Deluge
In her early twenties, Leila Chatti started bleeding and did not stop. Physicians referred to this bleeding as flooding. In the Qur’an, as in the Bible, the Flood was sent as punishment. The idea of disease as punishment drives this collection’s themes of shame, illness, grief, and gender, transmuting religious narratives through the lens of a young Arab-American woman suffering a taboo female affliction. Deluge investigates the childhood roots of faith and desire alongside their present day enactments. Chatti’s remarkably direct voice makes use of innovative poetic form to gaze unflinchingly at what she was taught to keep hidden. This powerful piece of life-writing depicts Chatti’s journey from diagnosis to surgery and remission in meticulous chronology that binds body to spirit and advocates for the salvation of both. Chatti blends personal narrative, religious imagery, and medical terminology in a chronicle of illness, womanhood, and faith.

Deluge Details

TitleDeluge
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseApr 21st, 2020
PublisherCopper Canyon Press
ISBN-139781556595899
Rating
GenrePoetry

Deluge Review

  • Bryce Emley
    January 1, 1970
    "I've known men but never a god / that bled and lived. But I did."
  • K.B.Pfotenhauer
    January 1, 1970
    Ever since I came across Leila Chatti's work, I have been looking forward to getting her collection, and it did not disappoint. It's one of the best, most careful, and beautiful books I've read in my life. Chatti writes with a deft and lyrical hand, and I truly can't wait to see what she does next. I'm going through the collection a second time right now to underline my favorite lines. "...Perhaps I'd have beenbetter offto be wary, but I'd been waiting so long to hear God speak---I hadn't Ever since I came across Leila Chatti's work, I have been looking forward to getting her collection, and it did not disappoint. It's one of the best, most careful, and beautiful books I've read in my life. Chatti writes with a deft and lyrical hand, and I truly can't wait to see what she does next. I'm going through the collection a second time right now to underline my favorite lines. "...Perhaps I'd have beenbetter offto be wary, but I'd been waiting so long to hear God speak---I hadn't thought to think of what he might tell me." (from Mary Speaks)
    more
  • Patrycja
    January 1, 1970
    A stunning book that grapples with questions of faith, illness, and patriarchy. The poems are gorgeous, striking, thought-provoking. As I take in the book's cover, I am left wondering about how the book does or doesn't engage whiteness. Time to read it again! And to take the book's invitation to meditate on the complexities and contradictions of being human, of wanting to believe. Thank you, Leila, for this gorgeous work.
    more
  • Kate Baer
    January 1, 1970
    Breathtaking.
  • Karla Strand
    January 1, 1970
    Tunisian American poet Leila Chattis powerful poems center her faith, illness, embodiment, shame and womanhood. This is a collection to be reckoned with. Tunisian American poet Leila Chatti’s powerful poems center her faith, illness, embodiment, shame and womanhood. This is a collection to be reckoned with.
    more
Write a review