes" look at the Paris Climate Accord negotiations is certainly inspiring and builds confidence that monumental change can happen. I especially appreciated the "10 Actions" section and think my high school readers would too. The authors strike a nice balance between individual action and collective movement-building/voter strategy, smartly linking these approaches and pointing out how they inform one another. The authors are careful Short, practical, realistic but hopeful...The "behind-the-scenes" look at the Paris Climate Accord negotiations is certainly inspiring and builds confidence that monumental change can happen. I especially appreciated the "10 Actions" section and think my high school readers would too. The authors strike a nice balance between individual action and collective movement-building/voter strategy, smartly linking these approaches and pointing out how they inform one another. The authors are careful not to insinuate that we're going to solve the problem of climate change one vegan or one EV driver at a time, but they also don't discount the value of taking personal actions that make you feel plugged in to the issue and active on it in your own life. When they address personal actions, they approach these recommendations as a kind of spiritual balm and stepping stone to political engagement rather than as an endpoint or ultimate aim. The conclusion could certainly work as a excerpt to inspire students to see the possibilities that exist for addressing climate change and combat the "it's all futile at this point" outlook that social media feeds seem to exacerbate.
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  • Miguel
    January 1, 1970
    When someone writes an impassioned book about fighting climate change, its difficult to be overly critical of it if you are feeling like youre of the same view. On the other hand, when its a short book that doesnt have a lot of meat on the bones so to speak, its also hard to overly praise it. Theres a lot of broad information and advice in here and none of it is especially revelatory. The way its written had me thinking at one point that it might be good for high school students or someone When someone writes an impassioned book about fighting climate change, it’s difficult to be overly critical of it if you are feeling like you’re of the same view. On the other hand, when it’s a short book that doesn’t have a lot of meat on the bones so to speak, it’s also hard to overly praise it. There’s a lot of broad information and advice in here and none of it is especially revelatory. The way it’s written had me thinking at one point that it might be good for high school students or someone without a clue on the topic, but the more I listened the less it seemed vital to read. Reduce, reuse, recyle / vote green friendly politicians / don’t fly (but don’t mind while I travel the globe as I’m doing important “work”). Towards the beginning it’s stated that we might have to “flirt with a right wing autocracy for a term or two”. Huh… It seems like one would get a lot more reading David Wallace Wells or Vaclav Smil for some more pertinent info on the environmental threat and energy usage in particular.
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  • Donna Jones
    January 1, 1970
    Everyone must read this book. Climate change is a crisis -- our planet will go on existing but humanity will not -- at least other than a few tribes who eek out an existence on the few places on our planet that can support human life. The authors paint a realistic picture of what life will be like if we continue as is, and what it will be like if we take action now. And, because the topic is overwhelming, global, and caused by so many things, we often throw up our hands and give up because we Everyone must read this book. Climate change is a crisis -- our planet will go on existing but humanity will not -- at least other than a few tribes who eek out an existence on the few places on our planet that can support human life. The authors paint a realistic picture of what life will be like if we continue as is, and what it will be like if we take action now. And, because the topic is overwhelming, global, and caused by so many things, we often throw up our hands and give up because we think, what can one person do? This book both motivates you to take action and gives you concrete steps you can take. It only takes a small percentage of our population to take action -- even if it's to plant trees -- that can change the course of humanity. We are in a transformational time, we are in an emergency situation. Act like it. Do something. Start by reading this book.
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  • Vera
    January 1, 1970
    "Let us begin today to tell the story of how we did not baulk at this seemingly insurmountable challenge, of how we were not defeated by the multiple setbacks we encountered." This book from @globaloptimism is out now, and I would urge absolutely everyone to read it. It's short, concise, factual and full of actions you can take today, this week, this month or before 2030 to fight the climate emergency. If you feel helpless or hopeless, this is the book you've been looking for. For the sake of "Let us begin today to tell the story of how we did not baulk at this seemingly insurmountable challenge, of how we were not defeated by the multiple setbacks we encountered." This book from @globaloptimism is out now, and I would urge absolutely everyone to read it. It's short, concise, factual and full of actions you can take today, this week, this month or before 2030 to fight the climate emergency. If you feel helpless or hopeless, this is the book you've been looking for. For the sake of the planet, your children (current or future) and pretty much everyone's future, read this!
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  • Charlotte Newman-West
    January 1, 1970
    Short, easy to ready and definitely the clearest and most powerful thing I've read on climate change. It not only explains the emergency we face and the science behind it, but gives clear and practical ideas on how each of us can choose the future we want.
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  • Lindsay Thompson
    January 1, 1970
    Excellent read of what I can do as a citizen and steward of earth to reverse climate change and make a difference for my childs future on this planet Excellent read of what I can do as a citizen and steward of earth to reverse climate change and make a difference for my child’s future on this planet
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  • Bryan
    January 1, 1970
    A short, informative, and largely positive book about climate change and what to do to remain optimistic and engaged in working to fight climate change.
  • Gavin Chen
    January 1, 1970
    Essential reading.
  • Kim
    January 1, 1970
    While I cant say I enjoyed reading the book, because of the topic, this short book is well written and offers some hope but we need to take action now. While I can’t say I enjoyed reading the book, because of the topic, this short book is well written and offers some hope but we need to take action now.
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  • Deiber
    January 1, 1970
    Amazingly beautiful Amazing book. It really makes you think and put everything into perspective. I want to read it again and again.
  • Evelyn Perdue
    January 1, 1970
    How refreshing to have confident and actionable ideas. I want everyone I know to own and read this book. Then act. Thank you.
  • Norjak
    January 1, 1970
    Focuses on the potential/projected impact and what you as an individual can/should do now.
  • Beth
    January 1, 1970
    Wonderful!
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