All the Pretty Things
For fans of Sadie and The Cheerleaders comes an all new thriller about a boy who turns up dead under suspicious circumstances and the one girl who may be the key to solving the mystery of his untimely death.For Ivy, summer means roller-coaster season, spinning cotton candy at the Fabuland amusement park, and hanging out with her best friend, Morgan. But this summer is different.One morning, Morgan finds a dead body. It's their former classmate and coworker Ethan. To make matters worse, Morgan is taken to a hospital psych ward only days later, and she's not saying much--not even to Ivy.The police claim that Ethan simply took a bad fall, but Ivy isn't convinced and realizes it's up to her to get answers. What she finds is unsettling--it's clear that some people aren't being honest about Ethan's last night at Fabuland. Including Morgan. And the more secrets Ivy uncovers, the closer she gets to unraveling dark truths that will change her life forever.

All the Pretty Things Details

TitleAll the Pretty Things
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseMar 17th, 2020
PublisherDelacorte Press
ISBN-139781984897053
Rating
GenreMystery, Young Adult, Thriller, Mystery Thriller

All the Pretty Things Review

  • Nilufer Ozmekik
    January 1, 1970
    Well, I want to name my reads with Bryan Adams So far so goodalbum but unfortunately I name them with my favorite U2 song and I still havent found what Im looking forThis book seemed like a promising mystery. One young boy, Ethan who is also staff member, suffering from Down Syndrome found dead at an amusement park by his coworker Morgan. After the incident, Ivy, our heroine, daughter of parks owner, returns back from her holiday at NC and she finds out her friend climbed and hid herself at one Well, I want to name my reads with Bryan Adams’ “So far so good”album but unfortunately I name them with my favorite U2 song and “I still haven’t found what I’m looking for”This book seemed like a promising mystery. One young boy, Ethan who is also staff member, suffering from Down Syndrome found dead at an amusement park by his coworker Morgan. After the incident, Ivy, our heroine, daughter of park’s owner, returns back from her holiday at NC and she finds out her friend climbed and hid herself at one of the rides, psychologically in bad shape, telling Ivy some mysterious words made us thing there is something supernatural about Ethan’s dying. Then they took her to the psychiatric ward. So I start to think something so big, twisty, shocking will come out about Ethan’s death. Aliens? Serial killers? A cult? Wow amusement park massacre! Or Ethan’s soul will come back and haunt the people at the park!!! So the story turned into Haunting at Hill Amusement Park kind of horrific and bleak combination. Nope! No! Nada! It cannot be! Because we’re tricked! There is no big mystery or something spooky about this story! We may understand who is the bad guy from the third chapter. He’s carrying a big shiny signboard above his head pointing at him! I feel like Billie Eilish’s “ Bad Guy” starts playing in my head at each page the guy appears. Duh!And Ivy playing Nancy Drew, taking so much responsibility for her age, co-manages park at the same time, interrogating everyone about the mystery ( okay there’s no freaking mystery, let’s call it just “mys”: something trying to be creepy but answer is written in front of us! Actually it screams us from the first pages! Saying Hello! Please see me idiot! ) and everyone giving her spooky, weird answers, trying to do their best to be seen cool and more enigmatic! Come on guys please grow the hell up!So yes, so called twisty revelation comes at the end. So a group of underage kids act mysterious, talk in riddles and Ivy acts like she is Sheryl Holmes and so obvious, predictable bad guy (Oh boy, JERK word is already imprinted to his forehead and you still call it a big revelation!!) is caught. Yayyyy!!! The book finally finished! I couldn’t be so glad because my throat is so sore for screaming at Ivy: “Stupid! Stupid! Stupid!”So I gave my two stars and wanted to forget everything about this book! Let’s move to the other one!Special thanks to NetGalley and Random House Children’s - Delacorte Press for sharing this Arc copy in exchange my honest review. I wish I liked it more and could write a praising review.bloginstagramfacebooktwitter
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  • Chelsea Humphrey
    January 1, 1970
    Well this is tough, because I loved the premise behind All the Pretty Things and it had some truly creepy moments, but the whodunnit is quite obvious from the early stages of the story. That, coupled with the stilted dialogue and dads who say "Ummm...?!" at the beginning of every sentence truly wore me down. I'm not the target audience for this book, so perhaps this is what the teens are into these days, and if it sounds interesting to you then I recommend trying this one out for yourself.*Many Well this is tough, because I loved the premise behind All the Pretty Things and it had some truly creepy moments, but the whodunnit is quite obvious from the early stages of the story. That, coupled with the stilted dialogue and dads who say "Ummm...?!" at the beginning of every sentence truly wore me down. I'm not the target audience for this book, so perhaps this is what the teens are into these days, and if it sounds interesting to you then I recommend trying this one out for yourself.*Many thanks to the publisher for providing my review copy via NetGalley.
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  • megs_bookrack
    January 1, 1970
    ARC received!!Thank you so much, Delacorte Press. I look forward to seeing what this one is all about!
  • JenacideByBibliophile
    January 1, 1970
    Actual Rating - 2.5 StarsDisclaimer: This book was sent to me by the publisher, Random House Childrens, via Netgalley for an honest review. Wow.I meanwhat the actual f**k?There were about a dozen different ways I saw this story going, but the way it DID go?Wow.This lovely little tale is told by Ivy, the daughter of the owner of the Fabuland amusement park. After her grandparents had successfully opened multiple chains of their popular doughnut shop, her father decided to think bigger and Actual Rating - 2.5 StarsDisclaimer: This book was sent to me by the publisher, Random House Children’s, via Netgalley for an honest review. Wow.I mean………what the actual f**k?There were about a dozen different ways I saw this story going, but the way it DID go?Wow.This lovely little tale is told by Ivy, the daughter of the owner of the Fabuland amusement park. After her grandparents had successfully opened multiple chains of their popular doughnut shop, her father decided to think bigger and purchased Fabuland. Now Ivy works every summer at the park in the cotton candy booth, surrounded by smells of fried food and the screams of terrified and joyous park-goers zipping by on roller coasters. It is usually always a summer to remember, and this summer is no different. While out of town with her mother, Ivy gets a call that a well-known young man and Fabuland employee, Ethan, had been found dead. The police suspect that he had fallen off the train trestle in a nearby park on his walk home, but when Ivy’s best friend Morgan alludes that something more shocking may have happened, Ivy begins digging for answers.[image error]Who doesn’t love an amusement park and a little murder, right? The smell of freshly popped kettle corn, fried dough, and colorful cotton candy mixed with elated screaming from a roller-coaster drowning out the real screams of someone being killed?!*Drip. Drip. Drip.*Is that rain I feel coming down?!Nope! It’s the blood draining from a body!No.…That’s not how this story goes at all. “Sometimes I wonder if you’re scared of the wrong things.” All the Pretty Things was NOTHING like I expected. Even more than halfway through the book I was assuming it was going to turn out one way, and then it veered off the tracks and plummeted into a crowd of chaos and epicly wretched confessions. I wasn’t blindsided per se, I was just…left completely speechless. But even after I sat there in my super uncomfortable chair with my mouth a little agape from shock, and slightly hinged to the side from disgust, I knew I was going to have trouble expressing my feelings on this one.*Sigh*Here goes.Ivy is seventeen. She seems chill, seems responsible, and seems patient as hell with a dad like that. But that’s pretty much all I know about her. Yeah, no s**t. That’s about it. Sure, I knew her parents were divorced, and that her brother didn’t come back from college that summer to work at Fabuland, like he normally did. And okay yes, I also knew her best friend Morgan was the one who found Ethan’s body in the park (YUH–IKES). But apart from that, the girl really doesn’t have much of a personality or any scheme of emotions other than blasé and MORE BLASÉ.I’m almost offended on Kristen Stewart’s behalf for me even putting this Kristen Stewart gif in here, as if I’m assuming Kristen Stewart has no personality.…Which I’m not…I just really needed a gif of a girl in a carnival.But the point is this: Ivy is a little bit dull, and honestly, it’s okay that she is for most of the book. But by the time that shocking ending came around, I NEEDED the girl to give me SOMETHING! But instead, she had BARELY. ANY. REACTION. to what had just happened. All I got was a little bit of shocked realization, her going to get closure from a friend, and a confirmation of some past childhood memories from her even more under-developed mother. Suffice it to say, the characters in this book are about as interesting as cardboard. They are developed just enough to be passable in a story, but you never make a connection to anyone or end up caring about their well-being. There’s no substance, no feeling and no emotion.But what I really need to talk about, is Ivy’s father. “I always knew you wanted to stay small. Just a small person, I guess.” The guy is a jackass and had me cringing five pages in. He is written in such an awkward way that doesn’t seem at all intentional, and every time he had a “scene” my face smooshed itself up into this formation of disgust, annoyance and perma-confusion. It was like the author was trying to make him cool and witty, but was failing miserably at it. He’s just that type of person that has so many personalities but can’t seem to pick one to run with. And I kid you not, the entire page of notes I have written for this book is all about her dad and my feelings on him from beginning till end, and that’s all!Here, let me show you:Ivy’s dad is legit f***ing creepy and disgusting.He just drooled over a twenty-year-olds ass…nice.He is super annoying and all over the place.He legit just called his employee a dumbass. Twice.So. Much. Crude. S**t.Okay this guys is seriously so f***ing creepy, I can’t stand him.What an asshat.His offhand comments are so random and weird, it makes me super uncomfortable.IS THIS GUY EVEN A PERSON?!? Oh.Look. I know this review probably doesn’t make a lick of sense to you, but don’t worry. I don’t even know what I just read. Which is upsetting, because it’s not like this is a horrible book by any means. It was just…strange. The characters felt thrown together, the premise was not even the actual premise because it was just a cloak and dagger show for what the real premise was, and the ending didn’t give me enough clarity or leave me feeling like it was securely tied up. I think the only thing that saved this book for me was that it was set in an amusement park, and I was so curious to figure out how Ethan died.But at least there were some good quotes. “It had been here from this perspective the whole time – creaking away in the background, behind all the good-natured screaming. I’d always heard it, humming along in the distance, day in and day out. I was just afraid to open my eyes and look.”
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  • Wendi Lee
    January 1, 1970
    Ivy comes back from vacation to find her small town in turmoil. An acquaintance and fellow Fabuland co-worker has died, and Ivy's best friend, Morgan, had the misfortune of finding his body. Even worse, Morgan has barricaded herself on one of Fabuland's rides after hours, and is refusing to get down. It's up to Ivy to get Morgan down from the ride, and then solve the mystery of what really happened to their co-worker, Ethan. The atmosphere in this mystery is exactly right. Fabuland (which Ivy comes back from vacation to find her small town in turmoil. An acquaintance and fellow Fabuland co-worker has died, and Ivy's best friend, Morgan, had the misfortune of finding his body. Even worse, Morgan has barricaded herself on one of Fabuland's rides after hours, and is refusing to get down. It's up to Ivy to get Morgan down from the ride, and then solve the mystery of what really happened to their co-worker, Ethan. The atmosphere in this mystery is exactly right. Fabuland (which happens to be owned by Ivy's father) is sparkly and filled with families during the day, but beyond the surface feels creepy as heck. Her own family also feels unstable, with Ivy's parents divorced and her brother staying far away during his first college summer. Ivy pinballs between her parents' houses, clutching memories of happier times. Digging through the events leading to Ethan's death means interviewing co-workers and acquaintances, and even getting her long-distance brother involved. Ivy's psyche as she works her way through what happened is fascinating. I only wish the novel kept going - but hey, I'd be happy with a sequel!
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  • Alexa
    January 1, 1970
    This one is a bit of a slow burn, for fans of "slice of life" YA contemporary who like messy characters and bits of suspense. I was drawn in initially by the "set at a small town amusement park" angle, which indeed is the book's strong suit. Fabuland felt so real, and I love all the weird quirks of the world.Even though it starts off with a death of one of the park's employees, the book isn't a typical "someone died and I must investigate!" thriller because Ivy's drive is to get to the bottom of This one is a bit of a slow burn, for fans of "slice of life" YA contemporary who like messy characters and bits of suspense. I was drawn in initially by the "set at a small town amusement park" angle, which indeed is the book's strong suit. Fabuland felt so real, and I love all the weird quirks of the world.Even though it starts off with a death of one of the park's employees, the book isn't a typical "someone died and I must investigate!" thriller because Ivy's drive is to get to the bottom of things on behalf of her friend Morgan, who found the body but is out of commission, mental health wise, for most of the book. That plus the entanglement of Ivy's dad owning the amusement park and that conflict of interest (daughter of owner snooping around colored a lot of her interactions), gave the first half an oblique, slow burn quality. Ultimately this isn't a thriller that's a straight-forward whodunit. It's more of a "how messed up are all these relationships and what is everyone hiding" book. Once the book got going and all the threads started coming together, I was all-in. I loved all the complicated emotional entanglements, and even though Ivy was frustrating at times in how passive she was, her emotional arc felt organic and was fascinating. That said, LORD, was Ivy passive sometimes! It was all in the service of character, but there were moments where she just rolled over and took people's abuse. I was definitely on her side in those scenes, and wanted to see her stand up for herself, but she didn't. Her character arc ultimately feels earned, though I do think she'll frustrate some readers.
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  • Elaine
    January 1, 1970
    Thank you to NetGalley for a Kindle ARC of All The Pretty Things. I was intrigued by the premise (and the cover! Can I say how much I love this cover?) and excited when my request was approved.But, then my excitement waned.This isn't so much a thriller than it is about a young woman struggling to come to terms with the harsh realities of her life and family. * Minor spoilers ahead * When a young, mentally disabled man who works at her dad's amusement park is found dead, Ivy plays Columbo and Thank you to NetGalley for a Kindle ARC of All The Pretty Things. I was intrigued by the premise (and the cover! Can I say how much I love this cover?) and excited when my request was approved.But, then my excitement waned.This isn't so much a thriller than it is about a young woman struggling to come to terms with the harsh realities of her life and family. * Minor spoilers ahead * When a young, mentally disabled man who works at her dad's amusement park is found dead, Ivy plays Columbo and tries to find out what happened.To make matters worse, her BFF Morgan, was the one who discovered her body.As Ivy interviews the staff and classmates, she doesn't realize she is on the road to discovering painful truths about her own family, and what that may cost her.Ivy as a character was okay, though she was only 17, at times, her thoughts and actions were painfully immature, or maybe I'm officially too old for YA books.The writing was fine, but the story was uneven, disjointed, as if the author wasn't sure what she was trying to say.Is she referring to #MeToo when she brings up sexual harassment and predatory behavior in the workplace?Is the book about domestic drama and family relations, in that we see only what we want to see?The fact that Ivy's dad was a major skeez was hard to stomach, but perhaps that was the author's intention, to demonstrate how we turn a blind eye to so many things, especially when it concerns those closest to us.I was hoping for a mystery to solve, a suspenseful story, or spooky, and though there are dark themes here including sexual violence, All the Pretty Things wasn't for me.
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  • PinkAmy loves books, cats and naps
    January 1, 1970
    ***Thank you to NetGalley for providing me a complimentary copy of ALL THE PRETTY THINGS by Emily Arsenault in exchange for my honest review.***When Ivys best friend Morgan finds the body of a special needs young man, the teen ends up in a psych hospital leaving Ivy a cryptic message about Ethans death. Ivy, determined to help her friend and solve the mystery, questions her coworkers at Fabuland, the her fathers amusement park. Ivy is a good kid, hard working, dedicated to her father, loyal to ***Thank you to NetGalley for providing me a complimentary copy of ALL THE PRETTY THINGS by Emily Arsenault in exchange for my honest review.***When Ivy’s best friend Morgan finds the body of a special needs young man, the teen ends up in a psych hospital leaving Ivy a cryptic message about Ethan’s death. Ivy, determined to help her friend and solve the mystery, questions her coworkers at Fabuland, the her father’s amusement park. Ivy is a good kid, hard working, dedicated to her father, loyal to her friends. She’s more adult than her father, who’s a bit of a sexist pig and makes comments like, “it looks like tits, but not in a bad way.” Ivy knows how inappropriate her dad behaves, but I don’t think she truly understands the hows and whys and the impact of such behavior on others. As good a friend as she is to Morgan, Ivy doesn’t always appreciate the impact she has on others, particularly when she’s startled with information later in the story.I had an inkling where ALL THE PRETTY THINGS was headed, but that in no way lessened my enjoyment of this important, topical story. I also had questions as to why Ivy didn’t communicate with her mom more and why her mother, knowing what she did, didn’t check in with Ivy more often. They had a good relationship.You can’t go wrong with a mystery set in an amusement. ALL THE PRETTY THINGS is a book I will reread.
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  • Chelsea
    January 1, 1970
    I was really exited to read this. Unfortunately, it was another disappointing "thriller. It was pretty obvious just three chapters in that the dad was a creep. I still don't understand how the main character didn't notice or just pretended it wasn't a problem. She also seemed emotionless throughout the whole book and I don't get why, considering what her friend was going through. Nothing much happened and the writing felt really stilted and the dialogue was cringey.
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  • Carrie (brightbeautifulthings)
    January 1, 1970
    I received a free e-ARC through NetGalley from the publishers at Random House/Delacorte Press. Ivy has always been the bosss daughter, first at her fathers doughnut chain, and now at Fabuland, an amusement park full of roller coasters, cotton candy, and princess parades. Everything changes one summer when her best friend, Morgan, discovers a body and ends up in the psych ward the next day. Everyone is convinced that Ethan fell from the bridge on his way home from Fabuland, but Morgan and Ivy I received a free e-ARC through NetGalley from the publishers at Random House/Delacorte Press. Ivy has always been the boss’s daughter, first at her father’s doughnut chain, and now at Fabuland, an amusement park full of roller coasters, cotton candy, and princess parades. Everything changes one summer when her best friend, Morgan, discovers a body and ends up in the psych ward the next day. Everyone is convinced that Ethan fell from the bridge on his way home from Fabuland, but Morgan and Ivy aren’t so sure. Ivy is convinced that finding answers will help her friend, but the more she learns about Ethan’s last night at Fabuland, the more she realizes that everyone has secrets, and most things are secret for a reason. Trigger warnings: death, suicide attempt, severe illness, sexual assault, physical/emotional abuse, slut-shaming, mental illness, trauma, grief.I don’t like to give low ratings to books, but this doesn’t have a lot going for it. I’m not even sure All The Pretty Things should be marketed as a YA thriller, since it lacks anything in the way of thrills, and there’s very little mystery to be had. Most of the plot consists of Ivy walking around and talking to people, and the progress of her amateur investigation is glacial. (Never once does she think, “Maybe I should go to the police with this information.”) It’s also obvious pretty early on that there’s only one person with the motivation to commit a murder or cover one up, which takes all the punch out of the ending. What the book really does, rather than create a compelling murder mystery (if there’s even been a murder, which isn’t clear), is strip away the sugar-coating of Ivy’s life and force her to see the more gritty, adult world in which she actually lives. Sadly, that life is not particularly noteworthy. Everyone has secrets, and none of them are interesting.Ivy’s character development is fair. Over the course of the novel, she realizes that, like a child, she’s been willfully ignorant of some pretty important things, and she takes steps to change that. As a character, we don’t know her that well outside her role as “the boss’s daughter”. (Though she despairs that people think of her that way, there just isn’t much else.) She’s her dad’s Girl Friday, and she overlooks most of his bad behavior. I’m trying to think of a word for Mr. Cork that’s less strong than “abhorrent”, but nothing comes to mind. In short, he’s a creep, and it’s clear from the beginning that you wouldn’t want to be alone in a room with him if you were a girl. Though Ivy insists that he makes things fun and larger than life, I was never able to see it. He’s an abuser with no sense of boundaries. And that’s pretty much it for main characters. I’m a sucker for carnival/amusement park settings, but even that couldn’t save it.I review regularly at brightbeautifulthings.tumblr.com.
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  • Lindsay
    January 1, 1970
    It seems I side with the majority in saying that this wasn't what it proclaimed to be. After reading the summary, the reader expects this to be a mystery set in an amusement park, and the story is that to a small degree. What the summary leaves out is everything else. How Ivy spends the whole book asking fellow amusement park workers questions regarding Ethan's death. How much time is dedicated to Ivy working at Fabuland and thinking. How there is never a mystery like the synopsis claims. The It seems I side with the majority in saying that this wasn't what it proclaimed to be. After reading the summary, the reader expects this to be a mystery set in an amusement park, and the story is that to a small degree. What the summary leaves out is everything else. How Ivy spends the whole book asking fellow amusement park workers questions regarding Ethan's death. How much time is dedicated to Ivy working at Fabuland and thinking. How there is never a mystery like the synopsis claims. The author attempted to build suspense with multiple characters speaking in riddles to Ivy, but the secrets fell flat upon their reveal.The twist was easy to see from the first chapter since this character's words and actions screamed "look at me! i'm acting and talking inappropriate!" and so the reveal wasn't a reveal. The lack of suspense and mystery was instead filled with Ivy's train of thought and characters speaking in code to not reveal anything to Ivy.The pros of this book were the amusement park setting, how it took place in New Hampshire, and Ivy's dedication to her best friend even though Morgan shut her out during the whole book. Thank you NetGalley for an ARC.
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  • dumplin’
    January 1, 1970
    im gonna be real i skimmed this but in my defense i was like ten chapters in and bored out of my mf mind i’m gonna be real i skimmed this but in my defense i was like ten chapters in and bored out of my mf mind
  • Morgan (youarethelibrarian)
    January 1, 1970
    Seriously, Goodreads, where are the half stars? I would rate this one 4.5 stars. This book was not what I was expecting, but in the best possible way. There is a mystery, and yet it isn't the focal point of the novel despite the main character thinking it is for most of the book. In the end, though, Ivy comes to terms with something she has turned a blind eye on for far too long. The book also did not end like I was expecting, however the ambiguity of what happens after the book's pages end is Seriously, Goodreads, where are the half stars? I would rate this one 4.5 stars. This book was not what I was expecting, but in the best possible way. There is a mystery, and yet it isn't the focal point of the novel despite the main character thinking it is for most of the book. In the end, though, Ivy comes to terms with something she has turned a blind eye on for far too long. The book also did not end like I was expecting, however the ambiguity of what happens after the book's pages end is more realistic than the way a lot of mystery novels play out. I really liked this. The setting, the characters, and most of all Ivy searching for truth without realizing what she will dig up. All the Pretty Things is realistic and haunting because of that. *I received an eARC from Netgalley and the publisher. Thanks! All opinions are my own.*
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  • Sarah
    January 1, 1970
    this honestly wasnt the book i thought it was going to be. there could have been a lot that wasnt in the book and it could have been a lot more suspenseful. i think i actually enjoyed about half of this book. half of it was boring and a lot of the protagonist just doing stuff. it also took me almost a week to read, so that could also affect my feelings for it. the beginning and the end were the best parts, in my opinion. there was too much with the amusement park, i think.with that said, the this honestly wasn’t the book i thought it was going to be. there could have been a lot that wasn’t in the book and it could have been a lot more suspenseful. i think i actually enjoyed about half of this book. half of it was boring and a lot of the protagonist just doing stuff. it also took me almost a week to read, so that could also affect my feelings for it. the beginning and the end were the best parts, in my opinion. there was too much with the amusement park, i think.with that said, the writing was very good and i would definitely read the author again. it was easy to read and flowed very well. it was just not as much of a mystery as i’d been expecting.
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  • Cassie
    January 1, 1970
    Thank you to Netgalley and Random House Childrens for e-ARC in exchange for an honest review. This was...not good. This supposed ya thriller is missing any and all thrills, which is a bummer. The premise was good, I loved the setting and the beginning was strong. But then 90% passed with just the MC, Ivy, going around and asking other characters what happened on one fateful night. Absolutely nothing of any significance happens until the very end. And even then, its not exciting or surprising in Thank you to Netgalley and Random House Children’s for e-ARC in exchange for an honest review. This was...not good. This supposed “ya thriller” is missing any and all thrills, which is a bummer. The premise was good, I loved the setting and the beginning was strong. But then 90% passed with just the MC, Ivy, going around and asking other characters what happened on one fateful night. Absolutely nothing of any significance happens until the very end. And even then, it’s not exciting or surprising in the least. There’s some heavy themes in here (like consent and sexual assault) but it felt out of place. This book doesn’t know what it wants to be. I didn’t particularly like Ivy, who could be quite dense and unsympathetic, which made this book tough since we are forced to read her thoughts the entire time. It was often repetitive and boring. I wish I had stopped reading it earlier, but I was convinced it would pick up and get better. I was so very wrong. It really shouldn’t be marketed as any kind of thriller, but it’s not really a standard contemporary either. It’s a very light mystery, with a dark coming of age contemporary theme, mixed together around an amusement park background.
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  • Margarita (margaritathedrink)
    January 1, 1970
    I am stuck in between my rating so i am going with 3.5 starsThis book was not as dark as Sadie but still on that level, it dealt with death/loss and sexual assault/harrassment.and i also never want to read the word Sprinkles ever again. *SPOILERS*Ivy is the main character and comes home from a trip to her best friend Morgan in another state of mind. Morgan had recently found a coworker Ethan who had down syndrome dead leaving questions unanswered and her in a state of mind that Ivy was trying to I am stuck in between my rating so i am going with 3.5 starsThis book was not as dark as Sadie but still on that level, it dealt with death/loss and sexual assault/harrassment.and i also never want to read the word Sprinkles ever again. *SPOILERS*Ivy is the main character and comes home from a trip to her best friend Morgan in another state of mind. Morgan had recently found a coworker Ethan who had down syndrome dead leaving questions unanswered and her in a state of mind that Ivy was trying to figure out. Ivy went into detective mode to get stories on Ethan about that night he died and started asking too many questions that got people upset. after so many questions and putting things together she accepts that Ethans death was accidental but there is more to the story. in the beginning Ivy's dad gives major chomo vibes and you can tell her father is a perv and Ivy just doesnt want to see it like most children/teens tend to be, even most adults. you start wondering when he is going to get caught up, how the story will unravel for her father. You think the victims would get justice but as real life goes most victims never get justice from the sexual predator. instead it goes into full circle with ethans death and revealing that Ivy's dad was a part of it.This book was good, i read it in a day so i was interested to know what happened i just was not expecting that ending. I wanted more since majority of the time Ivy was just playing detective and i wanted her to discover it ina much bigger way than what had happened. The dad creeped me out the entire time and i wish he got what he deserved than what was given at the end. And i just wanted the victims to have a voice but it got pushed aside to uncover a cover up in Ethans death. i am still trying to decide how i feel about this book and what i want to say.Thanks Netgalley and Random House for the e-arc
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  • Lu
    January 1, 1970
    I received this book from NetGalley in exchange of an honest review.TW: death, overdose, sexual harassment and assault, suicide thoughtsIvy Cork is the daughter of the owner of Fabuland, the amusement park in her city and during summer she usually takes care of the spinning cotton candy machine and she hangs out with her best friend Morgan. But when Morgan finds one of their former classmate and coworker, Ethan, dead, everything changes and Morgan has a mental breakdown, refusing to talk to Ivy. I received this book from NetGalley in exchange of an honest review.TW: death, overdose, sexual harassment and assault, suicide thoughtsIvy Cork is the daughter of the owner of Fabuland, the amusement park in her city and during summer she usually takes care of the spinning cotton candy machine and she hangs out with her best friend Morgan. But when Morgan finds one of their former classmate and coworker, Ethan, dead, everything changes and Morgan has a mental breakdown, refusing to talk to Ivy. So Ivy decides to understand what exactly happened the night Ethan died and why Morgan (besides finding his body) is so upset she wouldn't talk to her. Set in the amusement park, the reader follows Ivy while she talks with her coworkers, trying to piece what happened, who saw Ethan last, how was the boy, trying to solve the mystery surrounding his death, getting herself involved into a investigation that will uncover ugly truths about people she loves.All the pretty things, told in first person, is a dark thriller, beautifully written and plotted, an intricate mystery that led the reader to read the book at once, because he/she feels the need to know what happened to Ethan, to Morgan, to Ivy. Through Ivy's eyes, we get to see her relationships with her parents and brother, with her friend Morgan, with her coworkers, thinking about her role in her father's "empire" and job. Asking questions, discovering relationships and secrets, Ivy is a brilliant main character, curious, inquisitive and ready to do anything to understand the situation, even when it will hurt her.Skillfully, bits are revealed through each "interview" Ivy makes, leading her and the reader to piece everything together, or at least to try to, until the shocking and brilliant ending.
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  • The Reading Writer- Angie Simmons
    January 1, 1970
    Ivy Cork has spent part of her summer visiting family, and gets the news that her best friend is in crisis and a teen boy is dead. She returns home to a world far different that she left. This book was kind of like riding a rollercoaster for me. There were things that it did well, and I loved the creepy aspect of investigating the death of an amusement parks teen employee, and Ivys fierce dedication to her best friend, Morgan, that found the body. I think Ivy, whose dad owns the amusement park, Ivy Cork has spent part of her summer visiting family, and gets the news that her best friend is in crisis and a teen boy is dead. She returns home to a world far different that she left. This book was kind of like riding a rollercoaster for me. There were things that it did well, and I loved the creepy aspect of investigating the death of an amusement park’s teen employee, and Ivy’s fierce dedication to her best friend, Morgan, that found the body. I think Ivy, whose dad owns the amusement park, goes on an important journey of discovery, even if she gets more than she bargained for. But I also think there are things that could have been done differently, or wrapped up better. This was an easy, fast read that’s good, but it leaves you wanting more. I think this is a three star novel, especially since I feel so ambivalent about how things ended. It was very drawn out, then rushed. **Many thanks to NetGalley and to Random House and Delacourte Press for giving me an ARC in exchange for an honest review. My opinions are my own.**
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  • Merlin Bookworm
    January 1, 1970
    It was good. Sad and not what I expected when I picked it up. I called the part about her dad though.
  • Brenna Clark
    January 1, 1970
    Thank you so much to NetGalley for this ARC; it was one of the most thrilling mysteries I have read in a long time. I had the hardest time putting it down once I had started it-- all of the chapters ended in a question being answered but like a sapling, the intrigue just grew and grew until there were so many branches. Some branches might be questions that hit a dead end. Others bore fruit and continued the life of the story. The majority of them had this in common: even if one mystery seemed Thank you so much to NetGalley for this ARC; it was one of the most thrilling mysteries I have read in a long time. I had the hardest time putting it down once I had started it-- all of the chapters ended in a question being answered but like a sapling, the intrigue just grew and grew until there were so many branches. Some branches might be questions that hit a dead end. Others bore fruit and continued the life of the story. The majority of them had this in common: even if one mystery seemed solved, a million more concerns kept coming up. It kept me guessing until the end, but still a spectacular job of sowing seeds so that the ending didn't blindside the reader. Emily played her cards exactly right, and this devastating look into how trauma can bring a town (and its inhabitants) to its knees was exactly what I needed to break my reading slump.Now, at first glance, you can see what this book is about. The synopsis will tell you of Ethan, a young man who fell to his death not far from the amusement park where he worked. You hear of the girl who found him, Morgan, and her best friend Ivy, whose father runs the amusement park. Ivy was gone to another state to visit her grandparents, and so was not there to witness the chaos of the immediate time frame after the boy's body was found. All she knows upon returning home is that Morgan is missing, and when she finds her, she is inconsolable. Ivy chalks it up to grief and mental stress from discovering Ethan, but after talking with Morgan as she recovers in the hospital, she senses something more is amiss. So, she begins to ask around her small town, trying to see what she can uncover. She's hoping to help Morgan get better, but what she begins to piece together threatens to tear her own life apart. There is more to this plot than meets the eye, and you can feel the tension of it in between every line.These characters are so expertly crafted. I fell in love with Ivy, which I think is extremely important for a protagonist who is going to be kicking up a lot of dust. If you're not with her, while she's asking personal questions to these heartbroken acquaintances you would not be able to root for her. However, you can tell it comes out of a place of love, because she is trying to get to the bottom of it for her best friend, and this colors the way that she looks at everything and everyone. She is oblivious to most of the dangers, and even if she wasn't, I think she would still press on. She is strong, capable, and smart. We see her split her time between sleuthing and pleasing her overeager doughnut dynasty father, who she loves but is also a frightening kind of oblivious as well, or so it comes across. He makes comments throughout the book that made me extremely uncomfortable, and it was very interesting to watch Ivy see him (as well as her mother) for the first time. The tragedy makes her take a magnifying glass to her own life, and as she's discovering the truth about Ethan, she is also finding her way out of her father's shadow.At the book's conclusion, my jaw was on the floor. I even had to take a few minutes after finishing to just breathe-- the finale happens a bit like life and roller coasters, once it drops you're in for a few minutes of breathless screaming before it's all over. When the dust settles, it's not only a thriller that will keep you on the edge of your seat, it's also a story about how well you know the people around you. This goes for family, best friends, coworkers, and even that person you see around but never get a chance to interact with. You have no idea the battles these people are fighting. You can't ever tell who has malice pulsing through their veins. Most days, you're not even sure who you can really trust. In the end, though, these things will out for better or for worse. And what better setting than a fairground for this coming-of-age revelation. It looks so beautiful in the dark of the night. But are you ready for what it looks like when the lights go up?
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  • Debora
    January 1, 1970
    Thank you so much to Netgalley and the publishers for giving me the opportunity to read this in advance.TW: sexual harassment, domestic violence, self harm, substance abuse, death (obviously) Let me know if I missed some.--Summary: So we have a story about a young woman, Ivy, who's father owns a local amusement park. Her best friend Morgan, finds the body of a special needs friend who also worked at the same amusement park. Ivy feels that her small community and even her best friend are hiding Thank you so much to Netgalley and the publishers for giving me the opportunity to read this in advance.TW: sexual harassment, domestic violence, self harm, substance abuse, death (obviously) Let me know if I missed some.--Summary: So we have a story about a young woman, Ivy, who's father owns a local amusement park. Her best friend Morgan, finds the body of a special needs friend who also worked at the same amusement park. Ivy feels that her small community and even her best friend are hiding the truth from her and everyone else. Maybe the accident wasn't really an accident? So I did enjoy the the setting a lot. I've never read a book with an amusement part setting. It was fresh and different and it made me want to pick up any other book with a similar setting. Added with the small town "everyone gossips" setting. It fueled my mystery thriller loving soul.I did read the entirety of this in a single day. It was really easy for me to read large chunks of this book in a setting. The story was quite addicting. The book did start a little abruptly for me. I would have liked to get the know the characters more.Speaking of characters, none really stood out to me. I did actually get confused with all the basic white boy names (Ben, Tim, I think there was an Ethan?) The main character's father obviously was a pretty predominant figure. I absolutely hated him, but he wasn't supposed to be likable so kudos to the other for enticing this reaction. There was also one boy that I wanted to see more of, I think it was Ben. He was interesting to me but I'm not so sure where his story ended up.I do think the ending was a little underwhelming. I saw one of the twists coming from a mile away and the other twist was more of a "huh? ok I guess that makes sense". I usually don't care if the reader can guess the twist early on but the story itself was a little too obvious for me. It was entertaining for sure but it was a very standard YA mystery thriller.You might like this book if you enjoy:- small town secrets- Nancy Drew type protag- a little slice of life- family drama
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  • Leah
    January 1, 1970
    What. A. Read. I am so glad that NetGalley and Delacorte Press provided me a copy of this title to read in return for my honest review. I have been LOVING the explosion of mystery YA lately and this one did not disappoint. Ivy's dad owns the amusement park, Fabuland, in her New England town. Ivy spends her summers working in the park with a cast of characters, including her best friend Morgan. This summer, however, has been different than summers past. While Ivy was away visiting relatives, What. A. Read. I am so glad that NetGalley and Delacorte Press provided me a copy of this title to read in return for my honest review. I have been LOVING the explosion of mystery YA lately and this one did not disappoint. Ivy's dad owns the amusement park, Fabuland, in her New England town. Ivy spends her summers working in the park with a cast of characters, including her best friend Morgan. This summer, however, has been different than summers past. While Ivy was away visiting relatives, Morgan discovered the body of Ethan, a young boy from the community and employee of Fabuland, dead. When Ivy returns to town she begins questioning what really happened the night Ethan died and slowly realizing things in her own life may not actually be as they seem. For starters, be patient with this title as you read. While it started with a bang, the middle section was a little slower, but then I got to the last 20% of the book and could NOT put it down. If you had asked me to rate this book about 50% through, you would have been looking a 2 stars because I felt there were so many things included in the plot that made no sense and didn't belong. I should have known better than to judge too soon as Arsenault took every little nugget I was questioning and made it all make perfect sense with a twist I did NOT expect by the end. As for the characters in this book, I loved how diverse they all were yet they all worked somehow cohesively inside this theme park. I was instantly creeped out by the depiction of Ivy's dad. In my head he was the perfect stereotypical carnie and I applaud Arsenault for writing him that way. I loved Winnie and Ben and really appreciated Ivy's ability to question the unknown while discovering more about herself in the process and come out stronger on the other side. A great YA mystery read that won't disappoint!
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  • Laney Estel
    January 1, 1970
    📖 BOOK REVIEW⠀📚BOOK: All the Pretty ThingsAUTHOR: Emily Arsenault #EmilyArsenaultStars: ⭐⭐⭐Published: March 17, 2020https://amzn.to/2TphSGsThere is a sinister element to this book, and then again, not as sinister. I cant tell you exactly why there may be trigger warnings, but there are a small amount. The characters have a depth to them where you are always wondering what trauma they have all endured for being so secretive. While I did enjoy elements of this book, the ending was not what I 📖 BOOK REVIEW⠀📚BOOK: All the Pretty ThingsAUTHOR: Emily Arsenault #EmilyArsenaultStars: ⭐⭐⭐Published: March 17, 2020https://amzn.to/2TphSGsThere is a sinister element to this book, and then again, not as sinister. I can’t tell you exactly why there may be trigger warnings, but there are a small amount. The characters have a depth to them where you are always wondering what trauma they have all endured for being so secretive. While I did enjoy elements of this book, the ending was not what I expected. For me it wasn’t as shocking as I thought it would be, but it was a little bit revealing of what we already know. There are few parts of the story that I don’t think got addressed as well. But the story was one that was important. Small Summary:For Ivy, summer means roller-coaster season, spinning cotton candy at the Fabuland amusement park, and hanging out with her best friend, Morgan. But this summer is different.One morning, Morgan finds a dead body. It's their former classmate and coworker Ethan. To make matters worse, Morgan is taken to a hospital psych ward only days later, and she's not saying much--not even to Ivy.The police claim that Ethan simply took a bad fall, but Ivy isn't convinced and realizes it's up to her to get answers. What she finds is unsettling--it's clear that some people aren't being honest about Ethan's last night at Fabuland. Including Morgan. And the more secrets Ivy uncovers, the closer she gets to unraveling dark truths that will change her life forever.*****I voluntarily read and reviewed an advanced copy of this book. All thoughts and opinions are my own. Received from Netgalley.⠀
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  • Amanda
    January 1, 1970
    There were some things about this book that I really enjoyed and some things that really rubbed me the wrong way. The atmosphere of this story was on point! Almost every scene of the story takes place in the Fabuland Amusement park and the sights and sounds are described very vividly. Amusement park settings are always fun for me to read so I loved this aspect of the book. The plot was okay...a boy is found dead at the bottom of a bridge and the amusement park owner's daughter goes on a mission There were some things about this book that I really enjoyed and some things that really rubbed me the wrong way. The atmosphere of this story was on point! Almost every scene of the story takes place in the Fabuland Amusement park and the sights and sounds are described very vividly. Amusement park settings are always fun for me to read so I loved this aspect of the book. The plot was okay...a boy is found dead at the bottom of a bridge and the amusement park owner's daughter goes on a mission to find out what happened the night he died. The "do it yourself detective" work is a trope that I really don't enjoy. It's just very unrealistic and ridiculous to me. The victim in the story had down syndrome but did not display the characteristics of anyone that I know or have known with down syndrome (he seemed to have more traits of someone on the autism spectrum). I work with many students with special needs in my job. I was very concerned about a scene where a character chugged a beer, felt lightheaded, then got in their car and drove. For a YA book, this seems very irresponsible to include. I was waiting for there to be some sort of discussion on how this was not safe but it never came. (I understand that it's not an author's job to teach readers and in most cases I don't want that, but this scene almost condoned underage drinking and driving.)Overall, the atmosphere was the only strong point in my opinion. I received a copy of this book from NetGalley and Delacorte Press to review. All thoughts and opinions are my own.
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  • Victoria
    January 1, 1970
    I've been a big fan of Arsenault's writing for years now and I greatly enjoyed this one - her second foray into the young adult world. It's an engaging read with characters that all come vividly to life. Ivy, the seventeen-year-old narrator, returns home from an early summer trip to visit relatives and has to quickly catch up on all that she missed - including the death of a coworker at Fabuland, the amusement park that her divorced father purchased only a few years ago. While juggling the tasks I've been a big fan of Arsenault's writing for years now and I greatly enjoyed this one - her second foray into the young adult world. It's an engaging read with characters that all come vividly to life. Ivy, the seventeen-year-old narrator, returns home from an early summer trip to visit relatives and has to quickly catch up on all that she missed - including the death of a coworker at Fabuland, the amusement park that her divorced father purchased only a few years ago. While juggling the tasks that her boss/father sets for her, Ivy also begins asking questions about Ethan, the boy with Down's syndrome that died. Tensions mount and it seems that Ivy's questions lead only to more questions - and to more drama.This book quickly becomes hard to put down. And while Ivy is a likable and sympathetic character, like in many YA books, the adults don't get the same treatment here. Some of the plot's twists are easier to see coming than others - and I think that this will especially be a discussion starter amongst its female readers of all ages. Be warned - this is a dark novel, despite the contrasting lightheartedness of the carnivalesque setting. Ethan's death is at he heart of this story, and I can see it being too much for some more sensitive readers. And though this is marketed to young adults, I really can see this being a YA novel that easily appeals and crosses over to adult readers as well. I really had a hard time doing anything other than reading this one - I like Arsenault's writing style a lot and I am looking forward to seeing what comes next from her!
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  • Courtney Pate
    January 1, 1970
    So, Im one of those people who reads reviews before I start a book. I dont know why, its just a craving I have. I have to know what others think and if I think the same. I dont really think it messes with my interpretation of the book. Especially not in this case. The reviews I read said it was predictable and they knew the bad guy from chapter 3. I did not.Ivy was a likable main character. She seemed genuinely concerned about her best friend, Morgan and solving Ethans cause of death. They said So, I’m one of those people who reads reviews before I start a book. I don’t know why, it’s just a craving I have. I have to know what others think and if I think the same. I don’t really think it messes with my interpretation of the book. Especially not in this case. The reviews I read said it was predictable and they knew the bad guy from chapter 3. I did not.Ivy was a likable main character. She seemed genuinely concerned about her best friend, Morgan and solving Ethan’s cause of death. They said he fell, but not everything adds up. She had feelings that I think I would have at 17. She was my favorite character.The side characters were all interesting and likable too. She had a unique relationship with each of them that seemed well thought out. She seemed like a real girl, which I really liked. Ivy was someone you’d meet in highschool any day.Ivy’s dad was the worst. He was misogynist, creepy, and said the worst things. I hated seeing him on the page. I cringed every time and just could not fathom having any family member like that. Like, he was the literal worst. He was gross. I just can’t say enough about how much I hated him.There ended up being two mysteries, neither of which I really figured out. I kind of had an idea about Morgan’s mystery, but not Ethan’s. It was a fast, easy read. It just didn’t quite stand up to other YA mysteries I have read recently.
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  • Chelsea Wolfe
    January 1, 1970
    I received this ARC from the publishing company through NetGalley in exchange for my honest opinion and does not reflect my opinions on this book.All The Pretty Things had me intrigued the minute I saw it was for fans of Sadie and The Cheerleaders, both of which were on my top reads list last year and I was not disappointed with this read!This mystery thriller had me at the edge of my seat and not wanting to stop until I finished. When I did, I realized this was going to be a book I wouldnt I received this ARC from the publishing company through NetGalley in exchange for my honest opinion and does not reflect my opinions on this book.All The Pretty Things had me intrigued the minute I saw it was for fans of Sadie and The Cheerleaders, both of which were on my top reads list last year and I was not disappointed with this read!This mystery thriller had me at the edge of my seat and not wanting to stop until I finished. When I did, I realized this was going to be a book I wouldn’t forget. It’s more than just the plot, Emily Arsenault’s writing style is luscious and flows together perfectly. And the characters? They’re so relatable! Ivy’s dad is realistic, saying and doing things that other dads do that have their children hiding their faces in embarrassment, causing even me to cringe at some of the things while reading. There’s a lot going for this book in terms of themes including friendship, family, children of divorce, lies, secrets, and so much more. Overall, I think this is an excellent summertime mystery thriller for fans of YA that shouldn’t be missed. I gave this book a rating of a 4 out of 5 stars because there were some slow parts that I felt I had to push through but the overall story and plot were well worth it.
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  • Courtney (pawsitivelybookish)
    January 1, 1970
    Its summer which means roller coasters and cotton candy, especially at Fabuland. That is until Ethan, an amusement park employee with Down Syndrome is found dead. Ivy is the bosss daughter. Morgan, her best friend, who is found Ethan's body. Morgan puts her trust in Ivy to find out the truth about what happened during Ethan's last night at Fabuland. The summary of All The Pretty Things had me intrigued initially but it ended up falling short. Amusement parks are one of my favorite YA settings, It’s summer which means roller coasters and cotton candy, especially at Fabuland. That is until Ethan, an amusement park employee with Down Syndrome is found dead. Ivy is the boss’s daughter. Morgan, her best friend, who is found Ethan's body. Morgan puts her trust in Ivy to find out the truth about what happened during Ethan's last night at Fabuland. The summary of All The Pretty Things had me intrigued initially but it ended up falling short. Amusement parks are one of my favorite YA settings, so I did really enjoyed that aspect! Though, this book wasn’t much of a thriller. It was relatively slow-moving and I felt like Ivy was just wandering around asking questions. I knew there was going to be a twist at the end but I wasn’t quite sure what it was going to be. I felt like the twist involving Ivy’s dad, Morgan and Winnie was obvious but I didn’t catch on to the truth about Ethan. Ivy’s character development was nice to see but a little lacking. She was a very juvenile character at the beginning but began to really change when she found out the truth about her father. I would’ve expected a way bigger change given the circumstances, though. I would recommend this book for someone looking for a quick, easy read.
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  • Elizabeth
    January 1, 1970
    All the Pretty Things was a little rocky for me. Part of it was probably that the last thing I read was just so amazing that anything was going to have a hard time competing, but for this title, it was more than just that. This one got off to a bumpy start for me. The premise was interesting (a high functioning autistic teen boy falls to his death one evening after his shift ends at a local amusement park. The park owners daughter becomes interested in trying to find out what happened to him.) I All the Pretty Things was a little rocky for me. Part of it was probably that the last thing I read was just so amazing that anything was going to have a hard time competing, but for this title, it was more than just that. This one got off to a bumpy start for me. The premise was interesting (a high functioning autistic teen boy falls to his death one evening after his shift ends at a local amusement park. The park owner’s daughter becomes interested in trying to find out what happened to him.) I’m intrigued! Unfortunately, the story writing fell kind of flat after that. There was an interesting story behind it all, but unfortunately the author took entirely too long to get to what actually happened and when the reveals did start coming it seemed to scattered with too many loose ends to tie up. The author’s failure to tie up the loose ends made some of them feel irrelevant and the story ended up coming to this crashing halt just when you were starting to find out interesting things. Maybe it was just me, but I didn’t really care for this one. I did appreciate that the author attempted to handle several big topics for teens, but I felt like it was just too many topics to put into one book and none of them were fleshed out as well as they should have been.
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  • Elle Gutierrez
    January 1, 1970
    Thank you to NetGalley and Random House Childrens Books for providing me with an e-arc of this book in exchange for an honest review. These opinions are exclusively my own.I feel so conflicted about this book.While I think it delivered on the mystery aspect, I was not a fan of the characters at all. MC, Ivy, was so damn insensitive to those she questioned. She was playing Nancy Drew but completely bumbling the investigation. I also felt some characters gave very vague answers for the sake of Thank you to NetGalley and Random House Children’s Books for providing me with an e-arc of this book in exchange for an honest review. These opinions are exclusively my own.I feel so conflicted about this book.While I think it delivered on the mystery aspect, I was not a fan of the characters at all. MC, Ivy, was so damn insensitive to those she questioned. She was playing Nancy Drew but completely bumbling the investigation. I also felt some characters gave very vague answers for the sake of keeping the mystery rolling. You slowly start to piece together how everything happened, and I for one did not see the ending coming. I had suspicions about certain things, but it was more twisted than I imagined. Although I will say, that character was written to be extremely UNLIKEABLE. Like I said there characters just didn’t grow on me. I had trouble keeping all the names straight, to be honest. The main character made me want to just shake her. I get she’s not a detective but there were different ways she could have approached her questioning. Overall, it was a decent read and I do recommend you at least give it a try.
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