Red Noise
Caught up in a space station turf war between gangs and corrupt law, a lone asteroid miner decides to take them all down.When an asteroid miner comes to Station 35 looking to sell her cargo and get back to the solitude she craves, she gets swept up in a three-way standoff with gangs and crooked cops. Faced with either taking sides or cleaning out the Augean Stables, she breaks out the flamethrower.

Red Noise Details

TitleRed Noise
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseJun 9th, 2020
PublisherAngry Robot
ISBN-139780857668479
Rating
GenreScience Fiction, Space

Red Noise Review

  • Bob
    January 1, 1970
    I gave this 100 pages but it's just not for me. Dry, emotionless narrative with flat characters. I'd hoped for so much more, especially of the miner.
  • Vigasia
    January 1, 1970
    Red Noise is very good space opera with gang wars and badass main character.The Miner - our protagonist - decides to dock her ship at station 35 to fuel and make some money. There she finds out that the place is abandoned except three gangs with three heads of power leading them. They fight each other constantly, making a station a living hell.So she decides to bring them all down.As a plot is decent, the characters are what keep this book alive. The most interesting is of course our protagonist Red Noise is very good space opera with gang wars and badass main character.The Miner - our protagonist - decides to dock her ship at station 35 to fuel and make some money. There she finds out that the place is abandoned except three gangs with three heads of power leading them. They fight each other constantly, making a station a living hell.So she decides to bring them all down.As a plot is decent, the characters are what keep this book alive. The most interesting is of course our protagonist - The Miner - who we know almost nothing about. She definitely has a rich past. She has a lot of scars that can prove it. She's also intelligent and pretty badass in combat. But still we don't know almost anything about her. There are scrapes of her story here and there, but nothing solid. And I think that was my main issue with this book, and that's why I give it 4 not 5 stars. The Miner is great, but you can't create such interesting character and tell us that she obviously suffered some loses without giving us a full backstory. I want to know what happened to her and why she became who she is now. I have no more complaints. This book is well-paced with a good kind of humour we encounter along the way.4 stars
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  • Rosemarie
    January 1, 1970
    I liked it. The novel calls on the traditions and tropes of westerns and on those westerns based on Japanese films, and obviously on the original Japanese work. So, the protagonist isn't named, or only briefly, there are rival gangs and corrupt law officers, the place is far from anywhere with no help coming. 'Jane' turns the low level skirmishes into a war, there's a marriage, someone goes a bit barmy and a new big bad arrives, then it's all over as Jane takes out the rubbish. If you get the ae I liked it. The novel calls on the traditions and tropes of westerns and on those westerns based on Japanese films, and obviously on the original Japanese work. So, the protagonist isn't named, or only briefly, there are rival gangs and corrupt law officers, the place is far from anywhere with no help coming. 'Jane' turns the low level skirmishes into a war, there's a marriage, someone goes a bit barmy and a new big bad arrives, then it's all over as Jane takes out the rubbish. If you get the aesthetic and understand the tradition it stands in, this is marvelous fun. For those who don't you probably won't like the limited character development and gratuitous violence. I've seen complaints that 'Jane' acts 'too much like a man'. I didn't see that myself. She's a flower growing, ex-military intelligence miner with a grudge and a haunted past, what do you expect? She isn't going to be a wallflower, are women not allowed to be anti-heroes? Her character arc and that of Screwball do, in fact, develop over the novel and they follow in the tradition of the aforementioned spaghetti westerns. 'Jane' becomes less misanthropic and admits to herself that, yes she was pissed about being ripped off but she did want to help the people stuck on the Station to free themselves.The pace is fast and choppy, alternating between Jane and Screwball as events happen. It fits perfectly with the genre. The characterisation of these and other characters really fits with the genre too. The author has clearly read and seen a lot of these works, including the Japanese originals. Highly recommended.
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  • Ryan Creasey
    January 1, 1970
    This story kept me guessing the whole way. The characters were loosely defined and slowly developed over the week or so that takes place in the book. The explosive situation and how the characters deal with all the building tension is what really made.the story. While the majority of the characters aren't something to write home about, there are tons of aspects present here that were memorable and fun. The wasteland environment of the space station and the goons that populate it were a refreshin This story kept me guessing the whole way. The characters were loosely defined and slowly developed over the week or so that takes place in the book. The explosive situation and how the characters deal with all the building tension is what really made.the story. While the majority of the characters aren't something to write home about, there are tons of aspects present here that were memorable and fun. The wasteland environment of the space station and the goons that populate it were a refreshing take from the regular sci-fi criminal scum. I'd recommend the heck out of this to anyone wanting a fun story with plenty of twists.
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  • Andi
    January 1, 1970
    This book had so many interesting things going for it:- female- space- feeling of a westernHowever, I began to notice something... something that was a little ... odd. While the story was quick, without much detail and lingering things, it lacked 'feeling'. It was rather cold or emotionless. It followed the path of something like the 'mysterious man' and 'Magnificent 7'. Clean up an old spaceport. Turn the gangs against one another, take 'em all out.I began to notice... this female acted a lot l This book had so many interesting things going for it:- female- space- feeling of a westernHowever, I began to notice something... something that was a little ... odd. While the story was quick, without much detail and lingering things, it lacked 'feeling'. It was rather cold or emotionless. It followed the path of something like the 'mysterious man' and 'Magnificent 7'. Clean up an old spaceport. Turn the gangs against one another, take 'em all out.I began to notice... this female acted a lot like a male. I then started to play a game:s flip the 'she' bits to a 'he'.... low and behold, there was nothing really 'feminine' or 'unique' about our hero. I can't tell you how many times the female 'rubbed her chin'. I mean, I've read stories with women with male-attributes or things stereotypical male... but man, this was one of those that really let me down. A pass for me, unfortunately.
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  • Mike Lasagna
    January 1, 1970
    Space Yojimbo? Yes. I’d like that very much please. 🤩
  • Tina
    January 1, 1970
    I received this ARC from Netgalley in exchange for a fair review. Something struck me as familiar about this novel when I was reading but I didn’t pick up on it until almost the end: it’s definitely paying homage to Japanese samurai films (like Kurosawa) and American Westerns. I’m not a buff of the genre, but I’m definitely a fan of the aesthetic and the style. I really wish dumbass me hadn’t been so sleep-deprived from having a newborn (and a toddler) or I definitely would have picked up on it I received this ARC from Netgalley in exchange for a fair review. Something struck me as familiar about this novel when I was reading but I didn’t pick up on it until almost the end: it’s definitely paying homage to Japanese samurai films (like Kurosawa) and American Westerns. I’m not a buff of the genre, but I’m definitely a fan of the aesthetic and the style. I really wish dumbass me hadn’t been so sleep-deprived from having a newborn (and a toddler) or I definitely would have picked up on it sooner! I kind of want to go back and re-read it to look for things I missed. I’m deadass flummoxed at how I didn't pick up on it right away. Hell, even the cover looks like a minimalist Seven Samurai poster. Enough of my excuses. Like those films, the novel starts off with the mysterious stranger entering a corrupt town; in this case, the town is a near-abandoned and sparsely-populated space station. There are three leaders vying for control (including the cops, with a moustachioed "sheriff"), though none are ideal rulers. The Miner decides to lend her particular brand of assistance. With a sword. Unfortunately, what I didn’t really get was why. In Western movies, the character is a trope, but this novel (while I was completely addicted to it), suffers a bit with regards to the miner’s motivation. We don’t learn enough about her to understand why she wouldn’t just leave. It never felt to me like she was trapped (by money or other reasons), as she always seemed to have an answer or the ability to escape whatever situation she found herself in. There were attempts to have her wrestle with leaving, but there wasn’t enough of that or it didn’t go deep enough. I get that in the movies the character doesn’t need such a rationale, but from a book I expected a bit more. At the same time, I really liked how we don’t learn that much about her - just little tidbits here and there - it keeps her mysterious. I loved the dialogue, the diversity, the general degraded ambience of the station, and how no one was sacred in terms of violence bestowed upon them. Yet the three leaders, and Mary and Raj, needed more background; I found I didn’t care much about them as people, though they were fun to read about. The book is an absolute blast. I loved the amount of women in the novel and the dark humour (I laughed out loud quite a few times). The dynamic between the bartender and his regular (another Western trope - the saloon!) was so much fun, as were the action scenes. You don’t need to know/like Westerns (or can be sleep-deprived like me), and this is still a fun, gritty, action-packed adventure that just so happens to be set in space.
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  • Jim
    January 1, 1970
    Raucous mashup of Kill Bill, Westside Story (or Romeo and Juliet) and Tombstone (the Kurt Russell one). For instance:“Somewhere, the Miner could have sworn she heard a chainsaw rev.”“Where the fuck did you get the grenade? Are you out of your mind? Then she ruined the Miner’s comeback by passing out.”Whatever you, don’t forget to check your guns at Station 35’s airlock! No one knows who Jane is but she’s a miner, an augmented special forces operative and she’s here to chew bubblegum and kick ass Raucous mashup of Kill Bill, Westside Story (or Romeo and Juliet) and Tombstone (the Kurt Russell one). For instance:“Somewhere, the Miner could have sworn she heard a chainsaw rev.”“Where the fuck did you get the grenade? Are you out of your mind? Then she ruined the Miner’s comeback by passing out.”Whatever you, don’t forget to check your guns at Station 35’s airlock! No one knows who Jane is but she’s a miner, an augmented special forces operative and she’s here to chew bubblegum and kick ass and she’s all out of bubblegum. She has an unknown backstory that’s merely alluded to and I can’t wait to hear about. Fun story, snappy dialogue full of mayhem, hand grenades, a nuke or two, swords, sex, drugs and rock and roll (if play heavy metal while you read) - what more do you need?
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  • Ollie
    January 1, 1970
    Pondering the big mysteries of life and asking philosophical questions are things that science fiction does very well. But sometimes, you just want a big old scrap. In space, if at all possible. And wouldn’t you know it, John P. Murphy has given us just that. Red Noise is the story of a lone badass interposing herself between two warring gangs and looking to make a tidy profit off each of them as they escalate the conflict, with bloody skirmishes leading to even bloodier showdowns. If this sound Pondering the big mysteries of life and asking philosophical questions are things that science fiction does very well. But sometimes, you just want a big old scrap. In space, if at all possible. And wouldn’t you know it, John P. Murphy has given us just that. Red Noise is the story of a lone badass interposing herself between two warring gangs and looking to make a tidy profit off each of them as they escalate the conflict, with bloody skirmishes leading to even bloodier showdowns. If this sounds familiar, it’s no surprise - Walter Hill’s prohibition-era Western Last Man Standing and Leone’s Spaghetti Western classic A Fistful of Dollars sprang to mind as I was reading, and doubtless others will be able to bring to mind more examples of this setup than I can. But there’s a reason why the same stories come around again and again - it’s because, done right, they’re a hell of a lot of fun.And damn, Red Noise is fun.Putting his own twist on those Western tropes, Murphy transfers the action from the usual dusty boardwalks and corrals to Station 35, a former military installation built into an asteroid. Our drifter hero is, quite literally, drifting, as she’s an ore miner looking to offload her cargo and resupply. With no other stations within her fuel range, she’s forced to dock at Station 35, a location soon to be made infamous by her actions. Witnessing the situation that the inhabitants are enduring - one of warring gangs and corrupt law enforcement, as well as having been thoroughly ripped off herself, “The Miner” downs tools and straps on her sword to right some wrongs, and maybe get a decent payday while she’s at it. Yeah, that’s right, she’s the woman with no name too. Perfect.What unfolds is some highly entertaining, rapid-fire fun, with a cast of colourful thugs and crime bosses, sympathetic characters stuck in the middle of it all and more foul language than I could have wished for in my most puerile dreams. Seriously, there are some very colourful insults in there, it’s really a lot of fun. With the dapper Feeney in his rundown hotel and his traitorous former enforcer Angelica Del Rio in her captured casino, a lot more than insults end up flying across the galleria that separates them though. The action is stylish and cinematic, particularly as station rules prohibit firearms, allowing The Miner to show off her augmented close combat abilities as she slices and dices her way through more than her fair share of goons. There are plenty of nice touches to her meathead opponents too, whether it be a description of their interesting cosmetic gene modifications, their piercings, or their armament. All of this helps flesh out the world and give us more little details about it, and it’s done very subtly.Things don’t proceed in quite the straightforward way you might expect them to either, with plenty of twists and turns through the winding corridors of Station 35, as deals are made and broken and other players enter the game with their own agendas. Uneasy alliances made before The Miner’s arrival are tested, and The Miner will need her wits to be as sharp as her sword if she’s to survive the machinations of either side unscathed. There’s a lot of attention given to the consequences of The Miner’s actions, as the rival gangs attempt to work out what her angle is and whether or not they can trust her, with some really nicely developed character arcs in there too. As likeable as The Miner is, she is very much a character who has done a whole lot of living already, resulting in her being the infinitely cool weary loner that she is, but one that doesn’t really have much reason to change in terms of her character. Bringing in these other characters and developing their arcs makes this a much more satisfying story than it otherwise might have been - not that it isn’t fun to see a lethal veteran take on some cannon fodder, but it could have been a bit one-note. Happily, that isn’t the case at all.Cartoonish, stylish and slick, Red Noise is just as much fun as I hoped it would be, with a satisfying conclusion and plenty of sardonic, detached cool to boot. If this was Murphy’s A Fistful of Credits, here’s hoping we get For a Few Credits More.
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  • Joseph Stewart
    January 1, 1970
    This was a tough one for me to rate! The first 50 pages I'd probably have given it 5 stars but I found enough to issues to drag my opinion down as I read on, ultimately it would probably be a 3.5 for me but I"m rounding down on this one.I find a lot of sci-fi is either set on earth, usually only 20 to 50 years from now or are space operas set thousands of years in the future. What I really like is reading books like this set maybe a couple of hundred years out (not that this book references date This was a tough one for me to rate! The first 50 pages I'd probably have given it 5 stars but I found enough to issues to drag my opinion down as I read on, ultimately it would probably be a 3.5 for me but I"m rounding down on this one.I find a lot of sci-fi is either set on earth, usually only 20 to 50 years from now or are space operas set thousands of years in the future. What I really like is reading books like this set maybe a couple of hundred years out (not that this book references dates at any point, that's just my guess). The book is set entirely on a space station in the middle of nowhere which I absolutely loved as a setting. As many reviews have mentioned, this is essentially a Western set in space. Our hero is an unnamed miner with a murky past who docks at the station only to find it's slowly descending into chaos as two rival gangs and a corrupt security force stage petty turf battles. Like a female Clint Eastwood in space the miner decides to stay and clean up the station. I'm simplifying it a bit, but that in a nutshell is the book. My main issue is that there is zero character development, we really never get to know our protagonist and most of the other characters are cookie cutter stereotypes. Not only that but the plotting is surprisingly tedious for an action driven novel. I like the concept of this book but the execution didn't work for me. There was a lot I did like about the novel though and I'd definitely give John P Murphy another try.
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  • Thomas
    January 1, 1970
    Murphy, John P. Red Noise. Angry Robot, 2020.John Murphy says in an afterword to Red Noise that he has been much influenced by the films of Akira Kurosawa, who was in turn influenced by American genre film, including the western. It should not be a surprise, then, that Murphy writes space opera that is a mashup of the western and the samurai film. Imagine a run-down space station in the asteroid belt, buying ore from miners and resupplying their ships. It is run by several groups of ruthless cor Murphy, John P. Red Noise. Angry Robot, 2020.John Murphy says in an afterword to Red Noise that he has been much influenced by the films of Akira Kurosawa, who was in turn influenced by American genre film, including the western. It should not be a surprise, then, that Murphy writes space opera that is a mashup of the western and the samurai film. Imagine a run-down space station in the asteroid belt, buying ore from miners and resupplying their ships. It is run by several groups of ruthless corporate bosses, hired mercenaries, and other criminal types. No guns are allowed on the station, but there is no rule against swords. Our heroine is a battle-scarred, sword-wielding, mechanically enhanced veteran of a recent war. She now operates a small spacecraft, mining asteroids and growing orchids and bonsai maple trees. She soon finds that her martial skills are more demand than the ore she wants to sell. If she reminds you of a Ronin warrior of a new marshal come to town, the station will remind you of the movie western town, with anonymous townspeople who keep it running, a dock (livery stable), a saloon, a casino, and a crusty old doctor, actually called a sawbones. If you liked Sean Connery in Outland, you will probably read this book with pleasure, though I wish it had more stylistic flash.
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  • Ernest
    January 1, 1970
    Cue up the theme from The Good, The Bad, and The Ugly, and meet the woman with no name, at least not if she can help it. She's an ex-spook form some war that left military asteroids to be converted into way stations, and she tries to stay as far from other humans as possible, working a mining claim in an asteroid belt somewhere. Down on fuel, food, and funds, she reluctantly heads for the nearest station and arrives to find a stalemated gang war, a corrupt company official, and a security chief Cue up the theme from The Good, The Bad, and The Ugly, and meet the woman with no name, at least not if she can help it. She's an ex-spook form some war that left military asteroids to be converted into way stations, and she tries to stay as far from other humans as possible, working a mining claim in an asteroid belt somewhere. Down on fuel, food, and funds, she reluctantly heads for the nearest station and arrives to find a stalemated gang war, a corrupt company official, and a security chief all too happy to take bribes and look the other way. Station 35 is the pits, and she can't wait to take her money and leave.But she doesn't. Maybe it was meeting the few decent types there, or maybe it was not wanting to get fleeced for her ore, or maybe she's not as heartless as she'd like to be, but she stays and sets out to clean the place up. And by clean the place up, I mean to coat the gravity plated floors with red while making a lot of noise int the process. Pity they don't allow firearms on the station, she'll just have to make do with her sword.
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  • Alyce Caswell
    January 1, 1970
    I received this ARC from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.Do you want a wild ride from start to finish? You've found it. Red Noise is a zany sci-fi western that sees a badass woman called The Miner roll into town - er, a space station - where the locals make the mistake of ticking her off. Chaos ensues.I had so much fun reading this. Action and shocking twists - and sometimes it even tickled my funny bone. I quite liked this book. But I did wish there was a bit more world-building - or I received this ARC from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.Do you want a wild ride from start to finish? You've found it. Red Noise is a zany sci-fi western that sees a badass woman called The Miner roll into town - er, a space station - where the locals make the mistake of ticking her off. Chaos ensues.I had so much fun reading this. Action and shocking twists - and sometimes it even tickled my funny bone. I quite liked this book. But I did wish there was a bit more world-building - or galaxy-building, as it were. I didn't feel like I had any grasp on the broader setting.
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  • Sontaranpr
    January 1, 1970
    The Miner came to the station with a hold full of ore and a ship all out of fuel, food, and water. Then she found the only ore buyer was a crook, the security force was on the take, and the local crime family had split and was now in the middle of a very uncivil war. Sometimes you just want to be left alone and in this instance the Miner was willing to punch people until they'd finally let her.
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  • Paul Sparks
    January 1, 1970
    John P Murphy should be writing scripts for movies because he can write a book and tell so well I felt like I was at the movies, completely immersed in this Fast and Furious / For a Few Dollars More / Babylon 5 mix, it is funny, sad and full of angst and action Sequel please
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  • Peter Anderson
    January 1, 1970
    An enjoyable sci-fi with flavours of a Clint Eastwood western.
  • Carmen
    January 1, 1970
    Thanks Library Journal for the advanced reader's copy!Seeking only the perpetual solitude of her ship and work, the Miner docks at Station 35, hoping to sell her asteroid ore and get out. When the price for her cargo is anything but fair, the Miner explores further into the confines of the station, and what she discovers forces her into the throws of an interminable and dangerous battle between rival gangs and corrupt law enforcement. When the bitter campaign between an unstable mob boss and his Thanks Library Journal for the advanced reader's copy!Seeking only the perpetual solitude of her ship and work, the Miner docks at Station 35, hoping to sell her asteroid ore and get out. When the price for her cargo is anything but fair, the Miner explores further into the confines of the station, and what she discovers forces her into the throws of an interminable and dangerous battle between rival gangs and corrupt law enforcement. When the bitter campaign between an unstable mob boss and his treacherous former second in command starts threatening the life of her only friend on the station, the Miner realizes she has a critical decision to make: leave and save herself, or use her skills with a blade to end the deadly brawl once and for all. The story that unfolds contains plenty of twists and gruesome action. The Miner’s sense of vindication and her capriciousness make her an unreliable, albeit interesting protagonist; however, the lack of further character development and depth causes the plot to remain stagnant.VERDICT Libraries with well circulating sf collections may want this one; otherwise, pass.
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